The Next Level: Selling Sega Bit by Bit (Part 2)

Last week, I discussed the still very real possibility that Sega could end up on the auction block like THQ and Midway before it and tried to determine the best homes for a dozen of its franchises, both popular and obscure. This week, it’s gonna be more of the same: 12 Sega franchises and what companies would be the best fits for them.

Starting off this week’s assortment, Sega’s famous horror lightgun arcade smash, House of the Dead. The answer for this one’s obvious: Namco Bandai is still making Time Crisis games for both consoles and arcades to this day, and aside from Sega, they’re the only major Japanese publisher with a stake in the genre to this day. My secondary choice was gonna be Activision, which would cause the series to suffer like G did? So I did a little research for companies that had made some recent lightgun rail shooters, sure Capcom had those Resident Evil spinoffs, but then I saw a name that perked up my ears: Castlevania: The Arcade. That’s right, Konami actually made a lightgun (light-whip) game a few years back.

Next up, another oldie-but-goodie, Sega’s Genesis beat-’em-up classic, Streets of Rage. Now, you’re probably thinking the choice for this one is obvious: “Give it to Capcom, because blah blah blah Final Fight.” Well, I’m going off the beaten path with this one and giving it to an unlikely contender: SNK Playmore. SNK has quite the predigree of arcade beat-’em-ups in their past, games like Mutation Nation, the Sengoku series and even a few weird experiments in the genre like the first-person brawler The Super Spy (featuring the first appearance of SNK villain supreme, Geese Howard!) and the beat-’em-up/one-on-one fighting game hybrid Street Smart. Seeing SNK tackle a genre that isn’t a fighting game or Metal Slug again would be a fantastic treat and getting a fourth, actual factual Streets of Rage is pretty high on my Sega wishlist. Otherwise, yeah, give it to Konami or Capcom, I guess. Either one would probably just end up sitting on the franchise anyway.

Samba de Amigo, like Space Channel 5, was another of Sega’s rhythm game experiments, however this one focused heavily on motion-control through the maraca peripherals that were available both in the original arcade version and the Dreamcast home port. Considering the Wii got a port of Samba de Amigo itself that utilized the Wii Remote and Nunchuk add-on to accurately recreate the arcade experience, Nintendo is the clear choice. The fact that they themselves have a rhythm series that’s equally as wacky as Samba (Rhythm Heaven) is just icing on the cake. Likewise, Namco Bandai still makes Taiko Drum Master games, so they’d be an equally valid choice, especially if it did better in arcades than on consoles.

Then there’s OutRun, an unconventional arcade-style racer that focuses on completing an extended course with multiple branching paths within a time limit rather than beating out CPU-controlled drivers. It’s also one of my all-time favorite Sega franchises and I was especially happy to see it get a shout-out in the recent Sonic and All-Stars Racing Transformed. Not too many companies really focus on arcade-style racers these days, as most have moved onto racing sims, so the only obvious answer here would be Namco Bandai, who still put out a damn good Ridge Racer every once in a while. Second place goes to Ubisoft, as they currently publish the Trackmania games.

Jet Set Radio was one of those games that didn’t really get a fair shake when it first came out, but became a beloved cult classic down the line. Released when the Dreamcast was on the very precipice of disaster at the hands of Sony’s Playstation 2, Jet Set Radio (or Jet Grind Radio, as it was once titled in North America) is one of those rare 3D games that manages to avoid showing its age even today, due in part to its cel-shaded graphical style. The gameplay emulated the popular Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater series, but managed to expand on it to the point where JSR felt like a complete different game. After all, what other game can you think of where you can destroy tanks and helicopters by tagging them with graffiti? Personally, I’d give it to Ubisoft, considering both their work on Shaun White’s Skateboarding (proving they could get the skating mechanics right) and the Rayman series (proving that they’d likely keep the unique graphical style of the series. The only other company I think could do Jet Set Radio justice would be Nintendo.

Speaking of cult classics from the Dreamcast era, Shenmue is perhaps the prototypical example of the problems regarding the AAA industry today. Despite being the 4th best selling title overall on the Dreamcast, Shenmue fell short of earning back its immense budget. Still, there are many who wait for another entry in the series, even after the second game also failed to perform well outside of niche audiences. Having said that, I’d say that Atlus would be the best choice for the franchise. Both due to the fact that they’ve made a few games with similar mechanics to the series (Catherine comes to mind for me personally and I’ve heard the same regarding their Persona series) and because they tend to also do well with regards to niche audiences. My other choice is an extremely unorthodox one: Telltale Games. Considering the fact that Shenmue’s gameplay is not so far removed from point-and-click adventure games and its storyline is considered one of the main draws of the series, Telltale just seems like an interesting choice for a sequel, especially if they reunite the original creative team for a Shenmue III.

Valkyria Chronicles is another one of Sega’s more niche titles, at least as far as non-Japanese audiences go. An interesting take on the strategy RPG genre, where you shift into a third-person shooter-style segment during each party member’s turn. Consider the game’s unique take on the genre, I think that Atlus would probably be the best company to take on this one, due to its unique take on the genre and its popularity in Japan. After all, Atlus has even handled third-person shooters in the past (God Mode). If not them, then Nippon Ichi Software would probably be a good choice, considering their experience with the strategy-RPG genre.

There’s also Sega’s unique puzzle game: Chu Chu Rocket. Considering the fact that this was actually ported to the Game Boy Advance as a launch title, I’d be quite alright giving this to Nintendo. They would likely keep it on eShop, which would actually probably be a smart business tactic, considering the simplicity of the game’s overall design. I’d also consider Atlus to be a valid choice, considering their history with unorthodox puzzle games like the aforementioned Catherine and Rock of Ages.

Virtual On, while generally called an action game, is probably the best example of what I’ve come to call “arena fighters”. Think of it as the precursor to Anarchy Reigns, only with a custom arcade cabinet to boot. As such, my first choice would be Platinum Games. The problem is, I don’t really have a follow-up. Capcom used to make good arena fighters, like the Power Stone games and Spawn: In the Demon’s Hand. Konami made Castlevania Judgment, which in spite of its hideous character designs, was actually a pretty decent one. But considering the similarities between the recent Dragon Ball Z and Naruto fighting games with arena fighters, not to mention how close the Soul Calibur games are to them, maybe Namco Bandai would be the best secondary choice. At the very least, Namdai (Banco?) getting the rights would mean that Temjin and Fei-Yen would likely show up in the Super Robot Wars games a lot more often.
After Burner was Sega’s take on the combat flight simulator genre, only with good old fashioned 1980’s arcade flair thrown to give the game some fun factor. Recently it’s seen a resurgance, having been referenced in games like Bayonetta and the aforementioned All-Stars Racing Transformed (as a stage and one-third of a vehicle!). I can’t really think of many companies that still do games in that genre, aside from Namco Bandai, with their Ace Combat series. Otherwise, I’d just give it to Nintendo, because I can’t really think of anyone else who’d take it.

Then you’ve got the Super Monkey Ball series, another cult-classic Sega series, involving tiny monkeys in hamster balls running to the end of an obstacle course in order to get some bananas. The easy answer here is Nintendo: this game totally sounds like something the Big N would make. Hell, we might even see a Donkey Kong Country x Super Monkey Ball game. Atlus seems like a fair choice too, considering that they published the extremely similar Rock of Ages.

Rounding out this article’s list is Skies of Arcadia, one of Sega’s RPGs from the Dreamcast era. Considering it also showed up on the Gamecube, I’d just give it to Nintendo. They could use a couple more traditional JRPGs, right? I’d just as well avoid seeing Skies of Arcadia becoming another victim of Square-Enix’s IP hoarding, so Atlus seems like the only other logical choice.

Before we wrap things up, I’d like to discuss the fates of a few honorable mentions. First off, Sega’s original mascot, Alex Kidd should probably just go to Nintendo. Then there’s Columns, Sega’s first major attempt at a Tetris-style puzzle game, give that to Q Entertainment. Seaman was Sega’s attempt at a virtual pet style game, Microsoft seems like the best choice, considering I can’t think of a franchise that would be more Kinect-friendly. Shining Force was Sega’s first major success in the strategy-RPG genre, so give that to Nippon Ichi Software, as they make a great deal of SRPGs and would probably jump at having such a (comparitively) big name. Give Vectorman to Platinum Games, because they turned some heads in the third-person shooter genre with Vanquish. Finally, I’d give both Total War and Football Manager to Valve, considering they sell like gangbusters on Steam.

I guess if this two-part article has taught me anything, it’s that perhaps, Sega is greater than the sum of its parts, or rather its franchises. That’s probably the reason why, the last time they were in dire financial straits, Sammy Corporation just bought out the entire company, rather than simply taking on franchises that were considered the most important. Hopefully, should Sega fall once again, history will repeat itself in that case and all of Sega’s IPs will be kept together.

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