Top 10 Games I Want Ported FROM PC III: Beyond Thunderdome

It’s that time of year again. It’s funny: I originally intended these lists as a tongue-in-cheek parody of the recurring PC port lists I did years back, yet they’ve become one of my favorite traditions on this site, right up there with the collaborative wishlists we do here at the end of the year. I think part of what I like about these lists stems from the fact that it’s my way of sharing the wonders of games currently exclusive to PC with SNES Master KI, a man who would sooner gnaw an arm off than consider gaming on PC regularly. I don’t know what’s going on here, but these lists of mine seem to have some kind of mojo – for crying out loud, Double Dragon Neon was announced on Steam literally days before my first list came out – so it feels good to share the love, even a little bit.

Before we get to this year’s list, I might as well go through what’s been announced since December. The PC-to-console front has been pretty quiet as of late. The only major gain that’s been made is Streets of Red: Devil’s Dare Deluxe, which appears to be an expanded port of the rogue-like beat-‘em-up Devil’s Dare. It was released on both PlayStation 4 and Nintendo Switch just a couple of days ago. There was also the recent announcement that GameMaker Studio 2 was going to be compatible with the Nintendo Switch, which was preceded by the announcement of Undertale on Switch. Granted, Undertale was already released on PS4 and Vita before that, but it’s good to see it reach a wider audience. Since then, Hyper Light Drifter has also been announced for Switch, but again – it was already available on consoles.

The PC ports fared way better these past four months. First, there was the announcement of Devil May Cry HD Collection back in late December – less than a week after my last article went up – though it’s also coming to Xbox One and PS4. Then a few days later, they announced that the Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection would be coming to all four major platforms this May. I bring this up simply because it includes Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike (with online play!) – thus essentially giving us Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike Online Edition on PC. Of course, between this and the upcoming MegaMan X re-releases, I think that kills off any chance of those older conversions from my GOG wishlist – particularly Eurocom’s classic release of Super Street Fighter II Turbo and those old MegaMan X PC ports – being re-released, unless Capcom decides it’s worth the effort to try to exploit the few of us willing to double-dip, either out of nostalgia or curiosity.

After that, February brought us Puyo Puyo Tetris on PC. March brought us Senran Kagura: Peach Beach Splash and the announcement that Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy would be coming to PC (as well as Switch and Xbox One). Speaking of exclusives, Super Bomberman R – arguably the Switch’s break-out third-party launch game – will be coming to Steam (as well as PS4 and Xbox One) this June, with a nifty little P-Body (from Portal 2) Bomber as exclusive content. XSEED also announced that Ys: Memories of Celceta – my #1 most anticipated PC port from last year’s overall list – will be coming to PC (via Steam, GOG and the Humble Store) sometime this summer. In fact, the same day they announced Celceta on PC, DualShockers released an interview with XSEED’s Executive Vice President Ken Berry, focusing on their recent round of PC ports. Berry said that XSEED wanted to bring as many titles as possible to PC due to the ease of releasing a game worldwide and the lifecycle of PC games lasting much longer than consoles. He also hinted that the gap between console releases and PC ports will continue to shrink as time goes on.

Now that I’ve sufficiently patted myself on the back, it’s time to go over the rules I hold myself to when writing these lists. I’ll be sticking to games that were released on PC during the seventh and eighth generations – so pretty much from 2006 onward – that have not appeared on home consoles or portables by the time this article has been released. I’ll also list the platforms I think would be the best fit for each one, in the case that a game becomes exclusive to a single platform.

Spark the Electric Jester

I’ve always been a fan of the Sonic the Hedgehog series, but for years, Sega has struggled to recreate the magic of the Genesis-era 2D platformers in the modern day. While Sonic Mania – a game that was a collaboration between the creators of some of the most beloved Sonic fan games – managed to finally score Sega some acclaim last year, there have also been some attempts at recreating the style of the 16-bit Sonic games’ magic with various new IPs. Freedom Planet made it to the Wii U and PS4 in recent years, but one game that hasn’t been so lucky is Spark the Electric Jester.

In what I can only summarize as the love child of Sonic the Hedgehog and Kirby raised by MegaMan X, Spark the Electric Jester was developed by Felipe “LakeFeperd” Riberio Daneluz, the man behind such acclaimed Sonic fan games as Sonic Before the Sequel, Sonic After the Sequel and Sonic Chrono Adventure. The game itself skates the line of clearly taking inspiration from Sonic without feeling like a knockoff. Spark came out a few months before Sonic Mania did and felt like a good buffer game while waiting for Freedom Planet 2 – which was pushed back to 2019 at the beginning of the year.

Best Platform: Unfortunately, support for Spark has been discontinued by LakeFeperd, as he’s moved onto new projects, including a 3D sequel Fark the Electric Jester, which is clearly inspired by the Sonic Adventure games. The game was built in Clickteam Fusion 2.5 – the same engine used for the original Freedom Planet. Since it looks like there’s an (admittedly convoluted) way to port games from that engine onto all three modern platforms, it seems possible that it could make it to anything.

My money’s on Switch though, as Freedom Planet’s first console port was on the Wii U. Nintendo seems like the kind of company that would throw money at getting a game like this on consoles.

OmniBus

Weird and wacky games spawn on PC all the time, but it seems like there’s a decent market for them on consoles as well. Goat Simulator, I am Bread and Surgeon Simulator all seemed to do pretty well on PS4 and even the licensed Rick and Morty game Virtual Rick-ality is making its way to PlayStation VR later this month. So why not Omnibus? It’s a game that looks like a PS1 throwback – honestly, some of the models remind me of MegaMan Legends – where players take control of a bus and perform various tasks, mostly involving flipping the bus into the air and crashing through anything in sight. It’s stupid, but it’s fun stupid.

Honestly, I’m kind of surprised this one isn’t already on consoles. The game’s built in Unity; it runs on Windows, Mac and Linux and it was published by Devolver Digital of all companies.

Best Platform: PlayStation 4, hands down. The visuals look distinctly like something out of an early-to-mid PS1 game and Sony’s the main company taking risks with more bizarre PC games. I could see it coming to other platforms later on, but Sony would definitely insist on at least a timed-exclusive.

Super Star Path

For some reason, I’ve always felt like shoot-‘em-ups and puzzle games are a match made in heaven. Ikaruga and Zoop were two games that seemed to blend some elements from one genre into the other, though neither went far enough. Enter Super Star Path: a perfect combination of the two. Players are tasked with blasting through waves of alien enemies and when one enemy is hit, all adjacent enemies of the same color are also destroyed, while enemies of different colors essentially get turned into “garbage blocks” that block the path through the level. Super Star Path is a game that relies on quick thinking and quick reflexes.

Best Platform: Unfortunately, the game’s developer has yet to release any of their games on consoles. The game was built in GameMaker Studio, so it’s easy enough to port to any of the current three consoles. In fact, because of that, I’ll probably go with the Switch, simply because they seem to be making a big deal about how it’s compatible with the GameMaker engine now.

Zwei: The Ilvard Insurrection

With a heavy heart, this will probably be the last Falcom game I can actually include on these lists, unless XSEED manages to pull off some kind of miracle and gets their hands on a Falcom game that’s extremely old and PC exclusive. Zwei: The Ilvard Insurrection – née Zwei II – was the second and final entry in Falcom’s obscure action-RPG series and the last game they developed on the PC, both as an exclusive and overall. The franchise’s primary gimmick involves constantly swapping between two characters: one that focuses on physical attacks, while the other focuses on magic, hence the name (“Zwei” is German for “two”). I’m actually surprised that Zwei II didn’t receive any sort of console ports, especially considering the fact that many of Falcom’s Windows games were ported to the PSP when they pivoted to console development.

You’re probably wondering why I’m only doing the second Zwei game and not the first (subtitled “The Arges Adventure” in the West). For starters, the game was technically ported to consoles in Japan, with Taito handling the 2004 PS2 port and Falcom porting the game to the PSP themselves in 2008. Of course, those were Japan-exclusive releases, but considering the sheer number of hoops XSEED had to go through the get the game working on modern OSes, not to mention several PC-only features that aren’t viable on consoles, it would be easier to base a port of the first game on the existing console versions as opposed to the current Western release.

Best Platform: PlayStation 4 and the Vita are the obvious choices here. Even if you discount the fact that the game likely wouldn’t be ported by Falcom themselves and handed off to a partner, Falcom still tends to primarily focus on the Sony brand, as that’s where they think most of the domestic audience is. Having said that, I wouldn’t count out a Switch port down the line, if Falcom decides to revisit the series on consoles.

Verdict Guilty – 유죄 평결

When Street Fighter II ruled arcades back in the early 90s, it spawned numerous imitators – ranging from great to terrible. In fact, there was practically an entire subgenre of mediocre fighting games available on the Super Famicom, both licensed games and original properties. Verdict Guilty feels like a love letter to these games. In the near future, Neo Seoul has been hit with countless terrorist attacks and a massive crime wave, with few police officers willing to protect the people. Players can choose between 4 cops and 4 criminals in their search to unmask the crime lord responsible for the mayhem.

Verdict Guilty may be based on bad games, but it elevates the wonky mechanics of its inspirations into an artform. The game prides itself on being “easy to pick-up and play” with various interesting mechanics that make for a poorly balanced but still extremely fun game.

Best Platform: This is a difficult one. Verdict Guilty was coded from scratch in C++, the developer hasn’t released anything on consoles before and while the game has a clear SNES aesthetic, I’m not sure who would want exclusivity if any. I guess the Switch wins based on that last point alone.

Rosenkreuzstilette/Rosenkreuzstilette Freudenstachel

Admittedly, I wouldn’t have considered either of these games for console release – just due to the fact that I’d be concerned about whether they would be considered original releases or fan games, given its material – but if the games are allowed for sale on both Playism and Steam, then I think the game’s safe for consoles.

While the rebirth of MegaMan is nigh, the original Rosenkreuzstilette was actually released back in 2007, before the Blue Bomber went into hibernation. Both games are essentially love letters to not only the MegaMan series, but include references to various other Japanese retro games like Castlevania, Bomberman and even Super Mario Bros. Both games are among the best MegaMan tributes of all time and the fact that they both managed to get official English releases last year was amazing.

Best Platform: Playism is the games’ English publisher, so my pick would probably be PlayStation 4. While Playism has also published games on the Xbox One and the Switch, most of their console output has been on the PS4, so that just seems like the most obvious release platform, at least at this point.

Odallus: The Dark Call

Speaking of spiritual successors, Odallus: The Dark Call is a game built from the ground up to pay homage to the Castlevania series, mixing elements from Metroidvania and Classicvania to form an experience that’s both new and familiar. Developed by one of my favorite indie developers, JoyMasher – the same people who brought us Oniken – Odallus has been called “the best Castlevania game in years”, acting almost as a Shovel Knight to the franchise. While I hope Bloodstained doesn’t meet the same fate as Mighty No. 9, Odallus has certainly kept us busy while waiting for a “true” successor.

Best Platform: JoyMasher hasn’t released any of their games on console at this point and the game was made in Clickteam Fusion, so if I had to hazard a guess, my money would have been on the Switch. Danilo Dias seems to take a lot of his inspiration from the 8-bit and 16-bit eras of gaming, so I was sure he’d favor Nintendo over Sony or Microsoft.

However, seeing that JoyMasher’s upcoming game, Blazing Chrome – a love letter to the best Contra game, Hard Corps for the Sega Genesis – is being published by DotEmu’s new publishing arm, known as The Arcade Crew, I have to say that PlayStation 4 has become a lot more likely. While no platforms have been confirmed for this new game, DotEmu tends to favor the PlayStation brand when it comes to consoles. If Blazing Chrome does well, I could see them doing something similar with JoyMasher’s previous games.

Them’s Fighting Herds

In most lists, I’d consider this game to be a dark horse, but considering the sheer amount of off-the-wall choices I’ve made so far, I think it’s got a decent shot. Originally conceived as a fighting game starring the mane cast of My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, Them’s Fighting Herds received a complete overhaul after a cease and desist came from Hasbro. Entirely new designs were conceived by Lauren Faust and Lab Zero licensed them their proprietary “Z-Engine” to improve on the game’s design. The game’s recently entered Steam Early Access – due to issues with implementing the story mode, something Skullgirls fans should remember quite well – but the game should launch in full sometime this year.

Best Platform: Another difficult choice. Humble Bundle is the game’s publisher and as far as I know, they don’t have any preferences regarding platforms. The Z-Engine doesn’t help matters: Indivisible is set to debut on all three modern consoles this year. My gut tells me that Switch would be more likely, simply because of the sheer number of fighting games already available on PS4. TFH’s quadruped gimmick might help it stand out there, but not in a positive way.

River City Ransom: Underground

Developed by Conatus Creative Inc., a Canadian team, River City Ransom: Underground is a game that managed to be released despite having the entire world against it. After managing to receive a license from Million (the successor of RCR originator Technos Japan), all of Technos’ IPs would end up in the hands of Arc System Works. Fortunately, ASW signed off on the game anyway. While other modern River City games have merely felt like extensions of the NES classic, Underground feels like a true sequel. Taking place years after the original game, there’s an entire new generation of fighters waiting for players – each with their own unique fighting style. With four-player co-op, an arena mode for head-to-head fights and a total of 44 fighters to unlock, RCR:U takes the Kunio-kun franchise to new heights.

Best Platform: I’m torn between two extremes here. While the River City games seem to be released more reliably on Nintendo platforms, the PlayStation line is clearly the platform of choice for Arc System Works. What really complicates matters is the fact that the game itself was programmed using Microsoft’s XNA game engine, using the open source FNA for the Mac and Linux ports. Fortunately, all three platforms can use MonoGame, an engine that’s compatible with XNA games, so there are no hardware limitations.

In the end, I’d give the edge to the Switch. The game’s emphasis on co-op and the series’ history with Nintendo makes it seem like the much more logical choice.

Aliens Go Home Run!

I think the best way to describe the game is written on the store page itself: it’s a cross between Breakout, a shoot-‘em-up and baseball. Aliens Go Home Run! is an arcade-style game with less emphasis on branching storylines and more emphasis on clearing stages. It’s a game that’s clearly evocative of a simpler time and looks like a lost NeoGeo game. That’s really all I have to say about it.

Best Platform: This one easily goes to the Switch.  ANIM・ACE hasn’t released any games on console as of now, but considering their mission statement involves releasing games in the style of “Sega, Taito, Namco, Treasure and Nintendo”, it seems like the Big N is the safest bet.

Thus concludes another list of 10 PC games I’d like to see ported to consoles. As with last time, I own every game on this list – which makes sense because I’m recommending that they be made available to a larger audience. Doing lists like this is actually pretty fun: since I’ve already got the games in question, there’s less stress about choosing specific games. Clearly if I own them, I already enjoy them on some level, right? The only real limitations I have are choosing from the increasingly shrinking number of PC exclusives. However, as long as there are hobbyists and small independent developers, with budgets far too small to cough up the licensing fees to work on consoles from the beginning, there will always be games exclusive to PC. Whether they stay that way for good is anyone’s guess.

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