An Odyssey That Will Take Your Breath Away

Ever since those six seconds of footage in the Switch reveal trailer, I was incredibly hyped for Super Mario Odyssey (and endlessly gloated about how “Super Mario Switch” was a real game and not a tech demo as Nintendo tried to claim). I’ve wanted to write an article entirely dedicated to it for a while now, but ended up waiting until my second playthrough so that I could have maximum clarity on my feelings for it. It’s not like I could have had a review of it ready for launch day. Of course, after waiting this long and having already said that it lived up to my hype in the most anticipated games of 2018 article, I can’t just spend a few thousand words raving about it. I need a hook for this article. And during my second playthrough, it came to me. Last year there were two extraordinarily well-received games released in my two favorite game series, both of which weren’t my first choice for the series’ direction. And while I loved one of these games, the other left me very conflicted. These games are, of course, Super Mario Odyssey and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. Why did two games that seemed so similar in basic concept, both in series I adore, turn out so differently for me? Well, that’s what this article will attempt to answer.

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Spoilers: Mario wins this time.

Let’s start with Breath of the Wild, since as always, I like getting the negative out of the way first. Now despite me labeling this “the negative,” I’d like to clarify that I absolutely do not think BotW is a bad game. Putting all fears and associations aside, I’d have to say the Breath of the Wild is my pick for the second-best game of 2017, and that was a very, very good year. If it had actually made either its 2015 or 2016 release targets, it would have deserved to be my game of the year. There are things BotW does better than any other game I’ve played, the absolutely massive open world is better and more intricately designed than I would have thought something that big could ever be. Being able to climb almost any surface and safely jump/glide from any height in a game of this scale feels incredible and earns the game the “open air” label Nintendo gave it. Tricks with game mechanics that you should logically be able to do almost always worked, even when they wouldn’t in most games. The rune powers are used to great effect in the many, many, many micro-dungeons, and the game is gigantic. It took me over 100 hours to do everything in the game I felt was worth doing.

So why am I conflicted? There are two major issues. One is that for everything the game did better than I thought possible, there was a design choice I hated and felt almost betrayed by the inclusion of. Breakable weapons are the biggest factor, I really, really hate excessive resource management. How the game can give you infinite quickly regenerating bombs, but no truly permanent melee weapon boggles my mind, and it added a constant, unnecessary level of stress. This made the somewhat clunky menu worse, since you are forced to constantly switch weapons. Climbing was much slower than it needed to be and rain disabling it was ridiculous. It felt like there was a civil war going on during the game’s development over whether to make quality of life the goal or the mortal enemy, and neither side decisively won.

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Why why why why why WHY!?

My other issue is a more subjective one, or at least it counting as a negative is. Even with all the problems I mentioned above, Breath of the Wild is probably the best open world game I have ever played. But that isn’t what it should be, or at least not the only thing. It is a Zelda game, and as a Zelda game it fell short in many areas. I don’t want 50 different equippable weapons that have nearly identical functions, I want 10 unique items used in countless ways for puzzles and combat. Breath of the Wild only had five or so things that felt like genuine Zelda items. I want full dungeons, 120 tiny ones is a nice bonus, but it isn’t worth the five “real” ones being so short and de-emphasized. I don’t want to worry about collectables and stats and weapon durability, Zelda should be about level design. I should never dread having to explore a new town or area because I’m already overwhelmed. Breath of the Wild is clearly an exceptional game, but I feel it is noticeably lacking as a Zelda game, and games of that type are much rarer than the open world games BotW takes inspiration from. Until the next Zelda is announced and fixes my major issues, there is a cloud of fear hanging over this exceptional game.

I realize that my opinion is not a divine proclamation, and clearly many people really, really liked having such a non-linear and exploration-focused Zelda. I know that pleasing every fan every time is an impossible request, but I feel Breath of the Wild went too far in one direction. I’m not asking for every Zelda to be 90% dungeon style gameplay like Skyward Sword, but there has to be a compromise, right? Could a game find a balance where even if it wasn’t my very first choice, it left me feeling fully satisfied and secure about the franchise’s future, while still giving people with different priorities than me what they wanted? Is that even possible?

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Mario can do anything.

Yep, it absolutely is. Super Mario Odyssey is the first sandbox-style Mario game since 2002, as opposed to the linear platformers that are my preference. At its official reveal during the Switch’s formal debut, the trailer made it clear that the game would be far more focused on exploration than the recent 3D Mario platformers. While this somewhat disappointed me, it wasn’t like I didn’t enjoy the previous sandbox Mario games, and there was no indication that Mario’s ability to jump could break. I decided to have faith in the game, even with my conflicted response to Breath of the Wild when it was finally released. I eagerly awaited seeing more of Super Mario Odyssey, and counted the days until E3 when we were certain to get one of Mario’s signature greatly improved second trailers.

Would posting the entirety of Jump Up, Super Star!’s lyrics be excessive padding? Yeah, probably. But suffice to say, Super Mario Odyssey’s E3 2017 trailer was one of the best video game trailers I have ever seen. The game’s main new feature was revealed, Mario’s ability to possess enemies and objects ranging from goombas to a hyper-realistic T-rex that I’ve dubbed “Yoshi Senior”. And seeing extended gameplay demonstrations revealed that the non-linear levels were full of small sections containing classic style linear Mario platforming. My hype skyrocketed, I felt a sense of wonderful anticipation for a game that I hadn’t felt in years.

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And this isn’t even Yoshi’s final form!

I won’t go into too much detail about how fantastic Super Mario Odyssey is, there are plenty of reviews that will do that for me and you’ve had months to experience it for yourself. A colossal amount of content, constant variety with new things to possess in each level, 50+ mini-stages that play in my preferred Mario format, creative and beautiful settings with a huge amount of aesthetic variety, a staggering amount of things you can do with Mario’s partner Cappy even without possessing anything, and of course Mario’s signature perfect control and exceptional level design. But what I want to really praise Super Mario Odyssey for in this article is how it managed to balance two styles of Mario game and please everyone (well, every sane person).

Super Mario Odyssey has fully explorable levels, with secrets literally everywhere (they actually put in invisible coins to let you know when you had reached an area that didn’t have a moon hidden somewhere in it). Mastering the jumping system gives you an incredible amount of freedom and makes exploring every corner of every level enjoyable. A fast travel system and levels that put more of an emphasis on being deep than being sprawling means you never feel like you’re wasting time walking to a different area. The many forms Mario must take to find every Power Moon means your generous jumping abilities don’t make platforming challenges trivial. Levels have story missions that make them play out like the linear 3D Mario games, before opening up the entire level for exploration. And your reward for exploration may be a linear platforming mini-level. Super Mario Odyssey doesn’t feel lacking regardless of whether your prefer linear or sandbox style platformers.

Now despite this, Super Mario Odyssey isn’t my favorite Mario game and wouldn’t have been my very first choice. But that leads to another thing it does much better than Breath of the Wild. While Breath of the Wild’s decisions have me holding my breath for the next Zelda to address my issues and assure me that the series hasn’t been harmed in the long term, Super Mario Odyssey does the opposite and fills me with hope. Mario games often come in pairs, and with how successful SMO was, I’m expecting the next 3D Mario to essentially be Odyssey 2. Now Super Mario Galaxy 3 would probably be my preference if I was given the choice, but… there’s a possibility. The second Mario game in a pair is usually better, and if Super Mario Odyssey 2 is a better game and improves in the right ways, it just may manage to make a Mario formula I like better than the SMG games. Maybe if we cut down the number of worlds but made the linear platforming areas you found longer, long enough to pass for Super Mario 3D Land stages, we could actually have a hybrid that I like better than the linear Mario formula. It’s not guaranteed, but I never would have even contemplated it before Super Mario Odyssey. A game giving me that kind of hope, having that kind of potential, is something truly special, and a sign of just how masterfully designed Super Mario Odyssey is.

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Mario has the whole world open to him.

So, despite how similar Super Mario Odyssey and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild seem in many ways, they also gave me an almost opposite reaction. Again, I’m not saying BotW is a bad game, in fact with a few changes (full dungeons in exchange for the map being Skyrim sized instead of double Skyrim sized, no more breakable weapons) a direct sequel could be one of my favorite Zeldas. The game was great and could provide a great foundation, but there is also a risk of there being long term damage. Super Mario Odyssey, however, is both an exceptional game and something that made me optimistic and excited about the influence it could have on my favorite gaming series of all time, and that’s something that truly deserves to be described as taking my breath away.

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Turn Based #4: Focus Group Fantasy

SNES Master KI: Hello, and welcome to another Turn Based!  We’ll be trying something new this time, this will be a three-player round.  Increasingly prominent contributor Dari will be joining us for a discussion on how to design the ideal JRPG.  All three of us have our own ideas on how to do this, so hopefully we’ll end up with lots of bloody conflict and furious verbal combat.  Or hopefully we won’t, I forget which one we want.  Icepick is the least enthusiastic about the genre, so we’re making him go first.

Professor Icepick: I guess it could be argued that one of the most important aspects on a Japanese turn-based RPG is its setting. Due to the genre’s increased emphasis on storyline, a proper setting can create an engrossing world to explore for the 40-400 hours players can look forward to spending in the game itself. Yet roughly half of all JRPGs in existence will go for a cliched fantasy setting, taking place in a fictionalized version of medieval Europe. More recently, we’ve seen post-apocalyptic steampunk future go from a breath of fresh air to yet another one of those standard set pieces. Yet, very rarely, we’ll actually get something unique. I think the best example of this would have to be the Mother trilogy, released in the West as “Earthbound”.

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Long ago, in the far off ancient land of New York City circa 1993…

Taking place in what is essentially a contemporary setting driven more by off-the-wall humor than trying to ape the entire of Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, Earthbound managed to garner a cult following in the West due to its irreverent sense of humor and a setting that was, quite frankly, a breath of fresh air within the genre. As such, my ideal JRPG setting would be anything besides those two clichés that feel omnipresent within the genre. That’s not to say that it’s not possible to escape the bland nature associated with traditional fantasy or sci-fi tropes. It just takes some kind of a gimmick, like a fantasy game basing itself more on the folklore of a non-European region, perhaps a more mundane future with less obvious flaws or being developed by Nihon Falcom.

Dari, your thoughts?

Dariwan: I’d have to agree. Most of the time it takes something drastically changing in the middle of the story to make the setting be anything more than just the same old thing. Earthbound was definitely a different beast, kind of feeling like it’s in “America” which makes you feel like the game could be in your hometown or somewhere close by.

I feel like my ideal JRPG would be something like a mix of Japan or something like Earthbound mixed in with the tropes. I think that Tokyo Mirage Sessions mixed in eccentric Japanese settings and the cliché stuff pretty well, but I think we can go a bit farther than that. Not that we’re going in that far, but MMOs have the same problem as JRPGs with their settings being a bit blasé. but I feel as I said before my ideal setting is one that “lives” and changes as the game goes on, instead of being the same thing throughout.

KI, do you agree?

KI: My main criteria for a setting is that it’s different enough from reality to accommodate the variety needed for a 40+ hour game.  This seems easier to do in fantasy settings, which may be a reason why they’re such a common choice, but it isn’t necessary.  As mentioned, the Mother series was able to take neighboring towns in contemporary America and make one feel completely different from the next.  The key is that the setting can’t get caught up on feeling realistic.  You shouldn’t be confined by real life settings, or an obsessively “believable” medieval Europe expy, or rock-hard science fiction.  I want imagination and variety, and you can do that in any setting as long as you have the creativity and don’t chain it to realism, even realism attached to a fantasy setting.

I do like it when games change tone midway through as well, games like Xenoblade Chronicles 1 and 2 and Final Fantasy IX introduce settings late in the story that you see no indication of at the start of the game.  And Chrono Trigger of course has every world setting you can think of thanks to time travel.  With how huge the scale of JRPGs should be, one setting often isn’t enough for an entire game.

Icepick: Of course, JRPGs aren’t the only genre that relies heavily on story. Visual Novels are quite similar to JRPGs in terms of storyline, but the main that differentiates the two is the emphasis on gameplay. In my honest opinion, the main gameplay aspect related to JRPGs is the battle system present in each game. Unfortunately, in most cases, I’m left underwhelmed. I’ll break it down as simply as I possibly can: if the game’s concept for a battle system starts with “Attack”, ends with “Run” and can only manage to shove “Magic” and “Items” in between them, then chances are I consider you a cancer to the video game medium as a whole.

There have been a lot of games that have had interesting takes on the JRPG battle system that manage to set themselves apart from that mediocre stereotype. Games like Lunar and some of the Legend of Heroes games have turned their battles into almost miniature “turn-based strategy” segments, relying significantly on character placement to allow for more thoughtful combat. The aforementioned Earthbound sticks to a Dragon Quest-inspired battle system with one very unique (and game-making) alteration: when party members take damage, their health gradually decreases, allowing a knowledgeable player the chance to heal them before they get knocked out. I’d also be in remiss if I didn’t mention Undertale, an American indie game that was clearly inspired by Earthbound, but took its battle system in a different direction. Players can choose to attack enemy monsters, using an accuracy bar or simply interact with them to settle their conflict peacefully. But when the enemy attacks, the game turns into a sort of shoot-’em-up style game, representing the player with a heart icon, forcing them to escape injury in various ways.

Of course, my personal favorite battle system would have to be the ones found in the early Paper Marios, and to a lesser extent, the Mario & Luigi games. Relying on button presses to increase damage, extend attacks and even defend and counter enemy attacks with proper timing. There’s just something so captivating about this simple gimmick: it’s the closest I’ve ever felt to really being in control of my character in a turn-based RPG. It’s a shame that few other games have attempted to lift this system, going instead for the more traditional Final Fantasy or Dragon Quest-style of combat. The only game that really comes to mind for me is South Park: The Stick of Truth. The fact that the game is only referred to as being “inspired” by Paper Mario, rather than a “Paper Mario clone” or even its own sub-genre is perhaps one of the greatest crimes that JRPGs have yet to answer for.

Dari: I personally like turn-based RPGs simply because they allow you to strategize instead of getting hit every 2 seconds with no real chance to defend. Also, the turn-based system allows you to exploit weaknesses and keep going. I do agree that “Attack Run Magic Item” gets boring at times. That’s why games like Persona (Especially 5) and games like the Tales series definitely are different beasts of turn based games. The Tales series in particular feels like an action RPG as most of the games are open field actions in battle. You can jump and do combos almost like a fighting game and even do certain mystic arts by chaining certain moves together. I like those different atmospheres that can generate difference in the game itself. But as I said I like the standard JRPG experience except when they do it wrong.

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This is very different than the “Attack Magic Item Run” system. and that’s why I like it.

 

The game I’m currently playing is Blue Reflection it’s kind of like Persona but backwards. The battle system is…interesting to say the least. they have systems that don’t really matter until boss battles happen, and the basic gameplay is kind of easy. You also auto heal after every battle, which takes away any urgency in any battle, since you know you won’t die. It bothers me, but the story is decent enough to keep me playing. That’s another argument for another time though.

KI: I’ve recently had trouble getting into turn based games, so my ideal JRPG battle system has become the Nier/Ys style where basic combat feels like a character action game, but you still have stats and items and an MP equivalent.  As long as I’m not being harshly punished for CPU controlled characters getting themselves killed or spammed with unavoidable spells, I generally prefer action-JRPGs at this point, and my ideal one would definitely have a real-time combat system.

If the battle system is turn based, it’s important there be something to prevent it from being tedious or feel like you don’t have to really be engaged.  Semi-turn based battle systems like the Mario and Luigi games or Xenoblade games can work very well for alleviating this, with timing being a constant part of every battle.  Even something as simple as the rhythm-based damage bonuses in Xenoblade Chronicles 2 adds a lot to the battle system for me.

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This is way more like a rhythm game than it looks.

Icepick: The role-playing game designation in video games generally feels like a catch-all term: there is little in common between games like Final Fantasy, Fallout and Ys, yet no one would argue that they are not all “RPGs”. One common element all of these games share is the concept of “character progression” — simply put, as battles and other quest elements are completed, the player character becomes stronger and gains access to new abilities, much like how studying or exercising increases people’s mental and physical prowess in real-life.

I’m honestly kind of torn about this one. Generally, I like mostly random stat boosts with experience, with a handful of points for the player to assign themselves, in order to further customize their character to suit their playstyle. That’s generally what I would consider the standard, but it’s just how much control one has over these stats that I feel conflicted. I’ve played games where stat changes are considered permanent, which forces players to make their choices wisely, which I like. On the other hand, I’ve also played games that have allowed for a constant “experience pool”, which can allow stats and abilities to be changed at will, depending on the situation. For example, if one focuses on the “strength” stat in a game, to deal big damage, but eventually finds themselves in a position where an ability only accessible to characters with a high “wisdom” stat becomes necessary, the ability to shift those points around saves the player from pointless grinding — but also sort of destroys any stakes in making those decisions in the first place.

Dari: It’s a mixed bag for me– I like the usual “Level up assign stats and go” which is kind of like Dungeons & Dragons, but I like JRPGs that buck that trend. Games like Fire Emblem that just give random stats that you don’t have control over, but offer different classes at max level give you more customization than other RPGs regardless of how it looks in the start. I’m a fan of flashy attacks and big damage so character progression is really big for me. The thing that irks me more than anything is when your characters are starting, and they really don’t have much to do, so you’re sitting there attacking and praying you don’t die every battle. This goes into ‘grindin6g’ which is another thing that i actually hate about JRPGs. JRPGs that “hide the grind” are the games that I enjoy a lot more than ones where you literally have to find in a area, sit there and fight for your life until you level enough to easily beat them then move on. (FFVII, I’m lookin’ at you…damn Worm area.)

KI: I generally don’t like being overwhelmed by choosing stat placement, especially early in a game when I may not know what exactly stats do or how important they are to the battle system.  I like getting a boost in every stat when I level up, I’d rather have customization be separated from that base stat increase.  Systems like the Abilities in Final Fantasy IX or the badges in the first two Paper Mario games are my preferred way to customize characters, you have more understanding of exactly what you’re choosing and how it will affect the game.  I’d prefer that the customization system not be overly buerocratic, a skill tree where I have to essentially grind level ups to get an ability I want is very annoying.  I also like a balance between whether stats/abilities can be reassigned or not.  Permanent choices made before you understand the game should never ruin a save file, but if everything can be changed at any time I don’t want constant micromanagement required because the game didn’t bother to balance areas so multiple play styles would work.  So having experience and ability point equivalents separated is my preference.

Icepick: Another common trait among RPGs in general is that they have a tendency of adding side content in an effort to flesh out the game world and make it feel more like an organic, real place, as opposed to, well, a video game. Secret bosses or dungeons, sidequests, card games, collectables, it must be required by Japanese law for every single RPG in existence to have at least one of these tacked on.

I honestly can’t think of an example of side content that actually managed to elevate an otherwise mediocre game. I guess there’s really only one bit of non-story related content that I actually found memorable and those were the bromides in Lunar 2 on the original PlayStation. Maybe it was due to the inclusion of characters from the previous game — or perhaps it was the lewdness of a few choice images chosen — but that’s probably the only piece of optional content in an RPG that’s actually stuck with me.

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Expecting me to use one of the sexy ones? Shame on you.

Dari: I don’t think they’re exactly NEEDED but in grindy games, I think side content is good as a “rest” from the game and doing something different, keeping the game fun and not tedious and making the player hate them. One of these “side content” things I like, again from the Tales series, they have “skits” which is side stories and sometimes just random conversations that add to character development and sometimes elaborate on story. It’s really helpful to have small cute offside stuff like that to help an RPG shine and show out as a better game in general.

Stuff like sidequests can help or hinder a JRPG. They can be good for a refreshing side story or they could just open a new time hole that you want to get out of because you want to access the story. this happened to me in Final Fantasy Crisis Core. I didn’t get past chapter 2 of the story because the side quests never ended. But things like the card games in the Final Fantasy Games are nice diversions that are optional that you don’t have to put time into unless you want to. I think that’s the ideal “Side content” in a JRPG. optional stuff that has enjoyment in putting in effort, but it’s not pertinent to the story or plot of the game, just something to break the monotony of the grind or the game in general.

KI: For side content, my general feeling is that RPGs should heavily lean towards quality over quantity.  Tons of trivial (or would be trivial if they didn’t involve luck based grinding/trying to figure out what the hell you’re supposed to do) sidequests are a very bad thing, they are tedious and overwhelming.  Sidequests should never end up being the majority of a JRPG.  It gets even worse when those sidequests are practically mandatory, meaning that you will be severely underleveled if you skip sidequests and don’t do an absurd amount of grinding.  Xenoblade Chronicles X was really bad about that, if you somehow had high enough levels doing just main story missions would take around five hours.  As it is, I spent 60 hours and gave up on the final boss because I STILL wasn’t strong enough to win.  There’s a reason I usually specific Xenoblade 1 and 2 when I praise the series.  Chrono Trigger is probably the best handling of sidequests I’ve seen in a JRPG, the sidequests at the end of the game felt as polished as the main story, they weren’t overwhelmingly difficult to track down, and they added to the characters, basically being the end of their individual story arcs.  We need more RPGs with 5 great sidequests instead of 500 mindless/frustrating ones.

Icepick: Of course, what good is world-building when the world itself is lackluster? Map design is an important aspect of any RPG, regardless of sub-genre. In the 8-bit and 16-bit era, games relied on an overhead view to create truly labyrinthine dungeons and vast overworlds, but these days they can exist at any angle. It’s tough to really quantify my ideal world in general — I think my favorite maps of all time have been in the Ys series — but rather, it’s better to define a key component: variety. Each area on a world map should feel different from other areas, both in terms of aesthetic and in terms of design. If the layout of a volcano area matches the tundra, which matches the desert, which matches your character’s hometown where your adventure begins, which matches the villain’s fortress where the game comes to its conclusion, then what’s the point of changing the setting in the first place?

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Ice slopes in a desert area, Falcom is truly brilliant.

Likewise, the setting of each area should inform the designs of the dungeons themselves. You wouldn’t expect to sink in quicksand in a volcano area, deal with water puzzles in a forest and frankly, I think Ys Origin is the only game that could reasonably work slippery terrains into a desert setting. Granted, it’s interesting to experiment with that sort of thing, but recasting existing hazards to match their new biomes is a must.

Dari: I don’t have much to add to that. except in the realm of randomized worlds. The world has to be unique each time. it can’t be the same thing with a color or tint change and pretend it’s different. There needs to be some kind of radical change for it to make sense. The Persona games do this well – at least 1 and 2 and on for sure – 3 and partially 4 kind of slipped up by having pretty much the same layout for each dungeon but just had different randomized maps each time you enter.

Stage hazards are also an interesting thing i don’t see many games pick up on. You may be in a volcano area, but the lava rarely affects you. The Desert doesn’t really do much but make you hot (Golden Sun actually made you drink water in the desert and your temperature went up the more you stayed in it which I liked) We need a sense of danger otherwise we’re just walking around through a nice-looking setting with really nothing to fear or worry about. Except the monsters/enemies which get kinda stale when they’re the only threat.

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Speaks for itself more ways than one.

KI: When it comes to world design in JRPGs, there is a gold standard that isn’t even technically a JRPG.  If asked about level design in my ideal JRPG, there’s pretty much one word I would use to communicate what I want: Zelda.  Dungeons should be intricate and filled with puzzles and obstacles.  The overworld should never have generic empty space in it, for all my issues with it, even Breath of the Wild knocked it out of the park when it came to avoiding that.  The dungeons don’t have to be exactly like Zelda, but I want something in them besides combat.  Puzzle solving, platforming, shmup sections, just anything but flat halls or mazes.

Being able to interact with the world beyond a generic talk/inspect button and fighting enemies is important to me in a JRPG.  Again, the gold standard is Zelda’s palette of unique items that can be used for both combat and puzzle solving, but anything that makes the levels more than a hall/maze/field with a graphical theme (as Icepick alluded to) will satisfy me.  If I’m going to be playing a role in a world, let me truly interact with that world.

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Just because it isn’t an RPG doesn’t mean it can’t be the gold standard for them.

Icepick: Well, I’ve got to say, we’ve had a pretty fruitful discussion about what each of our ideal JRPGs would look like. I guess, the best way to finish would be to do a quick summary of everything we like to see in the genre. I love unique settings that avoid cliches that are synonymous with the genre. Engaging battle systems that go beyond simple menu-based random number generation are a must. I’m open to either permanent stat boosts or a pool of experience that can be readjusted on the fly, but not that big on sidequests in general and love it when an area’s themes are taken into account when designing dungeons.

Dari: I love JRPGs that don’t rely on side-quests but make wholesome side content that help the monotony. Games that “hide the grind” or even change up the battle system entirely to make a change. I like “Living” worlds that change and evolve as I go through them and I like when the character progression isn’t exactly the same as D&D and can do its own thing and still be interesting and fun. Also having the world fight you too is good as well. Have something besides the big bad and his/her cronies to want me dead.

KI: So, my ideal JRPG would basically be Zelda, Nier Automata, and Xenoblade being mixed together.  Varied settings with lots of surprises as you go through the game, action game style combat, intricate, puzzle heavy dungeons.  Simple upgrade system with a separate ability customization system, a few major sidequests that aren’t forced on you under threat of grinding.  A world that’s big enough to make exploration feel significant, but not so big it all blurs together.  Put gameplay and variety over realism.

Icepick: Well, that was a successful experiment. Hopefully Dari decides to join us in more Turn Baseds in the future. (We’ve actually already got a topic picked out, just in case he does.) So, who do you think has the best concepts for the perfect RPG? Dari, who is a die-hard fan of the genre; KI who is neutral, or the radical rebel that is Professor Icepick? Feel free to sound off in the comments below.

Bad Portsmanship?

Recently there has been quite a bit of derision directed towards the practice of “portbegging.” The idea that people asking for a game to be made available on their system of choice are at best pathetic and at worst a species of parasite that video game websites must actively suppress has become a strongly-held belief by some influential members of the gaming community, and as you can probably guess from my word choice thus far, I disagree. There’s a fair amount of nuance involved in this issue, but as a whole I think the title of this article more often applies to those against so-called “portbegging”.

Portbegging can be simply defined as asking for or demanding that a game which is coming to at least one other platform be released on your system or one of your systems of choice. Now that right there sums up the crux of why I think many condemnations of portbegging are unfair: they lump together asking for a game and demanding a game. There are very few circumstances where I would consider asking for a game to come to your system worthy of derision, as long as you are willing to take no for an answer given a reasonable explanation. Someone genuinely doesn’t know Nintendo owns Mario? Then I’m not going to throw a tantrum if they ask for Super Mario Odyssey on PS4, as long as they accept it not happening upon having the situation explained to them.

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No, this isn’t precedent.

This segues nicely into something I want to discuss. As you may be aware, Bayonetta 2 and 3 being Nintendo exclusive is the greatest injustice of the modern era, and Nintendo funding (or very likely funding in Bayonetta 3’s case) them is no excuse for the games not being released on PC, PS4, Xbox One, Vita, and 3DO. This is a rallying point for people who take the acceptance of portbegging to its illogical extreme, and needs to be addressed so that my argument does not appear contradictory. It really isn’t that complicated: there’s a difference between wanting a completely third-party game (especially if it’s already on systems from multiple companies) to be released on your platform of choice, and demanding a game owned or funded by a first-party publisher be released on competing systems.

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Coming to PS4 any day now for the last five years.

This is so obvious that I’m skeptical that many people truly don’t understand it, I think this false equivalency is more likely to be a bad faith argument used by people who are bitter that a game isn’t coming to a system they own. The idea that Nintendo is holding a game that only exists because of them “hostage” by making it exclusive to their systems, or that Nintendo fans have no right to complain if a third-party game is on every platform except Nintendo’s because they won’t “share” Bayonetta, is blatantly ridiculous. For the record, I completely understand that games like Cuphead will not come to Switch or PS4 unless Microsoft decides to allow it, and am not angry at Microsoft or those games for the situation. And again, if someone doesn’t understand the Bayonetta situation and asks for it on their system of choice, they’ve done nothing wrong as long as they accept the explanation for why that won’t happen.

So, moving on from the clear-cut exception of games that are made or owned by first-party publishers, what else determines when it becomes reasonable to be upset at an answer of no when you ask for a game on your system? One thing I consider a major factor is exclusive versus excluded. Of the four major gaming platform brands (Nintendo, Sony, Microsoft, Steam), I find it much harder to justify a game being on only three of those than just one of them. If a company can only afford (at least for now) to release a game on one of those, or even if one of the companies made a deal for exclusivity, I think that is often understandable. Now there are exceptions to that, mainly when it comes to sequels. If an indie game was successful on consoles but only the PC version gets a sequel, I’m much less likely to accept “well we could only afford to make a PC version” as a justification. (I’m still furious at ScrewAttack for what happened with the AVGN Adventures sequel) Likewise, paying to make a sequel to a multi-platform game exclusive to your system (not funding that game existing in the first place like Bayonetta 2) is a dick move. But for the most part, if a game is only available on one platform (or two in the case of Microsoft’s decision to release all of their Xbox One games on PC as well, which I think is a strategically bad move but one they have every ethical right to make) I consider demanding that it come to other systems to be bad portsmanship.

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I’m not angrily demanding this on Switch or PS4. That means I’m better than PC gamers and they should put it on my systems, right?

With all those exceptions, when do I actually think portbegging is unfairly maligned? When the game isn’t exclusive, but excluded. If a company refuses to release games on PC for no apparent reason or excludes Switch from a collection of classic games that it could unquestionably run perfectly (Capcom was guilty of this, but got better), while the other three platforms get it, I think asking for the game to come to the one platform that is missing out is a completely reasonable request. Does seeing “Can we have this game on Switch?” or “Is there any reason you can’t put this on Steam?” on a forum really ruin a game for you? Why is wanting your system to get every multi-platform game a sign of greed, isn’t that the entire point of games being multi-platform? The fact that at least one major message board would ban people on sight for asking for a game on a system it wasn’t announced for shows just how bad this anti-portbegging hysteria has gotten. It seems like it’s just a repackaged version of spending recess bragging that your system got a game and that loser’s system didn’t, only even more obnoxious since you’re acting like you’re the victim of having to see… *clutches pearls* portbegging!

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Never forget. Never.

So not too much more to say about this topic. There are times when demanding a game on your system is clearly unreasonable, but this does not apply to simply asking and, in some circumstances, even demanding it isn’t that unreasonable. If seeing someone ask for a game that isn’t even exclusive to your favorite system get one more version is really that upsetting to you, maybe you’re the one with the problem.

Arr Matey! The Case for Piracy in Gaming

*Note: This is only an opinion piece. Piracy is wrong and you shouldn’t do it unless you know that the thing you are pirating cannot support the creators or in protest of the creators.

A long time ago, I used to buy video games. I still do, but that’s really not my point. I realized that gaming was expensive. Games were more expensive back then and my wallet was hitting flies real fast. So then I found the PC. I had a Packard Bell. I know I’m showing my age by saying this but hey, age is better in some cases. I quickly found that there were many services that were available on the internet…especially under the wide world of DIAL-UP! But I digress (while still showing my age…) I found the wonderful world of emulation. I found ZSNES and I found out there were many games on the SNES and the NES that I never even knew about. I was a poor boy growing up, so being a gamer was hard. I didn’t have many real games or the consoles I have today. If the younger me could see me now, he’d be honestly surprised and maybe even shocked I spent so much money. Anyway, it’s time for me to start my reasoning.

It’s a Hard Knock Life for Games…

My gaming life started with the SNES. It was the first console I ever owned. The games I remember playing the most were Super Mario World, Tom and Jerry, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles in Time, Wheel of Fortune Deluxe Edition (the only game I still have) Legend of the Mystical Ninja and a Caesar’s Palace game my brother had. As you can see, my list was really small for carts in console. As I said earlier, when I found out about ZSNES, my gaming world was opened. It was there that I found out about many games that I could not have access to because I didn’t have the money to buy games. Games such as Final Fantasy, Lufia, Zombies Ate My Neighbors, Dragon Quest, Dragon Ball Z series, and lots more series were in my grasp. All it took was downloading a ROM of the game. There were many warnings about how downloading ROMS were illegal and such, but me and my wallet said that the risk was worth it. I played many games this way (and only this way) in a lot of cases. Most of my teenage years were spent downloading many different ROMS and playing games alone and sometimes with other people, depending on how much patience we had with internet and other things.

Instead of Winning….I Got Whipped!

As I continued my pirate gaming life, I found mIRC. This is a chatting program that allows you to connect to servers and chat with people around the world. See how great the internet is? Little did I know this would further my quest on finding more games for free! I found many mIRC servers that had many games on them I’d never heard of again! They were also on a new console. The Game Boy Advance. I think I was hooked around then. Because I had gotten a Game Boy Advance for Christmas one year during this time and I only had 2 games in real life for it. Those games were Metroid Fusion and Sonic Advance 1. All the other Game Boy Advance games I played (and still play to this day, really sadly) were emulated. I actually talked myself out of buying Kingdom Hearts:Chain of Memories on Game Boy Advance because I thought I wouldn’t be able to beat the game in real life, and I’m more used to the controls on the emulator on my computer anyway. The problem with emulation is when you have to reset your computer. You lose all your saves and all your games, so you have to remember what games you had and you have to reset them. This is part of the reason why I haven’t beaten many games at all. It’s also part of the reason why I stopped emulating so many games. But during the time that I did emulate, I saved a lot of money and had a lot of fun with the games I did have.

Instead of Cheating, I Forgot to Get Tricked!

I eventually got into consoles again and that really stopped my emulation days since. I tried to emulate some older PS2 games and such, but I guess the problem is the consoles of 6th gen and later are too powerful to run consistently and properly on a computer. I started this whirlwind with the original Xbox. I enjoyed my few games I had for that. I never did try to emulate those games because I thought the console would be too strong for anything my computer could do. My Xbox got stolen from me, so I decided to switch to a PS2. This was the first console I actually bought a decent amount of games for. This is because I impulse bought at lot more for this console, and I was getting a decent amount of money I could do whatever I wanted to with as well. When I got my PS3, I somewhat tried to go back to PS2 emulation, but it didn’t work out well, so I stopped trying. I also tried to emulate the 3DS and the Nintendo 64 but both of these were busts as well, so I bought a 3DS and played games the right way.

Over the years, I have bought more consoles and games, and emulated less. But when I had less money, I emulated more because it saved me money and still gave me fun times and memories I’ll never forget.

The moral of the story is, if you don’t have money, pirate for free, until you can, then don’t!

Retronaissance’s Most Anticipated Games of 2018

SNES Master KI

2017 didn’t quite turn out the way I expected when I wrote my top ten list for it.  Between delays and disappointments, I’d say only three games on it really matched my expectations.  In the end, I’m forced to say that 2017 in gaming was… freaking incredible!  Lists don’t define years, releases do, and between games I didn’t know I wanted so badly (Ys VIII, A Hat in Time, among others), a huge amount of games being both announced and released in 2017 (Xenoblade 2, Wolfenstein 2, Splatoon 2, The End is Nigh, Metroid II: Samus Returns, the long awaited console Undertale), the honorable mention games exceeding expectation (Crash N. Sane Trilogy, Sonic Mania) and my number one pick for Game of the Year both meeting my hype and actually making it out in 2017 (unless you want to take Nintendo at their word and say Super Mario Switch was a tech demo that just happened to have a level from Super Mario Odyssey in it), 2017 was amazing.  It was also great for announcements, so many franchises that had their future in doubt in 2016 got new games announced, and while some of them I’m not expecting until 2019, others will definitely be on this list.  Between those and the delayed/never confirmed for 2017 games, there’s plenty to anticipate in 2018, so let’s get started.

Honorable Mentions

  • Pikmin 4 (Switch): While not confirmed for 2018 (main reason this is only an honorable mention), with this game being “near completion” since 2015, I think we’re due. The only RTS I’ve ever gotten into, Pikmin finally getting an original mainline game on a successful console could be the big break it needs to go from Miyamoto passion project to major Nintendo IP.  Either way, it should be another great adventure in the cutest post-human world ever.
  • God of War (PS4): I was not pleased when this game was initially revealed. Well, that’s an understatement, I was heartbroken.  Thankfully, 2017 showed some improvements (more action, less WRPG) that have given me cautious optimism, although if this played like the original God of War games it probably would have made the top three.  This game’s cycle for me has been the complete opposite of Breath of the Wild, where I loved it at reveal but got more and more nervous as it approached release.  BotW was a fantastic game that disappointed me as a Zelda game, so is this going to be a terrible game that feels completely faithful to God of War?  Yeah, probably not.
  • Spider-Man (PS4): If you think about it, the Arkham series’ gameplay seems better suited to Spider-Man than Batman, with the emphasis zipping to (near) the ceiling, warning prompts, and “detective vision” that feels a lot like Spider Sense. Since Spider-Man is my favorite superhero, that definitely puts this game on my radar, even if it doesn’t quite crack the top ten.  Just hoping for lots of real boss fights against super villains and some platforming.
  • Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes (Switch): I remember when Wii U made its official debut at E3 2012, Suda 51 basically confirmed that No More Heroes 3 would be made for it. Then it was never heard from again.  Well, fixing everything that went wrong with Wii U is Switch’s main purpose, so it getting a new kind of-No More Heroes game seems appropriate.  Haven’t followed this too closely, but will definitely pick it up when it comes out.

10.  Red Dead Redemption 2

Publisher/Developer: Rockstar Games
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: 2018

The delays got this one, and we still haven’t really seen any more than we did in 2016, but this is still the first new Rockstar open world game in years, and the sequel to the game that signaled them getting their head out of their ass when it comes to quality of life features.  Not a whole lot to say about this game, I already complemented the environment graphics last year, and… yeah, nothing else to really do.  I did play Red Dead Revolver last year, that was fun, but completely different from Redemption and I’d never mention it if there was anything meaningful known about this game besides its series and developer.  Red Dead Redemption also taught me how to play poker, so that’s… yeah, let’s just move on.

9. Kingdom Hearts III

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release: 2018

The best case scenario for this game is that it comes out 12 years after Kingdom Hearts 2 and six years after the last new Kingdom Hearts game.  Where did it all go wrong?  Well, whatever the reason was, 2018 is the first year where I feel like there’s a real possibility of this game coming out, and I am looking forward to it.  The combat looks greatly improved and Disney has bought a ton of franchises since Kingdom Hearts 2 that would make great worlds.  And they just bought more, maybe if I’m still alive when Kingdom Hearts 4 comes out it will have a Simpsons world.  I liked Final Fantasy XV’s combat system, combine that with a better story and characters and you could have a masterpiece.  This might actually be higher on my list if I had more confidence in it coming out in 2018, but whenever it comes out I think I’ll like it.  It may have taken forever, and I’ve lived more than a third of my current life since Kingdom Hearts 2 came out, but at least it wasn’t a half life scenario (puts on sunglasses).

8. Runner3

Publisher/Developer: Choice Provisions
Platform: Switch (at least)
Release Date: 2018
 

The other game from my list last year that got hit by the delay stick (or would have if I hadn’t just been guessing when it would be released), we should actually get it in 2018, and it’s even a Switch semi-exclusive!  Back when the Bit.Trip games were being released, I thought Runner was the best of them by a wide margin, and was shocked when the developer agreed with me and gave it, and only it, a sequel.  And I was even more shocked when Runner2, which everyone seemed to forget about as soon as it was released, got a sequel.  Runner3 became a bit of a symbol of hope for me when it was announced, that the series I felt like I had lost in recent years weren’t gone forever (and that hope was completely valid, with the long awaited returns of Metroid and… something we’ll get to later).  But symbolism aside, Runner and Runner2 are great games and Runner3 looks at least as good, this game is slotted for early 2018 and I can’t wait.

7. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/ArtPlay/DICO
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation Vita
Release Date: “March 2018”

There’s hope for Konami’s franchises, there’s always hope, 2017 made that abundantly clear.  But while we wait for whatever demon has possessed Konami to be excised by a priest who calls his cross a boomerang, we have Bloodstained to tide us over.  Despite some people desperately trying to tie this game to Mighty No. 9, there is nothing to indicate that Igarashi exaggerated his creative talent the way Inafune’s was, and Bloodstained still looks great as we finally get close to its release date.  With a huge amount of content (Metroidvania mode, Classicvania mode, retro mode), this could be a feast that makes the wait worth it.  I even backed this game on Kickstarter, mainly to reward it for not pulling that “yeah, we’ll put it on consoles if hit this stretch goal placed above every extra for the PC version that we can think of” crap.  That alone shows a level of integrity that certain other Mighty disappointing games never could have matched, I think we could finally get a good replacement goldfish from Kickstarter.

6. Kirby: Star Allies

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/HAL Laboratory
Platform: Switch
Release Date: Spring 2018

Kirby has been doing great recently, ever since Return to Dreamland brought back the deep combos and variants for powers that had been missing since Super Star, Kirby platformers have been getting better and better.  So what can Star Allies do to stand out and keep that improvement streak going?  Maybe being the first HD Kirby platformer and the first console one since 2011?  Screw that, we got the goddamn yo-yo back!  My favorite Kirby powerup of all time, which was confined to Kirby Super Star for more than 20 agonizing years, is finally in a new game!  There isn’t too much else to say about the game at this point, but with Kirby’s recent track record there’s no reason not to expect a great platformer.  And again, it has the yo-yo; that’s on the level of Charging Chuck’s return for me.

5. Darksiders III

Publisher/Developer: THQ Nordic/Gunfire Games
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC
Release Date: TBA 2018

Not even a game released as its publisher died, that starred Death himself, could kill this series.  After years of re-releases and vague promises that “something” involving the series would be announced by its new owner, in 2017 we finally got Darksiders 3 announced.  The hybrid of character action combat and Zelda style puzzles is one I absolutely love, and Darksiders 3 looks to continue that and tone down on the WRPG elements added to the second game.  And with your character in this one using a whip, it looks like the new God of War game that I wanted.  Character action games haven’t been doing so great in the past couple years, but with this game, the hopefully at least decent brand name God of War, the heavily rumored Devil May Cry 5, and something you’ll see in a bit, 2018 looks like a comeback year for the genre.  At this rate we won’t see what happened after the end of the first game until Darksiders 5, but as long as we keep getting great playing games, this series can draw it out as long as it wants.  It was a long War, full of Strife, that may have caused some Fury, but this series was rescued from the grip of… doom.

4. Guacamelee 2

Publisher/Developer: DrinkBox Studios
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: “Early 2018”

I didn’t play Guacamelee until I was given a free copy of the Wii U version to review, and it made me wish I had supported the series from day one.  Guacamelee is my favorite digital only game of all time and one of my favorite Metroid-likes of all time.  The other games I played by its developer, Drinkbox, were also high quality, but nothing compared to Guacamelee.  So it getting a sequel (the developer kept their word about making it after they finished Severed, that’s something I always respect) natural caused a great amount of excitement for me.  I’m not sure how the story will continue, the first game seemed pretty self-contained, but I don’t care.  As long as we get that same mix of platforming, melee combat, and exploration, all done fantastically, the story can be whatever it wants.  Even with Metroid back, this series is one of pinnacles of its genre and deserves more praise and attention.

3. Yoshi Switch

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Good-Feel
Platform: Switch
Release Date: 2018

It may not have a name yet, but after Yoshi’s Wooly World miraculously not only made a good Yoshi game again but one that goes toe to toe with the legendary Yoshi’s Island, a sequel from the same developer is something I prayed for and am ecstatic that we got so quickly.  Aside from a couple interesting new features (being able to aim eggs at things in the background and flip to the other side of levels) we don’t know too much about this game, but I think that will change very early in 2018.  With levels demoed at Nintendo’s Treehouse during E3 2017, I think this game is close to completion and we should get it pretty early in 2018.  Whenever it comes out, I can’t wait to have Yoshi’s amount of great games finally average one per decade since the 90s… yeah, that’s really sad, but it’s water under the bridge.  Yoshi has finally found a Good home, and I can Feel that things will be all right for him from now on.  But what will Arzest do now?  Yeah, I don’t care either.

2. Bayonetta 3

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Platinum Games
Platform: Switch
Release Date: TBD

Okay, they never said this was coming in 2018, but I have two arguments for why this is on the list while Metroid Prime 4 and Pokemon Switch aren’t.  One, we’ve technically seen more of this game that either of those, and with Bayonetta 1 and 2 being ported to Switch in very early 2018, I feel like waiting over a year from then to release Bayonetta 3 seems unlikely.  And it’s not like Nintendo hasn’t released some games faster than anyone thought possible recently. (Wait, why isn’t Xenoblade 2 on this list?  Oh, right, the “inevitable” delay didn’t happen.)  Two, it just wouldn’t feel right if I DIDN’T put something on this list with a high chance of showing up on the 2019 list.  It’s tradition!  That aside, this announcement filled me with glee.  Bayonetta 2 is one of the best action games of all time, and I’m so relieved that Wii U’s sales struggles didn’t doom the series.  Now that Bayonetta 3 is on a successful system (and it being on one system is better than zero, regardless of what your favorite platform is) we can see what a Nintendo/Platinum team up is truly capable of.  As mentioned earlier, character action games seem to be making a comeback in 2018, and Bayonetta 3 is the perfect title to symbolize that.  Time for this series to achieve a triple platinum.  But would you believe it wasn’t the most exciting game announced during the week where it debuted?

1. MegaMan 11

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform:
Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC
Release Date:
“Late 2018”

I think this was the closest a game announcement has ever come to making me cry.  Even with Super Mario Galaxy 2 and Super Mario We Swear It’s A Tech Demo, it’s not like I thought there was a chance we’d never see another Mario game.  But Mega Man… I kept the faith, during the dark six and a half year between Universe (yes, Icepick, I did care about it from the start) and Legends 3 being cancelled and Mega Man Isn’t Dead Day I always insisted that series as popular and long running as Mega Man couldn’t permanently die.  But there’s always doubt, always fear, until it actually comes back.  And it did, it finally did.  I would have settled for a licensed game based on the new cartoon, so even if Mega Man 11 isn’t my very first choice, it’s still way more than I dared to hope for.  Classic Mega Man gameplay combined with the first attempt to feel like a modern game in over a decade should make the game fantastic, but I’ll be honest, the emotional impact was a big factor in this getting the number one spot.  It feels like a giant weight has been lifted from gaming, and the one two punch of Metroid and Mega Man returning after being MIA since 2010 made 2017 a better year than even my hope for it last year could have imagined.  As 2013 proved, even releasing great games can leave a dark aftertaste if the future doesn’t look bright, and 2017 was both the best year for gaming in a long time and one of the most hopeful.  2017 has left the world of gaming a much brighter place than it was at the start, and 2018’s games are a testament to that.  2018 has big shoes to fill, but it also has momentum on its side, I can’t wait to see how it turns out.

Dariwan

2017 is winding down. It was a pretty decent gaming year. We got great games like Persona 5, even better systems like the Nintendo Switch. Now that 2017 is coming to a close, we’re looking forward to 2018.  Here’s my top 10 Games (if I can find 10 I’m even interested in…) but first, a few honorable mentions.

Honorable Mentions

Here’s a few games that didn’t make the top 10 but I feel still deserve a mention…

  • Bayonetta 3 (Switch) – I love the Bayonetta series. A sexy witch who fights angels because she doesn’t like them. How can you hate this! (oh wait, you hate that the game isn’t on your system even though when it was, no one bought it …but I ain’t saying nothing you ain’t already heard…)
  • Death Stranding (PS4) – This game …I’m not even sure it IS a game at this point…interests me. I like the whole death and life thing it’s trying to portray, and I hope to see more of the gameplay that may interest me in the future.
  • Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night (PS4, Xbox One, Switch, PS Vita, PC) – I’ve half been a fan of the Castlevania series, despite playing half of one game. This game somewhat interests me because it seems like what the creator wanted to do with the Castlevania series if he had the chance.
  • Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection (PS4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) – The Street Fighter anniversary train still won’t end! Re-releases of most of the old games (Street Fighter 1, some of the Street Fighter 2s, Street Fighter Alpha, and all of Street Fighter 3) some with online and they’re all Arcade Perfect! There are some problems we’ve found with this but again, another article for another time.
  • Dragon Ball FighterZ (PS4, Xbox One, PC) – the only game with an actual date on this list! Dragon Ball FighterZ is a pretty much pitch perfect anime fighting game made by the great minds at Namco Bandai and Arc System Works. They really put in the work to make the game look like it literally came from the anime to my console! 3V3 combat is reminiscent of Marvel vs Capcom 2 and 3 and the combat looks pretty good for a Dragon Ball Z/Super fighter.

10. Spider-Man

Publisher/Developer: Sony Interactive Entertainment/Insomniac Games
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: 2018

I have a small bit of nostalgia for this game, mainly because of how I got certain consoles in my youth. I got an Xbox around the time the Raimi Spider-Man movies came out, and  of course they had games for said movies. I had the first Spider-Man Raimi  movie game (what a mouthful!) and I thought it was pretty awesome!  I’d eventually get my hands on the second game as well. Even if the games are considered mediocre for this day and age, I enjoyed them. So seeing a new Spider-Man game in this generation with great graphics and  great gameplay. Even though I also loved Shattered Dimensions in its day, I cannot wait to web-swing the streets of New York as Peter Parker (or maybe even  Miles Morales) against fighting Spider-Man’s great rogue gallery!

9. Ghost of Tsushima

Publisher/Developer: Sony Interactive Entertainment/Sucker Punch Productions
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: TBC

We don’t know a lot about this game, as all we saw were some nice looking cut scenes (I guess?) and some developer talk on  the game at the Paris Games Week in 2017, but the premise got me hooked. Being a Samurai in the feudal era of Japan interests me. And I’d like to play as that since I missed out on so many other games in the past like that (Brave Fencer Musashi, for one) The closest to a game like this I’ve played Is Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance. So I’m excited to see what more Sucker Punch can give me after the Infamous series.

8. Vampyr

Publisher/Developer: Focus Home Interactive/Dontnod Entertainment
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC
Release Date: Spring 2018

Again, this one I know little about. I have a love-hate relationship with Vampires. There are times when they’re awesome, (Castlevania series and the Vampire: The Masquerade series in games, almost anything really involving Dracula -OR BLACULA!- in movies/TV) and times when they’re just not. (Twilight, anyone? I shudder when I think about it: VAMPIRES DON’T SPARKLE!)  The little I’ve seen of this game reminds me of The Darkness, one of the only 3 FPS games I’ll actually play and enjoy. (If you want me to delve into that, I’ll talk about it some other time) and the Infamous series, which interests me a bit. So I’ll see how this goes…even though the developer, Dontnod, has had some stinkers in the past (Life is Strange, a train wreck using time travel to make things worse; and Remember Me, which no one remembers…ha ha) Let’s see if they can actually come up with some gold with Vampyr.

7. Indivisible

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/Lab Zero Games
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch
Release Date: 2018

I backed this game back in 2015. (I know, that feels SO long ago..) and this game is finally coming out in 2018! The things that sold me on it back then were the people who made the then-wonderful fighting game Skullgirls were developing it, and it had an interesting battle system. Now in those 3 years, we’ve seen a couple games copy this system, like the Fallen Legion series and Has-Been Heroes to an extent. But I think Indivisible will be a great game on its own and I hope my 3-year-old payment will be worth it in the end!

6. Darksiders III

Publisher/Developer: THQ Nordic/Gunfire Games
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC
Release Date: TBA 2018

I have had an interest in this series for a while. I bought the first game on PS3 a few years ago, I got stuck in it (as I usually do) and eventually shelved it, but I did like what I played. It definitely had God of War vibes and I love the fact that it involved the Horsemen of the Apocalypse. I enjoy the supernatural parts of religion, such as angels and demons and the such, so this game is right up my alley! I haven’t played the second game yet, but I have it on my PS4, so hopefully by the time this comes out, I may have a chance to play, if not beat the second one. Maybe even get the first one played and beaten to so I can enjoy this one. As always, a female protagonist is never a bad thing and neither is a whip for combat! (Here’s looking at you, Belmonts!)

5. God of War

Publisher/Developer: Sony Interactive Entertainment/SIE Santa Monica Studio
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: Q1 2018

How fitting this game is next after talking about Darksiders 3, since that game is pretty much inspired by this one! I’ve loved God of War since I bought the first game on an impulse so many years ago at Walmart (back when I bought my video games exclusively at Walmart…those were the days) I call(ed) it my rage game because I can let out all my anger and kill and gnash and have blood everywhere and no one will tell me anything AND I won’t go to jail!  Anyway, I’ve played most of the  games in the series by now (sans Ascenion) and I’ve loved every one I’ve player (save Chains of Olympus…don’t ask.)  Even though this game is straying from the old formula and it’s kind of giving me “dadmance vibes” like Spider-Man Homecoming did with Peter Parker and Tony Stark, I think the game will still be solid. Also using Norse gods this time instead of Greek will defintely spice things up in Kratos’ world, and he’ll obviously show that age isn’t anything but a number, and he can still kick butt, beard and all!

4. Soulcalibur VI

Publisher/Developer: Bandai Namco/Project Soul
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC
Release Date: TBA 2018

Ah yes, “it’s time to go back to the stage of history!” I’ve loved the Soul Calibur/Soul Edge series for a while, even if Namco themselves went a bit crazy for a few years. The last Soul Calibur game I played and loved was Soul Calibur II, but some of the characters in the later games were interesting to see. I didn’t really play very much of Soul Calibur III, IV, or V, so I’m not gonna comment much on them. But I got really excited when I saw the announcement for Soul Calibur VI during The Game Awards. The game looks superb, even if it looks like a retread back to  the original Soul Calibur, I personally think the game needs to go back to its roots, since the current games really have left  a sour taste in some people’s mouths. It’s also fitting since Soul Calibur just recently had its 20th anniversary, so a nod to its roots is never a bad thing. Also I may need another solid fighting game as it looks like my choices are dwindling…but that’s another article for another day.

3. Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes

Publisher/Developer: Marvelous Entertainment/Grasshopper Manufacture
Platform: Switch
Release Date: 2018

NO MORE HEROES. Another impulse game on the Wii, one of my first in my Gamestop days of buying games (I’m feeling  a bit old typing this). I bought this game because I’m a sucker for a cool guy with a sword. And oh that rabbit hole that Goichi Suda (Suda 51) dug was a nice one. The game is about a crazed otaku-turned-assassin who’s told to kill other assassins and rise up to the top of the leaderboards. The gameplay is amazing and one of the few games of its time to truly make motion controls feel fun! I really felt like I was Travis Touchdown and I was swinging that katana around! I beat the first game and loved it, and got stuck in the second. I got a bit angry when they remade the first game for PS3, because I really felt like the Wii was the perfect system for the game, but people gonna complain until they get what they want, and apparently it wasn’t that good a game. (good for them…) I got a bit scared for this series, because as I recall, Suda51 said on many occasions that this game wouldn’t be on a Nintendo system if it was gonna get an update, and the game wouldn’t really see a release. But when I saw this trailer, I felt like Suda51 gave me an early Christmas/birthday gift! (My birthday is 4 days before Christmas) I cannot wait to see what (and WHO) Travis Touchdown has gotten his awesome katana(s) stuck into this time!

2. MegaMan 11

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: “Late 2018”

I know I’ve personally had some bad times with this series, but I’m actually happy that Mega Man is gonna come back again in 2018! It’s been a long, long  wait for a new Mega Man game since Mega Man 9 and 10 came out in 2008 and 2010, respectively.  Most people even thought Mega Man to be a dead series, never to see another new game again. But for its 30th Anniversary, Capcom announced Mega Man 11 and also the Mega Man X series coming out to next gen consoles (PS4, Xbox One, and Switch)  I am personally very excited for the new Classic Mega Man game, even if I had much trouble with the series in the past, and it caused me a few…issues. I’m sure this game will be amazing and I will hopefully beat it sometime in the next 10 years….

1. Kingdom Hearts III

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release: 2018

Oh god I’ve been waiting for this game FOR-EVER!  Almost as long as the smash hit Persona 5 that finally came out last year in 2017!  (Winter 2015….grumble grumble) Anyway I’ve loved this series for a long time. Ironically I got into this series because my cousin had it. And she was afraid of one of the bosses. So she ended up giving it to me. My Xbox got stolen so I got a PS2, mainly for this game, and I’ve been in love ever since. I’ve played almost all of the games except for the few mobile games since then. I’ve been waiting for Kingdom Hearts 3 since I finished 2 around…2006-ish. When I heard this game was actually happening, I was shocked. I didn’t expect this game to come out at all in my lifetime since it took so long between 2 and 3 and they had so many side stories and spin-off games. I think they’re finally putting Nomura’s foot to the fire and telling  him to release this game in 2018, so I hope it actually comes out. The worlds look amazing from what I’ve seen and the properties they’re using are also top-notch. I chose this as my number one because I think this game will hopefully be the best of them all as it will end the Keyblade Seekers portion of the Kingdom Hearts series, then they can start on a whole other adventure, which I cannot wait to hear about in the far-flung future!

Well 2017 has ended and 2018 will soon begin. The last 12 months of gaming have been great and let’s hope for 12 more!

This is Dari, signing off!

NekoGamerX

2017 was a great year for video games and 2018 is looking good so far as well. This is my list for most anticipated games for 2018.

Honorable Mention

Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection (PC/Switch/PS4/XBO): Okay, so technically this is not a new game. I love classic Capcom fighting games and this sounds like a great collection. I only wish Capcom would release some more of their other classic fighters like Darkstalkers but that dream is dead.

10. Guacamelee 2

Publisher/Developer: DrinkBox Studios
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: “Early 2018”

I liked the original Guacamelee. It was a really fun Metroidvania/Metroid-like game. I didn’t care for the game’s theme but the gameplay was solid. I want more games like this.

9. project OCTOPATH TRAVELER

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix/Acquire/Nintendo
Platform: Switch
Release Date: 2018

This game reminds me of the old RPGs that were on the Super NES back in the day. I’m glad to see games like this are still around. Hope to see more like it in the future.

8. MegaMan 11

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: “Late 2018”

Okay, classic MegaMan is my second favorite MegaMan, but I won’t lie: I was hoping for a new MegaMan X game. Oh well, this is the next best thing and at least the older MegaMan X games are getting re-released on everything and MegaMan is not dead.

7. Blazblue Cross Tag Battle

Publisher/Developer: Arc System Works
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4
Release Date: 2018

I’ve been a Blazblue fan for years and I think it’s a way better series than Guilty Gear. I’m just waiting for Taokaka or Kokonoe to be announced as playable characters. Hell, why not both? I’d be happy with just one of them though, but at least Makoto is in it.

6. Monster Hunter: World

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: January 26, 2018

The Monster Hunter series is really fun and I’m glad to see it come to the PS4, though I don’t mind what it comes out on, as long as they keep coming out here.

5. Kingdom Hearts III

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release: 2018

Okay, this game has been a long time coming. I just about gave up on it, but it looks like it’s finally going to happen. And it’d better!

4. Indivisible

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/Lab Zero Games
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch
Release Date: 2018

Now this game, from what I’ve seen. It looks good and it’s being made by the same people that made Skullgirls, so I’ve got faith that it’s going to be good.

3. Dragon Ball FighterZ

Publisher/Developer: Bandai Namco/Arc System Works
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: January 26, 2018

This game looks way better than what MvCI could ever hope to be and a lot more. MvCI was the biggest letdown of 2017 for me and I hope there are more fighters like this in the works – and less games like MvCI.

2. Freedom Planet 2

Publisher/Developer: GalaxyTrail
Platform: PC, possibly more
Release Date: 2018

The first Freedom Planet was one of the most fun 2D platformers I’ve played in a long time and I was hoping for a sequel. Glad it’s coming in 2018. Well, at least I hope it does and doesn’t get delayed.

1. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/ArtPlay/DICO
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation Vita
Release Date: “March 2018”

I’ve wanted a new Metroidvania-style Castlevania game for a long time and with Konami being the way they are right now, I’ve given up on that. Bloodstained is the next best thing and it’s my only hope for a Metroidvania game. I don’t want this to be another Mighty No. 9 and from what I’ve seen, it looks like it’s not going to be. It looks like the people working on this game know what they’re doing, which makes me happy and I can’t wait to play the final game.

Shellshock

The year 2017 started with, and ended with a bang on many different fronts. We had what many consider to be one of the best years in gaming, and with good reason. We’re already seeing a growth in many different gaming markets with compelling software, as well as new hardware being released. Now that 2018 is on the horizon, there are many different games I’m excited for, more than how I was going into 2017. I don’t expect 2018 to top 2017, but it doesn’t have to, as it needs to be able to hold its own with lots of games that will keep people playing.

Now, I’m going to omit games with no set release window or date (Metroid Prime 4, Pokémon Switch, Fire Emblem Switch [sic], and Bayonetta 3, to name a few), as we don’t have a lot of info to go by. I’m also going to shy myself away from ports or remakes, with one exception. That being said, let’s get on with, what I would consider to be my Top 10 Most Anticipated Games of 2018!

Before we get into the list, let’s get into some honorable mentions, shall we?

Honorable Mentions

  • Soulcalibur VI (PS4, Xbox One, PC): Announced at The Game Awards 2017, Soulcalibur VI is returning to its roots by bringing us fan favorites from the original series, with a new take, and a reimagining of the series’ story and setting. Soulcalibur V was a disappointment, and it’s been years since that game was released, so I’m looking forward to seeing if 6 could give us the experience we’ve been wanting to see again.
  • Wargroove (Switch, PC, Xbox One): A strategy game in the vein of Advance Wars, Wargroove has a lot of interesting characters, and a battle system that will keep you coming for more. I’ve enjoyed the Advance Wars games, so I’ll definitely be looking forward to this.
  • Runner3 (Switch): The Runner games were fun to play, especially Runner2, in addition to the cool background music during gameplay. With paths that you could now branch off into the background, and the ability to double jump, there’s lots of new experiences to be had in this installment.
  • Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes (Switch): I’m going on record to say that I still need to finish the first game (as well as start the second after that), but that doesn’t take away my excitement I have for this game. There’s a lot of crossovers with other indie games, which is really cool. From what I’ve played of the first game, I liked, so there’s a high chance that I will enjoy this one.
  • Indivisible (PC, Nintendo Switch, Playstation 4, XBOX One): Lab Zero made a great fighting game in Skullgirls, and I’ve enjoyed that one a lot. With Indivisible, it looks a lot more ambitious, by combining Valkyrie Profile and Metroidvania-style gameplay, and that’s an awesome combination. However, there’s not a lot of info on this game, which is why it’s an honorable mention at best. Hoping we get more info on this game really soon!

And now onto the main list.

10. Valkyria Chronicles 4

Publisher/Developer: Sega
Platform: Playstation 4, Nintendo Switch, XBOX One
Release Date: 2018

Valkyria Chronicles 4 looks to be a return to form for the series, as it’s going back to a similar style that the first game had. It’s set in the same timeframe as the first game, so it’s not required to have played any of the other games in the series to have knowledge of what’s going on, or to even get right into it. If you are into turn-based strategies with an overhead view, and controlling characters with different methods of combat, then you’ll definitely want to pick this up.

9. Yoshi (Nintendo Switch)

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Good-Feel
Platform: Nintendo Switch
Release Date: 2018

Yoshi makes his return, this time on the Nintendo Switch. The game is developed by Good-Feel, and has a similar gameplay style as Yoshi’s Woolly World. Unlike Woolly World, Yoshi is made of a different material than yarn. When this was announced at the Nintendo E3 Spotlight, it was overshadowed due to the announcement of Metroid Prime 4. Despite that, I thought it was nice to see a new Yoshi game on the Nintendo Switch. Eggs are back, which made sense since Yoshi’s not made of Yarn in this one, so he won’t need Yarn Balls. Otherwise, the game is just like Woolly World, which is a good thing. I like Yoshi, so I’m definitely looking forward to this!

8. Dragon Quest XI

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix/Armor Project
Platform: Playstation 4, Nintendo Switch, Nintendo 3DS
Release Date: 2018

The Dragon Quest series outside of Japan has always been overlooked, at least until Dragon Quest VIII on PS2. That game sold well, but it did have a demo for Final Fantasy XII as part of it. We did get Dragon Quest IX on DS, and that ended up being the best-selling game in the series outside of Japan. We never got X here, though it did go the MMO route, but I’m sure some people would’ve appreciated it. That being said, when Dragon Quest XI was announced, I couldn’t be any more excited! It’s back to the traditional Dragon Quest gameplay we all know and love, and the game itself looks even more beautiful than ever before. I’m hoping it gets localized here in 2018, as I will be spending so much time with this game!

7. Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection

Publisher/Developer: Capcom/Digital Eclipse
Platform: PC, Nintendo Switch, Playstation 4, XBOX One
Release Date: May 2018

I said I wasn’t going to talk about ports or remakes, but I have to make this one an exception. Coming from Ultra Street Fighter II: The Final Challengers, many people criticized the price point, using HD Remix’s graphics, and the awful Way of the Hadou minigame. Out of nowhere, Capcom announced the Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection at the 2017 Capcom Cup, which includes twelve different Street Fighter games. You get the original, five versions of Street Fighter II, all three games in the Alpha series, and all three games in the Street Fighter III series. The reason I’ve added this game to my list is because of the Nintendo Switch version, specifically. The fact that I could take Street Fighter Alpha 3 and Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike anywhere with me is a big deal. Now I could play with my friends at the meetups I run, at conventions, or even online. You could only play Hyper Fighting, Super Street Fighter II Turbo, Alpha 3, and 3rd Strike online, but those are the four that are worth playing the most, so I’m fine with that. No matter where I go, Street Fighter will always be with me.
 

6. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/ArtPlay/DICO
Platform: Nintendo Switch, PC, Playstation 4, XBOX One
Release Date: 2018

Konami’s Castlevania series has been dormant for a couple of years now, mostly because Lords of Shadow 2 didn’t set the world on fire. As such, we haven’t seen a Metroidvania style game since Order of Ecclesia, though we did get Harmony of Despair, but that’s more-or-less a multiplayer platformer. Bloodstained returning to the Metroidvania style roots is something that I’m excited about. There’s also a prequel to the game in retro style, which is right up my alley, as I loved classic Castlevania.

I’ve backed this game on Kickstarter, and originally went for the Wii U stretch goal. Earlier this year, the development staff confirmed that the Wii U version was cancelled, but later confirmed that it was coming to Switch. I made the Switch (no pun intended), and now I’m looking forward to playing this game anywhere I go!
 

5. Dragon Ball FighterZ

Publisher/Developer: Bandai Namco Entertainment/Arc System Works
Platform: Playstation 4, XBOX One, PC
Release Date: January 26, 2018

I’m a huge Dragon Ball Z fan, and I’ve enjoyed many of the DBZ fighting games in the past, so this one is a no-brainer. After the disappointment that was Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite, many fighting game fans (including myself) took a look at this game’s previews and trailers, and were wowed at the execution of the fighting system. This felt more like a Marvel vs. Capcom game than Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite, and it showed. This game also has elements of many different Arc System Works games, such as “Vanish” and “Dragon Rush” moves, as well as “Super Dash”. Who is developing this game, might you ask? Well Arc System Works, of course! Even the element where you could collect the Dragon Balls to make a wish that helps you in the match sounds interesting, too! Dragon Ball FighterZ is definitely going to be a lot of fun, whether you love fighting games, the Dragon Ball universe, or both!

Sadly, this is the final Dragon Ball series video game where longtime Japanese voice actress Hiromi Tsuru voiced Bulma, as she passed away on November 16, 2017. May she rest in peace.
 

4. Blazblue Cross Tag Battle

Publisher/Developer: Arc System Works
Platform: Playstation 4, Nintendo Switch, PC
Release Date: 2018

Another crossover fighter? Yes, please! Arc System Works is two for two with multi-man tag team fighting games, both with Dragon Ball FighterZ, and now Blazblue Cross Tag Battle! Who knew they would be the ones filling a huge positive void in that market that not even Capcom could do?

Anyway, you have characters from the Blazblue series, Persona 4 Arena, Under Night In-Birth, and RWBY, all colliding against each other in this tag team fighting game! The gameplay is a mix of Blazblue Central Fiction, Persona 4 Arena Ultimax, and Under Night In-Birth EXE: Late[st], with lots of tweaks. While I’m looking forward to Dragon Ball FighterZ, I’m looking forward to Blazblue Cross Tag Battle even more!

3. Kirby: Star Allies

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/HAL Laboratory
Platform: Nintendo Switch
Release Date: 2018

Kirby has a lot of fun games; some of them are easy, and many of them are very challenging. Kirby: Star Allies returns to the 4-player co-op style, similar to Kirby’s Return to Dreamland. However, it also brings back the Helper feature from many games in the series, such as Super Star and Squeak Squad [sic]. You could have up to three companions with you throughout the game, and turn into a giant tire as you roll down hills. There’s a lot of new puzzles, which I always enjoy, since they could be challenging. You could also combine power-ups, something that hasn’t been seen in the series since Kirby 64, which is neat. During the September Nintendo Direct, they revealed King DeDeDe with huge muscles, so clearly, he’s been working out (though he still has stubby legs). This looks like it’ll be released during the Spring, and I’ll be picking this one up as it’s released!

2. Project Octopath Traveler

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix/Acquire
Platform: Nintendo Switch
Release Date: 2018

The moment I first laid my eyes on this game when it was announced back in January, I fell in love with it! Using an HD 2D engine, Project Octopath Traveler goes back to the old school JRPG roots with many new twists. In this game, you could make your command multiple times via boost points, which allows you to attack, defend, or increase potency of abilities. This game gives me vibes from Final Fantasy VI, Chrono Trigger, and the Bravely series of games, all rolled into one, with beautiful 2D graphics. This game feels more like a Final Fantasy game to me than a lot of modern games in that series. Acquire and Square Enix captured the magic of the older 16-bit era Squaresoft RPGs, and if they could add a lot of content to this game, it’ll make a lot of people come back for more! I also look forward to what the final name of the game will end up being.

1. Mega Man 11

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform: Nintendo Switch, PC, Playstation 4, XBOX One
Release Date: Late 2018

Many of you who know me better have already seen this one coming, and why wouldn’t this be my most anticipated game of 2018? I was so happy to see The Blue Bomber back with a new game! I had a glimmer of hope for a new Mega Man game for years now. I felt like there was hope since Mega Man was included as a playable character in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U. Since then, all we’ve had were Mega Man Legacy Collections 1 and 2, up until December 4th, where Capcom had that Mega Man 30th Anniversary Livestream. Even with the hope that I had, I went in, and kept my expectations low, as I didn’t want to be upset if there wasn’t a new Mega Man game that wasn’t a port. I sat through watching a game show, a Mega Ran Live Performance, and some developers talking about Mega Man’s history. Not long after the Mega Man X games were announced for all major platforms, Capcom showed off the History of Mega Man retrospective, in the form of Mega Man in 8-bit, running, jumping, and climbing through a big stage, showing off all the main games in the Classic series. It was sad to see Mega Man pass through 2011 and onwards with nothing (Mega Man XOver doesn’t count as a real Mega Man game in my eyes). Once I saw Mega Man in Dr. Wily’s lab, I was wondering what was going on, as Dr. Wily went through a turning door. When I saw Mega Man get the ? Orb that represents 2018, I wondered what was up, only to be shocked at what I saw.

MEGA MAN IS BACK!!!

So let’s talk about the game, and what we know so far. It’s a 2.5D style game that plays like the Classic Mega Man games. Mega Man looks a bit taller and sounds like a teenager, which I didn’t mind. The slide and Charge shot are back, which is great, because I wanted them to add a lot of elements from the entire Classic series. It looks like there was a Super Charge Blast of some sort, which I don’t know much about, but it looks to do a hefty amount of damage. The music sounds good, but I want to hear more catchy tunes that the Mega Man series is known for. The graphics look exactly what I would expect them to, a modernized Mega Man game with a 2.5D Gameplay. I’ve seen people claim that this game looks like Mighty No. 9, but to be honest, I think this looks a heck of a lot better. You could collect gears in this game, but it’s unknown as to what purpose they serve, but I wonder if it’s either similar to the Nuts and Bolts from previous entries, or something different? I’ll have to wait and see to find out all the details when Capcom’s ready to share them.

Capcom has been on a huge roller coaster ride with many of their fans for over 11 or so years, and they’ve made a lot of stupid decisions that really ticked people off. It seems like they now want to get on their fans’ good graces again, and while Mega Man 11 is a great start, they still have a long way to go before they get universal praise again. I really hope Capcom delivers with this game, and I trust the new lead director and producer to get the job done. I also had a funny feeling that Capcom wanted to make a new Mega Man game for years now, and there have been cancelled games, even after Universe and Legends 3’s cancellations (the Metroid Prime-styled Mega Man X game for Nintendo 3DS [sic] says hi), but they weren’t sure as to how to go about it. Now that the Blue Bomber is back, I will do everything I can to support this game. I will buy this game on both Switch and Steam (and if I had a Playstation 4 or XBOX One, then I’d get them on those platforms, too). Not only am I happy that Mega Man is back, I also never want him to go on another seven-to-eight-year hiatus ever again. Saying that I cannot wait for this game is a complete understatement, but the latter part of 2018 is going to be worth it!

So that’s my 10 most anticipated games of 2018.I had a lot more games that I was more anticipating than previous years, as there’s a lot for me to look forward to. There are many other games I’m looking forward to that’s not on this list, but they lack info or a solid release date, but if any of them get released in 2018, you bet I will be picking them up! Again, I enjoyed 2017 a lot more, and while I don’t expect 2018 to top it, I do hope we get yet another great year in video games.

Professor Icepick

2017 was probably one of the best years for gaming we’ve had in a long time. What I find really surprising is the fact that, for once, the vast majority of the games on last year’s list actually managed to come out – for better or for worse. The only real issue I’ve got with this year is that it seems like compared to this time last year, relatively few new games were announced to fill in the gaps the stellar releases that hit in 2017 left behind, but that’s just nitpicking. Hopefully, 2018 manages to continue 2017’s trend of timely releases and amazing titles. With that being said, let’s get started with this year’s honorable mentions before we tear into my top 10.

Honorable Mentions

  • Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection (PC/Switch/PS4/XBO): Okay, so technically this is a cheat. But that’s why it’s only on the honorable mentions listing. 12 classic Street Fighter games, with 4 of the most popular games getting full online capabilities for $40 sounds like an amazing offer to me. The fact that Digital Eclipse – who previously brought us the original MegaMan Legacy Collection and the Disney Afternoon Collection – is heading up this game’s development, and we know that there’s at least some form of rollback netcode involved makes me feel confident in this upcoming anthology’s quality.

I just hope they reconsider making Alpha 2 an offline-only experience. There has also been a bit of controversy over the fact that they’re only including the American versions of each game in this collection: even MMLC had both the American and Japanese versions of each game included in all releases.

  • Toejam and Earl: Back in the Groove (PC/PS4/XBO/Switch): One of the few stragglers from last year’s list, TJ&E may look amazing, but it’s been demoted to honorable mention this time. It’s partly due to the fact that so many other amazing games were announced for 2018, but I’m still bitter that it didn’t manage to release in 2017. I guess adding a Switch version pushed everything back.
  • Monster Boy and the Cursed Kingdom (PC/PS4/XBO/Switch): Monster Boy also hits the honorable mentions for the same reasons as Toejam and Earl. Of course, I guess Cursed Kingdom has an excuse: they’re retooling the graphics from sprites to hand-drawn animation. Considering how late into development they decided to shift the artstyle, it only makes sense that it’d be pushed back at least a year.
  • Dragon Ball FighterZ (PC/PS4/XBO): DBFZ was actually on the main list until I realized that there was another game slated for release next year that I preferred. It’s nothing personal, but I generally tend to prefer 2-on-2 tag fighters over the 3-on-3 versions – but looking at how well Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite turned out for me, that’s not an automatic sign of quality.
  • Indivisible (PC/PS4/XBO/Switch): Another game that was just barely kicked off the main list, Indivisible is the newest product from Lab Zero Games, the people behind Skullgirls. News on the game’s development has been slow and I’ve been following for a long time now. By this point, I’m just kind of burnt out on the whole concept, to the point where I’ve been ignoring news until something significant pops up. Still hoping they make that final stretch goal – which would add a bonus dungeon and multiple endings – by their end of the year deadline.

Dishonorable Mention

  • Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana (PC): “Same day release”, my fat, pale hairy ass.

10. Guacamelee 2

Publisher/Developer: DrinkBox Studios
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: “Early 2018”

I consider the original Guacamelee among the best Metroidvanias platform-adventure games ever released, so I was incredibly excited to hear that it’s finally getting a sequel. The only reason that it ends up so low on my list is that it’s presently a PS4 exclusive. That’s not much of a surprise, considering the first game launched as a timed exclusive on PlayStation, but considering the game took roughly 15 months to hit other consoles, that means I probably won’t be getting my hands on it until 2019 at this rate. Kind of kills the hype, don’t you think?

9. Lethal League Blaze

Publisher/Developer: Team Reptile
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: 2018

The original Lethal League is perhaps one of my favorite indie games of all-time. Effectively the bastard love child of Super Smash Bros., Super Dodge Ball and Pong, the game is a unique blend of arcade sports and fighting game action. The game managed to finally hit both the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One this year, but they also announced a pseudo-sequel – it’s been stated to be an expanded retelling of the original game – for those two platforms as well as PC. Boasting additional characters and a sleek new cel-shaded 2.5D art style, Blaze seems to be well on its way to taking Lethal League to the next level. We have very little information over all, but Team Reptile seems confident that the game will launch next year. I’m hoping that there’s some form of crossplay – ideally between PS4 and Steam – but even if there isn’t, I’m still excited for this remake.

8. Kirby: Star Allies

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/HAL Laboratory
Platform: Switch
Release Date: Spring 2018

I’ve been a fan of the Kirby series for a long time and I’d consider them to be the “chess” of the platformer genre: easy to learn, but difficult to master. Considering how much I ended up loving Triple Deluxe and Planet Robobot, I was excited when Nintendo first revealed their new Kirby game for the Switch back at E3 this past year and we got to see even more footage this past September during one of their Nintendo Directs. The ability to combine copy powers returns from Kirby 64, though in an entirely new form, which seems like a pretty good gimmick to base an entire game around. My only nagging doubt is the implication at the reliance on co-op play – and by extension, AI partners in single-player. I’m hoping that this doesn’t end up dragging things down, but I’ll just have to wait and see when the game releases.

7. Blazblue Cross Tag Battle

Publisher/Developer: Arc System Works
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4
Release Date: 2018

Okay, so Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite ended up being a huge disappointment to me and many others and to capitalize on that, Bandai Namco partnered with Arc System Works to deliver what looks like an amazing 3v3 tag fighter featuring the Dragon Ball franchise, with gorgeous cel-shaded 3D models on par with those of the Guilty Gear Xrd games. I was impressed, but still a bit sad: I’d been waiting for so long for a return to form for 2-on-2 games and Capcom had clearly messed that up for me. Turns out Arc System Works had my back the entire time – and with Blazblue no less! A crossover fighter utilizing Blazblue, Persona 4 Arena, French Bread’s Under Night In-Birth and the popular online animated series RWBY, I was suddenly unshackled from the tyranny of MvCI’s oppressive mediocrity. I’m not particularly fond of the current roster, but Arc’s promised many more announcements in the coming months.

6. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/ArtPlay/DICO
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation Vita
Release Date: “March 2018”

This has been a long time coming. Originally slated to be released this past year when it was first Kickstarted, Bloodstained was quickly booted back to 2018 once the fundraising came to its conclusion. Since then, we’ve had a revolving door of developers: Inti Creates was booted off the project and replaced with developers more proficient in Unreal Engine 4. The Wii U version was killed off and replaced with a Switch version, which led to mixed reactions at first, but inevitably met with more and more support as time went on. I played the demo they released back in 2016, and while it was a bit rough, the potential was definitely there even that early into development. So, as we finally approach the game’s release, I’m excited once more. I’m probably far more excited for the pack-in retro-themed prequel game and the game’s linear mode than I am for the base game itself, but the entire thing should be a blast. Yet for all that excitement, I still worry that we may have another Mighty No. 9 on our hands.

5. Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes

Publisher/Developer: Marvelous Entertainment/Grasshopper Manufacture
Platform: Switch
Release Date: 2018

“It’s a new game in the No More Heroes franchise” should be enough of a reason for this game to nab the number five slot on this list, but I’ve got a reputation of going above and beyond when it comes to describing just why these games end up where they do. Travis Strikes Again isn’t a traditional entry in the series, but instead chronicles Travis Touchdown being assaulted by Badman – the father of NMH’s Bad Girl – only for the two of them to get sucked into Travis’s Death Drive Mark II video game console and forced to beat its games in order to escape back to the real world. It’s implied to be a collaborative game, developed by several indie developers and might feature some crossovers with paradoxical big-name indie titles like Hotline Miami and Shovel Knight. To put it mildly, this game is for me what Death Stranding is to what feels like everyone else on the planet: I have no idea what it is, and yet I can’t help but be excited.

4. Fighting EX Layer

Publisher/Developer: Arika
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: 2018

This game almost didn’t make the list – simply because I was unaware that it was set for release next year. Back when I was a kid, I loved the original Street Fighter EX – a close friend of mine lent me his copy of the game for an extended period of time. Sure, the graphics were crude, the mechanics imperfect, but there was just something endearing about the whole game. I feel exactly the same about Fighting EX Layer: not an amazing technical powerhouse – either in terms of graphics or gameplay mechanics – but it looks like it’s going to be a lot of fun. Unfortunately, the game’s currently slated as a PS4 exclusive, but maybe if the game performs well, it could make its way onto other platforms.

…just wish they’d gone with “Fighting Layer EX” for the title instead. FLEX is a perfect acronym.

3. “Yoshi for Nintendo Switch”

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Good-Feel
Platform: …Switch
Release Date: 2018

20 years. 20 long years. 20 long, agonizing years filled to the brim with broken dreams and unfulfilled promises. That’s how long it took for Yoshi’s Woolly World to deliver a worthy successor to Yoshi’s Island and one that arguably outstripped its predecessor. Fortunately, it’s only taken 3 years for yet another sequel. Once again developed by Good-Feel, “Yoshi for Nintendo Switch” looks like it’s going to expand on the previous game’s formula – and honestly, that’s all it really needs to do. It looks like the game is going to expand on the craftwork setting of the previous game, implementing papercraft and various other media, while the gameplay appears to be better utilizing its 3D graphics, not unlike the early 2.5D platformers, allowing Yoshi to walk into the background and foreground. The truth is, this could’ve been a level pack sequel and I’d still be excited, but it’s good to see further experimentation with the solid formula of the previous game.

2. Freedom Planet 2

Publisher/Developer: GalaxyTrail
Platform: PC, possibly more
Release Date: 2018?

It’s funny: I put Freedom Planet 2 in the #2 spot and GalaxyTrail comes out with a massive update on the game’s progress. The original game is probably one of my favorite 2D platformers of this generation thus far and FP2 looks to deliver at least twice as much on everything the first game had. While we were never really given any sort of release window for the game – only a mention that a playable beta would be available in “mid-2017” (it hit in January of that year) back when the game was announced on Christmas 2015 – the game looks to be nearing completion. GalaxyTrail has mentioned that they have a release date in mind, but simply don’t want to announce it until they’re absolutely sure they can hit it. Considering the issues they had with the first game’s Wii U port, I can’t really blame them. They also mentioned that they can’t confirm any platforms besides PC, Mac and Linux, but are working hard to secure at least some form of console release.

1. MegaMan 11

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: “Late 2018”

I know I said these same exact words last year – and I know how well that turned out for me – but once again, “it couldn’t be anything else”. The Blue Bomber has been in dire straits the past seven years, with only a free PC game, a crummy mobile game and a disappointing spiritual successor to show for it. In retrospect, Capcom’s choice to let Inafune make the first move was a brilliant one, but it left the fanbase feeling frozen out. With the specter of Mighty No. 9 finally banished from the forefront of the fanbase’s mind, MegaMan 11 seems poised to capitalize on our aching hunger pangs and deliver a true new-generation MegaMan game.

The ironic thing is that one of the main criticisms I’ve seen leveled at MM11 is that the game has decided, like MegaMan 7, 8 and MegaMan & Bass before it, to abandon its 8-bit roots. Yet I seem to recall an incalculable amount of teeth-gnashing and wailing when MegaMan 10 decided to reuse that retro throwback art style, two years on the heels of MegaMan 9. I guess it’s true what they say: you can’t please everyone. The 2.5D style looks gorgeous, with the character models properly representing the concept art’s new take on the classic anime-inspired look. Some of the backgrounds even look hand-drawn, which just adds to the appeal.

Capcom has been a bit of a mixed bag in recent years, delivering on the promise of Resident Evil 7, while stabbing me in the back with abominations like Dead Rising 4 and Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite. Perhaps it’s naïve to believe in Capcom blindly at this juncture, so I’m looking at this game through the lens of cautious optimism. Still, after 7 years of radio silence, I’m ready to get hurt again. MM11’s set to launch on all four major platforms late next year and I’m willing to give Capcom the benefit of the doubt given what we know so far. At the very least, it should be better than nothing.

Those are my picks for 2018. Last year, I was cynical about any of my choices releasing in 2017, but considering how many did, I was able to come up with an entirely new list this time around. However, this was a double-edged sword: I’m a bit less hyped for this list overall, simply due to a lack of information on what’s been announced and the fact that it feels like very little has actually been announced in 2017 for next year. My previous lists all had the stench of constant delays permeating from some of my major picks, but this year has all but wiped the slate clean. I guess that makes creating a new list difficult: chances are, there could be some pretty amazing games set to release in 2018 that we don’t even know about yet. That’s my hope, anyway.

Shedding Light on My Dark Souls

In 2009, Demon’s Souls was released.  Initially a cult favorite, its popularity grew and put From Software on the map worldwide.  The game spawned four titles that the copyright lawyers assure you are only spiritual successors, as well as a host of imitators.  The series really hit the mainstream with Demon’s Souls’ immediate not-sequel Dark Souls, and its incredibly challenging, unforgiving and epic dark fantasy quests became iconic.  Until reviewers passed the title on to Crash Bandicoot and Cuphead to hide how terrible they were at old-school platformers and action shooters, Dark Souls became the go-to example of a hard game.  It was the Dark Souls of lazy and often nonsensical comparisons.

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No, seriously, they compared this to Dark Souls, look it up.

My feelings on the series (Demon’s Souls, Dark Souls 1-3, and Bloodborne, the fan name for the collective being Soulsborne) are… complicated.  I wanted to like the series, lengthy and challenging action-adventure games in a dark fantasy setting sounded great to me.  But with all those stats and equipment to manage, despite being Japanese I would classify the Soulsborne games (or at least the earlier ones) as really hard WRPGs.  I have no problem with hard games if they’re in a genre I like, but WRPGs are definitely not one of those genres.  And the controls and hit detection seemed too clunky for such a demanding game.  But were my complaints legitimate, or just me refusing to adapt to a series outside of my comfort zone?  I was never completely sure, which was a major reason I haven’t said much about these games before.

Well, the series offered to meet me halfway, and I accepted.  Bloodborne and Dark Souls 3 addressed some of my major issues (the characters move faster and checkpoints are a little more sane), and I managed to beat both of them.  For reference, I made it around a quarter of the way through Demon’s Souls before giving up, and only played a little bit of a friend’s copy of Dark Souls to confirm it hadn’t fixed my issues.  I didn’t bother trying Dark Souls 2.  I’m not claiming to be an expert on the series, but am I a fan?  I’m still not completely sure, which is why I’m writing this article.  While playing Dark Souls 3 (I beat that very recently, while Bloodborne was a couple years ago), I switched several times between finding it an enjoyable and satisfying game, and being furious at it and wanting to quit.  But either way, it was addictive and dominated my gaming time.  When I finished it, I felt a wave of emotion that was part accomplishment and part relief.  I’ve been trying to understand and articulate my thoughts on the series, and I think I’ve finally gotten it.

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I hate this asshole more than any other boss in recent memory.

The Soulsborne games have a concept I love, they are in a genre that has great potential to draw me in.  I really want to like them, but I feel like there are some serious flaws that could be easily fixed.  However, many of these flaws haven’t been addressed, and I think a major reason for that is that reviewers and the gaming community are refusing to acknowledge these flaws.  As the series progresses, some of my problems are addressed, but others are completely ignored.  I trudge through these issues to get at the part of the game that I enjoy, while wishing that the genre could fix these flaws and feeling resentful towards the rabid fanbase of the series for refusing to acknowledge these issues as flaws.  As these thoughts went through my head, I realized there was a very close parallel to my feelings about Soulsborne in a different series.  Yes, for all the games that supposedly are the Dark Souls (apparently the first difficult game ever made) of their genre, Soulsborne itself fits into that mold.

Dark Souls is the Grand Theft Auto of the 2010s. 

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Forget King’s Field, this is the Dark Souls prototype.

Yes, Soulsborne lines up almost perfectly with the beloved sandbox codifier that contains my personal punching bag (Grand Theft Auto 3 will always be terrible no matter how much the series improves).  And I think I’ve pinpointed what I find so frustrating about both the Soulsborne games and the pre-Grand Theft Auto V GTA games…

Recently, I’ve grown fond of the term “quality of life” as it relates to game design.  I define quality of life as features in a game that reduce frustration and inconvenience without making the game easier.  Being able to quickly equip items or abilities in real time instead of constantly pausing, information about items and stats prominently displayed and easy to access, the ability to retry challenges on the spot instead of being forced to commit suicide if you think you’ve messed up too much to finish an area.  And I’m sorry to say that in many ways the Soulsborne games seem to pride themselves on being anti-quality of life.  Want to fight a boss again?  In the later games you can almost always run to that boss easily without enemies getting any hits on you, but every time the boss kills you have to make that run again.  To make matters worse, you have to deal with a load time that’s longer than it would be if you could just respawn in the boss room.  You aren’t allowed to have a map, which isn’t even justified by realism, explorers made their own maps.  You… you can’t even pause.  There’s an offline mode, for God’s sake, let us pause!

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Seriously, how the hell is not being able to pause an offline game acceptable?

This is in addition to things that do make the game harder, but in ways I feel aren’t legitimate.  Having one shot at collecting the souls/blood you had at your last death is an interesting feature, but something needs to be done about how it punishes you for making progress between checkpoints.  Die early?  You can easily get your experience points back.  Make lots of progress then die?  You are very likely screwed.  And don’t get me started on using an item, dying, the enemies you killed along the way respawning, and that item STILL BEING GONE.  The line between challenging and cheap is always… one of those… to draw, but I think there are some elements of the Soulsborne games that are legitimately cheap.

So, what is my overall point, what am I hoping to get out of this?  Well, it ties back to the Grand Theft Auto parallels.  In 2008, Saints Row 2 came out, and in 2012 I finally tried the “GTA rip-off.”  It was night and day, SR2 kept everything I liked about GTA and fixed all of my problems.  That’s what I want: the Saints Row 2 of Dark Souls.  A game that improves the genre so much that previous games in it feel unplayable in comparison.  Something that even makes the developer of the earlier, more famous series take notice and improve their games.

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We may have the Dark Souls of everything, but what we need is the Saints Row 2 of Dark Souls.

So, back to the question of how I feel about Soulsborne, it remains complicated.  The later games are for the most part enjoyable for me, but I’m actively hoping for a game that will make me unable to ever go back to them.  So I guess I’m a fan at the moment, but a fair amount of that comes from Stockholm Syndrome.  Soulsborne draws me in with things I love, and holds them hostage with needlessly annoying and frustrating “traditions” that its fanbase refuses to acknowledge as flaws.  I seriously saw people arguing that the pre-patch Bloodborne load times were a good thing because they punished the player for dying.  Few internet gaming opinions have aggravated me that much.  For the time being, the Soulsborne games are good, but they could be so much better.  Let’s just hope that someday a Saint-like franchise fills these Dark Souls with light.

The Fear of Luigi

Things are looking up for Nintendo at the moment.  The Nintendo Switch has pretty much had the most successful launch anyone could expect, with critical reception and third party support going better for a Nintendo console than they have in a long time.  The Switch hasn’t even set off a wave of anti-popularity backlash like the Wii did.  The Nintendoomed meme has officially regained its full irony status.  It’s as if the last four years never happened.  But that’s what I want to talk about, the last four years…

Now some of my more observant readers who can do basic math may be wondering why I said the last four years.  After all, Wii U launched in 2012, five years ago.  The second it came out, or even the second it was announced, the world turned on Nintendo and their confusing Fisher-Price Wii add-on, right?  Not exactly.  While the Wii U’s launch certainly wasn’t the explosive success that the Wii and Switch enjoyed, it wasn’t bad either.  Wii U sold a decent amount during the 2012 holiday season, and if it had kept on track it wouldn’t have been a huge success, but it would have been a reasonably sized one.  Things didn’t go wrong until 2013.  On February 14th, 2013 it was revealed that the Wii U had sold only 55,000 units in North America during January 2013.  This was a pathetically low amount, and marked the start of disastrous console sales numbers that the Wii U never recovered from and that would cast a dark cloud over Nintendo for years to come.

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Hot buttered popcorn, what a curse!

You know what else happened that exact.  Same.  Freaking.  Day?  The Year of Luigi.  On February 14th, 2013 Nintendo announced that in honor of Luigi’s 30th anniversary, the year 2013 would be dedicated to the second best green Mario series character (Yoshi being the first, of course).  Luigi marked the year that sent Nintendo into a dark age.  The Year of Luigi was the year of what can best be described as a curse being inflicted on Nintendo.  Luigi is the symbol of every bad thing that happened to Nintendo from 2013 to 2016, and the poor Wii U never recovered from the darkness of that year, that specific day.

Well, is it really fair to blame Luigi for all of that?  It’s not like 13 is renowned for being a lucky number.  But let’s look at some of Luigi’s other big years.  1983, the year he debuted?  The North American video game crash hit in full force.  1993, 10th anniversary?  Worst year for SNES in its console war.  2003?  For Luigi’s 20th birthday Nintendo fell into third place in a console war for the first time ever.  2008?  The year of Wii Music’s E3 and the height of fears that Nintendo had abandoned their fans.  In addition to anniversaries, Luigi was the star of Nintendo’s big launch game for the GameCube, the worst selling Nintendo console until he cursed Wii U.  When did Nintendo 64’s launch hype wear off and set Nintendo on course for their first console war loss?  Early 1997, the same time Luigi made his first appearance on the system in Mario Kart 64.

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He knew exactly what he was doing.

When we look at the evidence, it’s clear: there is and always was something ominous about Luigi, a kind of darkness inside that is inexplicable and frightening.  Luigi’s insecurity, envy, cowardice, what have they been molded into inside the mind of the tall green plumber?  Is Luigi the sympathetic, comedic figure he is often portrayed as?  Is Mario oppressing Luigi by saving the world at great personal risk as a grand manipulation to make sure his brother never gets the glory?  Or is he protecting us, knowing what would happen if Luigi got the glory and power that his twisted heart desires?  I haven’t seen the true form of Luigi, I don’t know his real motives, but I… can feel them.

There is a bleak dryness inside and around Luigi.  A constant feeling of despair and dissatisfaction that eats away at you, distracts you, makes you unable to fight the darkness overlaying you, your view of the world.  Luigi knows he can’t do what Mario does, and it consumes him, he is a being of jealousy and bitterness.  But he has other talents, he can do things that heroes like Mario and Yoshi could never do, and would never want to do.  He manipulates people, makes them feel sorry for him.  Mario risks his life again and again for the sake of others, yet Luigi has a sizable percentage of gamers convinced that he is the victim because he does not receive as much credit as his brother.  The fear Luigi demonstrates, it isn’t real, it is a psychological manipulation technique.  Luigi puts others on edge, plants seeds of anxiety in them.  Luigi makes everyone around him weaker, and less able to counter the darkness he sows.

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The darkness within will claim you.

So what is Luigi truly capable of?  What is his ultimate goal?  I don’t know, deciphering the shadowy depths of this horrifying mystery is impossible.  Maybe Luigi wants everyone to be as miserable as he is, viewing himself as an evangelist for gloom and despair just as the Joker views himself as an ambassador for chaos.  Maybe he wants to use vague, creeping fear and hopelessness to do what Bowser’s minions never could and defeat Mario, taking his spot as Nintendo’s brightest star afterwards.  Maybe Luigi is an eldritch abomination who adopted the form of a green Mario and its intention is no more coherent than making children hallucinate a show about screaming puppets.  Whatever he is and whatever he wants, the curse of Luigi is a danger that we can no longer ignore.

So, what can we do about it?  How can we possibly combat the shadow of Luigi that hangs over Nintendo like the Sword of Damocles?  I wish I knew.  There are things beyond human control, beyond human comprehension.  Humanity lives at the mercy of the type of darkness that Luigi exudes.  We can only hope that our brush with him doesn’t cause complete madness, that his indecipherable whims don’t call for the total destruction of all that we hold dear.  Let’s hope that Mario can keep the darkness within his brother under control, but we’ll never be truly safe.  No matter what happens, we are destined to live in the fear of Luigi.

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We’ll never be safe.

Disclaimer:  This article is completely serious and absolutely not a creepypasta style parody written for Halloween.  The author really thinks that Luigi is a real life incomprehensible force of negative emotions while still viewing Nintendo as a video game company that makes the games Luigi stars in.  He is 100% serious when he blames Luigi for Wii U’s sales failure, the North American video game crash, Wii Music, and Trump being appointed president.  This is both serious and not at all related to the author being an only child who rarely encountered Luigi in classic Mario games and just never got why so many people love him so much.  Despite this being completely serious, he for some reason wants you to know that he wrote a similar Halloween article in the past accusing Mario of being a sociopathic attempted murderer, so it’s not just him picking on Luigi for the aforementioned reason that has nothing to do with this at all.  He will neither confirm nor deny wishing you a happy Halloween or knowing what Halloween is.

 

Turn Based #3: X, Shrugs and Rock ‘n’ Roll

SNES Master KI: Welcome to another installment of Turn Based! Today we will be tackling probably the most heated topic between myself and Professor Icepick that this series has covered so far. Ever since the original Mega Man X started the trend of new Mega Man series that coexisted with the original, people have argued over which was the best. The biggest battle in that area remained the original Mega Man series vs the X series, and Icepick and I are on opposing sides of this battle. Icepick will be representing the original Mega Man series, and I will be representing my beloved Mega Man X series. Since original came first I’ll let Icepick make the first actual argument, time for the battle where there can be no winners to commence! Who will win?

Professor Icepick: It’s easy to discount the Classic series as being “outdated” or “archaic”, but it’s obvious that it is the starting point for one of gaming’s most beloved franchises. If not for the humble release of the original Rockman on the Nintendo Famicom on December 17, 1987, the series wouldn’t exist whatsoever. Likewise, to this day, the best-selling MegaMan game of all time is MegaMan 2 on the NES, a feat which the franchise has yet to top. Classic is the most endearing branch of the MegaMan franchise, managing to claw itself back to relevance after over a decade of inactivity. Scoring not one, but two retro throwback games — before they were even cool! — as well as several spinoffs and appearances in various other forms of media, MegaMan Classic’s importance to Capcom, platformers and video games as a whole, cannot be understated.

KI: The thing is, none of that really addresses which series makes for better games. I don’t deny that the original Mega Man is the reason the series exists, but that’s true by definition of anything that has a spin-off series. Not to imply the quality gap is as large for the Mega Man games as it is for the example I’m about to give, but the Tracey Ullman show is why The Simpsons exists. The original Mega Man games are important and great games in their own right, but in my view, they were building up to something.

Mega Man X is, in my opinion, a colossal increase in quality on the level of Nintendo’s Super Nintendo sequels to NES games. Unlike the other Mega Man subseries, which are doing their own thing for the most part, MMX is an evolution of the original that shows what Mega Man can truly be. Everything the original series accomplished led up to it undergoing a super powered evolution into the SNES Mega Man X games.

Icepick: And that’s the problem, isn’t it? You’ve often told me that you consider the first game in the MMX sub-franchise to be the best by far, correct?

KI: I never said it was the best by far, it’s actually pretty close between the first four Mega Man X games. I believe that those four games, any one of them, are better than any game in the original Mega Man series. Mega Man X5 and X8 can also hold their own against many of them. Yes, there are two bad ones, but that doesn’t change the quality of the other games.

Icepick: That brings up another issue, MMX had spinoffs of its own: the Zero quadrilogy and the ZX duology. Personally, I prefer the gameplay in those two games over the X series in general. Which is where a major problem lies: through these six follow-ups, the X series lost any sense of cohesive identity. The Zero/ZX games are closer to the X series than any other branch of the MegaMan franchise in general. Therefore, while Classic can offer me something unique, I’m given the choice between the X, Zero and ZX series for that particular style of gameplay — and I’m always going to choose between the latter two series over the former.

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MegaMan’s been fighting animal-themed robots since before X was created!

KI: Zero and ZX have more differences from the X series than the X series does from the original. They may be more similar in setting, but the character customization, action-RPG and Metroid-like inspired gameplay completely changes the feel. And of course, you aren’t playing as a traditional Mega Man in those games, X played like Original with a couple new abilities, there was nothing from Original that you were missing. I’d almost argue that Mega Man series come in pairs, with Original/X, Zero/ZX, and Battle Network/Starforce all having the same basic gameplay philosophy, and Legends… well, it would probably need a third game before it got a sequel series.

Like I said, the X series plays like a (in my opinion) superior version of the original series, which is why the argument over them in the most prominent among the fanbase. I think for the purpose of this debate, we should limit our focus to the original and X series.

Icepick: Fair enough. However, when looking at both series in general, one must also account for overall quality. You casually mentioned this earlier, but X6 and X7 are generally considered to be among the worst games in the entire franchise, with dips in quality so severe, that no game in the franchise — not even the 1987 original — has as extreme of problems. Meanwhile, while you point out that MMX is generally considered the best game of the side-scrolling MegaMan series by many, the 11 mainline Classic games (yes, I’m counting MegaMan & Bass, if only because Capcom did in MM9) maintained a certain level of quality.

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See? 9 previous defeats show up in MegaMan 9! MegaMan & Bass was canon!

Many people hold the MegaMans 4 through 6 in low regard simply due to being “repetitive”, yet anyone who’s actually played them won’t hold that against the game’s inherent quality. MM7 is a weak entry in the series, but given the fact that it was developed in a mere 3 months, makes it amazing given the level of quality Capcom managed to achieve in a severely below-average development cycle. MegaMan 8 was experimental, finally taking into account the criticisms of the later NES era, only to have it explode in their face — delivering a game that managed to achieve mixed reactions. And that doesn’t even take the Game Boy games into consideration: which slowly evolved from portable cash-ins to some of the best games in the entire series.

KI: I don’t think you can give Mega Man 7 a pass for being made quickly. Who knows what the developers of X6 and X7 went through (X6 took less than a year and X7 was trying something completely new to the series). The original Mega Man games may not have lows as dramatic, but 1, 4, 6, 7, and M&B, I would say X5 and X8 (the mid-tier X games) easily beat those. I’m not holding repetitiveness against 4 and 6 for the record (and 5 is a great game), 4 had bland level design regardless of context and while 6 is my favorite of the ones I listed, it didn’t have great levels and was really easy. And you probably shouldn’t bring the GB games into this, remember the first two? They poke a big hole in the classic games never reaching truly bad quality.

So basically, I think the highs and mids of the X series are better than the original, and the lows being worse is pretty insignificant.

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The best Mega Man game in 20XX and beyond.

Icepick: The thing about the first two GB MegaMan games is that both were outsourced to outside developers. The fact that the team from Dr. Wily’s Revenge (the first Game Boy game) were able to come back from that and make IV and V, among the best in the entire series is telling. Meanwhile, X6 was built with the same team, using the engine from X5 — which itself was tweaked from X4 — and managed to create an abomination of a game, where the only redeeming factor would be its soundtrack. Yes, Capcom made Sonic ’06 before Sega — and worse yet, they didn’t even make it from scratch.

KI: But if you count GBIV and GBV, then you have to count other games from the same developer. X6 may have been from the same team, but they were clearly rushed and who knows what else went wrong. My only point with that is that we can’t give 7 a pass for being made quickly. But I think we’ve been avoiding the flame based elephant ancestor in the room for too long. I’m assuming you disagree with my assertion that the gameplay in the first four X games significantly surpasses the originals, correct? We should probably get into which series plays better when you compare the best games.

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He’s in the room, we can’t just ignore him.

Icepick: It’s been argued that the Classic games are more difficult than the X series in general. Frankly, I consider that a plus. Maybe, it’s the “hardcore gamer” in me talking, but frankly, I love a good challenge: which is part of the reason I prefer the aforementioned Zero and ZX series over the X series. Indeed, among the side-scrolling MegaMan sub-franchises, X is generally considered the easiest of the bunch.

KI: I’ve really never heard anyone argue that. Both series vary in difficulty from game to game to a significant degree. If we’re going into hardcore signaling though, the X series has more complex gameplay mechanics than the original and much more incentive to fully explore levels. Indeed, if you really want to make the game as hard as possible, you can do minimalist runs in the X games and it will affect you a lot more than it would in the original games. I’d also argue that the only times the X series really feels easier is when it avoids situations where exact tip of a ledge jumps screw you up, since you can accelerate and essentially grab ledges in the X series.

Icepick: Didn’t you once say that the platforming in Classic felt “cheaper” (i.e. more difficult) compared to the X series, due to the Classic having less abilities than his futuristic counterpart? Likewise, you’d also have to consider that X’s difficult is split between doing “minimalist runs” and “100% runs”, which run counter to one another: much of the difficulty in the X games are paradoxical. Going out of one’s way to find the hard to reach power-ups irreversibly powers up X, thus making the rest of the game easier.

KI: The X series has levels designed around the greater powers, and most of the powerups just bring you up to original Mega Man’s strength level (maxing out health gives you what you start with in original games, sub-tanks are basically E-tanks). The X level design removes the parts I felt were cheap, but adds new challenges (vertical sections relying on the wall climb being the most prominent example). I only mentioned the minimalist runs as a choice people have if they really want excessive difficulty, the games are not balanced around them and games like X3 and X5 can be pretty challenging even when you get everything.

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X may have more abilities, but the level design can keep up.

Moving on from difficulty for a second, I’d just like to point out the massive quality of life upgrade in the X games. Every X game has shoulder button weapon swapping, you can leave already completed levels whenever you want, picking up weapon energy automatically goes to the weapon that needs it the most if you don’t have a special weapon equipped. These all show up in most post-X1 original games, but the latter two have to be paid for or found. Doing that for QoL features that don’t make the game any easier, just more enjoyable to play, infuriates me.

Icepick: Honestly, I never really minded the lack of the ability to exit cleared levels in Classic games: in most cases, there weren’t collectables hidden in each stage, which made repeat visits kind of pointless in the first place. All the same, these feel like minor criticisms in the grand scheme of things.

Circling back to an earlier point you made, I disagree with simply claiming that X and Classic are strictly linked. In fact, I’d argue that the Zero games definitely had more of an impact on the later games in the franchise, due to their shift from a darker future than the setting of the Classic series to a post-apocalyptic wasteland. The point is, Inafune wanted to end that series at X5 and it looks like Capcom didn’t have any ideas on how to progress afterwards, thus leading the franchise to lose its identity in an effort to stay relevant.

KI: Later original games gave you incentive to revisit levels, especially 7, 8, and Bass. I’m not sure what you mean by Zero having a greater impact on later games as a counter for original and X being linked, it seems to support my point. And regardless of what happened behind the scenes or the later context of the X games’ identity, it doesn’t change the games themselves.

Icepick: And yet, I’d argue it did. X6 and X7 had no idea what they wanted to be, attempting to continue from X5’s attempt at closure. X8 may have rebounded, but by that point, the damage had been done.

KI: But we’re comparing the games that exist. After Mega Man’s hibernation finally ends, there’s a good chance that we’ll just get a new series or reboot, so there isn’t much impact on the future. I don’t think X6 and X7’s problems came from the story, the story was a mess, but neither original or X depend on story. X6 was rushed and X7 tried to do something new in gameplay that was much more the fault of the sixth generation’s antipathy towards 2D console games than any story issues. And it definitely doesn’t change the first five X games in any way.

Icepick: Maybe, but the point is that we’re only comparing games that presently exist. And considering the fact that an entire quarter of the X series is substantially worse than even the weakest Classic entry must be taken into account.

KI: But we were comparing the best examples in quality at this point. My stance is that half the X series is better than anything in the classic series, and another quarter is better than a majority of the games in the classic series. You can use statistics and fractions to make any point you want when the numbers are this low (80% of people know that), I’d say that two below average X games are better than almost two thirds of the classic series.

Icepick: Personally, I always found X2 to be utterly forgettable. Falls right out of my head the second after I’m done playing it or watching a playthrough. X3 had promise, but ultimately its version of Zero was a let-down. X4 is my favorite game in the X series for obvious reasons. Having said all of that, I think that saying that two-thirds of the Classic franchise are inferior to the outright “mediocre” X games is an overstatement. But I think it’s time to wrap things up.

KI: Well, we’re probably not going to reach a conclusion, which is expected. No shouting or the text equivalent this time though, so that’s progress. I think we should each make one last statement on why we feel our preferred series is superior, without arguing against each other’s. Want to go first for chronological reasons?

Icepick: That seems fair.

The point is, Classic’s definitely the more important of the two franchises, no matter what’s been said. Likewise, just due to the interesting turns the series has taken when ditching the 8-bit aesthetic — MM7, MM8 and MM&B were all experiments in their own right — I feel like the Classic series also has more potential when it comes to adapting to modern gaming conventions. Most fans of the X series want a strict throwback to either the SNES or PS1-era games, which the unjustified backlash against MM10 likely means that any future installment in the Classic series will attempt something new. MegaMan Classic adapted in ways that the X series only wishes it could, as shown by the poor reception to X7.

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The worst part is, this isn’t even the first MegaMan game with a shmup section.

KI: The X series is simply better designed than the Classic series. It has every gameplay strength the classic series has, added a couple huge new features (the dash and wall climb) that were implemented perfectly, and polished the game with quality of life enhancements and reasons to fully explore levels. The original style X games are considered the best because they essentially perfected the Mega Man formula, nothing since has matched them from any Mega Man series. I’m sure that in a perfect situation a team could pull a Super Mario Galaxy and make a new type of MMX game that surpassed the SNES ones, but as of right now I believe the X series has the four best Mega Man games, period, and two more that are high tier. It comes down to the games, and games come down to gameplay, and the X series has reached highs in that that no other Mega Man series, and very few video game series at all, have achieved.

As per usual, KI and I have come to yet another stalemate. I don’t honestly foresee any of these articles ending any other way, but that’s not a problem: Turn Based is more about discussion than changing opinions anyway. But what do you think? Did X improve on its predecessors or are the old ways the best? Feel free to sound off in the comments. — Professor Icepick

2017: Reclaim Your Happy Ending

The state of gaming goes up and down, the state of everything does. As much as I love the idea of the Earn Your Happy Ending trope, it’s obvious that in real life, nothing is ever stuck in a permanent state, positive or negative. But that’s not an easy thing to accept. After Nintendo, platformers, linearity, and 2D games made a comeback in the seventh generation, especially the second half, I desperately wanted to keep what we had gotten back. But even though the game releases in 2013 were incredible, it was clear that night was on the horizon. While trying to convince myself it wasn’t happening, I saw what I loved in gaming go into free fall from 2013-2016. Sure, there were still good and even great games released, but fewer and fewer ones that were what I really wanted. No matter how much I wanted things to freeze the way they were, that didn’t happen and a mix of denial and gloom descended over me (considering how the internet reacts to everything, I have no way of telling if this happened to other people or if that’s just how the gaming community would have reacted anyway).

But you know the good thing about nothing staying the same? After enough time, things also get better. As some of my previous article this years have shown, I’ve seen some very positive developments and trends this year for gaming, especially parts of it that I care about which were slumping in previous years (Japanese games, Nintendo). Even before this year started, the announced games gave me a feeling of true optimism for the first time in years (see my part of the 2017 top 10 lists). While not every game on that list delivered or is making it out this year (same as every year we’ve done those lists), those are more than made up for by both ones that personally surprised me and that were surprise announcements made after the year had started. 2017 for me has made gaming a phoenix rising out of the ashes, both in releases and announcements for 2018 and beyond.

As shown by the previous articles, there are many reasons for this. But why are they converging in the same year, and why have some frankly miraculous things happened against all odds? I always thought Switch had the potential to repeat the history of the original Wii, but I was never certain until it happened, and there are things I never would have guessed in my wildest dreams (Bethesda’s strong commitment, did they make a single game on a Nintendo system before Switch?). Nier went from being a critically-panned example of how JRPGs have cooties in 2010 to a cult classic to… a multi-million seller that already has Square-Enix hiring for its sequel and saying it has franchise potential!? Crash Bandicoot: N. Sane Trilogy became a mega-hit out of nowhere and along with Mario’s triumphant return could easily spark a resurgence in retail platformers. After pleas for SNES Remix were ignored during the dark days, we not only get SNES Classic, but it has a never before released game on it! So many franchises I missed that hadn’t been seen since 2013 or earlier either returned or had games announced in 2017.

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He’s cool again, no matter how dark his souls apparently became.

So the question is, why? Well, I can’t explain exactly what happened, but I do have a few theories to explain some of it. For the Nintendo stuff, it isn’t hard that hard to figure out. After their big push to turn Wii U around in 2014 didn’t work (E3 2014 just gives me a creepy aura of false hope these days), they went into cocoon mode. The Switch’s formal reveal in 2017 was their chance to come back, to show that they were still the strongest publisher in gaming and that they were not going to become a mobile focused developer (I’ve almost forgotten their mobile games exist in recent months), to prove that they could still make a successful console and that the original Wii wasn’t a fluke. They did it, and achieved things they had been trying for so long that nobody ever expected them to actually happen. Switch didn’t have a post-launch drought, they finally did it! With the delay of learning to make HD games behind them, Nintendo has been releasing and announcing Switch games at a rapid-fire pace. Not only that, there’s been a strong emphasis on giving fans what they had been asking for, which is miraculously working this time. Open world Zelda, sandbox Mario (with enough actual platforming that I’m not upset), Xenoblade and Splatoon sequels faster than anyone thought possible, Metroid Prime 4, mainline console Pokemon. And after I got scared they would minimize platformers because people complained about them on Wii U, they announced a new Kirby and Yoshi at the same E3. Switch is on track to become the best Nintendo system since SNES, and if it keeps it up, maybe, just maybe…

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And all the doom and gloom was simply switched off.

I don’t have as many guesses for the other positive developments, but I have some general theories. Japanese companies as a whole seemed to have trouble adapting to HD, not just Nintendo, so that could explain boosts to companies like Capcom and Square-Enix. PS1 and PS2 nostalgia kicking into high gear could be why Crash N. Sane Trilogy sold so insanely well, and bodes well for Japanese games in general, since they dominated those eras. PlayStation 4 and Xbox One took a while to get going, just like their predecessors, and we’re past that hurdle so their best days have started. I can’t think of much rationalization for long running Japanese series getting so much more western attention all of a sudden, but as long as it’s happening, I’ll gladly take it.

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I didn’t hype it, I didn’t play it, but if one person calls it weeb garbage, I’ll raise hell!

So, there’s my self-therapy session for the day (hey, not like there are tons of readers for me to focus on instead). But I’m not just trying to trick myself into being happy, 2017 really has been an incredible year for gaming in both releases and announcements. No one can ever say for sure what the future holds, but I think we have landed on the bright side of the coin, and hopefully we will stay there for many years to come. We need gaming now more than ever, and 2017 has been more than fulfilling that need.

Top Ten Sony Franchises in Need of Sequels

There are plenty of publishers out there with huge vaults of beloved IPs that sadly have no guarantee of ever again seeing the light of day.  Capcom, Konami, Sega, Square-Enix, and I think there’s a playing card company who makes games or something.  But there is one company who rarely gets mentioned when this topic comes up, but really should.  Yeah, the one in the title.  Sony actually has a vast collection of quality series, and their annoying habit of throwing series under the bus once they have three games has led to a lot of unjustly hibernating franchises from their camp.  Although not technically a Sony series, the recent revival of Crash Bandicoot has pushed this to the forefront of my mind recently. I’ve decided to rank the top ten absent Sony franchises that need sequels.  To qualify for this list, a game or series needs to have never had a new incarnation in its main series on an HD system.  Meaning HD remasters and cameos in Move mini-game compilations or Smash Bros. clones don’t count.  So, let’s jump in.  I’ll disclose that I’m not an expert on some of the lower ranked series, but everything on this list at least deserves a chance.

10.  Vib-Ribbon

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The only game on this list that I haven’t played, in large part because the original release never left Japan, I was still fascinated by this game simply from reading previews of it.  Vib-Ribbon is a very simple rhythm game, with its hook being that you can use music CDs to create levels in the game based on any song you want.  Now imagine being able to do this with digital music files or streaming sites, and you can see how much potential this concept has on an internet enabled system.  The original may have finally gotten a worldwide release, but there’s so much more a completely new game in the series could do.

9. Omega Boost

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To be honest I didn’t play this game very much (look, no one wants to do a top 7 or 8 list, I needed 10 dammit!), but the genre alone makes me want it to get another chance.  Rail shooters where you control a character instead of just a reticule are a rare breed, and Omega Boost is a well-liked entry in that genre.  I can’t give a huge amount of details on what I’d want the sequel to be like, but a flashy mech rail shooter with PS4’s power could easily be an enjoyable experience.  Give this game the second chance I haven’t yet, Sony.

8. Wild Arms

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Yes, I actually have finished a game in this series.  Of course, this series has several games, but still.  Wild Arms combines turn based combat with Zelda style items and puzzles, something I wish more turn-based RPGs would do, it does wonders for avoiding monotony.  With fantastic music and a fairly unique Wild West/steampunk setting, Wild Arms is one of the better RPGs on the PS1, and what I’ve played of the first sequel seemed even better.  Wild Arms managed to survive multiple generations in its true form, which already puts it ahead of the curve for Sony series, so I think there’s plenty of justification for giving this series another chance.  Maybe crossover with Wild Guns, no one can keep their names straight anyway.

7. MediEvil

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While this may seem like a generic 5th-gen platformer at first sight, MediEvil is actually an interesting genre hybrid.  Platforming, adventure game style puzzles, melee combat that’s pretty involved for a game of its time period and RPG elements, there aren’t many games exactly like MediEvil.  While it definitely shows its age in some places, the game is certainly playable.  But with melee action games having made colossal strides since the 5th generation, there is a huge amount of potential locked away in this game and its expensive sequel, which was never rereleased on PSN, unfortunately.  As long as it took inspiration from the right games, a new MediEvil could be a fantastic addition to PS4’s library, and fill a seldom used niche these days (horror themed game that isn’t bleak or ultra-violent).  Sony, we need MediEvil: Dan of the Third Day!

6. Alundra

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Back when almost all role-playing games on consoles were JRPGs, there was an obnoxious trend to call every single action-RPG a Zelda-style game.  These games often had clunky combat that was practically turn based and barely any puzzles, which meant I was usually disappointed when I played the “Zelda-style” game.  Alundra, though, has thoroughly earned the label of Zelda-like.  Alundra is intensely difficult in both combat and puzzles, has a sometimes crushingly depressing story, but is a huge and satisfying game.  The gameplay is very similar to the 2D Zelda games with the addition of a platforming element, and that is definitely a good thing.  I haven’t played the sequel, which is apparently vastly different and much less well regarded, so I’d say Sony should just give us a direct sequel to the first game.  Even without Working Designs around to translate it, a worthy sequel to Alundra would be a dream come true, and not the bleak, prophetic kind the game features.

5. Ape Escape

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I’m half convinced the right analog stick on the original analog/DualShock controller was added solely so Sony could claim it had more stuff on it than the Nintendo 64 controller.  I can understand why Sony didn’t want to use it much, it couldn’t be easily replaced by the d-pad on a non-analog PS1 controller like the left stick could, and no one wants to require accessories.  Still, waiting almost two years for anything to use the right analog stick (at least in a meaningful way) is pretty bizarre.  But at least the first game to require it was a good one.  Ape Escape is a fairly standard 5th-generation collection based platformer, with its hook being that you can aim your weapons and items while moving normally thanks to the right analog stick.  The collectables (escaped apes) all need to be caught by using a right analog stick controlled net, so the gimmick definitely gets used enough to justify the controller requirement.  The sequels never felt quite as tight in gameplay as the original Ape Escape, but they aren’t bad games and there’s no reason a new game couldn’t match the original.  This barrel of monkeys has been sealed too long, it needs to be opened again.

4. Skyblazer

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That’s right, even in an article entirely dedicated to Sony, the Super Nintendo still manages to crash the party.  The only pre-PlayStation game on the list, Skyblazer is a hidden gem on SNES that has needed more attention for decades.  Skyblazer can best be described as MegaMan, MegaMan X specifically, with melee combat and a magic based setting.  You jump, punch, and wall climb your way through levels, some of which you can choose the order of, and kill some great bosses to get special moves from them.  The game is begging for a modern big budget character action game/platformer hybrid, Skyblazer with the budget and scale of God of War could be absolutely amazing.  I’m not expecting this game to ever actually get a sequel, but that hasn’t stopped some other games I loved, so there’s always hope.  In the meantime, if you haven’t played this game, try to track it down, a growing cult following is the first step to a series getting a miraculous sequel.

3. Jumping Flash

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Is the robotic rabbit you play as in this a jackrabbit?  Was I missing a reference pun this whole time?  Either way, Jumping Flash was ahead of its time and holds up amazingly well considering.  Before Quake or Super Mario 64, Jumping Flash is a first person fully 3D platformer that showed up with PlayStation 1’s western launch in 1995.  Controlling a projectile and rocket equipped robotic rabbit, Jumping Flash and its very direct sequel (can’t say anything certain about the Japan only third game) are quality platformers that manage to still play well today despite how many opportunities there were to screw things up in hindsight.  With DOOM 2016 hopefully igniting a resurgence in non-realistic, action based first person shooters, now would be the perfect time for Jumping Flash to return.  The game’s signature gigantic jumps combined with dual analog shooting and current-gen draw distance make me salivate.  This is another long shot (well, most of this list is), but a new Jumping Flash would be a… no, I’m not making that song reference, it would just be painful.

2.  Parappa the Rapper/UmJammer Lammy

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See, not everything in the top five is a platformer!  In 1997, I was extremely loyal to Nintendo, the playground “my system can beat up your system!” kind of blind devotion.  Despite hating everything PlayStation related on principle, Parappa the Rapper was so unique and charming that I still wanted to play it.  I actually rented a PlayStation just to play it (the system or game was defective and I had to return it the same day, that didn’t help my system war issues).  By the time I got over my one company mindset and actually got a PS1 of my own, the sequel/spiritual successor Umjammer Lammy had been released, which I loved even more.  I didn’t love Parappa 2, but the PS1 games have some of the best music and characters of all time.  The gameplay needs some work, which is precisely why we need a new game!  Describing exactly what happens in the games feels like a disservice to anyone who hasn’t played them, but if you have played them before, I guarantee you remember them.  While I’d prefer Umjammer Lammy 2 (Parappa had his chance and I just like Lammy’s music style better), any return for these paper pop stars would be incredibly welcome.

1. Jak

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The newest game on this list, the Jak series got a decent amount of attention in its heyday, but I think it still deserved more.  For one thing, are you wondering why I said Jak instead of Jak and Daxter?  That’s because Jak 2 dramatically improved the series and never got the credit it should have.  Yes, it’s darker and clearly took some influence from Grand Theft Auto, that doesn’t change that the gameplay is dramatically improved from the original’s fairly generic collect-a-thon style.  Jak 2 and 3 have tons of variety, some of the best platforming of their generation, and great stories that are not just angsting.  Jak 3 may have resolved the story arc of the trilogy, but it also set up a new story arc that was never given any games.  Naughty Dog became obsessed with realism (which apparently makes dark tones okay while Jak is nothing but an edgelord) and auto-platforming while the Jak series got nothing except lower profile sequels of varying quality that never advanced the story in any real way.  I don’t know if we’re ever going to get Naughty Dog back to their platforming glory, but someone needs to make a real Jak 4, fans of the series have waited way more than long enough.  I’m still furious that Naughty Dog taunted fans of the series by saying they almost made a Jak 4 but canceled it to make The Last of Us (and that they planned to make it play like Uncharted), Jak is number one on this list not only because it’s my favorite series listed but because I feel that Sony genuinely owes its fanbase a new game.  People have been shown to still really love Crash, a 3D Mario platformer is getting more hype than anything in its genre has in at least a decade; it is time Sony, give us Jak 4.

So there you have it, ten Sony franchises that deserve their chance to shine and bloom in HD.  Who knows if any of these will actually get that chance, but it’s not impossible (Sly Cooper not qualifying for this list was a pretty big surprise).  I don’t know why Sony is so inclined towards throwing series away once their generation and/or trilogy is over, but they have a surprisingly rich staple of franchises that could give them the true exclusives needed to make their library stand out from Xbox and PC.  As Crash N. Sane Trilogy shows, PS1 era nostalgia has arrived and PS2 era nostalgia is around the corner, take advantage of this Sony, and give these series the sequels they deserve!