PC Ports Wishlist 2: Lost in New York

Around this time last year, I decided to do a new article in my long-running indulgence: port-begging for PC games. Of course, in the most recent article, I also added in some additional musings. I discussed what my favorite overall “victories” were since I’d originally started doing these lists, as well as focusing on both my overall top 10 most wanted games out of what I’d covered in older lists and the top games for each remaining list. I can’t really remember if I decided I wanted to make it a yearly tradition after the previous article – at the same time, I guess I just sort of assumed I’d be doing it again anyway. I had fun with last year’s lists, so why not?

This time around, I’m going to be focusing entirely on 2017 with the recap. As such, I’ll be starting with my top 5 confirmations of the years, which was a lot more difficult than I would have expected. Little has really moved since last year’s “Best of the Rest” list, but I’ve finally been able to cobble together an entire new list, so it only seems fitting to introduce it in this article. Finally, considering the fact that the top two slots in my previous top ten list – MegaMans 9 & 10 and Ys SEVEN – have since been released, I’ve decided to write up a new list. Not every game is new, but some have switched places.

Before we get on with this year’s lists, I’d like to go over the PC port announcements that were made since August, when I did the list for GOG games. Admittedly, I didn’t really expect that much in the way of announcements, especially considering the major announcements revealed from May until August. That’s not to say there was nothing these past four months. Killer Instinct was finally released on Steam back in September, technically not a new port – as it was previously a Windows Store exclusive. However, putting it on Steam and adding (albeit limited) crossplay with both the Xbox One and Windows Store versions was a nice touch. September also brought us the announcement of Zone of the Enders 2 receiving another re-release, adding a new VR option, on both PS4 and PC. While the ZOE HD Collection was on a previous list, I suppose getting a new release of the game that worked – apparently, the PS3 and Xbox 360’s version of the first game was broken – is better than nothing, so I’ll count that as a win. However, November alone definitely brought me some big-name releases – that ended up forcing me to modify the new game’s list not once, but twice. Capcom announced that Okami HD would be ported to PC, as well as PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. I wish I could say that I had considered this game for my list, but I thought of it as too much of a long shot, given the series’ Japan-centric aesthetic running counter to Capcom’s Western goals. Sphinx and the Cursed Mummy, a Zelda-like adventure game with platformer elements previously released on the GameCube, PlayStation 2 and the original Xbox, also managed to receive a remastered port on PC, Mac and Linux, courtesy of THQ Nordic. The game didn’t fall within my usual criteria for inclusion, but considering the game’s recent cult following, it’s definitely good news from my perspective. Injustice 2, on the other hand, was originally going to be on this year’s list, but it ended up receiving a PC port courtesy of the fine people at QLOC. Unfortunately, the game uses Denuvo, so I’m going to have to hold off on it until WB comes to their senses. And just like last year, the biggest surprise comes from SNK. The Last Blade 2 – based on the PS4 release this time around – was released on Steam completely unannounced. Ironically, this was another game I intended to put on this year’s list but had to swap it for something new at the last minute.

Speaking of last-minute announcements, there were two more PC gaming announcements I’d consider wins literally the day before this article was scheduled to go up. First, both Jazz Jackrabbit games were released on GOG, which means that the GOG wishlist I wrote back in August has finally borne fruit. Here’s hoping it’s the first of many. Earlier this week, XSEED announced a livestream on November 30th, with a mystery announcement. I was hoping for something Falcom-related and once again, I hit the jackpot. 2001’s Zwei!! – now retitled as Zwei: The Arges Adventure – is being translated and set to release on their usual storefronts (Steam, GOG and the Humble Store) sometime in “Winter 2018”. The work that went into bringing this to modern computers cannot be understated: the original game used DirectX5. XSEED managed to collaborate with Matt Fielding of Magnetic Games, the developer behind Exile’s End. As such, a majority of the original applications and mini-games from the original Falcom release have been maintained in this new version, with the exceptions of the calculator and the calendar. Frankly, I’m just surprised at the turnaround on this one and can’t wait for it to be released.

This year’s list of console ports also managed to achieve a win. Owlboy was originally announced for the Switch back in May, but since then, PS4 and Xbox One ports have also been announced. Last year’s list did way better. Back in March, Lethal League was announced for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Team Reptile also announced a sequel – named “Lethal League Blaze” – set to release some time next year on both PC and “console”. Undertale was also announced for release on PlayStation 4 and Vita back during this year’s E3. I was honestly surprised that it didn’t end up hitting the Nintendo Switch, but that’s life. Likewise, while NEO AQUARIUM – The King of Crustaceans – failed to receive a console port, its sequel ACE OF SEAFOOD has been ported to the PlayStation 4, as well as developer Nussoft teasing a future port to the Nintendo Switch.

Top 5 Successes of 2017

Before I get to my actual picks, I’d like to give an honorable mention to Arc System Works in general. They’ve made quite the evolution over the past couple years, going from re-releasing old PC ports of classic games on GOG to outright announcing PC versions of upcoming games – Double Dragon IV and BlazBlue Cross Tag Battle come to mind. I hope more Japanese companies take after their example and decide to offer major PC support for any games they decide to release in the West.

5. de Blob 1 & 2 – THQ Nordic (Wii, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

I honestly didn’t think this was possible, which is why this made the list over ASW. ASW’s transition into a more PC friendly company was alluded to for quite some time, but when Nordic Games rebranded themselves as “THQ Nordic”, the Darksiders III announcement wasn’t remotely surprising. Bringing back not one, but both de Blob games, on the other hand? Absolutely blew my mind. When Nordic first purchased the intellectual property and said they “had plans” for the series, I thought it was merely corporate talk. After all, the game’s rights had languished in purgatory while other major IPs were claimed by other companies at auction. Best of all, they hired Blitworks to handle the ports of both games. Eventually, the first game had ports announced for the Xbox One and PS4, and it wouldn’t surprise me if the second game follows.

4. Bayonetta/Vanquish – Sega/Platinum Games (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii U)

Speaking of amazing turnarounds, Platinum Games managed to grant us not one, but two of their cult classics from last-gen on PC this year. The fact that both games came out so close to one another made this even more amazing. It’s also been heavily rumored that both games will be released as a double-pack on the PS4 and XBO, though confirmation has yet to be made. With Platinum’s Twitter heavily implying that Bayonetta 3 may be on the horizon, it only makes sense to get the game in as many hands as possible. While a Bayonetta 2 PC port is a pipe dream due to Nintendo’s heavy involvement with the game’s development, I hope we can see even more of Platinum’s back catalog hit PC in the near future.

3. The King of Fighters XIV – SNK (PlayStation 4)

It’s funny: I was honestly expecting to put this one on this year’s list of new games: it was even the sole new addition to last year’s list. SNK managed to impress me with a timely Steam port that I assumed would usher in the game’s demise when it came to additional content, but apparently that wasn’t the case at all. With a port handled by Abstraction Games – an underrated company that handled the Double Dragon Neon PC port – KoFXIV is now capable of shining in brand-new ways, thanks to a fledgling mod community. Seriously, what they’ve been able to do with the game has been amazing.

2. MegaMan 9 & 10 (MegaMan Legacy Collection 2) – Capcom (Xbox 360, PS3, Wii)

I’m surprised this is coming in at number 2, but my top request definitely put up a good fight. I’m probably alone in the sense that I’d have been willing to pay $20 for these two games and all their DLC alone. Adding in two more MegaMan games that hadn’t shown up on PC before – MegaMans 7 and 8 – only served to sweeten the deal and make it a can’t-miss proposition for me. For a while, Capcom had been weird about what they’d port to PC – but in recent years, as long as it’s not a Nintendo-exclusive, PC gamers are likely to get love from Capcom. If anything, I wish they’d been a little less generous in some cases…

1. Falcom (in General)

Yeah, I get that it’s kind of cheating to put an entire company in the top slot, but if I’m going to be honest, they deserve it. Sure, the promises of day one parity with the console releases of Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana ended up being a pipe dream, but considering the rumors of the port’s quality (or lack thereof), not to mention the outright poor quality of the original translation, it may have turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Aksys Games’ translation of Tokyo Xanadu eX+ is set to launch the same day as its PS4 counterpart as promised, but considering how late they started their own beta testing (similar to Ys VIII), well, “watch this space”. Even though Ys VIII didn’t hit its original release date on PC, some good did come of it. Ys VIII is actually the first game that NIS America is releasing on GOG, which is amazing. Whether or not that means other NIS games will hit the platform is beyond me, but that seems pretty cool.

Despite these setbacks from one of their new partners, XSEED more than picked up the slack when it came to representing Falcom on PC. The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel, Ys SEVEN and Zwei: The Ilvard Insurrection (formerly “Zwei II” in Japan) all saw release on Windows PC this year. Also, they’ve announced that both Trails of Cold Steel II’s PC port and the first Zwei!! will release some time next year. Good stuff, but that’s not the major reason why they topped it out. In an interview with Techraptor, Toshihiro Kondo – Falcom’s president – said that he wanted “all of [their] games that come out to [release] on Steam”. Not just all future titles, not all of the old games that Falcom previously released on Windows, ALL of their games. Big words, but considering the massive collection of Falcom games we’ve amassed on PC so far, I wouldn’t be surprised if this comes to pass.

Our Feature Presentation

Before we go onto my new list, I feel like it’s worth going over the rules I’ve limited myself to in the past with these lists. It’s odd, I know, but it just ends up making the process of building a list much more fun. For starters, I’m limiting myself to games from the seventh (PS3/Xbox 360/Wii) and eighth (PS4/Xbox One/Wii U/Switch) generations of gaming. Porting anything else seems like it would require a brand-new release across the board and this is more about simple ports. Considering the sheer amount of games from these generations that have been ported to PC in recent years, it only seems fair. I also try to limit myself to one game per company, though considering the sheer number of buyouts we’ve seen, I’ve decided to expand that to one game per “brand” – but only if the buyout happened since the games were made in the first place. For example, I can ask for one game each from Sega and Atlus, but asking for two games from Square Enix is a no-no. I also consider one “series” as an entry, as long as the games themselves were all present in the generations available to me. Finally, no games that are clearly “console-exclusive”. So, even though Sony Music has started that whole “Unties” publishing label for indie games and Nintendo’s willing to do tie-ins on mobiles, I’m not going to be asking for stuff like Parappa the Rapper Remastered or Super Mario Odyssey. It’s just common sense.

Brandish: The Dark Revenant – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Portable)

I mentioned earlier that Falcom’s president wanted to put all of their games on Steam. The main goal most people have their sights set on is getting Trails of Zero and Trails of Azure on the PC platform. A segment of Falcom’s popular “Legend of Heroes” series, these two games – known colloquially as the “Crossbell games”, named after their setting – are quite literally the most commonly requested games. Unfortunately, they also lack any official English translations, so this would be a necessary part of porting the games to PC.

But do you know what Falcom game already has a full English translation and is also currently doomed to exclusivity on the inescapable purgatory that is the PlayStation Portable? That’s right, Brandish: The Dark Revenant. A remake of the first installment in a short-lived Falcom series, the games bring a new perspective to the first-person dungeon crawlers of old with its unique brand of gameplay. Brandish’s translation was a labor of love from Tom “Wyrdwad” Lipschultz, one of XSEED’s most prominent localizers. While the PSP remake saw its original Japanese release in 2009, it only managed to reach America in January 2015 as a digital-only release. It’s a shame that such an interest game was resigned to such a lackluster fate outside of its home market. Considering the fact that we’ve seen Ys SEVEN hit PC this year, I’d love to see Brandish achieve the same thing. At worst, it would at least give XSEED’s new partners a chance to hone their craft while XSEED is working on translating the Crossbell duology.

Rare Replay – Microsoft Studios/Rare (Xbox One)

This almost feels like cheating, considering I put the Banjo-Kazooie games on an earlier list. Considering they’re both included in this compendium of some of Rare’s most beloved titles (not owned by Nintendo), getting this collection would just end up killing two birds with one stone. It may seem unlikely given the fact that it hasn’t already come to PC, but that’s exactly what I thought about the Killer Instinct reboot back on my very first list. If I’m going to dream, I might as well dream big.

Tekken Tag Tournament HD – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3)

This has the exact opposite problem compared to Rare Replay. I’ve already asked for the second Tekken Tag Tournament, so why ask for the original? The answer’s simple: despite being outclassed in every possible way by its sequel, I associate some really happy memories with the classic game. The re-release in the Tekken Hybrid package reminded me of that and so did replaying the game for the Tekken retrospective I did this year. There was just something amazing about the original game, some intangible factor that prevents me from letting go of it. That’s not to say I wouldn’t rather have the second game if forced to choose, but if Bandai Namco considers re-releasing both, I’m not going to complain.

Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir – Atlus/Vanillaware (PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita)

Every list has got to have at least one pipe dream on it. A game that outright transcends any other baffling choice. I’ve got quite a few on this year’s list, but I’d say last year’s re-release of Odin Sphere is the big one this time around. Since I started doing these wishlists nearly four years ago, we’ve seen Atlus’s stubborn refusal to acknowledge the PC market go from the rule to the exception when it comes to Japanese publishers. Having said that, Atlus USA does do a good job of publishing various indie titles on the platform and Sega has apparently been applying pressure on Atlus’s PC-phobia, with various people speculating that we could see a Persona game hit the platform someday. Frankly, I’d rather just have Vanillaware games, considering the developer’s stated openness to releasing their games on PC. Leifthrasir is technically their most recent release, therefore it feels the most likely.

Azure Striker Gunvolt 2 – Inti Creates (Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo Switch)

This was honestly a last resort when it came to PC port requests. Don’t get me wrong: I loved Gunvolt 2 even more than the original game. It’s more that it seems like Inti Creates may have abandoned the platform when it comes to the games they publish themselves. Not to mention the fact that I think I’d rather have a release of the Striker Pack on PC, as opposed to just the second game. The original Gunvolt’s release on Steam was sort of wonky and it looks like the version included in the Striker Pack on Switch is a much more coherent experience, likely due to what Inti Creates was able to learn from their first attempt at transferring the title – which required two screens – onto a single-screen platform and improve their efforts. At the same time, asking for the Striker Pack feels a bit skeevy, considering we already have the first game on Steam. That’s what makes the whole thing so complicated. I mean, ideally, they’d just release the Striker Pack on Steam and give anyone who bought the first game a discount. That’s my opinion anyway.

Yakuza series – Sega (PlayStation 3, Wii U, PlayStation 4)

From what the internet has been telling me, the Yakuza games – better known as Ryū ga Gotoku in Japan – are the best games I’m not playing. I totally want to try them out, but I’m afraid I’m just no longer into playing big experiences like that on console these days and frankly, I wouldn’t even know where to start at this point. Much like Atlus’s Persona series, there is a massive wellspring of support for these games to make their debut on PC. Some people want the games to start with the latest game in the series – either Yazuka 6 (the next game set to hit the West) or Yakuza Kiwami 2, the remake of the second game set to hit Japan in a matter of days. Other people seem to be fine with the series starting up with Yakuza Zero – which has essentially been deemed the perfect place to jump into the series for newcomers. Meanwhile, I’m a little more extreme: I want everything. Start by localizing the Japanese-exclusive HD ports of the first two games on the Wii U, then just continue from there. Ideally we’d be seeing most of the cut content restored to its original glory in the process. It sounds ridiculous, I know, but honestly, a legitimate entry in the Yakuza series hitting PC is a pipe dream anyway.

(P.S. Nice try, Sega. But no one’s counting that smartphone game you’re working on as an actual PC release for the Yakuza series. In fact, most of us were just insulted.)

The Witch and the Hundred Knight – Nippon Ichi Software (PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3)

NIS America still appears to be pretty heavily involved in the PC scene, but personally, I wish they’d port more of Nippon Ichi’s games to the platform. The Witch and the Hundred Knight is a game that friends of mine have been raving about, and considering the fact that it’s an action-RPG, I’m onboard with it too. The game’s sequel released in Japan early this year and is set to release in the West sometime next year, so allowing the PC crowd to get their hands on the first one would be a nice treat. Though frankly, I’m still worried about which Disgaea game we’ll get next – I’m kind of worried that they might just skip right to 5, considering the game’s ESRB listing. I’d rather play through the rest of the old games first, personally.

Final Fight: Double Impact – Capcom/Iron Galaxy Studios (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)

Truth be told, my backlog of PC port requests from Capcom is running pretty low. That’s not exactly a bad thing: it means that most of the recent games I actually want from the company have already been released on PC. Final Fight: Double Impact just seems like a safe choice to make. It contains arcade-perfect releases of both the original Final Fight and Magic Sword, two beat-‘em-ups with significantly different gameplay styles. Factor in the drop-in multiplayer using GGPO and it’s still worth playing to this day, in spite of the DRM present on the PS3 release. Considering that the 360 and PS3 have essentially been retired, it’d be nice to see this collection – or better yet, a bigger collection with more games included – ported to modern platforms, PC included.

Windjammers – Data East/DotEmu (PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita)

Windjammers is among the most underrated multiplayer games of all-time, so when it managed to get a re-release on both PS4 and Vita this past year, it was exciting. The only thing that could’ve made it better would’ve been if PC had been involved in the fun as well. Fortunately, DotEmu’s released a whole lot of their ports on the platform down the line, so I’m pretty confident that we’ll be tossing frisbees in no time. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that out of all of the games on this year’s new list of games, this is the one I’m most confident will hit PC by this time next year.

Let It Die – GungHo Entertainment/Grasshopper Manufacture (PlayStation 4)

Let It Die and I have had a pretty turbulent history. I was originally excited for the game when it was first announced as “Lily Bergamo”, I’m a huge fan of Grasshopper Manufacture after all. Then the game was transformed into Let It Die and touted as a “free-to-play” experience, at which point, I totally lost interest. Flash-forward to earlier this year when I actually hear some actual information about the final product and I’m intrigued all over again. Let It Die may be a free-to-play game littered with microtransactions, but it’s built far more like a classic arcade game than the mobile cash grabs we associate the concept with. Let It Die is effectively a dungeon-crawler with rouge-like elements, you’re limited to a single life – but if you pay in a quarter, you can continue with your current character. Otherwise, you’ve got to start from scratch. Aside from that, the game maintains the typical Grasshopper off-the-wall insanity: for example, the player is guided by a skateboarding grim reaper named Uncle Death. The permadeath mechanic also lends itself to asynchronous multiplayer: dead characters appear in other players’ games. It’s an honestly interesting concept and one that I’d like to see on PC, though given the fleeting nature of games like this, I wouldn’t hold my breath.

Top 10 Most Wanted

Last year, ranking my top 10 list of the games I want ported to PC the most was more haphazard than anything. I’ve never really been all that good at ordering my favorite things in general and in many cases, there wasn’t really much of a difference in how much I wanted many of the games on the list. So to compensate for it, I’ve decided to factor in just how likely I think it would be to see a re-release on PC, which should go a long way toward explaining why various games have switched places from the previous year. Keep in mind that the top two games from the previous list were in fact the top two games I wanted, this new method just helps to keep things feeling a little more structured: I’ve never really been all that good when it comes to rankings and usually by the time I’m done with one list, I instantly regret the final product. Also, don’t view a game being snubbed from the list as a sign that I don’t want the game: it’s safe to assume that I want everything that’s ever been on any of my list, even games like the now-defunct Tekken Revolution. These are just the ten that would make me the happiest to see on PC at this point in time.

10. Catherine – Atlus (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Like I said earlier, Atlus’s Japanese branch appears to be actively against doing PC versions of their games. That setback won’t stop me from holding out hope. But this was clearly the longest of the longshots last year and yet, here we are. Considering the fact that we were teased with a potential new entry in the series back in August, it only seems reasonable to bring the original back for those who missed it or simply want to play it on more modern platforms.  And what platform is more modern than the PC? Come on, Atlus: you’ve literally got nothing to lose – do a modern “HD” port on PS4 and PC, replacing the Xbox brand. It’s a Golden opportunity you can’t afford to miss.

9. Lollipop Chainsaw – WB Games/Grasshopper Manufacture (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Lollipop Chainsaw dropped a fair amount this year and there are a couple of reasons for this. For starters, WB Games’ PC gaming record has been littered with ups and downs in recent years – ranging from the legendarily bad port of Arkham Asylum to hiring QLOC to fix the botched Mortal Kombat X port to adding Denuvo to a QLOC-developed port of Injustice 2 – Warner Bros. just seems to keep me guessing in strange new ways. More importantly, I don’t think WB Games has any interest in reviving the game, particularly given the game’s controversial content and our current social climate. I mean, the game hasn’t even been added to the Xbox One’s library through backward compatibility. Even Catherine managed that. I think our only hope to see this game again is if Grasshopper Manufacture’s new parent company GungHo Entertainment manages to buy the rights from WB Games and that just seems like a pipe dream.

8. Dragon’s Crown Pro – Atlus/Vanillaware (PlayStation 4)

Of course, even though Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir is the most recent Vanillaware release, we do know what their next release is. Last year, I simply had the original Dragon’s Crown on this list, but considering the fact that there’s a re-release coming up with a higher resolution and on a platform with a more PC-friendly architecture, it just seemed obvious to ask for the new version instead. Still seems odd that they’re doing a re-release so soon: they even released a patch for the PS3 and Vita versions allowing for crossplay with Pro. Truth be told, there’s a part of me that wonders if Dragon’s Crown Pro is just being made as a Trojan Horse to allow Vanillaware to toss their hat into the PC gaming market. I’m more than onboard with the concept.

7. NeoGeo Battle Coliseum – SNK (Xbox 360)

This one seemed like an obvious choice. I didn’t have any 2D fighting games on the list last year and frankly, that’s unacceptable. Considering the fact that many of SNK’s old games that have been re-released on this gen have made their way onto PC – particularly the ones handled internally – it only seems fair to ask for something from the previous gen. Hamster’s been killing it with their Arcade Classics releases of classic NeoGeo games, but SNK’s work after their long-running self-made arcade hardware is a rarity these days. Considering the rumors abound that SNK may be working on a second Battle Coliseum game, re-releasing the first on modern platforms seems like a no-brainer. I see it going down like this: initial release on the PS4, followed by a Steam release at some point down the line.  Not an ideal scenario, but perhaps the most realistic.

6. Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo HD Remix – Capcom (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Another significant drop from last year’s list, I just think that seeing either a re-release of the old PC version or a new port of the HD release just isn’t in the cards anymore. Puzzle Fighter’s recently been relaunched as a new free-to-play mobile game with a hideous art style and I’m sure that Capcom would try to avoid any undue competition by releasing the original game. And believe me, this new mobile game is going to need all the help it can get. Maybe we’ll see a re-release if it fails to meet Capcom’s likely insane expectations, but it’ll take some time to gauge the game’s success.

5. Tekken Tag Tournament 2 – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U)

While we did finally end up getting a Tekken game on PC this year, I honestly still would prefer Tag 2 to make its way there as well. Unfortunately, as TTT2 was among the worst selling games in the entire series, it seems like the chances of this game getting re-released on more platforms are pretty slim. At least it’s on the Xbox One via backwards compatibility, but I’m still salivating over the thought of what the modding scene could do with this game.

4. Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles – Konami (PlayStation Portable)

It feels a little weird moving this up, considering Konami’s recent history. This year offered us an omen: Super Bomberman R, one of the Nintendo Switch’s launch titles, was a true return to form for the company. This has led to a great deal of speculation about a return to Konami’s roots, with potentially even more new games in the vein of classic titles. An easy way to test the waters for this kind of revival would be re-releasing actual old titles and I still can’t think of a better choice than the Dracula X Chronicles. Containing a full graphical remake of one of the most beloved Castlevania games, an official English translation of the original PC Engine version, as well as a retranslated version of Symphony of the Night, DXC deserves a better fate than being trapped on the likely-defunct PlayStation Portable line for all eternity. The remake could use a little polish to handle higher resolutions, but aside from that, it would be a perfect package.

3. Splatterhouse (2010) – Bandai Namco (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)

2010’s Splatterhouse reboot did not get nearly as much love as it deserves. The game was a high-adrenaline romp through a horror-inspired environment that both paid homage to and build on the original games. Considering we’ve seen various companies choose seemingly random games for modern revivals, Splatterhouse feels like it could have a chance. The game’s only major flaw, its terrible load times, could easily be fixed on modern platforms and frankly, even if you’re not a fan of the reboot itself, it also comes with perfect ports of all three of the mainline games from the 90s. If that’s not worth a re-release, then I don’t know what is.

2.  MegaMan: Powered Up/MegaMan: Maverick Hunter X – Capcom (PSP)

I wouldn’t have considered putting this so high on the list, but considering the recent re-releases of Okami HD and Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney on contemporary platforms, it looks like Capcom may be raiding their backlog for some big cheap releases. For me, the most obvious choice would have to be a twin-pack of their MegaMan releases on the PSP. Both games were critical darlings crippled by the platform they were released on and their timing. Re-releasing both games with improved resolutions in a two-pack for $20 would sell like gangbusters. Considering the fact that Powered Up isn’t even available as a downloadable title outside of Japan, this would also go a long way to preserve what is objectively the best iteration of the original MegaMan in existence and the fascinating curiosity that is MHX’s Vile Mode. Better yet, don’t just release this on PC – release it on everything: PS4, Switch, and even the Xbox One. Come on, Capcom. It’s the Blue Bomber’s 30th anniversary, let’s celebrate!

1. Ys: Memories of Celceta – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Vita)

It might surprise you to see that while much of last year’s list has remained pretty much the same, Memories of Celceta managed to jump a whopping six places to take the number one slot. For starters, the main reason that it was low was to keep things fair – after all, Ys SEVEN was my second most highly-requested PC port of all, and with that out of the way, MoC could flourish. But beating out a MegaMan game for the top slot? That comes down to pure psychology. With SEVEN coming out this year and Lacrimosa of Dana eventually hitting PC at some point, Celceta is literally the only remaining modern Ys game without a PC version in the West. You ever notice how the most painful losses are the ones where you come so close to victory? The most noticeable gap in any collection is a single entry? Same basic concept: PC is so close to being a perfect platform for the Ys series, it just needs that one last game.

Another element that puts this so high on my list is the sheer possibility of it. Everything else on here feels like a pipe dream to at least some extent – a majority of these games are from last-gen and companies don’t seem quite as keen on re-releasing old content as I’d hoped. With that in mind, I’d easily consider Ys SEVEN to be the less likely of the two missing Ys games when it comes to PC ports and that managed to become a reality. Considering the poor timing of SEVEN’s release date on PC compared to the American release date for VIII on consoles, I’d almost be willing to bet that we might see confirmation of a Memories of Celceta PC port from XSEED around the time NIS America announces the final release date for the PC version of Lacrimosa of Dana.

To put it simply, Memories of Celceta is the only game on this list right now that I don’t see merely as a hope. It’s an inevitability. Falcom has already begun focusing more on the PC market in the West, the fact that day-one PC releases were a big part of what led them to choose Aksys and NIS America only proves it. XSEED has been playing a game of catch-up, effectively proving that they are capable of following through with this new strategy given the fact that they released 3 Falcom games on PC this year alone, with one more set likely to release sometime next year. And while the Trails games are Falcom’s top brand in Japan, Ys is still the more popular brand in the West. The Western demand for Crossbell may be deafening, but there’s a much more viable option left to XSEED. The cry for Memories of Celceta on PC is literally deafening: it was riled up by a Twitter gaffe two years back, Joyoland’s attempt to put their ports on Steam Greenlight with pages entirely written in Chinese were met with salivation in English and SEVEN’s recent PC release proves that XSEED finally has the resources to make this request a reality. It’s time to complete my collection.

Thus concludes this year’s set of lists. It almost makes me wonder what I’d be able to write next year. The sheer amount of new games receiving releases on PC and old games being ported long after their initial release is what caused me to abandon this entire concept in the first place, so in a strange sense, it almost feels good to not have to write these nearly as often as I did in previous years. At the same time, I do miss writing up these lists: that’s why I’ve continued with the yearly April Fools’ list of console ports and managed to put together a wishlist for GOG this past summer. On the plus side, I’ve almost got a full list ready for next April, but as for December 2018, I’m kind of at a loss of what to do to extend an article like this to its usual length. Oh well, at least I’ve got a whole year to figure that out.

 

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Shedding Light on My Dark Souls

In 2009, Demon’s Souls was released.  Initially a cult favorite, its popularity grew and put From Software on the map worldwide.  The game spawned four titles that the copyright lawyers assure you are only spiritual successors, as well as a host of imitators.  The series really hit the mainstream with Demon’s Souls’ immediate not-sequel Dark Souls, and its incredibly challenging, unforgiving and epic dark fantasy quests became iconic.  Until reviewers passed the title on to Crash Bandicoot and Cuphead to hide how terrible they were at old-school platformers and action shooters, Dark Souls became the go-to example of a hard game.  It was the Dark Souls of lazy and often nonsensical comparisons.

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No, seriously, they compared this to Dark Souls, look it up.

My feelings on the series (Demon’s Souls, Dark Souls 1-3, and Bloodborne, the fan name for the collective being Soulsborne) are… complicated.  I wanted to like the series, lengthy and challenging action-adventure games in a dark fantasy setting sounded great to me.  But with all those stats and equipment to manage, despite being Japanese I would classify the Soulsborne games (or at least the earlier ones) as really hard WRPGs.  I have no problem with hard games if they’re in a genre I like, but WRPGs are definitely not one of those genres.  And the controls and hit detection seemed too clunky for such a demanding game.  But were my complaints legitimate, or just me refusing to adapt to a series outside of my comfort zone?  I was never completely sure, which was a major reason I haven’t said much about these games before.

Well, the series offered to meet me halfway, and I accepted.  Bloodborne and Dark Souls 3 addressed some of my major issues (the characters move faster and checkpoints are a little more sane), and I managed to beat both of them.  For reference, I made it around a quarter of the way through Demon’s Souls before giving up, and only played a little bit of a friend’s copy of Dark Souls to confirm it hadn’t fixed my issues.  I didn’t bother trying Dark Souls 2.  I’m not claiming to be an expert on the series, but am I a fan?  I’m still not completely sure, which is why I’m writing this article.  While playing Dark Souls 3 (I beat that very recently, while Bloodborne was a couple years ago), I switched several times between finding it an enjoyable and satisfying game, and being furious at it and wanting to quit.  But either way, it was addictive and dominated my gaming time.  When I finished it, I felt a wave of emotion that was part accomplishment and part relief.  I’ve been trying to understand and articulate my thoughts on the series, and I think I’ve finally gotten it.

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I hate this asshole more than any other boss in recent memory.

The Soulsborne games have a concept I love, they are in a genre that has great potential to draw me in.  I really want to like them, but I feel like there are some serious flaws that could be easily fixed.  However, many of these flaws haven’t been addressed, and I think a major reason for that is that reviewers and the gaming community are refusing to acknowledge these flaws.  As the series progresses, some of my problems are addressed, but others are completely ignored.  I trudge through these issues to get at the part of the game that I enjoy, while wishing that the genre could fix these flaws and feeling resentful towards the rabid fanbase of the series for refusing to acknowledge these issues as flaws.  As these thoughts went through my head, I realized there was a very close parallel to my feelings about Soulsborne in a different series.  Yes, for all the games that supposedly are the Dark Souls (apparently the first difficult game ever made) of their genre, Soulsborne itself fits into that mold.

Dark Souls is the Grand Theft Auto of the 2010s. 

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Forget King’s Field, this is the Dark Souls prototype.

Yes, Soulsborne lines up almost perfectly with the beloved sandbox codifier that contains my personal punching bag (Grand Theft Auto 3 will always be terrible no matter how much the series improves).  And I think I’ve pinpointed what I find so frustrating about both the Soulsborne games and the pre-Grand Theft Auto V GTA games…

Recently, I’ve grown fond of the term “quality of life” as it relates to game design.  I define quality of life as features in a game that reduce frustration and inconvenience without making the game easier.  Being able to quickly equip items or abilities in real time instead of constantly pausing, information about items and stats prominently displayed and easy to access, the ability to retry challenges on the spot instead of being forced to commit suicide if you think you’ve messed up too much to finish an area.  And I’m sorry to say that in many ways the Soulsborne games seem to pride themselves on being anti-quality of life.  Want to fight a boss again?  In the later games you can almost always run to that boss easily without enemies getting any hits on you, but every time the boss kills you have to make that run again.  To make matters worse, you have to deal with a load time that’s longer than it would be if you could just respawn in the boss room.  You aren’t allowed to have a map, which isn’t even justified by realism, explorers made their own maps.  You… you can’t even pause.  There’s an offline mode, for God’s sake, let us pause!

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Seriously, how the hell is not being able to pause an offline game acceptable?

This is in addition to things that do make the game harder, but in ways I feel aren’t legitimate.  Having one shot at collecting the souls/blood you had at your last death is an interesting feature, but something needs to be done about how it punishes you for making progress between checkpoints.  Die early?  You can easily get your experience points back.  Make lots of progress then die?  You are very likely screwed.  And don’t get me started on using an item, dying, the enemies you killed along the way respawning, and that item STILL BEING GONE.  The line between challenging and cheap is always… one of those… to draw, but I think there are some elements of the Soulsborne games that are legitimately cheap.

So, what is my overall point, what am I hoping to get out of this?  Well, it ties back to the Grand Theft Auto parallels.  In 2008, Saints Row 2 came out, and in 2012 I finally tried the “GTA rip-off.”  It was night and day, SR2 kept everything I liked about GTA and fixed all of my problems.  That’s what I want: the Saints Row 2 of Dark Souls.  A game that improves the genre so much that previous games in it feel unplayable in comparison.  Something that even makes the developer of the earlier, more famous series take notice and improve their games.

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We may have the Dark Souls of everything, but what we need is the Saints Row 2 of Dark Souls.

So, back to the question of how I feel about Soulsborne, it remains complicated.  The later games are for the most part enjoyable for me, but I’m actively hoping for a game that will make me unable to ever go back to them.  So I guess I’m a fan at the moment, but a fair amount of that comes from Stockholm Syndrome.  Soulsborne draws me in with things I love, and holds them hostage with needlessly annoying and frustrating “traditions” that its fanbase refuses to acknowledge as flaws.  I seriously saw people arguing that the pre-patch Bloodborne load times were a good thing because they punished the player for dying.  Few internet gaming opinions have aggravated me that much.  For the time being, the Soulsborne games are good, but they could be so much better.  Let’s just hope that someday a Saint-like franchise fills these Dark Souls with light.

Rising Fun: Dawn for Japanese Games

The second half of the 80s and entirety of the 90s were a golden age for Japanese games.  From the moment Super Mario Bros. revived the American console industry, Japanese games absolutely dominated consoles.  While there were some exceptions, the vast, vast majority of good console games came from Japan during the third, fourth, and fifth generations.  Even the most prominent exceptions were made by western developers that were working with Japanese companies: Naughty Dog, Insomniac, and of course Rare.  Things started to change in the sixth generation, games like Halo, Grand Theft Auto 3, and the rising Tony Hawk series were critical and commercial successes, something very few western console games had achieved before that point.  Japanese games were probably still bigger or at least equal at that point, but it definitely wasn’t the absurd level of domination they previously held.  This was, of course, a good thing: there’s no reason for one country to dominate the way Japan did at one point.

 

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And thus Japan conquered console gaming overnight.

 

In the seventh and eighth generations, however, things started to become unbalanced in the other direction.  Several Japanese companies went into slumps at the same time, while western mega-publishers increased their dominance.  This led to an attitude in the 2010s that Japan was becoming irrelevant to the gaming industry.  I was not happy about this, but it would be fair to ask why when I was fine with how things were in the 90s.  Well, I have a few reasons.  For one, there was a fair amount of nationalistic gloating, treating this as “revenge” and calling the Japanese gaming industry a failure for not being able to match the combined output of two continents.  There’s also the fact that the fading Japanese companies had made so many great games in the past, and losing something is a lot more painful than never having it to begin with.  And while this may be too subjective and in the moment to use as a reason, I would much rather have 90s Capcom, Konami, and Squaresoft as the dominant publishers instead of companies like EA, Ubisoft, and Activision.  I’m not saying we need to go back to Japanese dominance, but all game producing regions making great games is the optimal situation and always will be.  I just want Japanese games to make a comeback for their own sake.

 

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Market Combat Evolving.

 

That seems to be what’s happening.  After many years of turmoil, Japanese-developed games are making a substantial comeback in 2017, in both the released and upcoming categories.  This year we’ve already seen Resident Evil 7, Yakuza 0, Gravity Rush 2, Nier Automata, Nioh, and Persona 5; quality releases that have mostly seen a good deal of commercial success and attention from the gaming community.  Looking ahead, we have Sonic Forces, Tekken 7, Tokyo Xanadu, Ys VIII, and Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite as some promising 2017 releases.   Compared to the past few years, this is a huge upturn in quality Japanese games.

Going beyond a simple games list, many of these games represent once mighty Japanese publishers and developers showing signs of recovering from their slumps.  Capcom finally made a Resident Evil that was well received, Team Ninja made their first well liked game in who knows how long with Nioh, Sega has two promising Sonic games coming out this year (although one is technically by western developers) – there are decades that would kill for that amount – and Square Enix has brought an underrated series into mainstream success while giving Platinum a chance to shine simultaneously with Nier: Automata.  Series that never had a huge western presence, such as Persona, Ys, Yakuza, and the aforementioned Nier/Drakengard also seem to be getting more attention than they previously did, which is great for the Japanese gaming industry.  The light of dawn may be starting to break through the cynicism that has clouded the concept of Japanese games in recent years.

 

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Looks like JRPGs don’t have cooties anymore.

 

There are two major Japanese publishers I consciously avoided mentioning up until this point.  One of them is a hugely conspicuous absence considering who is writing this article.  Why have I waited until now to say anything about Nintendo?  Because I like building things up before playing my strongest card.  Nintendo is in their own league among developers, and I’m don’t mean because they’re my favorite, their situation as the primary developer for their systems puts them in a very different position than the third parties I’ve covered.  Nintendo has always been prominent as a software publisher, even during the Wii U days their games sold millions with absurdly high attach rates that annihilated the best selling games of other systems with a low userbase.  However, Nintendo’s health is often measured by their console’s sales, and that has certainly not been going well in recent years.

Then it was like someone simply flipped a Switch.  Seeing what happened when they tried to copy their competitors with the Wii U, the Nintendo Switch is showing all indications that it recaptured the lightning bottled by the original Wii.  With the system selling out every shipment it makes almost instantly (and this is in March and April) and a non-pack in game managing to attain an unprecedented over 100% attach rate in at least one region, we have plenty of reason to believe that Nintendo’s console division is back on track.  And they’re definitely contributing to Japanese games making a resurgence in 2017.  This year we have or are scheduled to get The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, ARMS, Splatoon 2, Xenoblade 2, Fire Emblem Warriors and the game that means so much to me it was my most anticipated game of 2017 based on a six second “tech demo”, Super Mario Odyssey.  Breath of the Wild, the only one released so far, is one of the highest rated games of all time and would single handedly make this a better year for Japanese game reception than some of the last few.  Nintendo is back, and they’re ready to lead the charge in the Japanese game resurgence.

 

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Mario is back, and he’s not alone.

 

And what was that other company I avoided mentioning?  Well, it’s one that’s pretty easy to ignore, if the bitterness doesn’t get you, at least.  Konami, tormentor of employees, bane of Kojima, the Japanese EA.  No other Japanese publisher fell as far as Konami, but even with them, there is a glimmer of light this year.  Super Bomberman R is one of the more prominent Switch launch games that isn’t Zelda, and has been selling amazingly well for such a niche game.  Konami has publicly announced plans to revive more dormant franchises, as opposed to fleeing video games to make pachinko machines.  The slightest bit of hope for Konami is a miraculous step forward at this point.

 

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This game existing at all is a frigging miracle.

 

So, with the games released and announced in 2017, I think it’s safe to say that the sun is rising again for Japanese games.  Again, I’m not asking for western console games to go back to their dark age.  While I generally prefer Japanese design philosophy, western developers (many of whom grew up with games from Japan’s golden age) are perfectly capable of using it, and both sides can learn things from the other’s games.  Gamers benefit from as many developers as possible making great games, no matter what region they’re from.  With E3 fast approaching, we will hopefully soon have even more games to look forward to from Japanese developers and proof that the revival trend will continue in 2018 and beyond.

Retronaissance’s Most Anticipated Games of 2017

SNES Master KI

Well, 2016 is almost over, and while there were some great games released, I mainly just want this year to end and to focus on the future (or gaming’s future, anyway).  Thankfully, 2017 in gaming fills me with a sense of true optimism (as opposed to forced hope) that I haven’t had in a long time, lots of series that haven’t had an entry (or a satisfying entry) in years are returning and while Nintendo has a lot less representation on this list than my ones from previous years, things should Switch on that front very early in the year.  So, let’s hurry up and get our focus to the new year.  I’ve decided to handle games from previous lists that got hit by delays with a rule that games can only appear on my lists twice, so Zelda won’t be showing up this time.  Let’s get this started!

Continue reading

The Year Without a PC Port Wishlist

Christmas has pretty much always been my favorite holiday, especially when I was a child. I was a greedy little boy while I was growing up: one of my favorite holiday traditions was always writing up my list to Santa on my computer. Sure, some years I’d get overzealous and start thinking about it as early as August, but I’d always have a lot of fun just writing the list itself. I’d always try to sort things in the order I wanted them, but that was actually part of the fun for me: one week I’d really want some action figures, the next some new video game caught my eye. The downside to starting a list that early is that as time goes on, new items catch your eye. Even the greed of a child has its limits, so I would often have to pare down my list, trimming the items I could “do without”. (Gotta love child logic, am I right?) In a sense, I think those PC ports lists I wrote for a long time were the evolution of that favored Yule tradition, but eventually I got tired of doing them. Too much wishing, not enough getting. I’ve taken a hiatus on them and now, it’s been over a year. Instead of making an entirely new one, why not look over my previous works and analyze them a little? This year, I’ll be recounting my 5 favorite success stories, my top 10 most wanted and the game on each list I’d consider the most important (excluding those on the aforementioned lists) plus a brand-new one for good measure!

Before we get started (fittingly enough, with my favorite success stories), I’d like to start with some recent successes as well. Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 was released on PS4 earlier this month and it will also be hitting both the Xbox One and Steam in March. Meanwhile, Garou: Mark of the Wolves was also recently released on PlayStation consoles via CodeMystics, but surprise, surprise: an entirely different port hit Steam soon after, from the good folks at DotEmu. In fact, it was such a surprise, I actually had to change a list entry because of it. The DotEmu port is less fancy than the CodeMystics port, but apparently, not only does the Steam version have a more solid netcode, but it’s also getting immediate bugfixes to iron out some of its bizarre glitches. Funny how that works. I expected that to be the last bit of news I got on the PC end of things, but I was wrong: The Legend of Dark Witch 2, another game I’d been salivating over the prospect of seeing a PC port is announced to be hitting Steam sometime during “Q4 2016”. One last big surprise for me.

You’ll also remember that this past April, I did an “April Fools’ Day” article, revolving around 10 PC games I’d like to see receive console ports. Well, like many of my jokes, this one ended up biting me in the ass. During the PlayStation Experience, Ys Origin (the only PC-exclusive Ys game) was announced to be hitting both PlayStation 4 and, amazingly enough, the Vita on February 21, 2017 with the port being handled by the good people over at DotEmu who are utilizing XSEED’s English translation and coming up with original French, Italian, German and Spanish translations as well. (As an aside, DotEmu’s also bringing a favorite of mine – the NeoGeo classic Windjammers – to the same platforms. Let’s keep our fingers crossed for a PC port down the line!) You’d think that would be enough, but the world wasn’t done having fun at my expense: soon after, it was revealed that the indie platformer Kero Blaster would also be coming to the PS4, thanks to its publisher Playism. They’ll also be bringing Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight to PS4, though release windows for both titles have not been announced. Continue reading

Retronaissance’s Most Anticipated Games of 2016

SNES Master KI

It’s time for another top ten most anticipated games list. 2015 didn’t turn out to be as good for games as I was hoping, and the primary reason for that was delays, so I’m doing things a little differently for this list. The jumped guns from my 2015 list are too numerous and prominent to just exclude, so I’m just going to ignore that list, even if it means some repetition. There’s still new stuff to say about the games, after all. 2016 looks even better than the pre-delays 2015, so let’s get to the list!

10: Pokken Tournament

A Pokemon fighter is long overdue, and one will arrive on Wii U in 2016. I’ve honestly lost track of what year it was when we first saw that teaser clip of an unidentified Pokemon game, but the long journey to a home system is almost over. Despite how obvious it was, I still breathed a sigh of relief when it was confirmed that Pokken Tournament would indeed get a home release. Wii U can definitely use a new fighter, and I’m looking forward to see what kind of bonuses we’ll get in the home version.

9: Ratchet and Clank (PS4)

I love platformers, I’ve made that very clear in my writing. While it feels like most retail platformers we could get in 2016 are in that vapor realm where they aren’t confirmed enough to make it to this list (Sonic’s anniversary game, Mario’s new concept 2D platformer and next 3D platformer), we do have Ratchet and Clank. A reboot of the series, the footage shown so far gives me hope that it will feel like a platformer, and it’s about time PS4 got one of its own (no I don’t remember Knack, and neither do you). Let’s hope it does well enough to give Jak and Sly another chance as well.

8: Ace Attorney 6

Being so story driven, I do no research about Ace Attorney games before playing them, so it’s hard to talk about this one. Regardless, I am very glad that it was confirmed for western release as soon as the game was announced, and I’m hoping the new setting will combat some of the predictability factor that hurt AA5 for me. Not much else to say, at least from me, but very much looking forward to this game.

7: Doom (2016)

I had a revelation during 2015: I love old style first person shooters. I played several Doom games for the first time, and was very happy to see that a new one with a simultaneous console release was already announced. Doom 2016 looks to have more of the fast paced action of the 90s games with some console style conveniences, which sounds great to me. A few years ago this series making my list never would have crossed my mind, but my horizons have been expanded and I can only hope Doom 2016 sparks a revival of FPSes with more enemy variety than “guys with different types of guns!”

6: Shantae: Half-Genie Hero

This made Honorable Mention last year, with me saying that if Shantae and the Pirate’s Curse was as big of an improvement as I had heard, it would have placed higher. Well, Pirate’s Curse was better than I had ever imagined, becoming my favorite WayForward game of all time by a clear margin. So naturally, Half-Genie Hero is much more anticipated by me this year. A sequel that fixes Pirate’s Curse’s only flaw (graphics that were incredibly pixelated in HD) is just what I want, so let’s hope that Half-Genie Hero finally makes it out in 2016.

5: Street Fighter V

It will have been seven years since Street Fighter IV came to consoles when SFV comes out, and somehow this is FASTER than we’re used to for the series. Regardless, Street Fighter V seems to be doing everything right, from the free DLC characters to cross-play that will make things a lot easier for S-Rank. I haven’t been following this game as closely as some people I know, but Ryu will be waiting for me and I’m sure I’ll be able to jump right in and start fighting for the honor of D-Pads and consoles. I just hope I have some idea what the hell is happening in the endings this time.

4: Nier: Automata

This was probably the biggest pleasant shock for me in 2015’s gaming scene. I never expected Nier to get a sequel, and if I somehow did I sure as hell wouldn’t have expected Platinum to help make it. I loved Nier, I love Platinum, this is a match made in Heaven, or possibly a frozen hell. If you didn’t play Nier, it had some of the best RPG real-time combat I had ever seen and an amazing amount of gameplay variety. The combat had a similar feel to pure action games, so Platinum actually making it should make it truly amazing. Square-Enix had a great 2015, but this game is my favorite thing they announced all year.

3: Mario and Luigi: Paper Jam

If there’s a bright side to this game coming out late in NA, it’s that I’ll have Xenoblade X finished before I get this. Oh, and it also means it gets to make one of these lists. I loved Dream Team, and it sounds like Paper Jam is going to fix all the problems with it. More of the great level design and my favorite turn based combat system of all time, with better writing and skippable tutorials? Paper Jam sounds perfect, and you know which Mario and Luigi game it is? The fifth. It looks like my lucky number will come through again (even after 2005 and 2015 kind of shook my faith in it). And I couldn’t do this write-up with referencing paper jam Dipper. Akefhgkjfdgbnk!

2: Star Fox Zero

Yep, the top two (oh come on, you knew what number 1 was as soon as I said I wasn’t disqualifying games that were on last year’s list) are the same as last year. But after the tantrum thrown by people who don’t understand that Nintendo games always look much worse at their reveal than they actually will be, this game still needs love. Platinum is probably my favorite non-Nintendo developer right now, so Platinum and Nintendo working together on this game is pretty freaking awesome. After nearly 20 years of struggling, we are long, long overdue for an action-packed direct sequel to Star Fox 64, and it looks like that’s exactly what we’ll get in April. Never give up, trust your instincts, Nintendo franchises always strike back.

1: The Legend of Zelda (Wii U)

We don’t know much more about this game than we did a year ago, but dammit, what we know is still enough to get me hyped. A Zelda with a huge but more importantly FILLED open world sounds great, but that honestly isn’t why I’m excited for this game. I’m excited for this game because I trust the series and developer, and I don’t see why so many people regard that as a bad thing. Aside from a few games that ironically seem to have been rushed to make sure Zelda Wii U didn’t have to be, Nintendo’s quality level has been extremely high in the past few years, and I see no reason not to expect fantastic things from this game. We’ll probably have to wait two and a half years between this game’s announcement and release, but none of that will matter once we finally have it in our hands.

Honorable Mentions

Uncharted 4

I still have some resentment towards this series for replacing Jak, but my true spite is reserved for The Last of Us. I enjoyed the PS3 Uncharted games, and if Uncharted 4 takes some cues from the current Tomb Raiders, it should be the best one yet.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD

I love Twilight Princess, the only flaw is that combat is too easy. Just add a hard mode (which most Zeldas have now) and make sure to keep the Wii remote option, and things are perfect.

Final Fantasy XV

Haven’t been following this that closely, but if it has a good combat system and Square-Enix is as redeemed as they appear, this should be a great game. Not much else to say, really.

Shellshock

2015 was a very strange year for video games, and it didn’t leave me with a lot to offer. The games that did come out in 2015 that I’ve played were great, and I couldn’t get enough of them. Now that 2015 is about to end, let’s talk about 2016 and what it has to offer. There’s a lot of games coming out that I’m anticipating; some of them are games that were delayed, and others were announced within the year. Here are my top 10 most anticipated games of 2016.

10. Shantae: Half-Genie Hero

Developer: WayForward Studios
Publisher: WayForward Studios
Platform(s): PC, Playstation 3, Playstation 4, Playstation Vita, Wii U, Nintendo 3DS, XBOX 360, XBOX One
Release Date: Early 2016

Shantae: Half-Genie Hero was originally targeted for 2014, but the game had constant delays due to the extra Stretch Goals that were added. Once again, it makes my list, as I have been playing the Shantae series (sans Pirate’s Curse, which I intend to play at some point). Even though it’s coming to multiple platforms, I will be picking up the Wii U version.

9. Yooka-Laylee

Developer: Playtonic Games
Publisher: Team 17
Platform(s): Wii U, Playstation 4, XBOX One, PC
Release Date: October 2016

I grew up playing Rare’s 3D Platformers on the Nintendo 64, and I enjoyed most of them (mostly the Banjo-Kazooie series). However, I’ve lost interest in Rare soon after Microsoft bought them out, thus ending their partnership with Nintendo. After playing Banjo-Kazooie: Nuts and Bolts on the XBOX 360, I was disgusted with what they did with the series, and thought to myself that Banjo-Kazooie is dead. Needless to say, I’m not the only one who felt that way.

Playtonic games is a company made up of former Rare staff members, especially most of the key members who worked on the original Banjo-Kazooie. Yooka-Laylee is a spiritual successor to the Banjo-Kazooie games in many ways, but it also has elements from other games, such as Donkey Kong Country and Donkey Kong 64. I’m really looking forward to this game, as I would love to help keep the spirit of the old Rare alive!

8. Mighty No. 9

Developer: Comcept, Inti Creates, Abstraction Games (3DS/Vita)
Publisher: Comcept (Digital), Deep Silver (Retail)
Platform(s): Wii U, Nintendo 3DS, Playstation 4, Playstation 3, Vita, XBOX One, XBOX 360, PC
Release Date: February 9, 2016 (Retail), February 12, 2016 (Digital)

Another repeat offender on my list, as this game keeps getting delayed over time. Thankfully, there is a guaranteed release date, as it’s going to be released on February 9th in Retail, and February 12th digitally across all platforms. Now as far as this game goes, I’m still excited for it, and anything that plays like Mega Man and the Mega Man X series makes me happy.

7. Street Fighter V

Developer: Capcom, Dimps
Publisher: Capcom
Platform(s): Playstation 4, PC
Release Date: February 16, 2016

Street Fighter V is the latest installment in the Street Fighter series. While Street Fighter IV (and its subsequent updates) provided a mix of nostalgia for Street Fighter II with a brand new look and feel to the series, Street Fighter V has a bit of Street Fighter Alpha and Street Fighter III added to the mix, with tons of new things to make it stand out from the rest. There will be a starting cast of seventeen characters (twelve of them are returning, and five of them are brand new), with other characters coming at a later date.

What gets me excited about this game is that Charlie and R. Mika, who are among my favorite Street Fighter Alpha characters, make their return to the series in Street Fighter V. Other characters, such as Birdie, Urien and Karin, are excellent additions and it’s nice to see them back after being absent for years. We also have new takes on other returning characters, and the newer characters seem very interesting. I tried the demo at New York Comic Con this year, and I thought it was a major improvement from Street Fighter IV. I’m definitely looking forward to playing this game!

6. Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam

Developer: AlphaDream
Publisher: Nintendo
Platform(s): Nintendo 3DS
Release Date: January 22, 2016

Announced at E3, Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam is the fifth installment in the Mario & Luigi series. This game is a crossover between Mario & Luigi and the Paper Mario series, where both worlds collide. You take control of Mario, Luigi, and Paper Mario to take on both Bowser and Paper Bowser, and their respective armies running rampant across the Mushroom Kingdom. Gameplay is identical to that of the Mario & Luigi series, but you now press the Y Button in Battle to control Paper Mario’s Actions.

Since this game has the quirkiness and the humor from both the Mario & Luigi and the Paper Mario series, this is definitely something I am looking forward to. I still need to beat Partners in Time (which I’m not really a fan of) before tackling the others, then finally making my way to this game.

5. Project X Zone 2

Developer: Monolith Soft, Banpresto
Publisher: Bandai Namco Games
Platform(s): Nintendo 3DS
Release Date: February 16, 2016

I was surprised to see that Bandai Namco Games sign on for a sequel to Project X Zone. There are a lot more characters you control in this game, from Bandai Namco, Sega, Capcom, and now Nintendo! Fire Emblem Awakening’s Chrom and Lucina and Xenoblade Chronicles’ Fiora join the cast. Other series new to Project X Zone 2 are Shinobi, Strider, Ace Attorney, Shenmue, Soul Calibur, Yakuza, and even Segata Sanshiro himself, among others, are represented here.

This game retains the character turn based gameplay from its predecessor, but what interests me about this game is that you now have a full player turn, where you control all of your characters, and an enemy turn, where all the enemies are controlled, as opposed to a random character turn. This is another Strategy RPG that I will happily add to my Nintendo 3DS library, and I look forward to playing every second of it!

4. Pokken Tournament

Developer: Bandai Namco Games
Publisher: Nintendo/The Pokémon Company
Platform(s): Wii U
Release Date: Q2 2016

I’m a huge fan of the Pokémon series, and I do enjoy playing Tekken, so this definitely works for me! Pokken Tournament has a fighting style where you roam around in an arena, performing multiple combos on your opponents, and unleashing an inner power (some of the Pokemon will become a Mega-Evolution) with a Resonance Gauge, allowing you to use Special Attacks. You can also summon assist Pokémon to help you out.

I got to try the arcade version of this game at Dave & Busters in NYC, and I’m impressed with the gameplay. It feels different from Tekken, but then again, with Pokémon, it works! This is one of my must-have games for 2016, and I cannot wait to play this!

3. Star Fox Zero

Developer: Nintendo EPD, Platinum Games
Publisher: Nintendo
Platform(s): Wii U
Release Date: April 22, 2016

Originally set for a 2015 release, Star Fox Zero goes back to its roots from the Star Fox (SNES) and Star Fox 64 days, with tons of new features, as well as scrapped ideas from Star Fox 2. This isn’t a remake, nor is it a prequel to the original Star Fox, but it is a new installment, nonetheless. There isn’t much dialogue revealed, but the gameplay is exactly as a Star Fox game should be. I got to try this out at Nintendo World Store during the E3 week, and I was impressed! The Gamepad controls takes time to get used to, but once I do, I will enjoy myself!

2. Fire Emblem Fates

Developer: Intelligent Systems
Publisher: Nintendo
Platform(s): Nintendo 3DS
Release Date: February 19, 2016

I’ve enjoyed Fire Emblem Awakening when it was released in 2013, as I was craving for a Fire Emblem on 3DS at the time. I was heavily excited when Nintendo announced Fire Emblem Fates on the January 2015 Nintendo Direct. As soon as more details popped up, I was curious about having two different versions, and the first thing that popped up my mind was “So is this going to be Fire Emblem meets Pokémon now?”, but as it turns out, it’s part of the game’s story.

It starts off similarly on both versions, but after a certain point, you take a completely different path. Once you do take that path, you stick to it throughout the entire game. There is also a downloadable expansion, which serves as the game’s conclusion. This is probably the biggest story in any Fire Emblem game yet, and I look forward to February 19th!


 

Honorable Mentions

Before I talk about what’s number one, I’d like to talk about my honorable mentions. These games are what I’m looking forward to, but not as much as the games on this list, and as a result, they make this short list.

Bravely Second (Nintendo, Square Enix), Hyper Light Drifter (Heart Machine), Cuphead (Studio MDHR), Genei Ibun Roku #FE (Atlus, Nintendo)


 

1. The Legend of Zelda (Wii U)

Developer: Nintendo EAD
Publisher: Nintendo
Platform(s): Wii U
Release Date: Holiday 2016

Another repeat offender, but there’s a reason for that. Eiji Aonuma needed more time for development of this game, so it’s slated for Holiday 2016 for now. We haven’t seen much of this, but what little I’ve seen is enough for me to put this on the number one spot. I am going to love moving around in an open world setting, and exploring new dungeons. We’ll see at E3 as to what’s going on with this game, and what else it has to offer.

And there we have it, my Most Anticipated games of 2016. It seems like 2016 will be a bigger year for video games, seeing as how we’re going to see the NX for the very first time, and how will it stack up against the competition. There’s a lot to look forward to, and I’m ready to take that ride!


 

Professor Icepick

Well, 2015 was a decent year for the most part. Sure, we got some good releases, but what I got out of it was more hope for the future. A lot of key titles were announced, and while most of them won’t hit until after 2016, it’s still important to look forward. On the plus side, all but 2 of my picks from last year actually hit this time around. Not bad, if you ask me.

10. The King of Fighters XIV

Publisher/Developer: SNK Playmore
Platform: PS4 (maybe more?)
Release Date: 2016

I’m going to be honest, I’ve been hard on the latest KoF game since it was first announced. After all, it would be hard to top the Playmore era’s magnum opus after SNK went back into hibernation for a few years. Then there was the Chinese buyout, which worried me somewhat at first, as I feared a shift from pachinko machines to mobile games. Worst of all was the first trailer: everything about it reminded me of the Maximum Impact games. But as time went on, especially after the latest trailer from the PlayStation Experience, the game’s look began to improve. It’s not quite at hype levels yet, but considering that it boasts a 50-character roster at launch (Mortal Kombat X only managed around half that, and it’s the closest competition that comes to mind), I think it’s worth keeping an eye on. Hopefully, the fact that PSX downgraded it to “Playstation 4 Console Exclusive”, as well as the fact that a key executive from SNK Playmore said that their success on Steam was a key reason they got back into game development, means I’ll be able to partake on my platform of choice down the line, hopefully with crossplay.

9. Star Fox Zero

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Platinum Games
Platform: Wii U
Release Date: April 22, 2016

If there’s one series that Nintendo fans have been clamoring for, it’s probably Metroid. Then F-Zero. Star Fox is definitely a close third, though. Sure, its legacy has been somewhat marred by various mediocre releases: Star Fox 64 was a tough act to follow. The upcoming Zero, however, looks like it might just do the trick. Co-developed by developer darling Platinum Games (Bayonetta, Madworld, Metal Gear Rising), Zero looks to be bringing Star Fox back to its action roots and is even managing to incorporate the Arwing’s Walker transformation from the cancelled Star Fox 2, among other things. With Platinum on-board and an emphasis on the classic gameplay of the first two games in the series, I’ve got a good feeling that this one might be the game to put Star Fox back on top.

8. Timespinner

Publisher/Developer: Lunar Ray Games
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, 3DS
Release Date: July 2016

Timespinner was merely an honorable mention last year, but it ended up getting pushed back to 2016, much to my chagrin. One of my Kickstarter darlings from quite some time ago, Timespinner is looking to evoke various classic games like Castlevania: Symphony of the Night and MegaMan X, with a SNES-inspired artstyle. Players take on the role of Lunais, a young woman with the power to control time. After the technologically advanced empire of Lachiem kills her family, she vows revenge, travelling through history to destroy them all. With interesting time manipulation mechanics and solid-looking gameplay, Timespinner looks like it will be worth the wait.

7. Cuphead

Publisher/Developer: Studio MDHR
Platform: PC, Xbox One
Release Date: 2016

Cuphead was also only on my honorable mentions last year, but since then, this game has started looking better and better. A run-and-gun game with nothing but bosses starring two cup-headed inkblots who lost a bet with the devil and are forced to do his bidding. The real star of the game, however, is its beautiful 2D animation that looks like it was ripped straight out of a Max Fleischer cartoon. I thought it was due out last year, but there really wasn’t any solid confirmation on that.

6. Yooka-Laylee

Publisher/Developer: Team17/Playtonic Games
Platform: PC, Wii U, Xbox One, PlayStation 4
Release Date: October 2016

Another one of my Kickstarter darlings, though I’ll be surprised if you haven’t heard about it. Yooka-Laylee is a spiritual successor to Rare’s N64-era platformers. You know, games like Banjo-Kazooie, Conker’s Bad Fur Day and to a lesser extent, Donkey Kong 64. With vibrant character designs and a glorious soundtrack handled by David Wise and Grant Kirkhope, Yooka-Laylee is set to launch at the end of 2016.

5. Doom

Publisher/Developer: Bethesda Softworks/id Software
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: Spring 2016

Growing up with only a PC and a Game Gear during my earliest of gaming days wasn’t easy, missing out on some really big titles. Sure, there was the occasional port; some good, some bad, but then there was Doom. Doom was probably the first big mainstream PC gaming phenomenon I actually remember and it was glorious. After Doom II came out, the series went on a long hiatus, only to be revived with the mediocre Doom 3, which tried to retool the game into a pseudo-survival horror game for some reason. Bethesda got its hooks into the series recently, and that’s a good thing: they’re taking Doom back to its crazy, gory but ridiculously cartoony roots. I’m not completely sold on the game just yet: the cinematic kills look like they’ll get tedious after a while and Bethesda doesn’t exactly have the best reputation for releasing games without a hell of a lot of glitches at launch. Still, it looks like it’s going to be good regardless.

4. South Park: The Fractured but Whole

Publisher/Developer: Ubisoft
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: 2016

I’ve loved South Park since the show debuted in 1996. I love Paper Mario, so it was pretty much a no-brainer that I’d like The Stick of Truth. When Matt and Trey announced they were working on a sequel at Ubisoft’s E3 conference this year, I was incredibly hyped…and the hype still hasn’t exactly worn off. This time, they’re ditching the fantasy motif and going for something more superhero-related. Considering how awesome the superhero-themed episodes of South Park are and the fact that Matt and Trey are returning to write this one (with more experience under their belts this time), I’ve got some high hopes for this game.

3. Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana

Publisher/Developer: Nihon Falcom
Platform: PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita
Release Date: Summer 2016 (Japan)

Yeah, I know: Ys VIII will only be hitting Japan in 2016. Regardless, it’s exciting. We haven’t heard a thing about the game since TGS 2014, when it was first announced with that awesome teaser trailer. Then Toyko Xanadu took all of Falcom’s attention and for a while there, I thought Ys 8 might’ve just become vaporware. Fortunately, it’s back and with a release window no less: Summer 2016. Sure, we probably won’t see it hit the States for at least a year or two, but knowing it actually exists is good enough for me.

2. Shantae: Half-Genie Hero

Publisher/Developer: WayForward
Platform: PC, Wii U, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Xbox 360, Xbox One
Release Date: 2016

I love me some Shantae, that much you should know by now. For the third consecutive year, Half-Genie Hero makes the list. I’m not sure if it’ll actually hit in 2016, just like I wasn’t sure it would hit in 2014 or 2015. I just feel like keeping the hope alive, especially since development has really gone underway, especially with the release of the limited beta on PC. Nintendo appears to think it’s coming this year though. So there’s that.

1. Street Fighter V

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform:  PlayStation 4, PC
Release Date: February 16, 2016

Pretty obvious, when you think about it. I’ve loved the Street Fighter series since I played the second game on the SNES when I was a child. I’ve gotten my hands on the beta twice and I’ve had fun with it. I’ll probably have way more fun when I get a chance to play against friends though. The new characters look better than most of the ones from the original version of Street Fighter 4: F.A.N.G’s my personal favorite at this point in time, but I’ve honestly like all of them but Necalli. There’s also the fact that Capcom’s already confirmed 6 new characters for next year, all of whom will be free to those who put in the time and the effort to unlock them. All-in-all, Street Fighter V has been fun and hopefully it lives up to my expectations when the game launches in February.


 

Honorable Mentions

Project X Zone 2

Publisher/Developer: Bandai Namco/Monolith Soft
Platform: 3DS
Release Date: February 16, 2016

I was a fan of the original – never finished it though, because chapters got too long for me. Besides, it’s got Segata Sanshiro in it. ‘Nuff said.

Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir

Publisher/Developer: Atlus/Vanillaware
Platform: PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, PlayStation 3
Release Date: Spring 2016

Ever since I played Muramasa, I’ve wanted to try out more of Vanillaware’s games. I always sort of hoped that Odin Sphere would hit PS2 Classics, but this is even better. Only this that could make this better would be a PC release. (Then again, George Kamitani himself said they were exploring options for that sort of thing…)

Hyper Light Drifter

Publisher/Developer: Heart Machine
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Xbox One, Wii U, Ouya
Release Date: 2016

Making my honorable mentions list two years in a row is no small feat. Hyper Light Drifter is an action RPG with a beautiful pseudo-retro style. Despite not being released yet, it has managed to achieve quiet the number of cameos and references: Shantae: Half-Genie Hero, Indivisible, Runbow, the list goes on.

Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/AlphaDream
Platform: 3DS
Release Date: January 22, 2016

Aside from the original on SNES, I have enjoyed pretty much every Mario RPG games. Paper Mario and Mario & Luigi are two of my favorite turn-based RPG series of all-time, so a crossover between the two is more than welcome from my standpoint.

Clayfighter

Publisher/Developer: Interplay/Drip Drop Games
Platform: PC
Release Date: 2016

When I was a kid, I used to love playing the original Clayfighter on Sega Genesis. The sequels weren’t so good, but I’m still sort of looking forward to the upcoming reboot. Hopefully it ends up exceeding even the original, while maintaining its wacky sense of humor.


 

Dishonorable Mention

Mighty No. 9

Publisher/Developer: Comcept/Inti Creates
Platform: PC, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Xbox 360, Xbox One, Wii U, 3DS
Release Date: February 9, 2016

The reason I consider this a “dishonorable” mention is because, while I am still looking forward its release, the development cycle was infested with problems and constant delays. Don’t even get me started on the Red Ash debacle, which was followed with the final delay that pushed it into 2016. Part of me thinks that was Inafune’s way of punishing us, but I just can’t be sure.

So those are my most anticipated games of 2016. That’s not to say that there aren’t even more games that I’m looking forward to, but these are my top picks. What do you think? Did we miss any games you’re looking forward to? Feel free to sound off in the comments section with your picks for 2016.

Retro or Reboot?: Streets of Rage 4

(I’d like to preface this article with an apology for the lack of activity lately. I just wasn’t feeling motivated to write any more articles for the past couple of months, mainly due to writer’s block. Fortunately, I’ve got some ideas now and I’ve decided to make up for the hiatus by posting two articles each for the next two months.)

One of my favorite series to write on this blog was Sum of Its Parts. Unfortunately, lately I’ve been lacking proper topics to continue it. I’ve received some outside suggestions, but they were all inappropriate: they were either series that I’m not familiar with or, worse still, series where there’s already an ideal game in the series (which kind of defeats the entire point of a series dedicated to fashioning together elements from numerous games to form an ideal sequel, don’t you think?). Still, I enjoyed writing those articles too much to just completely give up on the idea, so I decided to try retooling it a bit, to create a sort of “successor” to the original concept. Having said that, I hope you enjoy the first of what I hope to be many articles in this new series, Retro or Reboot?

But what is the point of this new series? Basically, I’ll be taking a series that has been inactive for at least two generations (so, at this point, we’d be seeing stuff from the PS2 era or earlier), preferably one that saw all of its releases in the span of a single generation and speculate two potential avenues for a modern revival: a retro-themed revival that would simply try to recreate the original concept (albeit with more modern technology and likely end up as a budget release) and a higher-scale reboot that would take the original concept and try to transpose it onto a genre that would be more palatable for modern audiences. Of course, both of these could go wrong very easily, but I’m going to back away from my standard cynicism and just go with what I’d consider the ideal for both iterations could be.

Today’s topic is, obviously, Streets of Rage: one of my all-time favorite beat-‘em-up series. The entire trilogy was released on the Genesis back in its heyday, though the first two games also received scaled-down ports on Sega’s Game Gear. Since then, the original games have seen multiple re-releases on modern platforms. Aside from that, the series has laid dormant since the third (and currently, final) game was released. Of course, that’s not to say that there haven’t been attempts to revive the series. The short-lived PS1/Nintendo 64 3D beat-‘em-up Fighting Force was originally an attempt at making a fourth Streets of Rage game on the Saturn. There was also an attempt at a series revival on Dreamcast, Bionic Commando Rearmed developer GRIN was working on a 3D remake before their closure, Backbone Entertainment pitched a new game, and even Ruffian Games (developers of Crackdown) made a pitch for an updated revival on what is assumed to be 7th-generation platforms. Unfortunately, none of these projects ever came to fruition and alas, the series has remained inactive since 1994.

Retro

Simply put, we’re talking about going back to basics here. A straight-up, good old fashioned multi-plane beat-‘em-up, in either a fully 2D or a 2.5D style. Of course, Streets of Rage 4 may not be the best possible title for a game like this, considering Sega’s previous attempt at an old-school revival with that number, but for the time being, let’s just use that title as a placeholder.

Potential developers for a retro-themed revival would be a good start, but before we get to that, I’ve got a couple of honorable mentions that were disqualified for various reasons. It’s a shame Sega scared off the team behind that awesome fan-made Streets of Rage remake, they were literally perfect for this kind of a project. Likewise, Double Helix did an amazing job on the Strider and Killer Instinct revivals, so seeing their work on a SoR game would’ve been great. Alas, they got bought out by Amazon and are likely relegated to making shoddy smartphone games for the rest of their tenure there. Just as well though, I wasn’t really fond of their designs for Jago or Hiryu anyway, so I shudder to think how they would’ve done up Axel.

With the honorable mentions out of the way, I do have a few developers in mind that I’d love to see work on this. First and foremost, WayForward Interactive. They did an amazing job on Double Dragon Neon (my favorite beat-‘em-up of last generation) and they have a previous relationship with Sega (they developed the Metroidesque Aliens: Infestation for Sega on the Nintendo DS). Another developer I wouldn’t mind seeing work on this would be Vanillaware. Sega did buy out Atlus, with whom Vanillaware has a previously established relationship, and they’ve done some amazing work in the beat-‘em-up genre with Dragon’s Crown. Finally, in spite of my mixed feelings on their work in the Sonic series, I feel like Dimps Software would be another good choice for a Streets of Rage retro revival. Ignoring their hit-or-miss record on the Sonic franchise, Dimps has actually made a great number of good games, including work on the recent Street Fighter games and the Game Boy Advance title Dragon Ball: Advanced Adventure (a great example of a full-2D beat-‘em-up), Spikeout: Battle Street (a sequel to a Sega Dreamcast game that was considered a successor to the Streets of Rage series) and even Demolish Fist, an arcade-exclusive 2.5D beat-‘em-up in the same vein as Final Fight or Streets of Rage.

Now let’s go even further into detail on the most important part of the game: the gameplay itself. The most important thing any developer put in charge of this project must consider is the “feel” of Streets of Rage and how it compares to other beat-‘em-ups. Yes, I’m aware that this is as vague as “soul”, “emotion” or whatever buzzword people who don’t like modern games says in order to justify their inability to articulate what it is they think the game lacks, but trust me, it’s not quite that bad. I’ll elaborate. Beats of Rage is a fan-made engine that has been floating around the internet for a number of years that is based on the Genesis-era SoR games. Many games have been made in it, including fan-made sequels and/or remakes of other classic beat-‘em-ups such as Battletoads, Double Dragon and Final Fight. Of course, these games don’t feel quite right as entries in the series they’re supposed to take place in, they feel like reskinned versions of the later two Streets of Rage games. This is an important distinction to make and as such, the original trilogy’s gameplay engines (especially those of SoR2 and 3) should be the basis to shoot for when it comes to making a brand new game in the series.

A new game in the series doesn’t necessarily have to be a 1:1 recreation of the classic games in order to be a good Streets of Rage game. There are some modern conventions that SoR4 could take on that would improve the quality of the game. As an example, I’d like to bring up the evasion maneuvers in modern beat-‘em-ups like Double Dragon Neon and Dragon’s Crown. Old-school beat-‘em-ups were arcade games through and through, with cheap mechanics that guaranteed that the average arcade gamer would feed their machines with a thousand allowances’ worth of quarters. As we know, the arcade scene is pretty much dead outside of Japan, but beat-‘em-ups never really made the jump properly and still relied on their old tactics like unstoppable cheap beatdowns for the sake of difficulty. DD Neon gave players an evasion roll (ala The King of Fighters) which, if timed correctly, also gave players a boost in damage. Dragon’s Crown gave players the ability to backflip to avoid attacks, which could be leveled up to allow up to 4 evasions in a row. Branching paths, like those found in the cease-and-desisted SoR Remake would be another element I’d love to see brought into the series proper. I’ve always been a sucker for that gimmick. Maybe timed boss fights like those in SoR3 could be interesting, but only if they’re properly balanced. One last thing that I think would be a good addition to the series would be to make good on some lost content. I am, of course, referring to the motorcycle segment that was excised from the third SoR game. Let’s face it, it looked fun and it would definitely add some diversity to the gameplay.

Finally, let’s discuss the aesthetic. Earlier, I mentioned that I didn’t really care whether the game was done in true 2D or “2.5D”. I’d like to expand on that and say that regardless if SoR4 uses pixel art, high-definition 2D graphics or 3D models in its artstyle really doesn’t matter to me. What I find more important is whether or not the game resembles those from the Genesis era. As I mentioned earlier, there were numerous attempts to make another game in the Streets of Rage series and what I’ve noticed about most of them is that many of them barely resembled the games of old. Sure, Fighting Force and the Dreamcast SoR4 had their excuses, they were trying to apply a new spin on a then recent, if slightly outdated series. Less forgivable is what Backbone entertainment’s pitch entailed. The concept art that was released for their pitch was…unsettling, to be polite. In fact, the only pitch with an artstyle I really liked was GRIN’s, because it actually resembled the old games to some extent. Keep the old games in mind when handling the game’s art design and you can’t go wrong.

Reboot

An old-school beat-‘em-up from the arcade days might work well for a low-budget release, but for something demanding a decent budget, it would just be a waste of money. Fortunately, we’ve got a perfect successor to the genre: the modern action game. Games like Dynasty Warriors, Devil May Cry and God of War all stem from the beat-‘em-ups of old, so revitalizing Streets of Rage in this genre would be perfect.

Having said that, there’s really only one real choice for this one: Platinum Games. They have the action game pedigree (Madworld, the Bayonetta games and Transformers Devastation to name a few), the pre-existing relationship with Sega and the popularity with core gamers necessary to even attempt a revamp of this magnitude with minimal pessimism. Having said that, if they couldn’t get Platinum to do it, I’d have at least a little faith in Dimps if they got called in to handle this one.

With that out of the way, let’s go a bit more in-depth with the gameplay. Like I said earlier, the best way to modernize Streets of Rage would be to turn it into an action game. The question is, what level of craziness should we expect from a modern translation of SoR? Considering the fact that the first game allowed you to call bazooka support, the second game included locales like a baseball stadium and an amusement park and the third game’s plot involved resurrecting main villain Mr. X as a cyborg and replacing key figures around the city with robot duplicates, it’s safe to say that the series was never really grounded in reality. Fighting hordes of gangbangers across a location as interesting as “The City” is bound to be amazing to say the least. If Platinum ends up working on it, I’d want them to crank up the insanity levels significantly though. I’m talking “fighting the Statue of Liberty with your bare knuckles” (ha ha) insane.

Aesthetic is a much different beast in the reboot compared to the retro revival. As I said earlier, most of the later attempts at a new entry in the Streets of Rage series had aesthetic problems in my opinion. In this case, I feel like the Ruffian Games version best described my fears of what a big-budget SoR revamp could look like: a bland realistic-looking world. Personally, if they decide to go all-out for the graphics in a brand new game, I’d love for them to take artistic cues from the Japanese box art of the Bare Knuckle games. Keep everything really colorful with high contrast. Neon signs and other interesting effects in the city areas and maintain the series’ tendency towards crazy locales. Even the first game, which was more down to earth than any of the others, had a level on a cruise ship. Basically, make the game look like 1990s concept art fully realized. Finally and perhaps most importantly, if you decide to redesign any returning characters, make sure they actually resemble their original designs in some tangible way.

With the two options for a series revival fully realized, I’d like to wrap up my thoughts with some miscellaneous thoughts: elements I’d like to see in a new game in the Streets of Rage series, regardless of the direction it takes. First of all, it is imperative that they get Yuzo Koshiro back for the soundtrack. Next, as for a roster of returning characters, it would be great to see all of the characters from the first two games return. Yes, seeing Adam fight alongside Max would be great, and you’ve got to bring back Axel, Blaze and Skate as well. I was never really fond of Dr. Zan, but I wouldn’t really mind it if he and the other SoR3 characters returned as well.

And so the first article in the Retro or Reboot series comes to its conclusion. What do you think? Would you rather see a Genesis-style revival or one that’s more up-to-date? Do you disagree with any of my opinions about how either take on Streets of Rage should turn out? Let me know in the comments section.

10 Games I’d Like to See Re-Released #1: SEGA

Truth be told, I’ve been tempted to do another PC ports request article, but lately, there just haven’t been enough games released that fit the bill. After all, it’s not fair to request games to hit PC when they haven’t even hit the systems they originate on. So I decided to look at that series from a different perspective. Inspired in no small part by the recent announcement of Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir, the remaster of the Vanillaware’s PS2 cult classic, I’ve decided to start up a new spinoff. Instead of looking at more recent games and seeing what I would want to get ported to PC, I feel like delving into some forgotten older games that haven’t seen a release on 7th or 8th generation consoles and modern PCs for a change. Might as well spread the love, right?

The rules will be somewhat different from the PC port series. First of all, I’m going to be looking at games from the 6th generation (that is, PlayStation 2, Gamecube and the original Xbox) and earlier. Instead of limiting companies to one entry per article, I’ve decided to focus on one company for each article. I’ll also be discussing any potential improvements that could be made to these games, in cases where the games themselves would receive an HD re-release. To make things more fair, I’ll also be avoiding games that saw re-releases on 7th generation and later consoles, via PlayStation Classics, Virtual Console or anything like that. Sure, more substantial re-releases would be better, but it’s better than nothing.

So as I said, in each of these articles, I’m only going to be focusing on a single company. This time around, we’ll be looking at Sega. Now Sega may not be at their best at this point in time, but it’s hard to deny that they’ve got a rich history in their archives. That’s not to say that Sega hasn’t done a good job with re-releases in general, but lately they’ve slowed down on that front. It would be arrogant to assume that this article would have any real effect on Sega’s policies, but every little bit helps, right?

Sonic Heroes (PS2/Xbox/GCN)

I never really thought Sonic Heroes got a fair shake. It seems like a majority of people played it on the PlayStation 2, and that version…had a lot of issues. Personally, I played it on GameCube and had absolutely no issues with it. Besides, we’ve seen re-releases of the other two games in the so-called “Dreamcast era”, why not Heroes?  For those of you out of the know, Heroes is perhaps the game where the running gag of Sonic having a million friends hit critical mass and the ensuing backlash would keep most of them off-screen for the foreseeable future. Players would take control of a team of three characters: one speed-oriented, one flight-oriented and one power-oriented, each providing their own advantages in specific situations. With four different teams (Hero, Dark, Rose and Chaotix), that’s a whopping 12 playable characters. Each team, however, would offer their own specific twists on the game’s stages. Team Hero was normal difficulty, Team Rose was easy mode, Team Dark offered a harder difficulty and Team Chaotix tended to offer alternate objectives, aside from just completing the stage.

Potential Improvements: Aside from upping the resolution for current-gen consoles and PCs, as long as they base the re-release on the Gamecube or Xbox versions, it should be fine.

Shenmue I & II (Dreamcast/Xbox)

Well, this one’s pretty obvious. I’ll be honest, I’m not really all that well-versed in the Shenmue games, but considering the gigantic megaton that was the announcement of Shenmue III, now is the best possible time to capitalize on the demand. After all, the success of Shenmue III’s Kickstarter proves that there’s definitely a high demand for this kind of thing. In fact, Blitworks, the companies behind the HD port of Jet Set Radio, said they had interest in bringing it to modern platforms.

Potential Improvements: Aside from increasing the game’s resolutions, perhaps including an option to decrease the difficulty of the game’s infamous quick-time events would be nice. Maybe just give an option for an easy mode, that would give players more time to react or multiple chances to get the QTE right. Clearly, this would work better as an optional chance, leaving the original QTE system intact for those who want a more authentic or difficult experience.

Jet Set Radio Future (Xbox)

Another game Blitworks mentioned they wanted to bring to modern platforms was Jet Set Radio Future. I’m a really big fan of the original JSR (or Jet Grind Radio, as I tend to call it) and I did actually own Jet Set Radio Future at one point. Unfortunately, I’ve long since lost my copy (it was from the bundle with Sega GT 2002) but have been itching to complete it at some point. Considering how much copies of JSRF go for online, I’d much rather see a re-release, especially because then I won’t have to plug in my Xbox again.

Potential Improvements: The obligatory high-definition resolutions would be nice, especially given JSRF’s interesting cel-shaded art style. Another nice bonus would be trying to put the soundtrack from the original into Future as well, just because that would be a pretty awesome addition.

Burning Rangers (Saturn)

Another game I never really got the chance to play, but considering what I’ve heard about it, it sounds amazing: rescue civilians and put out fires in a futuristic setting. Too bad it commands obscene amounts online, especially when it comes to the English version. Oddly enough, unlike other popular Saturn games like NiGHTS into Dreams and even the original Panzer Dragoon, Burning Rangers didn’t even get a re-release in the Japan-exclusive Sega Ages 2500 series on PS2. Despite being out of print for almost two decades, Burning Rangers still makes the occasional cameo in Sega games. It had a table in the Game Boy Advance Sega Pinball Party and recently had its own track in Sonic and All-Stars Racing Transformed.

Potential Improvements: I’d like to see Burning Rangers get the same treatment as the recent NiGHTS into Dreams HD re-release: a version rebuilt from the ground up with high-definition graphics and widescreen support, with an emulation of the original Saturn version included as a bonus. Throw in a nice gallery and the soundtrack, and you’ve got it made.

Dynamite Cop (Dreamcast)

I will be honest, Die Hard Arcade is one of my favorite arcade games of all time. Unfortunately, it’s in this weird limbo, where it’s technically a licensed game (due to being inspired by the movie Die Hard, and named after it outside of Japan) while also not being a licensed game (the game is referred to as “Dynamite Deka” [Dynamite Detective] in Japan and stars an original character, Bruno Delinger, who would eventually make an appearance in the 3DS game Project X Zone).

So let’s do the next best thing: re-release the sequel! Dynamite Deka 2, released as Dynamite Cop outside of Japan, is a refined version of the original’s cross between 3D beat-‘em-up action and quick-time events, this time taking place on a cruise ship, instead of a skyscraper.

Potential Improvements: HD upscaling is once again on the agenda, but what would be really awesome would be if they included Dynamite Cop’s arcade-exclusive revision: Dynamite Deka EX: Asian Dynamite. Basically a rearranged version of Dynamite Cop, this time taking place in Hong Kong. The game itself is incredibly similar to Dynamite Cop, with extremely similar level layouts, but it would still be a pretty cool novelty to have a bonafide home port of this game, especially if the original can’t be included due to legal issues.

Fighters Megamix (Saturn)

Recently, Sega re-released some of their old Saturn-era 3D fighting games. Virtua Fighter 2, Fighting Vipers and Sonic the Fighters all made it to Xbox Live Arcade and PlayStation Network (but sadly, not Steam). They did, however, leave out one game, arguably the best of the bunch: Fighters’ Megamix. Fighters’ Megamix was Sega’s own attempt at a self-contained fighting game crossover, mostly starring characters from Virtua Fighter 2 and Fighting Vipers, but with characters from other Sega games like Sonic the Fighters, Rent-A-Hero, Virtua Cop and even Daytona USA! That’s right, you actually get to fight as a friggin’ car!

Potential Improvements: Just make it on par with the other Model 2 Collection games, including the online multiplayer. That’s an absolute must for fighting games.

Billy Hatcher and the Giant Egg (Gamecube)

Like Sonic Heroes, Billy Hatcher and the Giant Egg is one of Sega’s early third-party titles that I feel just doesn’t get nearly enough love. It was a pretty interesting 3D puzzle-platformer with its reliance on the egg rolling mechanics, as well as having different eggs with different abilities. As with Burning Rangers, the game is gone but not forgotten, making appearances in both of the Sonic and All-Stars Racing games. Billy was even playable in the first one.

Potential Improvements: All I can really think of is HD upscaling.

Panzer Dragoon series (Saturn/Xbox)

This one’s pretty obvious and it’s been requested so much, it’s surprising that Sega hasn’t really addressed it. The original Panzer Dragoon actually has been re-released a couple of times before: once in the aforementioned Sega Ages 2500 series and as an unlockable bonus in Panzer Dragoon Orta for the original Xbox. Aside from those instances, we haven’t really seen much of these games otherwise. I mean, I can understand why Zwei and Saga weren’t re-released, but Orta should be achievable to some extent, or at bare minimum, even the first game. Ideally though, we’d see the whole set.

Potential Improvements: As with Burning Rangers, I’d say to give it the NiGHTS HD treatment. A full collection of all 4 games would be ideal, but I think that it’d be more workable if they made Orta a separate release, while bundling the 3 Saturn games into a collection.

Space Channel 5 (Dreamcast/PS2)

This one, I feel like I shouldn’t even need to discuss, but here we are. For whatever reason, only Space Channel 5 Part 2 has seen a re-release on 7th generation consoles and PC, while we’re still missing out on the original. It’s especially weird because both games had ports to the PS2, which I assume is what Sega used as the base for the most recent port. Still, having the sequel up without the original just seems…well, blasphemous.

Potential Improvements: Just make it on par with the games in the “Dreamcast Collection” or Jet Set Radio HD and it should be fine.

Zombie Revenge (Dreamcast)

The last game on the list is actually a spinoff from Sega’s popular House of the Dead series. Eschewing the traditional light-gun rail shooter style of the mainline series, Zombie Revenge goes for beat-‘em-up gameplay with shooter mechanics, not unlike Die Hard Arcade/Dynamite Cop. It’s an interesting little game that just seems like it should be preserved in some way, if only because I want more Sega-developed 3D beat-‘em-ups at my disposal in the here and now.

Potential Improvements: Aside from enhancing the visuals, very little comes to mind. Maybe they could throw in the original House of the Dead as a bonus game, at least for platforms where there’s a way to properly implement controls for a light-gun shooter.

Honorable mentions go to Blue Stinger and Skies of Arcadia. If I’m going to be honest, I thought this article went pretty well. Like I said, since the PC ports series is currently on hiatus, this will probably act as its replacement, at least for the time being. I do have some ideas when it comes to other companies I want to write articles for, but you’ll just have to wait until next time to see what they are. Of course, if you’ve been following the site, you’ve probably got a pretty good idea for what’s coming next.

10 Games I Want Ported to PC Takes Manhattan

I’ll be honest: I lamed out on writing another article last month. I wish I could say that it was due to an increased workload at my day job. It wasn’t: I just came down with a bad case of writer’s block. On the plus side, I’ve finally come up with an idea for another non-list article, which you should be seeing sometime next month, but until then, you’ll just have to deal with another one of my crazy PC port begging lists. Perhaps, to be more accurate, you’ll be dealing with what may well be the last of my crazy PC port begging lists.

Before we get on with the bulk of the article, there have been a lot of recent developments in the PC port scene that have made me incredibly happy, especially considering how dead it was back in March when I wrote my last article. Axiom Verge finally hit Steam this month, but that had always had a PC version announced, so it doesn’t really count. In terms of actual news, Shantae and the Pirate’s Curse, one of my early requests, had a PC port announced and hit Steam last month. XSEED released Ys VI: The Ark of Napishtim on Steam last month as well. Granted, that’s not really a PC port: the game actually originated on PC in Japan, that version had just never been released in the West before. Related to that bit of news (and objectively more important), Nihon Falcom company president Toshihiro Kondo recently stated in an interview with Windows Central that they were “especially happy with the situation on Steam” and that many of their titles “enjoyed better sales volume on Steam than Playstation”. Considering he also brought up Falcom’s origins as a PC developer, we could be seeing a shift in the company’s resources from console exclusive releases and some more substantial PC releases in the future.

Speaking of substantial releases, the third Shantae wasn’t the only game on a prior list to get confirmed since last time. Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus R was recently listed on Steam. The turn of events was amazing: within a week, the title was leaked through a listing on the Korean Game Rating Board and officially listed on Steam. More impressive is the fact that the game is being developed AND published by Arc System Works themselves, as opposed to H2 Interactive, who handled the PC ports of the Blazblue games. Even more exciting is the fact that a developer from Arc System Works recently stated that they “have lots of games queued up for Steam! Some of them might even be out of your imagination, I can assure you that!“ Needless to say, I was absolutely excited to see that news and I’m already speculating what could be next (keeping my fingers crossed for Chronophantasma EXTEND and Xrd).

Before we start, let’s go over the rules for the umpteen-billionth time. My lists stick mostly to third-party companies (aside from Microsoft) with a general focus on companies that have recently released games on PC. Games will be taken from the seventh (360/Wii/PS3) and eighth (WiiU/PS4/XBO) generations of video games, as well as handhelds from those eras and mobile games. Games that weren’t system exclusives are preferred. Finally, games from the same series released on the same console can be packaged together on a single list entry. With that out of the way, let’s get down to the real meat of this article.

Devil May Cry HD Collection – Capcom (PS3/360)

This one only seems fitting. The fourth DMC received a decent port when it was initially released on PC, and that’s only been improved further with the upcoming Special Edition release. The third game, on the other hand, was one of Capcom’s early attempts at porting and ended up almost as bad as the infamous Resident Evil 4 PC port. Capcom later rectified that screw-up with a release of the HD version on PC, but DMC3 was never redeemed. In fact, Capcom still currently sells this mediocre release on the Steam storefront. And that’s not even covering the fact that the first 2 games were never actually released on PC in the first place. Capcom has the resources to rectify both of these mistakes, and considering the fact they are apparently focusing more on re-releases these days anyway, this just seems like a perfect solution.

Banjo-Kazooie/Banjo-Tooie – Microsoft/Rare (360)

Okay, let’s be honest. The recent Kickstarter success of Yooka-Laylee has already assured that we’re going to be seeing some Banjo-Kazooie-esque 3D collect-a-thon platforming action hit PC (and Wii U, and Xbox One, and PS4…) in the foreseeable future. That still doesn’t make the games that inspired it any less essential in my opinion. Considering the fact that Microsoft put some resources into upscaling the games for the 360, it would only make sense to re-release these enhanced ports to other platforms instead of just allowing them to die with the 360. We’ve already seen Microsoft utilize Rare’s old IPs well with their recent reinvention of Killer Instinct, I say they should keep exploiting that nostalgia.

Zone of the Enders HD Collection – Konami (PS3/360)

Speaking of exploiting nostalgia, I’ve always been a sucker for the original Zone of the Enders. I rented the game from Blockbuster when I was young and had a blast playing through it. I never actually got a chance to play the second game or the GBA spinoff (though I’ve been told I dodged a bullet on the latter). So I was excited to hear that the games were getting an HD remaster on the PS3 and 360 a few years back. Unfortunately, it was handled pretty poorly, with both games initially running horribly and a fix coming out farther down the line…but for only one of the games and on one platform. What a bummer. Considering what I’ve seen with buggy releases on PC games, I can only wonder if such a crisis could have been averted if the game had received a PC port. Considering the game’s poor reputation and the fact that Konami has recently stated that they’re focusing more on mobile releases these days, this is probably a long shot, but it’s one worth mentioning.

Puyo Puyo Tetris – Sega (3DS/Wii U/PSVita/PS3/PS4/XBO)

I love Puyo Puyo. I love Tetris. What else do I have to say? This is pretty much a match made in heaven we’ve not seen the likes of since Dr. Mario and…well, Tetris. Sure, the game’s available on pretty much every system under the sun, with the exceptions of the Xbox 360 and PC. Even more unfortunate, the games have yet to be released outside of Japan. Needless to say, a PC release would probably make an international release of every other version far more likely. So that’s a bonus for my fellow puzzle aficionados.

SNK Arcade Classics Vol. 1/0 – SNK Playmore (PSP/Wii)

SNK Playmore’s been doing a pretty good job when it comes to releasing older titles on Steam. Sure, their latest game is a buggy port of one of their recent mobile-original free-to-play titles (Metal Slug Defense, which, ironically enough, I actually liked on Android), but aside from that, they have been doing stellar work on their PC ports: early access betas to start ironing out any issues with the online and quick responses to most legitimate bug concerns. The only real problem I have is that most of their releases have focused on their more high-profile franchises: the King of Fighters and Metal Slug games. One easy way to rectify that would be to do a simple, barebones collection of some of their old less-notable titles. Fortunately, two such collections already exist. Volume 1 has games for the NeoGeo, such as the original Fatal Fury, Sengoku and Last Resort, among others. Volume 0, on the other hand, is a collection of their pre-NeoGeo games, like Psycho Soldier, Ikari Warriors and Athena. An original, more substantial collection would probably be better, but if we can get these, it would be something.

Mamorukun Curse! – g.rev/UFO Interactive (AC/360/PS3)

As I pretty much always say during these lists, I love me some shmups. So here’s another one for the list. Mamorukun Curse, better known in Japan as Mamoru Has Been Cursed! (don’t ask me why they decided to change the name). It’s a pretty typical vertical shmup, with a few unique aspects. First of all, movement is freer than in most shmups, though most of the game does move as you’d expect. There’s also the unique “Curse” bomb mechanic, which destroys enemy bullets but also strengthens enemies, allowing players to rack up a high score.

Guwange – Cave (360)

One good shmup deserves another. Guwange is a vertical-oriented bullet-hell from Cave. It does differ from many of their shmups in a few specific ways. First of all, you are given the choice between three characters, each with their own unique weapon: Hiiragi with her concentrated arrows, Kamono and his spread-shot swords and Shishin who is able to aim kunai in 6 different directions. The characters walk along the ground, forcing them to dodge buildings and other obstacles in addition to the billions of bullets headed their way. The traditional one-hit kill system present in most shmups has been replaced with a life meter that allows for two or three hits. Unfortunately, players are limited to only three of these in the entire game and health power-ups are scarce, especially compared to the scoring bonuses afforded to players by more traditional lives systems in the genre. Fortunately, by holding down the attack button, each character can summon a shikigami, an invincible protector that can phase through enemy fire and obstacles. Of course, the character still remains on-screen and vulnerable (and a little less mobile), but this sheer power of the shikigami is crucial to both survival and racking up high scores.

Aquapazza: Aquaplus Dream Match – Examu/Atlus USA (AC/PS3)

Aquapazza is…an odd choice, I must admit. It’s almost like Dengeki Bunko: Fighting Climax, in the sense that it’s a fighting game crossover involving a lot of obscure Japanese video game and anime characters who don’t originate in the fighting genre itself. However, instead of being a crossover between various companies, Aquapazza’s roster entirely consists of characters from Aquaplus franchises, including To Heart, Comic Party and Tears to Tiara. So, basically, it’s a bunch of visual novel characters duking it out in a fighting game. Yeah, it’s basically just an animu fighter, and while I’m not familiar with most of the roster, I’m more concerned about the gameplay. Players choose from 13 characters and 13 partners, sort of like a faster-paced Vanguard Princess. Sure, this game’s a total longshot for PC, but I still think it’s worth asking for.

Chaos Code – FK Digital/Arc System Works (AC/PS3)

Remember how I mentioned earlier that Arc System Works was teasing some big upcoming releases for Steam in the future? Releases that go beyond the common demands for the latest incarnations of the Guilty Gear and Blazblue series? Well, I’ve already mentioned a few of my big picks from them in the past: Persona 4 Ultimax, Under Night: In-Birth Late[st] and Hard Corps: Uprising. This time, I’m going to add another one to that list: Chaos Code. Developed by Taiwanese developer FK Digital, Chaos Code is another anime fighter, but it’s got some unique features all its own. Characters’ movesets can be customized with an additional two out of four possible “edit special moves” chosen prior to the fight. There are also two different modes for characters: “run” which focuses on speed and “step” which focuses more on technical play, sort of like the “Power”/”Speed” system from The Last Blade games. All-in-all, if Arc System Works considered this game worth publishing, then that’s a testament to the game’s quality.

Nier – Square Enix (360/PS3)

Lately, the offerings from Square Enix’s Japanese branch have been pretty one-track: nothing but Final Fantasy games. Some from last-gen’s consoles, some that are ports of smartphone ports of DS games. Of course, they’ve got more than just Final Fantasy games, and I’m not talking about Kingdom Hearts or Dragon Quest, though I won’t be surprised if we get some mobile ports of the latter. Let’s take Nier, for example. Generally classified as an action RPG, Nier also borrows from several other genres, like shmups, survival horror and even text-based adventure games. I’m not too sure about the game’s quality, but I’ve heard good things about both Nier and its predecessors, the Drakengard games. So I’m willing to give it a shot.

Usually, by the time I wrap up these articles, I’ve got another list entirely set up, from start to finish. This time, unfortunately, I just don’t have enough to do another list in July. So, I’ll be going on a hiatus with this series for quite some time. Hopefully, I won’t ever have to revive it. This isn’t exactly goodbye though. While PC port lists may have gone by the wayside, I’ve got a whole bunch of other ideas for future lists. You’ll just have to wait until July to see.

Retronaissance’s Most Anticipated Games of 2015

SNES Master KI

Before I get to the honorable mentions, I have to acknowledge two games I jumped the gun on last year.  Xenoblade Chronicles X and Yoshi’s Wooly World were on my 2014 list (under their codenames), and would have definitely made this list if it weren’t for that.

Honorable Mentions

Shantae: Half-Genie Hero

Publisher/Developer: WayForward
Platform: PC, Wii U, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Xbox 360, Xbox One
Release Date: 2015

I haven’t gotten around to playing the third Shantae yet, but if it’s as big of an improvement over the first two as I’m told, I’m sure I’ll love this one.

The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask 3D

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Grezzo
Platform: 3DS
Release Date: Spring 2015

While I don’t love Majora’s Mask as much as a lot of people, it’s still a great game and a remake that could fix some of my problems with it has great potential.

Scalebound

Publisher/Developer: Microsoft Studios/Platinum Games
Platform: Xbox One
Release Date: 2015

I’m almost certainly not going to be able to get this in 2015, but it’s still a Platinum game, and I love Platinum.


10. Code Name: S.T.E.A.M.

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Intelligent Systems
Platform: 3DS
Release Date: March 13, 2015

While strategy games aren’t exactly my forte, I’ve managed to get into the ones Nintendo has made, so I’m cautiously optimistic about Codename STEAM.  I’ve managed to not resent it for not being Paper Mario, at least, and am hoping that Nintendo can pull off a real-time/turn based balance that very few games can make work for me.

9. Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater

Publisher/Developer: Activision
Platform: Xbox One, PlayStation 4
Release Date: 2015

The only sports series I’ve ever truly loved (really, it’s more of a combo based platformer), I have wanted the THPS series to return to its THPS4 glory for over a decade now.  While we don’t know anything about this game besides its 2015 release date, I’ve seen series return to form after long dark ages before, and I have faith that it is at least possible for it to happen again.

8. Bloodborne

Publisher/Developer: Sony Computer Entertainment/From Software
Platform: Playstation 4
Release Date: March 24, 2015

I really wanted to like Demon’s Souls, I loved the idea of a massive and ultra-challenging dark fantasy action game.  However, I couldn’t get past the WRPG elements.  Bloodborne’s faster, action game style battle system gives me renewed hope.  I don’t have a PS4 yet, but if this game delivers, it may be what gets me to take the plunge.

7. Rise of the Tomb Raider

Publisher/Developer: Microsoft Studios/Square Enix/Crystal Dynamics
Platform: Xbox One, Xbox 360
Release Date: Holiday 2015

Tomb Raider 2013 was a fantastic revival for the series, I loved it as soon as I played it despite not being into the Tomb Raider series to begin with.  Being able to control your jumps just makes everything feel so much better.  This game would be higher on the list if not for the Xbox timed exclusive issue.  I hate timed exclusives, regardless of whether the system I own is the one which gets them (remember the Resident Evil 4 trolling?).  But I still have faith that this will be a great game, whether I settle for the 360 version or wait until 2016 for the inevitable PS4 release.

6. Splatoon

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo
Platform: Wii U
Release Date: Q2 2015

My initial impression of Splatoon was that it looked interesting, but that I wasn’t going to get hyped until a solid single player mode was confirmed, which I was sure would happen.  Well, it happened, and in time to shoot the game up on this list.  The puzzle/platformer/shooter hybrid gameplay in single player looks great, and easily unique enough to justify this being a new IP.  Maybe people will actually remember this before going into the “Nintendo never makes new IPs” nonsense.

5. Mighty No. 9

Publisher/Developer: Comcept/Inti Creates
Platform: PC, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Xbox 360, Xbox One, Wii U, 3DS
Release Date: April 2015

Mega Man will come back.  It is impossible for a series that old and popular to be killed for good, no matter how incompetent Capcom has become.  But in the meantime, Mighty No. 9 should do a great job of filling that void in our hearts.  Inafune is not making any effort to pretend this isn’t a replacement goldfish for Mega Man, and I’m fine with that.  The classic/X hybrid gameplay looks great, the only thing that could make this better is if my joke to troll Icepick came true and Beck was replaced by Mighty Number 10 (but you can call him X) after the first level.

4. Mortal Kombat X

Publisher/Developer: Warner Bros. Games/Netherrealm Studios
Platform: PC. PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One
Release Date: April 14, 2015

Like the aforementioned Tomb Raider 2013, Mortal Kombat 2011 was a fantastic return to form for a long-suffering series.  And unlike Tomb Raider, Mortal Kombat was a series I had plenty of nostalgia for.  All Mortal Kombat X has to do is keep the same solid fighting engine that the series finally achieved, and have the same boatload of single player content, and I’ll be happy.  And thanks to story mode, we can look forward to seeing what happens next in this game, instead of finding out what happened in the previous one.

3. Mario Maker

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo
Platform: Wii U
Release Date: 2015

Now this game is long overdue.  After more than half a decade of the premiere make your own platformer franchise being little on intuition and big on floaty physics, we’re getting a game with intuitive touch screen level design and the perfection of 2D Mario physics.  I can’t wait to make my own levels and play yours, even if we don’t get an expansion pack’s worth of pre-made levels included like I’m hoping.  I’ve already got several level ideas planned for this, and you’ll get to play them.

2. Star Fox Wii U

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo
Platform: Wii U
Release Date: 2015

“Come on Reggie, give us Star Fox!”  Well, he did.  We don’t know much about this game, but Nintendo has been on a roll with game quality lately, so I see no reason not to expect this to be the long overdue return to form for Star Fox.  Not much more to say, but I know I’m not the only one greatly anticipating learning more about this game.

1. The Legend of Zelda Wii U

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo
Platform: Wii U
Release Date: 2015

After a long pseudo-drought where we only got touch-screen controlled Zeldas, the series has come back in a big way with the last couple games (yes, I liked Skyward Sword, and so will you in a couple years).  While the idea of an open-world emphasizing Zelda would have frightened me a few years ago, A Link Between Worlds showed that there is absolutely nothing to worry about.  Like Star Fox, we don’t know a terribly large amount about this game, but I’ve never had more confidence in Nintendo’s game quality.  On November 20th, 2015 (Yes, that’s a guess, but my guesses about release dates for Nintendo’s big Holiday game have a pretty good track record), it’s time to return to Hyrule.

Professor Icepick

While last year was pretty good for video games, I notice that a few of the games I had on this list last year missed their release windows. Oh well, it appears none of them died, due to copious updates. Last year was pretty good (at least for me, AAA market kinda took a hit), here’s hoping 2015 manages to be even better.

Honorable Mentions

Cuphead

Publisher/Developer: Studio MDHR
Platform: PC, Xbox One
Release Date: 2015 

A quirky 2D platformer that takes design cues from classic black & white cartoons.

The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask 3D

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Grezzo
Platform: 3DS
Release Date: Spring 2015

A long-awaited enhanced port of a classic Zelda title for the Nintendo 64.

Hyper Light Drifter

Publisher/Developer: Heart Machine
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Xbox One, Wii U, Ouya
Release Date: Early 2015

A top-down 2D action-RPG that draws inspiration from both A Link to the Past and Diablo II.

Timespinner

Publisher/Developer: Lunar Ray Games
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, 3DS
Release Date: November 2015

A SNES-inspired Metroid-like that takes cues from games like MegaMan X and Symphony of the Night.


10. Axiom Verge

Publisher/Developer: Tom Happ/Sony Computer Entertainment
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita
Release Date: 2015

So let’s start things off with an indie game you may not have heard of. Axiom Verge is unique as it is being developed by a single man: Tom Happ, who previously worked on such high profile titles as Tiger Woods and NFL Street. The game’s development started as a part-time hobby back in March 2010 and the game is finally approaching completion. It’s an exploration platformer that takes cues from games like Metroid, Contra and Blaster Master. It’s also got a really nice looking 8-bit aesthetic that is somehow simultaneously simple and detailed.

9. Tekken 7

Publisher/Developer: Namco Bandai
Platform: Arcade
Release Date: February 2015

I’ve actually been playing the Tekken games since the original one hit arcades back in the mid-90s, and despite a few missteps (Tekkens 4 & 6, respectively), the latest major release in the series, Tekken Tag Tournament 2, was incredible. T7 appears to be going in another new direction, removing TTT2’s bound system and adding “Rage Arts”, which are basically super combos. These trends worry me a little, but I’m still anticipating the game, especially as this may finally be the first Tekken to hit PCs when it is released for the home market.

8. Citizens of Earth

Publisher/Developer: Atlus USA/Eden Industries
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Wii U, 3DS
Release Date: January 20, 2015

I’ve mentioned in the past that Nintendo’s Earthbound is one of the few traditional turn-based RPGs I like, due to its unique setting, clever writing and quirky variations on JRPG gameplay. When Eden Industries (made up of ex-members of Next Level Games) announced Citizens of Earth, I’ll admit, I was a little excited. Mostly because this probably the closest thing to another Earthbound we’ll ever see in the West. Alas, their initial crowdfunding campaign failed, but Atlus USA stepped in and funded the game themselves. Citizens of Earth places you in the role of the Vice President of the World, who recruits friends, family and other citizens to help him campaign for re-election, allowing for a unique party system where various members have different unique abilities.

7. Code Name: S.T.E.A.M.

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Intelligent Systems
Platform: 3DS
Release Date: March 13, 2015

Code Name S.T.E.A.M. was one of those games I just loved at first sight. With an awesome steampunk setting, an aesthetic inspired by American comic books and a unique battle system that harkens back to Valkyria Chronicles’ turn-based strategy/third-person shooter hybrid gameplay, this game just looks amazing to me. Considering the fact that you’re fighting off an alien invasion with famous characters from literature under the leadership of Abraham Lincoln with anachronistic steam-powered technology makes it even cooler. It’s got such a ridiculous premise, I can’t help but love it. Here’s hoping the game lives up to its potential though, but with Intelligent Systems handling development, I’m sure it’ll be a blast.

6. Splatoon

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo
Platform: Wii U
Release Date: Q2 2015

Speaking of new Nintendo IPs, Splatoon’s a definite departure from what we’ve come to expect from the Big N. Debuting at E3 2014 as a 4-on-4 third-person shooter, the game’s colorful and vibrant artstyle was interesting. Competing with your opponents to cover more of the stage with your ink, it’s an interesting twist on traditional multiplayer shooters. What made the game even more palatable for me was the announcement of an extended single-player campaign. Definitely can’t wait to see how this one turns out.

5. Kirby and the Rainbow Curse

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/HAL Laboratory
Platform: Wii U
Release Date: February 13, 2015

This was one of the biggest surprises I had all year. Kirby: Canvas Curse was one of the most interesting games on the Nintendo DS and I always figured it was going to be a one-hit wonder. Lo and behold, Nintendo decided to make a sequel on the Wii U of all things. Better still, they decided to use a really cool claymation aesthetic, which I fell in love with at first sight. Better still, it’s heavily rumored that this is going to be a $40 title like Captain Toad. At that price, how could I resist?

4. Yoshi’s Woolly World

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Good-Feel
Platform: Wii U
Release Date: Spring 2015

I’ll be honest: when this game was first announced as “Yarn Yoshi”, I was incredibly skeptical about it, as every single follow-up to the SNES classic Yoshi’s Island has been mediocre at best. However, as I saw more footage of the game and learned of Good-Feel’s involvement, I became excited, mainly because of how much Woolly World began to resemble Kirby’s Epic Yarn as development progressed. Of course, then there was that long period of radio silence where I feared the game had been cancelled, but fortunately more news eventually came and the game was confirmed for release in 2015. After so many years of waiting, it looks like Yoshi’s Island is finally getting a worthy sequel and I can’t wait.

3. Shantae: Half-Genie Hero

Publisher/Developer: WayForward
Platform: PC, Wii U, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Xbox 360, Xbox One
Release Date: 2015

Another of my Kickstarter darlings, Half-Genie Hero is the fourth game in the Shantae series. For the longest time, I was merely a fan of Shantae from afar: I had only played a small portion of the original. This past year, however, I beat all three games in the series: the first on 3DS’s Virtual Console, the second in its recent Director’s Cut re-release on Steam, and the third on 3DS. Of course, HGH is going to be an entirely different animal, with hand-drawn HD graphics instead of traditional sprite work. This is also going to be the first time the series isn’t released on a Nintendo handheld and the first time it will appear on Playstation and Xbox systems. While the 2015 date isn’t solid, Wayforward has recently confirmed the scope of the project and is hard at work, delivering another amazing product.

(Oh, by the way, I know this was on my list last year, despite missing 2014 entirely. Let’s just retroactively give that spot to Pirate’s Curse, which for some reason, I thought was going to make its 2013 release window. …in January 2014.)

2. Mortal Kombat X

Publisher/Developer: Warner Bros. Games/Netherrealm Studios
Platform: PC. PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One
Release Date: April 14, 2015

As you may very well know by now, I’m a huge fan of 2D fighting games. Unfortunately, there aren’t that many games in that genre in 2015 that have been announced that aren’t either expansions of existing games, Japan-exclusive “doujin” titles or recent Kickstarters that may not hit their release targets. Fortunately, Netherrealm Studios has got my back. We’ve seen them blossom into a truly skilled developer in 2011’s Mortal Kombat, watched as they experimented with new system mechanics in 2013’s Injustice: Gods Among Us, and are looking to deliver a truly glorious experience in their upcoming Mortal Kombat X. With each character being split into 3 variations, each with different strengths and unique abilities, plus stage interactions returning from Injustice, MKX is shaping up to be a truly amazing game. I just hope the PC port is more stable than the previous NRS releases, whether it’s done by High Voltage Software or a new team altogether. Their previous ports crash my current laptop, despite being powerful enough to run the games (albeit on low settings).

1. Mighty No. 9

Publisher/Developer: Comcept/Inti Creates
Platform: PC, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Xbox 360, Xbox One, Wii U, 3DS
Release Date: April 2015

Does this really surprise anyone? I’ve been mooning over this game ever since it was first announced. By the time it comes out next year, we’ll have gone half a decade without a new MegaMan release from Capcom (the last game they actually managed to release was 2010’s MegaMan 10). I think we’re long overdue for some classic run-and-gun platforming. Though the game’s development has been marred by some controversy (especially with regards to “slacker backing” additional content like voice acting and an additional stage as future DLC), I’m still incredibly excited to see the final project in action.