My Mega Man Introspection

Contrary to what you may assume, the first video game mascot to capture my heart wasn’t Mario. It wasn’t Sonic, even if I was loyal to him for a brief period before I gave Mario my allegiance. I’m not old enough for it to be Pac-Man, young enough for it to be Crash, or cursed enough for it to be Bubsy. The first video game character to spark my imagination was Mega Man (or his similarly named successor, Mega Man X) and his series has permanently been in my top three favorite game series for over 25 years. In honor of his imminent revival, I’m going to go over my personal history with the franchise, all the good times and the bad times. Let’s dive into my mind and do this!

Now when I said bad times, you probably thought of the time between the 2011 cancellations and “Mega Man Isn’t Dead Day”, but that’s not the only one for me. At the very start of my history with Mega Man, something happened that I’m still surprised didn’t manage to turn me off the entire series. You see, when I was very young, I had an instinctive love of video games, but no game consoles. The only thing in my house that could play games was a computer my family had gotten from my grandfather. It was a Tandy 1000 in the year 1992. You don’t have to look that up, I’ll tell you that it was severely underpowered at the time. Finding games that could run on it was not an easy task, but I was determined, and even if they were in four color mode, I found some games that would work…

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And that’s how we met.

Yes, that’s right, my first Mega Man game was the infamous Mega Man DOS. My second was Mega Man III DOS (I count the Tiger Handheld version as “Mega Man II DOS” for the record). That was my introduction to the series, those abominations from the masters of unspeakable horror at Hi-Tech Expressions. If you haven’t personally experienced the Mega Man DOS games, I assure you that they’re as bad as everyone says. But you know the really sad part? Those were my best computer games. So I played them, I struggled and struggled until I could beat both of them consistently. Sure, saying I beat both of those games at age six sounds cool now, but you aren’t thinking like that when you’re a kid, just wishing you could play games that were actually good. I kind of sort of enjoyed the games at the time, but I knew there were countless infinitely better games that were out of my reach.

The year or so before I finally got a console, when my only games were on that Tandy 1000, certainly left a negative taste in my mouth when it came to PC gaming. So why did Mega Man emerge completely unscathed? Well, some of my best childhood memories involve getting to play my cousin’s seemingly endless pile of SNES games when I visited his family a couple of times a year. In early 1994, shortly after I got my first console (it was a Genesis: why it wasn’t a SNES is a story for another time) and wanted to put my torture at the hands of Hi-Tech behind me, I was on one of those treasured visits. Eagerly looking through his games, trying to choose where to start, I noticed something. Something wondrous, a treasure that would change everything forever. For the first time in my life, I laid my eyes on this:

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This probably isn’t my cousin’s cart, but who knows?

Yes, it had happened. I had discovered the Mega Man X series. Still having fond feelings towards the series that had given me the best games I owned for what felt like forever at the time, MMX was my easy choice for first game to play. Words can not describe how much I loved the game, I was expecting something resembling the DOS games and instead I got what to this day is one of the best games I’ve ever played. Zero was the coolest character I had ever encountered in any medium, the explosions when bosses died were the best graphical effect I had ever seen, and I didn’t have to press J to jump. Mega Man X made an incredible impression on me, and was probably the biggest factor in making me switch my loyalty to SNES, before Mario meant anything particularly important to me.

While there are plenty of memories that I treasure associated with the Mega Man series in the decade or so that followed (staying up late and beating Mega Man V on Game Boy in bed, being cured of my mono-console ways by Mega Man X4, writing a Mega Man parody series that somehow got past 600 pages), this is going to be long enough already without detailing all of them. By the mid-2000s I owned and had beaten every Mega Man platformer (except for a couple of the Game Boy ones which I didn’t realize were different games, don’t worry, I’ve since rectified that), and while the X series was and is my favorite any Mega Man platformer was a must-buy for me. Let’s get to the part where the gaming community as a whole gave Mega Man attention again, Mega Man 9.

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Not how people pictured Mega Man’s seventh-gen debut.

In 2008, we had had at least one Mega Man game almost every year for two decades. However, we hadn’t had a numbered installment in the Classic series since 1997, and through the filter of pre-2011 privilege, not getting the specific type of Mega Man you wanted seemed like a big problem. After years of requests, Capcom granted the wish of Classic fans and finally announced Mega Man 9. But what no one saw coming was how it looked and played: it was 8-bit. Not even the “8-bit” that was run through a heavy nostalgia filter upgrade like most games using that label these days, Mega Man 9 looked and played almost exactly like the early NES Mega Man games. This was a novelty at the time, and Mega Man 9 was well received. I enjoyed it, not my favorite Mega Man game, but a worthy installment and knowing we could in fact go home again was a nice feeling.

However, there was something in the back of my mind, a burning desire that I think was shared by many. We got a game that played just like the NES Mega Man games. The Mega Man X series never reached the height of its glory days after it changed up its formula with the fifth entry. So if we got Mega Man X9 and it played just like the SNES games… That concept, that phantom, hung over me. Something I wanted, that I know a huge portion of the Mega Man fanbase wanted so badly, that never materialized. While Capcom ignoring us and making another 8-bit Mega Man Classic game in 2010 hurt to some extent, I refused to blame the game itself for that. Mega Man 10’s more creative level design made it a top-tier Classic game, in my opinion.

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Well if I’d have to play it to see the improvement instead of just looking at a screenshot, then forget it.

That opinion was not common, at least back in 2010. Unfortunately, there was a perfect storm of negativity that consumed Mega Man 10. For one thing, there were two Mega Man series that were currently in a cliffhanger state (ZX and Legends), in addition to X fans who wanted their turn with the retroizer. But far worse were the fickle sequelphobes who were infuriated that Capcom had made a “rehash” of what they had regarded as a breath of fresh air with Mega Man 9. Or that’s what they claimed anyway, some of them would have complained no matter what Capcom did. Either way, Mega Man 10 didn’t perform nearly as well as Mega Man 9. This was annoying to me, but I had no idea what kind of catastrophe was coming…

At the start of 2011, Mega Man seemed to be chugging along at his standard rate. The Mega Man Legends fanbase got their wish with the announcement of Mega Man Legends 3, and Mega Man Universe looked like another solid Mega Man platformer to me (not so much to people who judged the entire game on an alpha build). But a darkness more threatening than Dr. Wily, Sigma, and Dr. Weil combined was about to descend on Mega Man. Keiji Inafune, who was well respected and considered the father of Mega Man at the time, left Capcom on clearly hostile terms. Mega Man Universe was canceled and triggered a tidal wave of apathy for most of the fanbase. Then Mega Man Legends 3 was canceled, and the shit hit the turbine. Capcom, one of the most consistent and respected publishers for around 25 years at that point, was demonized overnight (for a variety of reasons, but Mega Man’s fate was arguably the biggest factor) and it was generally accepted that Mega Man was dead, killed to spite his creator. The dark days had begun.

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The alpha build character model is ugly? That’s it, kill the whole franchise.

As you may imagine, I was not happy about this. I don’t handle negativity and pessimism well, and the mood around the Mega Man and Capcom fanbase was more negative than I had ever seen. The vindication from everyone suddenly caring about Mega Man Universe and stopped bashing Mega Man 10, the “last” Mega Man game, did nothing for me. I just wanted Mega Man back, in any form, something to give fans of the series hope. Whenever I replayed a Mega Man game, there was a twinge of sadness interfering with all the great memories I have of the series. I maintained that a series as old and popular as Mega Man could never permanently die, it would inevitably return at some point (now THAT’S vindication I enjoy), but there was an ever increasing anxiety as time went by with no word of a new Mega Man game.

2013 was the year of false hope for the franchise. There are two main reasons for that, I’ll start by covering the one that didn’t become a cautionary tale about how not to launch a new IP. At E3 2013, Nintendo showed their first trailer for the fourth Super Smash Bros. game, and there was one thing I wanted from it more than anything else. I tried not to expect it, not to get my hopes up, even when we got a special character introduction cinema after the main trailer. As the Nintendo characters looked up at the shadowy new arrival, part of my brain yelled at the other part not to get excited yet. Then that helmet appeared on the silhouette, and both sides exploded in hype. Mega Man was in Smash Bros. He had his first-ever HD design, and it looked fantastic. Surely this meant the franchise was alive, and a new Mega Man game announcement was imminent? Maybe even co-developed with Nintendo? Nope.

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What could have been.

As disappointing as that missed opportunity was, it was nothing compared to the other thing that happened in 2013. Yes, I know, this is supposed to be about Mega Man, and technically this announcement wasn’t related to Mega Man, according to lawyers at least. But you have to be the most gullible person on the planet to believe that. Yep, we’re going to talk about Mighty No. 9.

In 2013, Mega Man’s “father” Keiji Inafune launched a Kickstarter for an “original IP” called Mighty No. 9. But literally every single person in the universe knew from the start that this was supposed to be the spiritual successor to Mega Man. Starring the fighting robot Beck, his creator Dr. William White (aka Bill Blackwell), a supportive female robot named Call, and eight Mighty Number robots that Beck had to defeat/save and take the powers of, Mighty No. 9 would almost certainly have resulted in a lawsuit if it wasn’t for the fact that the gaming public’s consensus was that Inafune had a moral right to copy Mega Man. Capcom didn’t need any more bad PR, and the Kickstarter was a record-breaking success. Mighty No. 9 was coming, and it would for all intents and purposes revive Mega Man.

Oh dear God, where to start. Well, right at the beginning, my feelings towards the game weren’t super positive. I deeply resent Kickstarters that put console versions of the game as a stretch goal that requires funding every extra imaginable for the PC version first, and I wasn’t convinced that Capcom wouldn’t sue and stop the game from being made. I also wasn’t comfortable with the idea that MN9 meant we didn’t need Mega Man anymore and that the franchise could just stay dead. But it was still “better than nothing” and once the console versions were confirmed, I anticipated MN9. For a brief period, anyway.

Let me see if I can remember everything that went wrong during Mighty No. 9’s development. The graphics were severely downgraded from the target renders, the community manager for the backers was mired in controversy (to be as generous as possible), the game was repeatedly delayed after exact release dates were given, Keiji Inafune started a Kickstarter for a not-Mega Man Legends game before MN9 was released, Inafune was revealed to have far less to do with Mega Man’s creation than most had believed, the physical rewards for backers were put in delay limbo and the launch trailer was insultingly patronizing unless you liked anime (in which case, it insulted you directly). This trailer was so bad, even the head of one of the companies working on it was disgusted by it. And this is before the game was actually released.

When the game was finally released in 2016, there was no miracle to overcome the many, many issues during development. While not an absolutely horrible game, Mighty No. 9 has sloppy collision detection, some horrifically obnoxious and generally uninspired levels, and a combo system meant to differentiate it from existing Mega Man games was more annoying than anything. In addition, the graphics looked terrible to make sure it could run on Vita and 3DS… and neither of those versions even came out.

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Behold what became of your false idol.

So it was universally agreed upon that Mighty No. 9 was not, in fact, the revival of Mega Man that we had all been waiting for and Keiji Inafune’s reputation has been completely ruined to this day. Once again, all I had to show for this was some vindication (looks like we weren’t fine if Mega Man stayed dead) that didn’t comfort me at all. Thankfully, after several bleak years in gaming, 2017 saw a massive upswing for me. Nintendo made another miraculous comeback thanks to the Switch, Japanese games as a whole started to recover, and the existing eighth generation systems had completely gotten over their long start of the generation slump. Even Capcom was getting some positivity again, with Resident Evil 7 being considered a return to form for the series. Several series I had been missing/worried about the future of got new installments announced in 2017, including Darksiders, Xenoblade, and (especially) Metroid. As 2017 drew to a close, gaming looked brighter than it had since… 2010…

Yes, as all these good things happened in gaming, there was something always at the back of my mind. Something that I wanted most of all, something that would truly signal that things were going to be okay, something I refused to ever let myself expect for fear of more disappointment. It was the start of December 2017, and something was going to happen. A special stream for Mega Man’s 30th anniversary was scheduled, but no one was getting their hopes up. Capcom seemed to have forgotten how to make new Mega Man games, but they were perfectly willing to re-release his games and use his image for money however possible (I was so desperate for a new game that I initially accepted the existence of that awful new cartoon in the hopes it would spawn a licensed game). So celebrating Mega Man’s past with no regard for his future was completely in character and had happened before. But I decided to watch anyway, and hey, at least they were re-releasing the X series this time. Then they said there was one more thing they wanted to show us…

A trailer that showed Mega Man running through the years as we saw all his games listed, and shown in the case of the Classic series, began. The sides of my mind that had argued during the Smash Bros. trailer were at it again, one side saying there was no reason to do a trailer like this and give it so much attention if it was going to end with seven years of nothing while the other tried to squash any hype or expectations. Despair took hold as the trailer appeared to end with a mere 30th anniversary logo, but then the skit continued and we saw Dr. Wily escaping while Mega Man followed him. The sides of my mind were in a full shouting match again while Mega Man approached a question mark symbol listed under 2018, and teleported away when he touched it…

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You will always remember where you were when Mega Man came back.

I’ve said this before, but it’s true: that was the closest a video game trailer has ever come to making me cry. That feeling when Mega Man teleported into a level in a BRAND NEW game after so many years of (what I had hoped was) hibernation is indescribable. I think the several years’ worth of frustration and worry actually flew away from my body in eight pulsating rings of light. I watched that trailer again and again, I still watch it when I need a burst of positivity, remembering how I felt when it was confirmed that Mega Man was coming back. I’ve dubbed that day, December 4th, 2017, Mega Man Isn’t Dead Day. Mega Man 11’s existence was the announcement that excited me the most in a year full of incredible ones. It signaled that Capcom was truly on the road to recovery (which 2018 further demonstrated with the massive success of Monster Hunter World, long awaited and great looking footage of the Resident Evil 2 remake, and the announcement of Devil May Cry 5), and that gaming as a whole had been saved from the dark cloud of pessimism that had hung over the mid-2010s.

So there isn’t a huge amount to say after that point. The long and painful absence of the Blue Bomber got his revival game far more mainstream attention than it would have had otherwise, even if I still don’t think it was worth the years of agony. Mega Man 11 information has been gradually drip fed to us throughout the year, and I have been very impressed by the level design shown in the gameplay footage and the demo level. The wait is almost over, in a matter of weeks (or days when you read this) the first Mega Man game in eight and a half years will have arrived. I’m looking forward to creating new Mega Man memories with it and hopefully getting my holy grail of Mega Man X9 after waiting so long. I just wanted to share how important this series is to me and how much fans of it have gone through to get to this moment, so until next time, just remember that Mega Man is alive and there is always hope for gaming.

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Shedding Light on My Dark Souls

In 2009, Demon’s Souls was released.  Initially a cult favorite, its popularity grew and put From Software on the map worldwide.  The game spawned four titles that the copyright lawyers assure you are only spiritual successors, as well as a host of imitators.  The series really hit the mainstream with Demon’s Souls’ immediate not-sequel Dark Souls, and its incredibly challenging, unforgiving and epic dark fantasy quests became iconic.  Until reviewers passed the title on to Crash Bandicoot and Cuphead to hide how terrible they were at old-school platformers and action shooters, Dark Souls became the go-to example of a hard game.  It was the Dark Souls of lazy and often nonsensical comparisons.

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No, seriously, they compared this to Dark Souls, look it up.

My feelings on the series (Demon’s Souls, Dark Souls 1-3, and Bloodborne, the fan name for the collective being Soulsborne) are… complicated.  I wanted to like the series, lengthy and challenging action-adventure games in a dark fantasy setting sounded great to me.  But with all those stats and equipment to manage, despite being Japanese I would classify the Soulsborne games (or at least the earlier ones) as really hard WRPGs.  I have no problem with hard games if they’re in a genre I like, but WRPGs are definitely not one of those genres.  And the controls and hit detection seemed too clunky for such a demanding game.  But were my complaints legitimate, or just me refusing to adapt to a series outside of my comfort zone?  I was never completely sure, which was a major reason I haven’t said much about these games before.

Well, the series offered to meet me halfway, and I accepted.  Bloodborne and Dark Souls 3 addressed some of my major issues (the characters move faster and checkpoints are a little more sane), and I managed to beat both of them.  For reference, I made it around a quarter of the way through Demon’s Souls before giving up, and only played a little bit of a friend’s copy of Dark Souls to confirm it hadn’t fixed my issues.  I didn’t bother trying Dark Souls 2.  I’m not claiming to be an expert on the series, but am I a fan?  I’m still not completely sure, which is why I’m writing this article.  While playing Dark Souls 3 (I beat that very recently, while Bloodborne was a couple years ago), I switched several times between finding it an enjoyable and satisfying game, and being furious at it and wanting to quit.  But either way, it was addictive and dominated my gaming time.  When I finished it, I felt a wave of emotion that was part accomplishment and part relief.  I’ve been trying to understand and articulate my thoughts on the series, and I think I’ve finally gotten it.

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I hate this asshole more than any other boss in recent memory.

The Soulsborne games have a concept I love, they are in a genre that has great potential to draw me in.  I really want to like them, but I feel like there are some serious flaws that could be easily fixed.  However, many of these flaws haven’t been addressed, and I think a major reason for that is that reviewers and the gaming community are refusing to acknowledge these flaws.  As the series progresses, some of my problems are addressed, but others are completely ignored.  I trudge through these issues to get at the part of the game that I enjoy, while wishing that the genre could fix these flaws and feeling resentful towards the rabid fanbase of the series for refusing to acknowledge these issues as flaws.  As these thoughts went through my head, I realized there was a very close parallel to my feelings about Soulsborne in a different series.  Yes, for all the games that supposedly are the Dark Souls (apparently the first difficult game ever made) of their genre, Soulsborne itself fits into that mold.

Dark Souls is the Grand Theft Auto of the 2010s. 

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Forget King’s Field, this is the Dark Souls prototype.

Yes, Soulsborne lines up almost perfectly with the beloved sandbox codifier that contains my personal punching bag (Grand Theft Auto 3 will always be terrible no matter how much the series improves).  And I think I’ve pinpointed what I find so frustrating about both the Soulsborne games and the pre-Grand Theft Auto V GTA games…

Recently, I’ve grown fond of the term “quality of life” as it relates to game design.  I define quality of life as features in a game that reduce frustration and inconvenience without making the game easier.  Being able to quickly equip items or abilities in real time instead of constantly pausing, information about items and stats prominently displayed and easy to access, the ability to retry challenges on the spot instead of being forced to commit suicide if you think you’ve messed up too much to finish an area.  And I’m sorry to say that in many ways the Soulsborne games seem to pride themselves on being anti-quality of life.  Want to fight a boss again?  In the later games you can almost always run to that boss easily without enemies getting any hits on you, but every time the boss kills you have to make that run again.  To make matters worse, you have to deal with a load time that’s longer than it would be if you could just respawn in the boss room.  You aren’t allowed to have a map, which isn’t even justified by realism, explorers made their own maps.  You… you can’t even pause.  There’s an offline mode, for God’s sake, let us pause!

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Seriously, how the hell is not being able to pause an offline game acceptable?

This is in addition to things that do make the game harder, but in ways I feel aren’t legitimate.  Having one shot at collecting the souls/blood you had at your last death is an interesting feature, but something needs to be done about how it punishes you for making progress between checkpoints.  Die early?  You can easily get your experience points back.  Make lots of progress then die?  You are very likely screwed.  And don’t get me started on using an item, dying, the enemies you killed along the way respawning, and that item STILL BEING GONE.  The line between challenging and cheap is always… one of those… to draw, but I think there are some elements of the Soulsborne games that are legitimately cheap.

So, what is my overall point, what am I hoping to get out of this?  Well, it ties back to the Grand Theft Auto parallels.  In 2008, Saints Row 2 came out, and in 2012 I finally tried the “GTA rip-off.”  It was night and day, SR2 kept everything I liked about GTA and fixed all of my problems.  That’s what I want: the Saints Row 2 of Dark Souls.  A game that improves the genre so much that previous games in it feel unplayable in comparison.  Something that even makes the developer of the earlier, more famous series take notice and improve their games.

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We may have the Dark Souls of everything, but what we need is the Saints Row 2 of Dark Souls.

So, back to the question of how I feel about Soulsborne, it remains complicated.  The later games are for the most part enjoyable for me, but I’m actively hoping for a game that will make me unable to ever go back to them.  So I guess I’m a fan at the moment, but a fair amount of that comes from Stockholm Syndrome.  Soulsborne draws me in with things I love, and holds them hostage with needlessly annoying and frustrating “traditions” that its fanbase refuses to acknowledge as flaws.  I seriously saw people arguing that the pre-patch Bloodborne load times were a good thing because they punished the player for dying.  Few internet gaming opinions have aggravated me that much.  For the time being, the Soulsborne games are good, but they could be so much better.  Let’s just hope that someday a Saint-like franchise fills these Dark Souls with light.

Retronaissance’s Most Anticipated Games of 2017

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Well, 2016 is almost over, and while there were some great games released, I mainly just want this year to end and to focus on the future (or gaming’s future, anyway).  Thankfully, 2017 in gaming fills me with a sense of true optimism (as opposed to forced hope) that I haven’t had in a long time, lots of series that haven’t had an entry (or a satisfying entry) in years are returning and while Nintendo has a lot less representation on this list than my ones from previous years, things should Switch on that front very early in the year.  So, let’s hurry up and get our focus to the new year.  I’ve decided to handle games from previous lists that got hit by delays with a rule that games can only appear on my lists twice, so Zelda won’t be showing up this time.  Let’s get this started!

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10 More Games I Want Ported to PC

Hey, I said this was going to be a recurring series last time, didn’t I? If you’ve read any of my previous articles, you’ll know that I’ve been getting more and more into PC gaming in the last few years. One of the big reasons for that is the emphasis on backwards compatibility: even when the game’s original developers fail to deliver, it usually takes a resourceful fan a short amount of time to make it work again on newer systems. Consoles just don’t deliver on that as well as they did during the previous two generations. On the plus side, with the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 running on PC architecture, PC ports could be beneficial to console gamers as well, allowing for easier and enhanced re-releases of these older games.

Before I recap the rules I established in the previous article, I’d like to give a shout-out to Deep Silver for taking down one of the games I had planned for a future list, before I even got the chance to set it up: Suda 51’s latest game Killer is Dead is coming to PCs this May. So I’ll have to replace that in a future list. Anyway, the rules are the same as they were in the last article: only one game per company per list; sticking mostly to third-party companies (with the exception of Microsoft, who is known to release games on PC as well), especially those that have released games on PC recently and games will specifically be taken from the seventh (Wii/360/PS3) and eighth (WiiU/XBO/PS4) generations, especially those that were on multiple consoles at the time of their release. Finally, games that are both from the same series that were released on the same platform CAN be packaged together. So, once again, let’s get on with the list.

Darkstalkers Resurrection – Capcom (360/PS3)

Anyone who has known me for a good amount of time knows that I love me some Capcom fighting games. At the top of that list stands not Street Fighter, not the Vs. Series, but Darkstalkers, a cult classic fighter revolving around some of cinema’s classic monsters duking it out in a fight to the death. I love me some Darkstalkers and when the second and third games in the series (Night Warriors and Vampire Savior, respectively) recently got re-released on PSN and Xbox Live Arcade, I just had to jump on it. I got both releases of the game the first day they were available and I had a lot of fun with them. Unfortunately, the game sold poorly on these platforms. So why ask for a PC release? Well, while it is possible to emulate both games online with the same netcode Resurrection used, that’s not exactly legal. I’d jump at the chance to have a legal avenue to play some Darkstalkers on my PC. More importantly, PC gamers are clamoring for some legitimate fighting game releases, to the point where Arc System Works recently allowed other publishers re-release the mediocre PC ports of both Guilty Gear Isuka and the Blazblue: Calamity Trigger on Steam (which lacks netcode, due to GfWL shutting down and no one bothering to convert it to Steamworks) and people are just eating it up, in an effort to show ASW that yes, people want their games on PC. Ultimate Marvel vs Capcom 3 may be the number one Capcom fighting game people are demanding a PC port for, but I’m well aware that Capcom’s deals with Marvel has lapsed.

Blazblue Chronophantasma/Continuum Shift EX – Arc System Works (AC/PS3/Vita/360*)

Speaking of Blazblue, I definitely want the other games in the series to see releases on PC. I guess at this point, getting Continuum Shift EX is useless for the most part, since its sequel Chronophantasma is already out in Japan and is due out in North America later this month. Anyone who’s familiar with the series, however, knows that there’s more to Blazblue than just having the current version ready for tournaments. The series has an extensive story mode, and considering the fact that we’ve got the first game’s story mode, it seems like it would be good to have the complete story up to this point, so doing a two-pack (perhaps gut CSEX’s online component like CT’s if that would make a port more cost-effective) would be great, especially for PC-only gamers who really want to get into the series. Xrd is still probably my top priority for a PC port, just because it’s both newer and runs on Unreal Engine 3 (which was literally made for PCs). Still, I’d probably be happier if the other Blazblue games made it to PC instead, as Calamity Trigger was the first Arc fighter I honestly enjoyed: my poor luck with the Guilty Gear series is legendary. Just my opinion, though.

Splatterhouse – Namco Bandai (360/PS3)

I’ve never really been that big on the survival horror genre, but I do tend to love games that borrow thematic elements from horror movies. Each game in the original Splatterhouse trilogy was a side-scrolling beat-‘em-up where you take on the role of Rick, who dons the cursed Terror Mask to save his girlfriend from a mansion filled with Lovecraftian horrors. In 2010, Namco Bandai rebooted the classic series as an action hack-and-slash, and while it wasn’t critically-acclaimed by any means, I loved the game. The atmosphere, the gameplay and especially the voice acting: if you can’t appreciate Jim Cummings cursing out Josh Keaton, I pity you. The only real flaw that bothered me was the abysmal load times which a properly-optimized PC port could easily fix. As an added bonus, Splatterhouse 2010 actually contained ports of the original trilogy as well, so even long-time fans who hated the reimagining have some incentive to pick it up. Besides, Namco Bandai recently ported Enslaved to PC, so why not Splatterhouse?

NeoGeo Battle Coliseum – SNK Playmore (360)

Considering we’ve recently seen Metal Slug 3 released on Steam, it seems like SNK Playmore has jumped on the Steam hype train. Frankly, I’d like to see something a little more recent come out. NeoGeo Battle Coliseum was one of Playmore’s first fighting games after regaining the SNK license and it’s an awesome little game. A 2-on-2 tag-team fighter that uses characters from various SNK games: King of Fighters, Samurai Shodown, Last Blade, Garou: Mark of the Wolves, King of the Monsters and even Marco Rossi from Metal Slug. I’ve had a hankering for more classic SNK fighters and NGBC is not only one of my favorites, but an underrated gem. Considering it was re-released on XBLA, just port that version, throw in the improved netcode from King of Fighters XIII or MS3, and you’ve got a solid release on your hands.

Sega Model 2 Collection – Sega (360/PS3)

The worst part is, this shouldn’t even be on here. Many sources online claimed that Sega’s Model 2 Collection was coming to PCs back when it was initially announced. Unfortunately, that never came to be, which is a shame, because I really want to get my hands on Fighting Vipers, one of my favorite 3D fighters of all-time, and the enhanced port of Sonic the Fighters, which finally made long-time dummied-out character Honey the Cat fully playable for the first time in any legitimate release. Virtua Fighter 2 would always be welcome as well. To make matters even better, Sega could also pony up the two games that we never got in the North American or European console releases: the original Virtual-On and Virtua Striker. Granted, in that case, Virtual On would be a higher priority for me than even VF2, but let’s keep it simple: porting the 3 games that were released outside of Japan to PC would be fine.

Vigilante 8 Arcade – Activision (360)

I’ve been a fan of car combat games ever since I played the original Twisted Metal at my aunt’s house when I was a kid. Unfortunately, Twisted Metal’s a Sony franchise, so asking for a PC port these days would be a fool’s errand. Besides, the latest game in the series (Twisted Metal for PS3) was apparently garbage. Fortunately, there’s one series in the genre I liked even more than TM and it’s ripe for the taking: Vigilante 8. Vigilante 8 Arcade was the third game in the series, released on the Xbox Live Arcade early in the 360’s life cycle, but it’s a pretty stellar semi-remake of the original game. Sure, it’s a little barebones and it’s an early title, but frankly, I’d love to see it get ported to PC at some point, even if just for the sake of preservation.

Red Dead Redemption – Rockstar (360/PS3)

This is a big one that people have been demanding for a long time, so I’m really just stating the obvious here. I’m one of the few gamers out there who actually remembers Red Dead Revolver, so I was ecstatic to hear it was getting a sequel on seventh-gen consoles. Unfortunately, they ditched PC for that release. Many other Rockstar games from that era got late PC ports: Grand Theft Auto IV, L.A. Noire and it’s been speculated that even GTAV is getting a PC port at some point. Unfortunately, I don’t really care much for GTA, I want RDR on my PC. Make it happen, Rockstar.

Mighty Switch Force! Hyper Drive Edition – WayForward Interactive (Wii U)

I haven’t really made it a secret: I’m a really big fan of WayForward Interactive’s work. They’ve made some of the best licensed games in recent times and their original IPs are generally fantastic. Considering we’re already getting the second and upcoming fourth Shantae games on PC, it seems fair to branch out and ask for a different series. Mighty Switch Force! HD Edition is a perfect choice, as it’s already an upscaled version of the 3DS eShop hit. Since the Gamepad support in the game was minimal, it seems like porting this to the PC would be simple, if not for the fact that WayFoward has a hectic schedule as it is. Still, this is a wishlist and I want more WayForward games on PC.

Muramasa: The Demon Blade (Rebirth) – Vanillaware/Marvelous AQL (Wii/Vita)

Muramasa: The Demon Blade was probably one of my favorite games on the Wii, so I was happy to hear it was getting an expanded port. Then I found out that port was for the Vita. What a waste of resources. Marvelous AQL has some experience porting games to PC and they handled the North American release of Muramasa Rebirth. Maybe they could even upscale the graphics to at least 720p, so we’d finally be able to appreciate Vanillaware’s hand-drawn 2D artwork in its full splendor. Bundle it with the additional DLC content exclusive to the Vita version, and it would be perfect.

Shadow Complex – Microsoft Studios (360)

I love a good Metroid-like. Most people call them “Metroidvanias”. I used to be one of those people until a friend of mine told me it bugged him and why it bugged him: because while Castlevania games in that style may have borrowed from Super Metroid, the same could not be said for the Metroid series itself. Why have I gone off on this random tangent? Simply because the only thing I really know about this game is that it’s one of the best Metroid-style exploration platformers to have come out in a long time. That’s good enough for me.

And that’s another list done. So far, two of the games on any incarnation of the six lists I’ve planned already have PC ports confirmed. While Killer is Dead: Nightmare Edition isn’t due out until this May, Double Dragon Neon was released last month. Abstraction Games did an excellent job on that port, even quickly patching many minor glitches in the PC version. Hopefully, by the time my third list is ready, a third game’s PC port will have been announced. Sure, that’s just wishful thinking at this point, but here’s hoping.

The Next Level: Selling Sega Bit by Bit (Part 1)

If you’ll recall, one of the earliest articles I wrote for this site was about Sega’s falling finances. Since that article was written, Sega’s been hit with the whole Aliens: Colonial Marines PR fiasco and they may be looking at a potential class-action lawsuit. Sega’s ship appears to be sinking once again, after losing one of the four or five key franchises they planned on using to remain afloat in these trying economic times, so now seems like as good a time as any to revisit the subject, wouldn’t you say? Last time, I explored the idea of other companies buying out Sega wholesale, but considering what happened with the bankruptcies of both Midway and THQ, it seems fitting to think of just what might happen if Sega gets cut up and each asset gets sold off to the highest bidder individually. So I’ve picked out 10 Sega IPs, some with recent releases, some that haven’t been seen for over a decade, some popular, and some so obscure you’ll probably think I just made them up. And just like last time, I’m not really dealing with what’s likely or possible, just what I personally think would be for the best when it comes to each individual intellectual property.

First up, the most obvious Sega franchise to get sold off: the blue blur himself, Sonic the Hedgehog. There’s an obvious answer to this one, folks. Some of you aren’t going to like it, but who cares. Nintendo has shown themselves in the past to be the best modern company when it comes to dealing with mascot platformers and even treated Sonic with respect when he made an appearance as a guest character in Super Smash Bros. Brawl. Needless to say, I’m sure that Nintendo is more than capable of continuing Sonic’s rehabilitation into a solid series, especially considering their heavy involvement in the recently announced Sonic: Lost World. Failing that, I wouldn’t mind seeing Ubisoft getting their hands on Sonic. Just imagine what a new 2D Sonic might look like on the Ubi Art engine. Just the thought of that gives me goosebumps.

Next up, Virtua Fighter, the first 3D fighting game ever. Not gonna say I’ve followed the series as much recently, but I loved the first 3 games. The obvious answer here is Tecmo Koei. Let’s face it, Dead or Alive’s gameplay is practically identical to that of VF (with a few minor tweaks) and while DoA is considering a wobbling, jiggling joke amongst serious fighting game fans, Virtua Fighter’s pedigree is assured. Besides, VF characters made appearances in DoA5. And while Namco-Bandai is an obvious runner-up, as they’ve made two of the most popular 3D fighter series of all time (Tekken and the Soul series), I feel like Virtua Fighter would be a much better fit for Capcom. Let’s face it, Capcom’s been trying to get back into the fighting game market, but their past 3D offerings have been…well, mediocre at best. Besides, Tekken and Virtua Fighter are two totally different animals.

Then there’s the NiGHTS franchise. Effectively Sonic Team’s first attempt at a 3D platformer, NiGHTS filled the gap left when the Saturn didn’t have a Sonic platformer to call its own. An interesting game in its own right, known for its beautiful (albeit extremely polygonal) artstyle and amazing soundtrack, which truly brought the dream world Nightopia to life. Just due to the family-friendly atmosphere of the series, I’m leaving it in the hands of Nintendo. Sure, Journey to Dreams was kind of lame for a sequel, but I’m sure that with enough time, the Big N could nail down the formula. Otherwise, the game itself seems like a perfect companion to the Klonoa series, so give it to Namco Bandai.

Speaking of games with weak sequels, how about Golden Axe? Man, was Beast Rider a stinker or what? I’d probably end up handing off this one to Capcom, simply for the purpose of killing two birds with one stone. Some people want a Golden Axe sequel that lives up to the original. Some people want a sequel to Capcom’s Dungeons and Dragons beat-’em-ups (which are finally being re-released on every major digital platform). So like that little girl in that taco commercial, I ask: why don’t we have both? Combining the Golden Axe mythos and setting with the gameplay from Capcom’s D&D games would be muy bueno, don’t you agree? If that doesnt work out, I guess Konami, the once-king of beat-’em-ups, is my saving throw. Just because I’d like to think that there’s a chance they could pick themselves up and stop making a mockery of their former glory. Fat chance.

Crazy Taxi was another one of Sega’s arcade hits turned console classics. It was also the subject of another lawsuit, this time in Sega’s favor against both EA and FOX Interactive in regards to another forgettable Simpsons licensed game. Regardless, Crazy Taxi was beloved in its own right, with its unique objective-based racing gameplay. I can only really think of one company these days that tackles arcade-style racing games (and isn’t EA) and that’s Namco Bandai. Nintendo would also be a good choice, as there’s a possibility they might just make it an arcade game again. Just not EA. Screw EA.

One of the cornerstone franchises of modern-day Sega is the Ryu ga Gotoku series, better known outside of Japan as Yakuza. The games themselves are effectively a cross between open-world sandbox games (GTA, Saints Row, etc.) and modern 3D action games, particularly ones that ape the classic beat-’em-ups of old (God Hand) with some action-RPG elements thrown in for flavor, set against a backdrop inspired by popular Japanese yakuza films. I’ll be frank: I think Atlus is the best possible company to handle the continuation of the Yakuza brand, due to the fluidity of the brand. If they don’t pick up the rights, I’d just give it to Take-Two Interactive or maybe Deep Silver. Maybe it would help them experiment a little more with regards to their respective sandbox games.

Phantasy Star is one of those rare Sega games that debuted in the days of the Master System and still manages to see new entries to this day: the second Phantasy Star Online game is due to hit the West sometime this year, along with iOS, Android and even PlayStation Vita ports. Once again, I think Atlus would be the best ones to handle this franchise. They have plenty of experience with regards to many forms of RPGs, from traditional JRPGs (the Persona series)to RPG hybrids (the upcoming Dragon’s Crown). And considering the way their North American branch handled Demon’s Souls’s online, it seems like they’d be able to handle both the classic Phantasy Star or the much more popular PSO series quite well. Level-5 might also be a good choice, considering their work on games like Rogue Galaxy and Ni no Kuni.

Another series originating from Sega’s pre-Genesis days was Shinobi. Appearing on many systems ranging from the arcades all the way to the 3DS, Shinobi, while not one of Sega’s most lucrative franchises, is still among its most beloved over old-school fans. Considering their interest in the Darksiders franchise and their own (albeit recently-ended) relationship with Sega, Platinum Games seems like a fair choice to take on Joe Higashi et al.’s adventure, considering their success with action games like the Bayonetta series and Anarchy Reigns. FromSoftware would be another valid choice (they have self-published a few of their games in Japan) considering they’ve worked on a few Tenchu games and have made some games that are really difficult, like a good Shinobi game should be. Perhaps you’ve heard of one: Demon’s Souls? Regardless, as with Yakuza, keeping Shinobi Japanese seems like it should be a top priority for the series.

Now onto some obscure games. First off: Panzer Dragoon. Oddly enough, my top pick for the classic rail shooter is Q Entertainment, the developer behind such games as Child of Eden and…well, a whole bunch of puzzle games. Considering how well Q did with Child of Eden, their spiritual successor to Sega’s Rez, I think seeing their take on the Panzer Dragoon series would be interesting. Otherwise, give it to Treasure. Those Sin and Punishment games were amazing.

Then there’s what is arguably Sega’s most popular rhythm game, Space Channel 5. The rhythm market has kind of dried up lately, but I can think of a few companies that still make them. The one I’m going with is Nintendo: Rhythm Heaven is at least as quirky as the SC5 series was and frankly, I’d love to see what kind of stuff The Big N might do with either the Wii U’s gamepad or the 3DS itself. Namco Bandai, who are still making Taiko no Tatsujin in Japan to this day would probably be my second choice.

Next, there is what may very well be the most obscure Sega franchise I’ll discuss: Comix Zone. An awesome action beat-’em-up featuring amazing (at the time) comic book-inspired graphics and interesting fourth-wall breaking gameplay mechanics. Considering both the game’s strictly Western influences and the fact it was developed by Sega Technical Institute, a dev team located in the United States, I don’t think a Japanese publisher could do Comix Zone justice. I just ended up picking WB Interactive, considering they’ve done quite well with the Midway franchises they’ve obtained and the fact that they’ve published totally awesome games like Lollipop Chainsaw, I’m more than willing to say the franchise would be in good hands. Ubisoft‘s really the only other major Western publisher I can think of that’s dabbled in the beat-’em-up genre, with Scott Pilgrim vs. The World.

Finally, there’s Space Harrier, one of Sega’s earliest franchises. Effectively one of the earliest on-rail shooters, SH had a few arcade sequels and a few home ports, but mainly lives on due to various references in other Sega games, such as Sonic and All-Stars Racing Transformed including the main theme on one of its tracks. Considering how similar the game is to the Sin & Punishment games, Treasure seems like a perfect fit for the franchise, especially given their history with Sega. Handing it off to Q Entertainment might also be interesting, they’d definitely have an original take for the series.

So there you have it, a dozen Sega games paired up with companies that might end up doing them justice. But let’s face it: I definitely missed some important franchises this time around. So see you later this month with Part 2 and another 12 Sega games I didn’t get to cover this time around.