The Year Without a PC Port Wishlist

Christmas has pretty much always been my favorite holiday, especially when I was a child. I was a greedy little boy while I was growing up: one of my favorite holiday traditions was always writing up my list to Santa on my computer. Sure, some years I’d get overzealous and start thinking about it as early as August, but I’d always have a lot of fun just writing the list itself. I’d always try to sort things in the order I wanted them, but that was actually part of the fun for me: one week I’d really want some action figures, the next some new video game caught my eye. The downside to starting a list that early is that as time goes on, new items catch your eye. Even the greed of a child has its limits, so I would often have to pare down my list, trimming the items I could “do without”. (Gotta love child logic, am I right?) In a sense, I think those PC ports lists I wrote for a long time were the evolution of that favored Yule tradition, but eventually I got tired of doing them. Too much wishing, not enough getting. I’ve taken a hiatus on them and now, it’s been over a year. Instead of making an entirely new one, why not look over my previous works and analyze them a little? This year, I’ll be recounting my 5 favorite success stories, my top 10 most wanted and the game on each list I’d consider the most important (excluding those on the aforementioned lists) plus a brand-new one for good measure!

Before we get started (fittingly enough, with my favorite success stories), I’d like to start with some recent successes as well. Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 was released on PS4 earlier this month and it will also be hitting both the Xbox One and Steam in March. Meanwhile, Garou: Mark of the Wolves was also recently released on PlayStation consoles via CodeMystics, but surprise, surprise: an entirely different port hit Steam soon after, from the good folks at DotEmu. In fact, it was such a surprise, I actually had to change a list entry because of it. The DotEmu port is less fancy than the CodeMystics port, but apparently, not only does the Steam version have a more solid netcode, but it’s also getting immediate bugfixes to iron out some of its bizarre glitches. Funny how that works. I expected that to be the last bit of news I got on the PC end of things, but I was wrong: The Legend of Dark Witch 2, another game I’d been salivating over the prospect of seeing a PC port is announced to be hitting Steam sometime during “Q4 2016”. One last big surprise for me.

You’ll also remember that this past April, I did an “April Fools’ Day” article, revolving around 10 PC games I’d like to see receive console ports. Well, like many of my jokes, this one ended up biting me in the ass. During the PlayStation Experience, Ys Origin (the only PC-exclusive Ys game) was announced to be hitting both PlayStation 4 and, amazingly enough, the Vita on February 21, 2017 with the port being handled by the good people over at DotEmu who are utilizing XSEED’s English translation and coming up with original French, Italian, German and Spanish translations as well. (As an aside, DotEmu’s also bringing a favorite of mine – the NeoGeo classic Windjammers – to the same platforms. Let’s keep our fingers crossed for a PC port down the line!) You’d think that would be enough, but the world wasn’t done having fun at my expense: soon after, it was revealed that the indie platformer Kero Blaster would also be coming to the PS4, thanks to its publisher Playism. They’ll also be bringing Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight to PS4, though release windows for both titles have not been announced. Continue reading

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Retro or Reboot?: Streets of Rage 4

(I’d like to preface this article with an apology for the lack of activity lately. I just wasn’t feeling motivated to write any more articles for the past couple of months, mainly due to writer’s block. Fortunately, I’ve got some ideas now and I’ve decided to make up for the hiatus by posting two articles each for the next two months.)

One of my favorite series to write on this blog was Sum of Its Parts. Unfortunately, lately I’ve been lacking proper topics to continue it. I’ve received some outside suggestions, but they were all inappropriate: they were either series that I’m not familiar with or, worse still, series where there’s already an ideal game in the series (which kind of defeats the entire point of a series dedicated to fashioning together elements from numerous games to form an ideal sequel, don’t you think?). Still, I enjoyed writing those articles too much to just completely give up on the idea, so I decided to try retooling it a bit, to create a sort of “successor” to the original concept. Having said that, I hope you enjoy the first of what I hope to be many articles in this new series, Retro or Reboot?

But what is the point of this new series? Basically, I’ll be taking a series that has been inactive for at least two generations (so, at this point, we’d be seeing stuff from the PS2 era or earlier), preferably one that saw all of its releases in the span of a single generation and speculate two potential avenues for a modern revival: a retro-themed revival that would simply try to recreate the original concept (albeit with more modern technology and likely end up as a budget release) and a higher-scale reboot that would take the original concept and try to transpose it onto a genre that would be more palatable for modern audiences. Of course, both of these could go wrong very easily, but I’m going to back away from my standard cynicism and just go with what I’d consider the ideal for both iterations could be.

Today’s topic is, obviously, Streets of Rage: one of my all-time favorite beat-‘em-up series. The entire trilogy was released on the Genesis back in its heyday, though the first two games also received scaled-down ports on Sega’s Game Gear. Since then, the original games have seen multiple re-releases on modern platforms. Aside from that, the series has laid dormant since the third (and currently, final) game was released. Of course, that’s not to say that there haven’t been attempts to revive the series. The short-lived PS1/Nintendo 64 3D beat-‘em-up Fighting Force was originally an attempt at making a fourth Streets of Rage game on the Saturn. There was also an attempt at a series revival on Dreamcast, Bionic Commando Rearmed developer GRIN was working on a 3D remake before their closure, Backbone Entertainment pitched a new game, and even Ruffian Games (developers of Crackdown) made a pitch for an updated revival on what is assumed to be 7th-generation platforms. Unfortunately, none of these projects ever came to fruition and alas, the series has remained inactive since 1994.

Retro

Simply put, we’re talking about going back to basics here. A straight-up, good old fashioned multi-plane beat-‘em-up, in either a fully 2D or a 2.5D style. Of course, Streets of Rage 4 may not be the best possible title for a game like this, considering Sega’s previous attempt at an old-school revival with that number, but for the time being, let’s just use that title as a placeholder.

Potential developers for a retro-themed revival would be a good start, but before we get to that, I’ve got a couple of honorable mentions that were disqualified for various reasons. It’s a shame Sega scared off the team behind that awesome fan-made Streets of Rage remake, they were literally perfect for this kind of a project. Likewise, Double Helix did an amazing job on the Strider and Killer Instinct revivals, so seeing their work on a SoR game would’ve been great. Alas, they got bought out by Amazon and are likely relegated to making shoddy smartphone games for the rest of their tenure there. Just as well though, I wasn’t really fond of their designs for Jago or Hiryu anyway, so I shudder to think how they would’ve done up Axel.

With the honorable mentions out of the way, I do have a few developers in mind that I’d love to see work on this. First and foremost, WayForward Interactive. They did an amazing job on Double Dragon Neon (my favorite beat-‘em-up of last generation) and they have a previous relationship with Sega (they developed the Metroidesque Aliens: Infestation for Sega on the Nintendo DS). Another developer I wouldn’t mind seeing work on this would be Vanillaware. Sega did buy out Atlus, with whom Vanillaware has a previously established relationship, and they’ve done some amazing work in the beat-‘em-up genre with Dragon’s Crown. Finally, in spite of my mixed feelings on their work in the Sonic series, I feel like Dimps Software would be another good choice for a Streets of Rage retro revival. Ignoring their hit-or-miss record on the Sonic franchise, Dimps has actually made a great number of good games, including work on the recent Street Fighter games and the Game Boy Advance title Dragon Ball: Advanced Adventure (a great example of a full-2D beat-‘em-up), Spikeout: Battle Street (a sequel to a Sega Dreamcast game that was considered a successor to the Streets of Rage series) and even Demolish Fist, an arcade-exclusive 2.5D beat-‘em-up in the same vein as Final Fight or Streets of Rage.

Now let’s go even further into detail on the most important part of the game: the gameplay itself. The most important thing any developer put in charge of this project must consider is the “feel” of Streets of Rage and how it compares to other beat-‘em-ups. Yes, I’m aware that this is as vague as “soul”, “emotion” or whatever buzzword people who don’t like modern games says in order to justify their inability to articulate what it is they think the game lacks, but trust me, it’s not quite that bad. I’ll elaborate. Beats of Rage is a fan-made engine that has been floating around the internet for a number of years that is based on the Genesis-era SoR games. Many games have been made in it, including fan-made sequels and/or remakes of other classic beat-‘em-ups such as Battletoads, Double Dragon and Final Fight. Of course, these games don’t feel quite right as entries in the series they’re supposed to take place in, they feel like reskinned versions of the later two Streets of Rage games. This is an important distinction to make and as such, the original trilogy’s gameplay engines (especially those of SoR2 and 3) should be the basis to shoot for when it comes to making a brand new game in the series.

A new game in the series doesn’t necessarily have to be a 1:1 recreation of the classic games in order to be a good Streets of Rage game. There are some modern conventions that SoR4 could take on that would improve the quality of the game. As an example, I’d like to bring up the evasion maneuvers in modern beat-‘em-ups like Double Dragon Neon and Dragon’s Crown. Old-school beat-‘em-ups were arcade games through and through, with cheap mechanics that guaranteed that the average arcade gamer would feed their machines with a thousand allowances’ worth of quarters. As we know, the arcade scene is pretty much dead outside of Japan, but beat-‘em-ups never really made the jump properly and still relied on their old tactics like unstoppable cheap beatdowns for the sake of difficulty. DD Neon gave players an evasion roll (ala The King of Fighters) which, if timed correctly, also gave players a boost in damage. Dragon’s Crown gave players the ability to backflip to avoid attacks, which could be leveled up to allow up to 4 evasions in a row. Branching paths, like those found in the cease-and-desisted SoR Remake would be another element I’d love to see brought into the series proper. I’ve always been a sucker for that gimmick. Maybe timed boss fights like those in SoR3 could be interesting, but only if they’re properly balanced. One last thing that I think would be a good addition to the series would be to make good on some lost content. I am, of course, referring to the motorcycle segment that was excised from the third SoR game. Let’s face it, it looked fun and it would definitely add some diversity to the gameplay.

Finally, let’s discuss the aesthetic. Earlier, I mentioned that I didn’t really care whether the game was done in true 2D or “2.5D”. I’d like to expand on that and say that regardless if SoR4 uses pixel art, high-definition 2D graphics or 3D models in its artstyle really doesn’t matter to me. What I find more important is whether or not the game resembles those from the Genesis era. As I mentioned earlier, there were numerous attempts to make another game in the Streets of Rage series and what I’ve noticed about most of them is that many of them barely resembled the games of old. Sure, Fighting Force and the Dreamcast SoR4 had their excuses, they were trying to apply a new spin on a then recent, if slightly outdated series. Less forgivable is what Backbone entertainment’s pitch entailed. The concept art that was released for their pitch was…unsettling, to be polite. In fact, the only pitch with an artstyle I really liked was GRIN’s, because it actually resembled the old games to some extent. Keep the old games in mind when handling the game’s art design and you can’t go wrong.

Reboot

An old-school beat-‘em-up from the arcade days might work well for a low-budget release, but for something demanding a decent budget, it would just be a waste of money. Fortunately, we’ve got a perfect successor to the genre: the modern action game. Games like Dynasty Warriors, Devil May Cry and God of War all stem from the beat-‘em-ups of old, so revitalizing Streets of Rage in this genre would be perfect.

Having said that, there’s really only one real choice for this one: Platinum Games. They have the action game pedigree (Madworld, the Bayonetta games and Transformers Devastation to name a few), the pre-existing relationship with Sega and the popularity with core gamers necessary to even attempt a revamp of this magnitude with minimal pessimism. Having said that, if they couldn’t get Platinum to do it, I’d have at least a little faith in Dimps if they got called in to handle this one.

With that out of the way, let’s go a bit more in-depth with the gameplay. Like I said earlier, the best way to modernize Streets of Rage would be to turn it into an action game. The question is, what level of craziness should we expect from a modern translation of SoR? Considering the fact that the first game allowed you to call bazooka support, the second game included locales like a baseball stadium and an amusement park and the third game’s plot involved resurrecting main villain Mr. X as a cyborg and replacing key figures around the city with robot duplicates, it’s safe to say that the series was never really grounded in reality. Fighting hordes of gangbangers across a location as interesting as “The City” is bound to be amazing to say the least. If Platinum ends up working on it, I’d want them to crank up the insanity levels significantly though. I’m talking “fighting the Statue of Liberty with your bare knuckles” (ha ha) insane.

Aesthetic is a much different beast in the reboot compared to the retro revival. As I said earlier, most of the later attempts at a new entry in the Streets of Rage series had aesthetic problems in my opinion. In this case, I feel like the Ruffian Games version best described my fears of what a big-budget SoR revamp could look like: a bland realistic-looking world. Personally, if they decide to go all-out for the graphics in a brand new game, I’d love for them to take artistic cues from the Japanese box art of the Bare Knuckle games. Keep everything really colorful with high contrast. Neon signs and other interesting effects in the city areas and maintain the series’ tendency towards crazy locales. Even the first game, which was more down to earth than any of the others, had a level on a cruise ship. Basically, make the game look like 1990s concept art fully realized. Finally and perhaps most importantly, if you decide to redesign any returning characters, make sure they actually resemble their original designs in some tangible way.

With the two options for a series revival fully realized, I’d like to wrap up my thoughts with some miscellaneous thoughts: elements I’d like to see in a new game in the Streets of Rage series, regardless of the direction it takes. First of all, it is imperative that they get Yuzo Koshiro back for the soundtrack. Next, as for a roster of returning characters, it would be great to see all of the characters from the first two games return. Yes, seeing Adam fight alongside Max would be great, and you’ve got to bring back Axel, Blaze and Skate as well. I was never really fond of Dr. Zan, but I wouldn’t really mind it if he and the other SoR3 characters returned as well.

And so the first article in the Retro or Reboot series comes to its conclusion. What do you think? Would you rather see a Genesis-style revival or one that’s more up-to-date? Do you disagree with any of my opinions about how either take on Streets of Rage should turn out? Let me know in the comments section.

From Good to Excellent

This article is dedicated to perhaps one of the most devious trends introduced to video game journalism as a whole, and considering it originated as little more than a catalog of paid advertisements aimed at children, that’s really saying something. Of course, I’m talking about what’s been referred to the “four-point scale”. By this point in time, it’s probably been around for the better part of a decade, with some notable exceptions. Unfortunately, the impact it’s had on the industry was both quickly apparent and toxic, especially its effects on the psyches of many core and hardcore gamers today.

For those of you who haven’t heard of it before, the “four-point scale” refers to a common phenomenon in modern video game reviews. Many journalists have a tendency when gives scores ranging in the top 40% of their respective scales. On a ten-point scale, this is represented by scores between 7 and 10 points, but in other scoring conventions it may manifest itself as scores between 3.5 and 5 or 70 and 100. Regardless, the trend basically shows that unless a game is entirely non-functional or the reviewer has some grudge against the game, the lowest score it can possibly get is would be a 7.

Of course, that explanation doesn’t explain the detrimental effect this trend has had on gaming. After all, a 70% score in education would either be considered the bare minimum for a C- or D-, depending on which scale the school in question uses. So, by extension, a 7/10 score would generally be considered a poor grade in any context. Unfortunately, the effect this has on the entire scale is profound. If a 7 is the lowest score commonly used in reviews, this affects the way the other scores in the scale are interpreted. Regardless of what most gamers think, an 8 out of 10 is a good score, NOT a bad one. Yet if a game that is generally well-liked by a significant grouping of gamers gets anything below a 9/10, even if they miss that by a tenth of a point, it’s considered a devastating insult and they end up going rabid about it. Granted, this doesn’t happen quite as often or as violently as it used to (probably due to a growing negativity amongst internet cultures in general, but that’s a topic for another time…and probably another blog), but I can still remember the fallout of Gamespot’s review for Twilight Princess way back in 2006. Over a score of 8.8.

Unfortunately, backlash against “unfair” reviews are probably the least serious of the negative effects of this trend. Even worse are the people who buy into the hype. Many gamers feel like any game that scores lower than an 8.5 or even a 9 has no right to exist. Another horrible side effect is that even reviewers are buying into the hype of the four-point scale. Take a look at a review for a game rated 7, 7.5 or even 8. If you ignored the scores, you’d think they’d given the game a 3 just based on the bile they spew at the game. Granted, maybe they would’ve given it a 3 but were forced to increase it to fit in the four-point scale. Regardless, it seems fairly unprofessional to see something with a relatively high score paired with an extremely critical review.

Perhaps worst of all is how it amplifies the effect a bad review can have on the game’s developer. Even a single low score can taint a developer’s reputation for years. Take Double Helix, when they were revealed to be the developers of the recent Killer Instinct and Strider games, gamers threw a collective tantrum, bringing up how shoddy their licensed games were. Because most tie-ins are of the finest quality, right? The gloom and doom became so impenetrable, even in my own small circle of friends, that I went from hating KI 2013 as much as everyone else did to playing Devil’s Advocate for DH to a bonafide defender of their work. I ended up being vindicated in the end: both KI and Strider turned out well. The point is, developers should not be forever tainted by a poorly-rated game. Pretty much every company in existence today has made their fair share of crap.

Why is the four-point scale so pervasive in gaming journalism? Most other forms of media criticism allow for a wider spectrum of scores, so why is mainstream video game criticism so limited by comparison? I’m not going to pretend I know exactly why this occurs, but I have heard some popular theories. Perhaps the most pervasive of these theories is also the simplest: it’s good ol’ fashioned bribery. Game journalists have a lot of expenses to deal with, and a great deal of their advertising budget comes from game publishers themselves. Considering Gamespot’s spotty reputation in this regard, it wouldn’t really be surprising if most (if not all) major game review websites fell prey to this kind of thing. A much more charitable theory, however, would be that it was just a natural evolution. Like I said earlier, bad reviews of popular games tend to get serious backlash. So maybe sticking to the four-point scale is a distinct strategy to reduce tensions. Of course, if this was the plan, it’s clear by now that it’s backfired spectacularly. One last theory I can think of is that, maybe the professionals just aren’t that good at their jobs to begin with. Wouldn’t surprise me, anyway.

Of course, the four-point scale isn’t literally a constant in the field of game journalism by any means. Many publications do use other scores on occasion. For example, it’s not exactly unheard of to see scores of 6, 5, 4 and especially 3s, out of IGN. Their review for Double Dragon Neon managed to only score a 3/10 back in 2012, and I’m still reeling over it. Of course, in my experience these lower scores only tend to occur when a game is assigned to a reviewer who either hates its genre or hates the game itself for some reason. Hell, even the widely acclaimed Donkey Kong Country Tropical Freeze only managed to receive a 6/10 from Gamespot, and rumors indicated there was a chance it may have been scored even lower prior to the review being posted. Unfortunately, these exceptions pretty much prove the rule at large, due to their overall rarity in mainstream video games journalism. The fact that I can point out specific examples quite easily is evidence of just how rare this kind of thing is in modern games journalism.

Personally though, I just think the four-point scale is an incredibly stupid trend in general, regardless of the collateral damage it has had on video games themselves. For one thing, there’s an odd trend in the prevailing viewpoint regarding video game criticism: only scores matter. In this age of Metacritic and other review aggregate services, all that really matters is getting a high score, regardless of the quality of either the reviews or the product itself. Even I’m guilty of glossing over the review itself and just looking at the score, though by this point, that’s mainly due to the fact that the quality of criticism somehow managed to get worse from the early 90’s, where they were pretty much either fluff pieces written to avoid any real criticism of the game or were just straight-up advertisements (sometimes, even posted side-by-side with actual advertisements for the game being reviewed). In the end, the four-point scale is more of a symptom of an even greater problem with modern game criticism, as opposed to the underlying cause in general.

Fixing this whole problem would be simple: just abolish scores in general. Hahahaha, yeah, THAT’S gonna happen. I guess a more practical solution would be to find some alternate way to quantify quality, as opposed to just cut-and-dry scores or letter grades. When I entertained the idea of going back to reviewing games after a long hiatus (don’t ask), I had grown weary of simply using the traditional points-by-category method of scoring that was the standard for the site I used to write for. I figured a better way to quantify a game’s quality would be determining how much I thought it was worth. How much I had paid for the game would be the maximum possible score for the game being reviewed, allowing for proper scaling between games of different price points. Of course, this whole concept didn’t really go that far: I never really determined a good way to properly weigh the worth of whatever game I was playing, attributes like playtime, replayability and most importantly, how much I enjoyed playing the game itself would have been key to these determinations. In the end, I still tend to use this method to assess games, but only simply as a way to determine whether or not I feel like I’ve been ripped off. I’ve seen certain sites go for a “buy it/rent it/avoid it” system, in addition to a conventional scoring method, which while a little simple, seems like an overall better way to deal with this kind of thing. I guess the simplest solution of all would be to have critics adopt a literal 4-point scale. You know, like the stars ratings movie critics tend to use. Give them half-points for good measure too.  At least that would be more accurate than what they’re currently doing.

By this point, the four-point scale has pretty much become another one in a long line of wisecracks and punch-lines regarding “professional” video game criticism. The fact that no amount of mockery can stop it is a little disconcerting. Nevertheless, it needs to end. Regardless of the reasons why, flooding the market with nothing but inflated scores is a significant blow to whatever reputation video game journalists and critics want to cultivate. Judging by their recent preoccupation with social issues and “watching the medium grow up”, I’m sure they would rather be considered true journalists than a bunch of spineless cowards. That’s just my opinion, though.

10 Games I Want Ported to PC

If there’s one thing console gamers have grown accustomed to over the past few generations, it’s been backwards compatibility. Sure, it wasn’t always perfect and it’s only been implemented well in few cases, but it’s still something that was taken for granted. Unfortunately, to those of us who like playing our old games on our classic systems, whether to save physical space or for ease of use, it seems like the days of backward compatibility being a killer app are nearing an end. Neither the PS4 nor the Xbox One are capable of playing their predecessors’ games natively: though Sony has recently announced their “PlayStation Now” streaming service and Microsoft has offered the insulting suggestion to “just hook your 360 into your Xbox One”. While the Wii U is still capable of playing disc-based and digital Wii games via an on-board emulator, we lost the ability to play GameCube games in the process and the Wii U’s Virtual Console library is pathetically small compared to the original, both in terms of game libraries and consoles supported. Worse yet, we’re even beginning to see various licensed titles get pulled off of digital distribution platforms, bringing the future viability of such games into question. Couple that with the several games from previous generations that have been lost to the ages for one reason or another and it’s clear that there are some problems with the way the industry has been heading.

Of course, there is another option. Compared to dedicated video game consoles, PCs have a much higher rate of backwards compatibility with older programs on newer OSes. While not always a perfect solution, in cases where games no longer function properly on newer computers, either official or community-led initiatives have been spearheaded to fix these games. With such emulation software as DOSBox and SCUMMVM, classic PC games that once seemed to be lost to future gamers forever were playable once again. Furthermore, in a stunning reversal of the negative opinion regarding DRM, specific ones, including Valve’s Steam, allow users to be able to download previously-purchased games on newer machines, regardless of whether they remain on the marketplace or not, much like the case with XBLA and PSN. Couple this with the fact that many companies have started doing late PC ports of games from the previous generation and it seems like there’s a new avenue for these games to maintain their existence for years to come.

Of course, in order to keep this list fair, I’ve decided to implement a few rules. First of all, I’m only going to look at third-party games for the most part (Microsoft being the exception, due to the fact that they’ve released previous console exclusives on PC down the line anyway), and there will be a significant lean towards companies that have already released games on PC. The games can’t have been released any earlier than the seventh (PS3/X360/Wii) generation, though this means that eighth-gen games are fair game as well. There will be only one game per company on this list, to make things fair and more challenging. Finally, games from the same series that were released on the same platform CAN be packaged together. So with that, let’s get started!

Lollipop Chainsaw – WB Games/Grasshopper Manufacture (360/PS3)

I thought this game didn’t get enough love from the mainstream gaming media, which dismissed it for its shallow story, simple arcade-style gameplay and short length. But they were just blind to the truth of the matter: it was a great little throwback to the hack-and-slash games of old and it didn’t bother taking itself seriously. Sure, the game didn’t perform as well as WB probably expected, but I’d love to see a PC port anyway. Just don’t have High Voltage Software handle the port: MK9 and Injustice’s ports were fairly buggy at launch and still suffer from lingering issues at present.

MegaMan 9/10 – Capcom (Wii/360/PS3)

This should have been a really obvious pick to anyone who saw my MegaMan wishlist last month. Considering they’re both fairly small games, it only seems fair to put them together in a double-pack, hopefully with all of the DLC included in the base package. Though that last bit seems fairly unlikely, as long as Capcom prices these games reasonably, I could see myself buying it again.

Tekken Tag Tournament 2 – Namco Bandai (AC/360/PS3/WiiU)

People have been harassing Tekken series producer Katsuhiro Harada about putting an entry of the World’s most popular fighting game on PCs, but until fairly recently, he’s said he hasn’t seen much of a point, despite being an avid PC gamer himself. Given the recent successes of other fighting games on the platform, however, he has softened his view on releasing a Namco fighter on PC. While the free-to-play Tekken Revolution seems like the most likely choice, especially given Namco Bandai’s previous F2P releases on PC, I’d prefer it if we got the previous game in the series: Tekken Tag Tournament 2. Both games were built on the same engine, but TTT2 is pretty much the complete package, including various match types, a fuller roster and even a customizable character mode. I would absolutely love to see this game hit PCs with an excellent port.

Bayonetta – Sega/Platinum Games (360/PS3)

Well, considering the fact that Kamiya’s been talking about porting the original Bayonetta to the Wii U, it only seems fair that they should also consider a PC port as well. After all, with the recent PC release of Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance on PC via Steam, Platinum Games will finally have one of their titles on the platform. Given the fact that Sega’s incredibly pro-PC, it seems likely that they would sign off on a PC port as well. Just use the 360 version as a base for both ports, okay Platinum?

UPDATE (1/24/2014): There’s even a petition to get Bayonetta (as well as VF5 and Vanquish) ported to PC.

The King of Fighters ’98 Ultimate Match/2002 Unlimited Match – SNK Playmore (360)

These two games were actually rumored to be coming to Steam for some time. When King of Fighters 13 was found listed on Steam’s backend, there were also listings for ’98 Ultimate Match and 2002 Unlimited Match as well. Considering both of these games were released on the Xbox 360, KoF13 Steam Edition used the 360 version as part of its base and SNK Playmore has expressed interest in releasing more games on PC, these two seem like an obvious pick. Use that awesome netcode from KoF13’s PC version though.

Double Dragon Neon* – Majesco (360/PS3)

Well, technically, this shouldn’t even be on here anymore, considering it’s already been confirmed to be coming out on Steam sometime this year. With the addition of Online Co-Op, I’m eagerly anticipating this game’s release. Still, I came up with this list last month before the recent announcement. So, as I don’t feel like coming up with a last-minute replacement, DD Neon remains on my list. Can’t wait for this one to hit.

Catherine – Atlus (360/PS3)

One of my favorite puzzle games of the past few years, Catherine meshed amazing gameplay with elements from the visual novel and dating sim genres in order to deliver a much more interactive and engrossing story, similar to what they’ve done to JRPGs in the Persona series. Considering that Atlus was recently bought out by Sega, seeing this classic ported to PC may be a lot more plausible than ever, but Atlus has had a few releases on PC themselves, including Rock of Ages and God Mode.

Guilty Gear Xrd – Arc System Works (AC/PS3/PS4)

Okay, I’ll be clear up front with this one. Arc System Works doesn’t exactly have the best history with supporting PC gaming, but they did manage to get an early version of Guilty Gear XX and the original Blazblue on PC, problematic as both of these ports ended up being. Both games were woefully out-of-date upon release, Blazblue didn’t even hit PC until after the second game had hit consoles. Still, there have been some rumblings over online petitions for getting the game on Wii U and PC, as Arc System Works has already all but deconfirmed releases on either Xbox. So I’m hoping that if ASW manages to pull through this time, they manage to give the game some real support.

Konami’s “ReBirth” Games (Castlevania: The Adventure/Contra/Gradius) – Konami (Wii)

I love me some classic Konami games. While I’ve only played Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth, I loved the game so much. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem like these games got enough love, being exclusive to WiiWare. Maybe if they were re-released on a platform with much more lasting appeal, they might perform better.

Killer Instinct (2013) – Microsoft Studios (XBO)

You know how I made a big deal about making an inclusion for Microsoft in this article? Yeah, this is why. Considering the fact that Microsoft has a history of porting their first-party Xbox games to PC and Phil Spencer’s recent proclamation that Microsoft Game Studios is going to begin focusing on bringing core gaming experiences to PC, this pretty much seems like a slam dunk. Now, I’m not going to expect anything in the near future, because clearly the Xbox One still needs some time to grow a userbase. But hopefully, maybe by the time the as-of-yet pseudo-confirmed Season 2 wraps up, Microsoft will see it fitting to consider a PC port.

All of those games hitting PC at some point in the future would be a nice little birthday surprise for yours truly. While many of these games may have little chance of actually receiving PC ports down the line (with one glaring exception), it was actually pretty fun to speculate about games I’d like to see revived on the platform. To be honest, this isn’t the only list I’ve written on the subject thus far, so I’ve decided to turn this into a recurring segment. What crazy choices do I have in store for Part 2? You’ll just have to wait until March to see.