Top 10 Games I Want Ported FROM PC II: The Secret of the Ooze

Last year, I decided to change things up when it came to my long-running series of PC port wishlists by doing a list of games that would be great games currently available on PC, but not consoles. I have to admit, I actually had a lot of fun doing it – looking back on lesser-known games that were only available on PC just struck me as a much less futile endeavor than constantly mooning about games that might never get re-released in any format, let alone on PC. At least with PC, there’s always an odd chance that maybe at some point, one of the console manufactures will stumble across one of these obscure gems and decide, “Hey, this could work well on our system” and pay someone to port it to their current platform. Considering the sheer length of your average PC game’s shelf life, I’ve got plenty of material for future lists: I’m even considering making this into a yearly tradition.

First things first, let’s go over what’s been announced since the last time I discussed this – both in terms of console releases and PC. Considering the topic of this article is focusing games being ported from PC to console, that seems like the logical place to start. As I already mentioned, both Ys Origin and Kero Blaster were announced for PlayStation consoles back in December – since then, Ys Origin released on PS4 in February and is expected to hit the Vita on May 30th. Kero Blaster still lacks a release date, but another game being handled by the same publisher (Playism) that didn’t quite make the list – Momodora: Under the Reverie released on March 16th and 17th on the PS4 and Xbox One respectively. Likewise, a game I originally intended to include on this year’s list: Pocket Rumble will be released on Switch sometime in the near future. Ironically, I would’ve suggested putting it on a Nintendo platform anyway, simply due to the lack of fighting games on the platform and the low-definition graphics seemed like a better fit for Nintendo’s core audience. An even bigger surprise came less than a week before this article was set to post: Lethal League is hitting both PlayStation 4 and Xbox One on May 10th, adding another win to what I had originally intended as a joke article.

Fortunately, time has been kind to the PC platform as well. First and foremost, when NIS America announced their obtained the localization rights to Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana, they also announced a release on Steam. This news is particularly inspiring, considering it comes hot off the heels of the fact that the Steam version of fellow Falcom title Tokyo Xanadu – being localized by Aksys Games – will be based on the PS4 release, Tokyo Xanadu eX+. Both games are expected to release late this year and I cannot wait for both games. The only thing that could make me happier would be PC ports of the 2 modern-era Ys games currently missing from PC – and XSEED did mention they had some big PC news coming up soon, so I guess I’ll keep my fingers crossed. Other good news include de Blob making its way to PC on April 27th, courtesy of the good folks at THQ Nordic and Blitworks. To make matters even better, Blitworks may have also leaked the existence of a port of the game’s sequel, which means that soon we could have the entire duology! Finally, Arc System Works teamed up with FK Digital to bring Chaos Code -New Sign of Catastrophe- to PS4 and Steam with a new online mode. Not to mention they confirmed that the “REVELATOR 2” upgrade for Guilty Gear Xrd will be hitting Steam alongside the console versions. It’s encouraging to see how ASW has embraced PC gaming. O

With those musings out of the way, let’s get onto the actual meat of the article: the next ten games I’d like to see ported to console from PC. Same rules as last time – we’re mostly going to be looking at relatively recent PC games, specifically those released during the seventh and eighth generations of video game consoles, that have not appeared on home consoles by the time this article has been posted. I’ll also be discussing which platforms I’d consider the best choice for these games if they do actually manage to make it to at least one platform.

Carrie’s Order Up!

Best described as a cross between Pac-Man and Tapper, Carrie’s Order Up is a fun little throwback to old-school gaming with graphics I’d liken to a lost Neo-Geo game. Players take on the role of Carrie, a crab waitress trying to raise enough money to keep the restaurant where she works afloat. The gameplay is simple enough: customers come into the restaurant, usually ambling around looking for the perfect seat; they place their orders which are made by Carrie’s coworker Calcia and Carries brings them to the right customers to keep them happy. But watch out! Once Carrie gets started, she doesn’t stop and bumping into customers is a big no-no. Fortunately, she can twirl to bypass customers, but using it too much leaves her dizzy. Plus, if the customers aren’t served in time, they’ll also leave angry. The game’s a mere $3 yet offers a great value at that price: in addition to the standard arcade mode, there’s an endless mode and tons of other unlockables.

Best Platform: I’d have to give this one to the Switch, no contest. The cutesy aesthetic coupled with the classic arcade-style of gameplay seems like a perfect recipe for getting lost in the shuffle on Sony – and I doubt Microsoft would ever want to pursue this style of content. Meanwhile, I could see Nintendo advertising this as one of their “Nindies”, perhaps not enough to receive a special announcement in a direct, but definitely a dedicated section in one of their sizzle reels.

Xanadu Next

Okay, now if you want to get technical, Xanadu Next has technically already been on home console – in fact, it was the first time it was available in English. Unfortunately, the system in question was Nokia’s N-Gage and from what I’ve heard, that port wasn’t exactly representative of the original PC game. From what I’ve heard, Xanadu Next has been described as a cross between Metroidvanias, Diablo and Falcom’s own Ys series. There’s no doubt in my mind that console gamers would want to get their hands on that kind of action.

Best Platform: PlayStation 4 and maybe the Vita, if it hasn’t died at that point. Falcom’s had a poor track record with Nintendo-original releases – ranging from as far back as Ys III on the SNES all the way to the ports of Ys I & II on the DS. Given the fact that Falcom gave up on their history of PC gaming to survive in Japan’s console-centric market, a tryst with the Xbox brand is laughable. No, just like Ys Origin before it, I could see Xanadu Next on Sony platforms – I’m just going to assume it won’t happen until after DotEmu has backported all of the Ys games currently available on Steam back to PlayStation all over again.

Super Killer Hornet: Resurrection

Here’s another game where I’m technically cheating by including it: both the original Super Killer Hornet and its remake appeared on the Xbox Live Indie Games service. However, given the fact that XBLIG is set to be taken down later this year – not to mention the fact that it wasn’t that big a priority for Microsoft in the first place – it seems like now would be a good time to try again. SKH:R is an odd mixture, focusing equally on fast-paced shmup action and mathematics. You see, power-ups like score multipliers, options and shot upgrades are tied behind completing simple math problems: first you collect a number with an operator, then a second number to complete the formula, then you’re given the choice of three answers. Answer correctly and you get upgraded. It may sound boring, but the game gets hectic pretty quickly considering this is all happening during a typical shmup.

Best Platform: This one’s going to be difficult. On the one hand, the game does have history on the Xbox brand, but it’s not exactly a stellar one. PlayStation has apparently tried to encroach upon Xbox’s former status of best console for shmups, but I’m not sure if they’d go for something quite like this – granted, the graphical style might be right up their alley. Nintendo, on the other hand, might be open to this unique title – so I guess I’ll give it to the Switch by default, though I wouldn’t count out a PlayStation release as well.

The Wonderful End of the World

I think the best way to describe The Wonderful End of the World would be if Katamari Damacy were less Japanese, made on a smaller budget but at least 90% as quirky. Made by the good people at Dejobaan Games – who have also brought us such games as AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! A Reckless Disregard for Gravity, Drunken Robot Pornography and Tick Tock Bang Bang – The Wonderful End of the World takes place, well, exactly at that point: a demon with a fish for a head is going to eat the world and all that inhabits it. Fortunately, you’re thrust into the role of a puppet that can absorb anything it touches – and everything you absorb only makes you bigger. You’re in a race against time to save as much of the world as you can before it’s all over. A short game, but a fun one all the same – probably my favorite of Dejobaan’s entire library, even if it’s not their most popular title.

Best Platform: Another hard choice. Dejobaan hasn’t really strayed from PC and mobile development throughout their existence. I’d imagine that Sony would probably be happier to prod Bandai Namco to make a new Katamari game and this game doesn’t really seem like the kind of Microsoft would go out of its way to put on Xbox. Nintendo’s Switch just strikes me as a the most viable option by default, just because I think the game’s quirkiness would be a good fit. Honestly, if Dejobaan were to start releasing games on console, I’d wager they’d probably go for something a little more contemporary.

Camera Obscura

I’m a huge fan of platformers – from the twitchy ones that require perfect hand-eye coordination and reflexes to the puzzle ones that force you to rack your mind. Camera Obscura is clearly of the latter camp, but it’s got some unique mechanics: players take on the role of a lone photographer scaling a ruined tower, the failed work of a long since passed cult planning to reach the sun itself. On your trek, you’ll have to face off with wild animals that have taken refuge in the abandoned obelisk, as well as crumbling architecture and traps left behind by the structure’s creators, armed with nothing but your trusty camera. However, this is no ordinary camera: it’s capable of creating afterimages of the world around you – allowing you to bridge gaps, climb ledges, create floating platforms and ever crush deadly monsters between objects in the real world and your copies. But will this ability be enough to scale the tower’s 57 floors?

Best Platform: Once again, I could see this working best on the PlayStation 4, though I wouldn’t rule out releases on the other two consoles. The puzzle elements are a pretty solid match for Nintendo or Sony, but I feel like Sony would probably jump on this one before Nintendo, simply due to the grungier take on pixel art present in the graphics. While Microsoft did get their hands on Fez and Braid – both noted as inspirations for Camera Obscura in its own Steam page – before anyone else, they just don’t really seem like they’re going out of their way to bag pre-existing indie games at this point, preferring to finance their own.

Ultionus: A Tale of Petty Revenge

Perhaps this is a bit of an odd choice, but we’ve seen games of this style released on home consoles both in the past and fairly recently. Starting life as a direct remake of an old computer game called Phantis developed by a little-known company call Dinamic Software, Ultionus: A Tale of Petty Revenge absolutely oozes early 90s western PC game. Players are thrust into the role of heroine Serena S who is inspired to strike revenge on a dangerous alien planet …because someone trolled her on the internet. The gameplay in each level is split into two phases: a side-scrolling shmup inspired by games like R-Type and a side-scroller run-and-gun not unlike the Turrican games of old. Considering its classic artstyle was handled by Andrew Bado, a former alumnus of WayForward and Gameloft and its soundtrack was provided by the incomparable Jake “virt” Kaufman, Ultionus not only feels like a classic ‘90s Amiga throwback, but looks and sounds like one too.

Best Platform: I’m going to have to go with PlayStation this time around. As a similar Amiga exclusive, Psygnosis’s Shadow of the Beast received a remake on PS4 not that long ago, there’s at least precedent to allow something like this to hit the platform. Also, given the fact that main character’s design is brimming with fan service, it might be better suited for Sony’s platform simply due to the perceived maturity of the game’s design in general.

Terrian Saga: KR-17

Another game clearly evoking the spirit of early ‘90s PC games, KR-17 is somewhat evocative of western retro platformers like Commander Keen, the old Duke Nukem games and Jack Jackrabbit. Boasting over 60 levels across 9 worlds, varied level designs, a storyline that’s interesting without bogging everything down, mind-bending puzzles and precision run-and-gun gameplay, Terrian Saga delivers an impressive package at a reasonable price point.

Best Platform: This time, I’m a bit torn. On the one hand, this game seems to have “Nindie” written all over it, with its clear retro style, relatively family-friendly tone and its tendency to achieve “Nintendo hard” levels of difficulty at times. On the other hand, the game’s developer is currently working on getting their next project on both PlayStation and Xbox in addition to PC. I guess because of that, I’d give the edge to PlayStation 4, but I could definitely see this game doing quite well on the Switch too.

Devil’s Dare

If there’s one type of game that never really managed to adjust to the death of arcades, it would have to be the humblest of video game genres – the beat-‘em-up. An entire genre built from the ground-up for the sole purpose of bilking the young and young-at-heart out of entire GDPs worth of quarters, the transition to the console era didn’t do the genre any favors: games had to choose between unlimited continues – which defeats the entire purpose of the games – and a set number of limited continues, which just leaves me disappointed. Devil’s Dare thinks differently: opting for a perma-death mechanic instead. Continues cost in-game money, which can be obtained by performing well. Run out of continues, and the game deletes your save. It’s an interesting concept in my book. Even if the rest of the game’s components aren’t quite the pinnacle of the genre, I think it’s still worth sharing with a wider audience.

Best Platform: I’d honestly be willing to go with the Xbox One on this one, simply because of the game’s gritty yet retro tone. I’d recommend a slight overhaul of the base gameplay and that kind of an undertaking might make the effort to port Devil’s Dare to new platforms more of a Microsoft-friendly project, simply due to their obsession with “getting things first”. Label it as “Devil’s Dare DX” or something along those lines and I’m sure the folks at Xbox would lap it right up.

Owlboy

Developed over the course of nearly a decade as a love letter to old-school platformers, Owlboy dubs itself a “hi-bit game”, due to the fact that it recreates the classic look of 16-bit games at a much higher resolution and with much more fluid animation than what was possible back when 2D pixel art was the apex of its popularity. Players take on the role of Otus, a young anthropomorphic owl. Unfortunately, he struggles with living up to the expectations set for him, because he was born mute. When sky pirates show up, things only get worse and Otus must set off on an adventure. Fortunately, Otus has friends in the form of various Gunners, whom provide him with cover fire while in flight.

Best Platform: This is perhaps the most difficult decision of them all, but I’m going to have to give it to the Nintendo Switch. While you’d think that the fact that the game was built in XNA would make it a shoe-in for Xbox, you’ve got to remember that Microsoft discontinued the service and it isn’t compatible with the Xbox One. Likewise, while PlayStation would likely want to pursue getting this title, much of the game’s inspiration comes from various Nintendo properties, including Kid Icarus and the Tanooki Suit in Super Mario Bros. 3. It’s also fair to bring up that D-Pad Studios, the game’s developer, did consider console ports back in 2013, when the game was still in development – not to mention the fact that ports to both Mac and Linux were released this year – so who knows just where this gorgeous game might end up in the future?

Environmental Station Alpha

Developed by small Finnish studio Hempuli Oy, Environmental Station Alpha is a Metroid-like, pure and simple. It boasts a minimalistic pixelated artstyle, ambient music and solid, yet simple gameplay. Alas, it’s still a Metroidvania – and we’ve reached the point where the independently developed Metroidvania has become a cliché unto itself. Still, when Tom Happ – the man who single-handedly developed Axiom Verge, the last Metroid-like indie to escape being deemed “unoriginal” – says that ESA is worth checking out, I’m not going to argue with him.

Best Platform: The Switch or possibly the 3DS, no question. This game totally evokes the look and feel of a Metroid game and Nintendo would be foolish to not at least try to get their hands on this game to quell that particular fanbase’s hunger. I’m fairly certain that a significant portion of both the PS4 and Xbox One’s core audiences might be turned off by the primitive graphics – though, Vita fans will beg for just about anything.

There you have it, 10 PC games I’d like to see ported to consoles. No honorable mentions this time – might need to save those games for next year after all. I already own every game on the list, but of course, that’s not really the point of this list – it’s less about getting the games myself and more about sharing them with a much wider audience. You know, better to give than to receive and all that mumbo-jumbo. Having said that, it was probably more fun to do this article than the last one: I had already blown through most of my obvious choices last year, so searching for new games that weren’t already on console was pretty fun. Not to mention the fact that actually seeing some of those titles I picked last year getting console ports – that definitely made things more exciting this time around. I wonder which (if any) games will make it over out of this batch. You know, aside from Pocket Rumble, considering that got announced before I started writing this article.

10 Games I’d Like To See Re-Released #05: SNK

Man, I’ve been slacking off a bit lately. I intended to have this up by the first of the month, like I usually do, but because I slacked off on next month’s article – and I’ve decided to have the companion piece to that pushed back to next month – I ended up just relaxing and recharging, instead of writing this one. In terms of games I ended up achieving, I can’t really claim victory here, but I am incredibly happy to hear that the original Dead Rising is being re-released on PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. While this technically wouldn’t have made my list, considering it was a last-generation title, it’s good to see that it will no longer be tethered to the Xbox 360 permanently. In addition, both main iterations of Dead Rising 2 (the original and Off the Record) are also hitting PS4 and XB1 – both games were already released on PC. I was kind of hoping we’d also see re-releases of Case Zero and Case West – but DR1 was really what I was most looking forward to in terms of re-releases.

Since I’ve gone on hiatus with PC ports, I feel like I might as well do my bragging about it in here. At the start of July, I got hit with a bombshell I wasn’t really expecting: Aksys Games got the rights to bring Falcom’s Tokyo Xanadu to North America and to make matters even sweeter – they’re financing a PC port of the game on Steam. It’s unknown if it’ll be a direct port of the Vita version, or if it will also include content from Tokyo Xanadu eX+, the enhanced PS4 port, but regardless I am ecstatic for what this may mean for future Falcom releases on PC.

Before we get started with the list, let’s go over the rules I’ve been keeping when writing these articles. I’m going to be looking at games from the 6th generation (Dreamcast, PlayStation 2, GameCube and Xbox) and earlier. I’ve decided to focus on one company for each article, and because I live in North America, I’m not counting any international re-releases, so if anyone decides to be a smartass and tells me I can buy some of this stuff on Japan or Europe’s services, that’s not going to work for me. If I can’t buy it legitimately from America, I’m not counting it. I’ll also be discussing any potential improvements that could be made to these games, in the case that they would receive an HD re-release. To make things reasonable, I’ll also be avoiding games that saw re-releases on 7th generation and later consoles, through PlayStation Classics, Virtual Console or other similar services. Of course, more substantial re-releases than straight emulations would be ideal, but at least the games themselves are easy enough to obtain and play.

To celebrate the recent release of The King of Fighters XIV, I’ve decided to delve into the library of the newly-rechristened SNK. SNK has been starting to re-release some of their classic fighting games on PS4 with full online functionality, as well as some of their arcade classics on PC via Steam and the Humble Bundle. However, I am clearly a very greedy individual, so I just can’t get enough SNK classics. Here are 10 games I’m absolutely hoping they re-release sometime soon.

Crystalis (NES)

I bet you were expecting me to start with a fighting game, weren’t you? Well, Crystalis is perhaps the best Zelda game on the original NES, at least in terms of official releases. The unnamed protagonist awakens in a post-apocalyptic world, where science and technology have been abandoned for magic. In order to defeat the devious machinations of the Draygonia Empire, our hero must combine the powers of the four elemental swords: Wind, Fire, Water and Thunder in order to reform the legendary sword, Crystalis.

Potential Improvements: Considering how poorly done the later GBC remake was, I’d prefer it if they just kept this one as true to the original as possible. Just put this sucker on the Virtual Console on Wii U, 3DS and NX (if it continues the Virtual Console program). That’s pretty much the best we can do for it.

The King of Fighters 2003/NeoWave/XI/’94 Re-Bout (Arcade/PS2)

Admittedly, this is kind of overkill, but these are all great games and since they’re in the same series, why not? 2003 and XI were the first two games in the series’ third arc: commonly referred to as the “Tales of Ash” Saga; ’94 Re-Bout was a remake of the game that started it all, with enhanced graphics, playable bosses and the addition of Edit Mode; while NeoWave was just a pseudo-remake of 2002 made for the Atomiswave arcade hardware.

Potential Improvements: Online play is really the only thing I’d want for these re-releases. Graphical enhancements are optional, but would probably be appreciated by most people. Personally, I’d rather see bonus features like image galleries and sound tests.

SNK Gals’ Fighters (NGPC)

I was a huge fan of the NeoGeo Pocket Color back in the day. In fact, I actually owned one while it was still active in the United States and it really helped me to become the SNK fanboy I am today. To be honest though, a majority of the games SNK released on their slick little handheld were derivatives of arcade titles, with the most popular “original” titles being their crossover games with Capcom. However, there was at least one original fighting game IP on the NGPC I’d love to see re-emerge, even only as a re-release. SNK Gals’ Fighters was another crossover fighting game, this time taking various women fighters from games like King of Fighters, Samurai Shodown and Last Blade and put them into a more comedic setting not unlike Capcom’s Pocket Fighter. A fully realized sequel and/or remake of this game would be my true goal, but that seems unlikely without at least some kind of a re-release to gauge interest.

Potential Improvements: Online play, full stop. Everything else was at a point where it can’t really be improved, due to the small scale of the system it originated on.

Rage of the Dragons (Arcade)

This is probably the most legally murky of the choices on this list, Rage of the Dragons was a spiritual successor to the Double Dragon fighting game on NeoGeo, which was loosely based on the live-action movie adaptation. Playmore couldn’t get the rights to make an actual sequel, so instead they decided to create an homage: starring such original characters as James and William – the Lewis brothers and “Abubo”. All-in-all though, a solid tag fighter from the NeoGeo’s later days.

Potential Improvements: Once again, online play would be the most important thing for me. What would be really cool though, would be if they were able to work something out with Arc System Works (the current owner of the Double Dragon IP) to do a “Double Impact”-style release with the original DD fighting game. That game was great.

Savage Reign/Kizuna Encounter: Super Tag Battle (Arcade)

This is the point in the list where things start getting obscure. First up, we’ve got a fairly unknown duology of SNK arcade fighters. Savage Reign was generally considered a very forgettable fighting game, but its sequel, Kizuna Encounter, was a fairly solid game. The first tag-team fighting game SNK ever made, Kizuna significantly improved over its predecessor with a more interesting cast and improved gameplay engine. I’d mainly include Savage Reign just to show how far Kizuna came.

Potential Improvements: Online play, ‘nuff said. Including both the original arcade and arranged CD soundtracks would also be a nice gesture.

Aggressors of Dark Kombat (Arcade)

Another obscure game, fittingly made by ADK – the creators of World Heroes, who were later acquired by SNK – Aggressors of Dark Kombat is a unique fighting game compared to the majority of those that appeared on the NeoGeo. While some Fatal Fury games allowed characters to jump into the background and foreground, Aggressors allowed players to full-on walk in 3 dimensions, not unlike a beat-‘em-up like Final Fight, Streets of Rage or Sengoku. In addition, the game also utilized a similar control scheme to beat-‘em-ups: one button for attacks, one for grappling and one to jump. The game also featured the ability to grab and use weapons found throughout the battlefield (again, like most beat-‘em-ups). Matches consist of a single round, but both characters’ health bars have multiple layers, leading to long fights. The closest we’ve seen to a revival was the appearance of Kisarah Westfield in NeoGeo Battle Coliseum.

Potential Improvements: Online play is really the only recommendation I can think of, though honestly, this would probably do best in a collection with other ADK-developed titles, not unlike 2008’s Japan-exclusive compilation, ADK Tamashii for the PS2.

Dark Arms: Beast Buster 1999 (NGPC)

SNK’s non-fighting game releases are generally considered fairly obscure, but Dark Arms is probably the weirdest entry on my list. Based on the pre-NeoGeo lightgun shooter Beast Busters (which received a smartphone sequel a few years back), Dark Arms was a top-down action RPG-style game featuring a demon hunter who enters the spirit world in order to prevent an outbreak of monsters in the main world. Your mentor is the Master, a grim reaper-esque fighter who gives you a weapon, called the Catcher, which you can use to collect the souls of felled monsters in order to create an ultimate weapon: the titular Dark Arms. Probably one of the most unique titles on the NGPC, I’d love to see modern audience get the chance to play it.

Potential Improvements: To be honest, I’ve got nothing to add. A straight port of the original would be a great treat, especially as a budget title.

Fatal Fury: Wild Ambition (Arcade/PS1)­

The King of Fighters XIV isn’t SNK’s first foray into 3D graphics. They’ve actually been experimenting for quite some time. While most people argue that the KoF spinoff duology Maximum Impact was their best attempt, I was fond of an older title. Wild Ambition was effectively a remake of the original Fatal Fury, in the sense that MegaMan Powered Up was a remake of the original MegaMan: the basic plot remained the same, but there were some pretty extensive changes made – changes that no one really cares about since it’s not canon anyway. The roster’s been rearranged – with many of the old forgotten characters replaced with more popular ones from later iterations, like Mai Shirunai and Kim Kaphwan.

Potential Improvements: This isn’t going to surprise anyone, but online play is pretty much the only thing I’d add to this, especially if they use the PS1 version as a base.

Breakers Revenge (Arcade)

Probably the most obscure game on this list, Breakers Revenge was a revamp of a 1996 fighting game developed by Visco. The main reason it’s on the list is because it was exclusive to the arcades: there wasn’t a release on the AES or the NeoGeo CD, despite both platforms being active when it was released. I’m not sure exactly who owns the rights to this one, as Visco and SNK co-published it, but considering the fact that Visco’s currently making slot machines and flat screen TVs, I’d guess it would be easy enough for SNK to secure the rights.

Potential Improvements: I’m not even sure if I should continue writing this section, because it’s obvious just going to be online play. Although, honestly, I also wouldn’t mind seeing the original Breakers packed in as a bonus.

Samurai Shodown 64 & 64: Warrior’s Rage (Arcade)

Ever since SNK expressed interest in reviving some of their other old properties, one name has risen to the top of the list: Samurai Shodown. SNK’s #2 fighting game franchise – mostly due to the fact that until now, none of its characters appeared in a mainline King of Fighters game – Samurai Shodown has had a very successful run for the most part. The obvious choice of action would be to re-release the classic 2D games again. Unfortunately, considering the fact that Samurai Shodown Anthology, which contains every major release in the series, was released on the Wii and PSP, they’re still somewhat easy to get one’s hands on. So I’ve decided to ask for the next best thing: the lesser-known 3D releases for the Hyper NeoGeo 64. Samurai Shodown 64 and Warrior’s Rage told their own story, taking place after the second Samurai Shodown game. It also introducted the world to Asura and Shiki, two fairly popular characters that would later appear in NeoGeo Battle Coliseum. Plus, no matter what, it can’t be as bad as Samurai Shodown Sen.

Potential Improvements: Online play would be my main request, but what would be really cool would be if they included the Samurai Shodown games from the NeoGeo Pocket Color, as they were scaled-down remakes of the 64 games. It would at least be interesting to have them compiled, at least for the sake of comparison.

Admittedly, it was harder to narrow this list down than it usually is. So my honorable mentions will be a little more in-depth than they usually are. First, we have Metal Slug Advance for the Game Boy Advance: one of the rarer spinoffs of the series, built from the ground up as a home gaming experience as opposed to the standard arcade run ‘n gun. Then there’s Buriki One, another Hyper NeoGeo 64 game. What appeals to me about B1 is its unique control scheme – buttons are used for movement, while the joystick is used to perform attacks and its tenuous connection to the Art of Fighting series. Finally, there’s The King of Fighters EX2: Howling Blood, another GBA game. It’s effectively the closest thing I’ll ever see to a King of Fighters R-3 and it’s a respectable game in its own right. I’d just love to see it get some more love.

Despite my overall love for SNK as a company, it was harder to make this list than I would have originally expected, but that’s mainly due to the fact that so many of the games I would’ve wanted received re-releases either during the seventh generation or even recently, with their latest round of re-releases on PS4 and Steam. Hopefully, some of the games on this list will be among SNK’s next choices when deciding which games to re-release in the future. By that token, let’s also hope that their classic slogan, “The Future is Now” is more literal than figurative.

Top 10 Games I Want Ported FROM PC

In the past, I’ll admit, I’ve had a tendency to write articles that were simply thinly-veiled attempts at port-begging – one of the perceived cardinal sins of PC gamers in general. Eventually, I decided to branch out into asking that old and nearly-forgotten games be re-released on modern platforms, partially out of the revelation that begging for games on a single platform was completely self-serving, but equally important was the fact that I was just running low on material in general: hopefully that problem won’t end up rectifying itself.

Regardless, after those articles began to dry up, I considered multiple ways to keep the concept alive. While I’m happy with what I ended up deciding on, there were some other concepts I managed to kick around: one of them a simple enough concept – a complete reversal on the original idea, done up as an April Fools’ parody of one of those PC ports articles, done completely tongue-in-cheek, focusing on the idea that it was, in fact, the console gamers that were being deprived of games. As time went on, I began to feel that the joke article simultaneously came off as too bitter in tone and was far too interesting of an article to relegate to joke status. So while I still decided to release the article on April 1st, it’s now a legitimate article, detailing 10 games I feel console gamers should be allowed to play.

The rules for this article is somewhat different than the usual. This time, we’re looking at relatively recent PC games (let’s say, games that were released from 2006 – a decade ago, near the beginning of the seventh-generation of video game consoles) that have not appeared on consoles at the time this article was written. To make things a little more interesting, I’m also going to opine on which platforms the game would be best suited.
Continue reading

Under Reconstruction: Ys V -Lost Kefin, Kingdom of Sand

If you haven’t figured it out by now, I have something of an obsession with remakes. The only real problem I have is that most of the time, I feel like they’re being wasted. It’s the same with movies: most of the stuff getting remade is already perfectly fine. It just seems like a waste in many cases, in some cases, the remake even turns out worse than the original (Wander of the Dragons, anyone?). Isn’t the point of remakes to improve on the source material? Why remake a perfectly good game when there’s so much trash out there just begging for a second chance?

Welcome to the first entry in a new series: Under Reconstruction. Similar to some of the other series I’ve written on here, this is going to be a proposal series, taking a look at weak games in various franchises (with at least a cult following) and determine the best way to rehabilitate them into something worthy of their respective series. …or at least cut down on how terrible it is.

Today’s topic is the fifth game in the Ys franchise: Ushinawareta Suna no Miyako Kefin for the Super Famicom. This topic hits me a little more personally than usual, as I spent the better part of this year doing a marathon run-through of 5 games in the series, concluding with Ys V. Now Ys V wasn’t the only clunker I played through: the SFC version of Ys IV (Mask of the Sun) was also fairly mediocre, but it has two competent companion titles (The Dawn of Ys on PC-Engine CD and Memories of Celceta on PlayStation Vita) to pick up the slack. Ys V only has a remake on the PS2 handled by Taito, one that fixes some of the original game’s issues, while creating entirely new ones in the process.

Ys V is generally considered the black sheep of the Ys franchise, but apparently originally that title was held by the third game in the series. Wanderers from Ys was a deviation from the traditional top-down perspective commonly associated with the early Ys games, opting for a side-scrolling system that led to some unfavorable comparisons to Zelda II. However, this all changed when the game was remade as The Oath in Felghana, generally considered one of the best games in the entire franchise. There’s also been something of a pattern in the Ys series’ releases as of late: Ys Seven was followed by the aforementioned Memories of Celceta, which was a reimagining of Ys IV. When the eighth game in the Ys franchise (recently reconfirmed by Falcom, to my relief) was first announced, fans of the series began to speculate that a similar remake or reimagining for Ys V would be on the horizon.

Gameplay

Ys V was a significant departure from earlier games in the franchise. What separated Ys from most action-RPGs of its era was its combat system: instead of using a button to attack, the player would simply bump into enemies off-center to deal damage to the enemies. Bumping dead center would either lead to traded hits or just damage to the player, depending on which game you were playing. However, both original versions of Ys IV revealed some significant shortcomings with the Ys series’ trademark. In Mask of the Sun on the Super Famicom, poor collision detection, stiff movement and precise hitboxes forced all but the most skilled players to grind in order to compensate for the game’s shortcomings. The PC-Engine CD’s Dawn of Ys, on the other hand, veered in the opposite direction. The addition of diagonal movement broke the traditional engine wide open, making killing enemies far easier than in previous games.

In order to compensate for this, Ys V elected to use a more traditional attack system. Unfortunately, this did not come without issues. Compared to the earlier top-down games in the series, combat felt sluggish, especially during boss fights. This was only compounded by the addition of a jump button, which was awkward as it sent Adol forward a set distance every time. This came into play with some awkward isometric platforming (not unlike that of Super Mario RPG) and worse yet, boss fights that required you to jump and slash to land hits, leaving little to no time to dodge. Even more bafflingly was the decision to give different swords completely different attack styles. Some swords slashed, allowing for a wider range, while others did more of a poke, which allowed for better range, but only facing forward. Regardless, it’s somewhat jarring to totally have to switch up your tactics simply based around what weapon you’re using…and since Ys V generally follows the same item progression as other games in the series, it’s pretty much unavoidable.

For as bad as Ys V was, it definitely had a net positive impact on the series overall. The following game in the franchise (Ys VI: The Ark of Napishtim) refined on the gameplay mechanics introduced in Ys V and would eventually lead to the release of two games that are generally considered among the best of the entire franchise: the aforementioned Oath in Felghana and Ys Origin. So while Ys V was filled with its own hiccups, it was an experiment that would eventually bear fruit and help perpetuate the Ys series until they eventually made the jump to 3D on the PSP.

Having said that, I’d probably use either Oath in Felghana or Origin as a base when it comes to developing this new game’s gameplay, just as an homage to the fact that this game was the progenitor of those games. There’s also the fact that the system used in Ys Seven, Memories of Celceta and apparently the upcoming Lacrimosa of Dana are all party-based: Ys V really lacks an assortment of characters that are battle-ready and I’d rather not shoehorn in a bunch of OCs to compensate for that. It would also be a nice change of pace for fans of the earlier games in the series.

Aside from that, most of my advice for the game’s base gameplay mechanics are pretty simple: “make it better” isn’t a constructive suggestion after all. First and foremost, ditch the separation between experience for physical attacks and magic: all that really did was provide me with less incentive to use magic (more on that later). To pay tribute to the original Ys V, I’d like to see two separate physical attack buttons to reference the “slash” and “poke” methods of attack I mentioned earlier: balanced so that slash is faster and provides more peripheral range, while poke deals more damage and has further reach. Finally, I’d fix the jumping mechanics. It looks like later games fixed that issue, but I figured that it was still worth mentioning regardless.

Magic

Now onto the weakest part of the original’s gameplay: the magic system. The magic system in the older games in the series was simple: equip some kind of relic (wand, ring, whatever) and you’d either get access the magic’s effect at the cost of some magic points. Simple stuff. Not so with Kefin: things became a lot more complicated. Basically, you have various elements of 6 types which are hidden throughout the game’s setting. You take these elements you find to various alchemists, who are able to craft items known as “Fluxstones” from specific combinations of three elements. Each Fluxstone can be equipped to any weapon (all 5 of them) and used at a cost of specific MP. Did I mention that you also have to charge the spells by holding one of the shoulder buttons before you can actually use them? Needless to say, the magic system in this game was a mess.

I’d say I could have come up with a better magic system in my sleep, but that would only be half-true: I just sort of outlined this one as I was drifting off to sleep one night. First things first, ditch the fluxstones. Crafting specific spells permanently without the knowledge of what they can do is stupid, period. Instead, we limit the number of elements found in the game themselves, 18 elements – 6 of each type found in the original game: fire, water, earth, wind, light and dark. Likewise, each weapon would have a set number of element slots, ranging from 1 to 3 depending on the strength of the weapon. As such, magic would be limited to a single button with the charge times dropped, much like the earlier games in the franchise.

As for the magic attacks themselves, they’d be pretty simple with three levels of attacks based on how many elements are equipped to Adol’s weapon at a time. Level 1 [a single element] would provide an “elemental slash” attack that would use a minimal amount of MP. Fire, Water, Wind and Earth would each act according to a “rock, paper, scissors” style of buffed damage on elemental enemies of specific types, while using an element on an enemy of the same type would heal it (like in the original Ys V). Likewise, dark and light would have their own system, where opposing types do double damage and same types only do half damage.

Level 2 [2 elements of the same type] would cast an elemental projectile, like the fireball from the old Ys games, and cost a moderate amount of MP. For example:

  • Fire casts the aforementioned fireball from earlier games, possibly with an added “burn” mechanic to slowly drain health from the enemies it hits
  • Water casts the ice ball (from Dawn of Ys), freezing enemies on impact
  • Earth could generate a seismic wave, which would deal massive damage on grounded enemies, but have no effect on flying enemies
  • Wind could cause a short-range projectile attack
  • Light could cause a weak homing attack that tracks the closest enemy
  • Dark could cause a chain lightning attack that could hit multiple enemies in proximity, but have the lowest range

Finally, Level 3 [all 3 elements of the same type] would cast a “magic attack”, either causing a powerful long-range attack or grant Adol some kind of special effect at a high MP cost. Here are the examples I came up with:

  • Fire – lava geyser
  • Water – tidal wave
  • Earth – earthquake
  • Wind – tornadoes
  • Light – a temporary boost for Adol’s attack and defense stats until his MP depletes
  • Dark – Adol would be invulnerable until his MP depletes (Shield Magic from Ys II and The Dawn of Ys)

Adol would also be able to combine different elements to create hybrid versions of the Level 1 and 2 attacks. Having all different elements would create a hybrid slash, which could cover the weaknesses of individual elements. Having 2 of one type of element and a third would create a hybrid projectile – one with the main traits of the dominant elemental projectile, but some added bonuses from the additional element: for example, water + water + light would create a homing ice ball and dark + dark + fire would add burn damage to the chain lightning attack.

Story

Conversely, Ys V’s story wasn’t particularly bad. At worst, I’d probably describe it as sparse. To the extent where by the end of the game, the storyline finally kicked into high gear and I started enjoying it, but by that point it was too late. There’s no simple answer that will automatically fix the story’s issues from the original, but I do have a few suggestions. For those of you who haven’t guessed it, this section is going to be filled with spoilers – so if you haven’t play Kefin and still intend to, stop reading now.

First off, I’d expand on the following characters:  Dorman, Rizze, her lieutenants (Karion, Baruk and especially Abyss [who didn’t even get a boss fight]) and the Ibur Gang (especially Terra, considering she ends up showing up in the sequel). Jabir should also be established earlier on in the game, he felt tacked on in the final product, pretty much literally appearing out of nowhere. Even if you just keep his identity secret and allow him to do monologues off-screen, that would be better than what he got in the Super Famicom version. Speaking of the Super Famicom version, keep Stoker and Foresta in the game. They were interesting and I still don’t understand why they were omitted from the PS2 version.

Next up, and this is crucial: bring in Dogi. Dogi is pretty much a key element in any Ys game that stars my favorite red-haired swordsman and Kefin was definitely poorer for having lost Dogi. In fact, Dogi was originally intended to be in Ys V, but was omitted due to time constraints. He actually ended up appearing in the PS2 remake. This would also have the added benefit of expanding on Effie’s character, as she was originally intended to be Dogi’s love interest in the game. When Dogi was dropped, Effie’s role was significantly downplayed – scaled back to simply saving Adol from his latest shipwreck and nursing him back to health.

This one also falls under gameplay, but it really applies to both: I’d keep the elements that Adol can equip to his sword separate from the elemental crystals used to revive Kefin. On that note, I’d also give each individual element its own purpose: the first element would be hidden in a specific chest in its corresponding dungeon and act as a boss key (boss doors would only be able to be opened by an elemental slash corresponding to the dungeon’s element) and the second would be a reward for beating the dungeon boss (along with the crystal). The third, however, would be a good excuse to expand on Kefin itself though. At one point in the game, Adol literally just has to hit various switches to move onto the next area. Instead, I’d purpose an additional 6 dungeons in Kefin with the expressed purpose of giving Adol complete mastery (the third element) of each element in order to continue on with his quest. It would have the added benefit of adding to Kefin’s importance in the overall storyline. On that note, I’d also expand on the final dungeon of the game, maybe hide all of the Isios items in there as opposed to just having them by the switches.

Regarding the villains, I’d like to see some specific changes made. First off, I’d like to see some expansion on Dorman, specifically regarding his motivations. Originally, Dorman was conceived as a descendant of royalty from one of Kefin’s rival kingdoms, destroyed during Kefin’s prime. I’m not exactly fond of that origin, so I don’t mind that it was discarded. Still, explaining his reasons would be a nice expansion on them. By that note, I’d like some changes to be made to the final boss. I’d like to see Jabir demoted to penultimate boss and the final boss position taken up by Rizze herself. Considering she was the main villain during the second half of the game and got hijacked by Jabir at the last second, she deserves it. Even if we end up with the clichéd “I was of the Kefin Royal Family. But now I’m even more, I’m a goddess!” shtick, it’s better than Jabir appearing literally out of nowhere and Rizze basically just being useless at the end.

The last thing I’d like to add is somewhat selfish, but I feel like it’s necessary given its omission from the original version. I’d like to hear some more mentions of the older Ys games, especially IV. The lack of references to earlier games just felt a bit odd. Maybe it could be explained by the new locale, but hell, even The Dawn of Ys threw in a reference to Wanderers from Ys and that technically took place AFTER Ys IV. Hell, what would be really cool would be if there were references to all four versions of Ys IV as rumors surrounding the mysterious red-haired swordsman.

Setting

At first, I was going to say something about how lazy the name “Afroca” for the Ys universe’s counterpart to Africa was. Then I found out that the continent where the earlier games in the Ys series took place was called “Eresia”. Three guesses what continent that was supposed to represent. Needless to say, I dropped my objection. On the other hand, it is the setting of Ys V itself I’d like to see somewhat modified, to see it draw more inspiration from its real-world counterpart, as opposed to just being “generic Squaresoft RPG land”. Keep Xandria as-is, perhaps change it into a Eresian colony and port town. Likewise, I’d keep the town of Felte as-is, I liked its Middle Eastern motif. Kokiriko Village and the Zeibe Ruins took on something of a Mesoamerican design with its pyramids, I’d prefer it to take on more of an Egyptian or Nubian look.

Graphics

Unlike most of my articles, I actually have a particular graphical style in mind for a remake of Ys V. 3D graphics seem more likely than 2D, especially since that’s the direction Falcom has been heading these days, but in this case, I’d prefer a more old-school “super deformed” for the characters, much like the Ys games of old. The Super Famicom version of the game went for a slightly more realistic character design, which I feel was a disservice to the game itself. Ideally they’d go for a 2.5D look like some of their earlier games: mixing 3D worlds with 2D character sprites, but in this case, I’d be more than open to a full 3D recreation of the games of old. I’ve seen it work with such games as A Link Between Worlds and Bravely Default, so imagining it for a Kefin remake seems perfectly valid in my eyes.

Music

I’ve heard some people say that Ys V had one of the weakest soundtracks in the franchise. I’m inclined to agree. That’s not to say it’s a horrible soundtrack by any means, just that compared to the other games in the franchise, it’s not particularly memorable. Having said that, I’d keep the majority of the soundtrack for a remake. Some of my personal favorites include Field of Gale, Thieves of Brotherhood, Break Into Territory, Crimson Ruins, Bad Species, Wilderness and Turning Death Spiral. In fact, if I really had any major issue with the music itself, it would be that the instrumentation leaves the music sounding like a generic SNES RPG, with a soundfont torn straight out of a Squaresoft game. The solution to this is pretty simple: let Falcom’s in-house JDK Sound Team take a crack at rearranging some of the original soundtrack and add in some new tunes as well.

Wow, this ended up a lot longer than I would have ever expected. This whole concept just sort of emerged from my utter frustration with playing Ys V and originally manifested as a small checklist of things to look out for if Falcom were ever to do a remake. I probably won’t end up with anything quite this long in any future entries of Under Reconstruction. What did you think of the article? Do you agree that Ys V should be remade or do you think that the Super Famicom and PS2 versions are good enough? Do you disagree with any of the changes I made? Feel free to sound off in the comments section, I’d love to hear some feedback.