Retrospective: MegaMan Classic [Part 4]

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Welcome back to the final installment of my look back at the Classic MegaMan series. While the games I covered in the first three articles took place in roughly a decade-long period, ranging from the late 1980s all the way to the end of the 20th Century, the original MegaMan franchise would go into something of a hiatus for almost a decade. Apart from collections, individual re-releases and even a remake of the original game, no new mainline games starring the original Blue Bomber would hit the scene until 2008, just past the Blue Bomber’s 20th anniversary. Of course, various spinoffs and sequel series got their time in the sun during this period, introducing new generations to the MegaMan universe in unique ways, but seeing the original return in a familiar form was enough to get people excited. Unfortunately, this brief renaissance ended as quickly as it would start, taking the entire franchise with it. We know of only a handful of games that Capcom cancelled after the departure of Keiji Inafune, the man long called “the Father of MegaMan” (erroneously, but hindsight is always 20/20) and since then, the entire franchise has languished, appearing in ancillary media and the occasional video game crossover. I wrote these four articles well before the actual day of MegaMan’s 30th anniversary – a deadline I imposed on Capcom after a disappointing 25th. I don’t know whether I’ll be right or wrong, but as we conclude this look back at MegaMan’s history, I would also like to take a shot at speculating directions the franchise could take as a whole – not just Classic, but every MegaMan, past and future. I’m sure that all of my speculations will end up less like predictions and more as a wishlist, but honestly, the latter seems more fun than the former anyway.

MegaMan 9

I’m always intrigued by cases of video games being ahead of their time. While not exactly the first time the MegaMan series could be considered visionary, the shift back to the classic 8-bit style in MegaMan 9 was definitely one of the earliest cases of the modern “retro throwback” movement. The problem is, the game came out back in 2008, long before the actual movement itself took off. Fortunately, just simply due to the lack of traditional MegaMan games released in the 2000s, not to mention the sheer novelty of an official game release using the classic NES aesthetic,  gamers came back in droves. MegaMan 9 could be best summarized as a love letter to MegaMan 2, generally considered to be the best game in the entire Classic line of games. Personally, I think they were a bit excessive in this regard, but the game still holds up today.

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…8, 9! Told ya MM&B was canon.

As early as 2004, Keiji Inafune expressed interest in creating MegaMan 9 as a “throwback to the super old school”, but such games didn’t fit into the “grandiose and expansive world that the consumer gaming industry has become, and so you have to make games that match the current expectations”. He also figured that a classic MegaMan game made in the same vein as the 8-bit games “would be quickly criticized for things like being simplistic, outdated, or too expensive”, which made justifying a project in this style difficult. However, with the rise of such retro gaming-themed services, most notably the Nintendo Wii’s Virtual Console, it was decided that the seventh generation would be the perfect time to revisit the original Blue Bomber. Recruiting the developer Inti Creates – a company of ex-Capcom developers who previously created the woefully underrated MegaMan Zero and ZX games – MM9 was built from the ground up as an homage to the first two games in the series, particularly MegaMan 2.

 

Capcom’s management supported making MegaMan 9 as a downloadable title, but originally wanted to make it in 3D. This would eventually lead to a compromise, allowing players to choose between 8-bit and 3D graphics, but eventually, the 8-bit style won out. During the development of MM9, Inti Creates sought to create a game that would surpass MM2 (as opposed to MM8), as it was considered the pinnacle of the series. The game’s producer Hironobu Takeshita referred to MM9 as “the new MegaMan 3” because of this. He also clarified that despite the aesthetic being a complete recreation of the 8-bit era, MegaMan 9 was far too large to fit on an NES cartridge. Keiji Inafune designed Plugman and Splashwoman, while the other six Robot Masters were designed by Inti Creates staff. Plugman was designed as a template for the younger designers to base their own concepts on, while Splashwoman was the series’ first female Robot Master and requested by the planning team. Originally, Splashwoman was intended to be a male Robot Master, while Hornetman was originally conceived as “Honeywoman” before Inafune presented Splashwoman’s design. Having said that, many of the Robot Masters in MegaMan 9 appear to draw inspiration from earlier MegaMan games: the most prominent examples being Splashwoman and Tornadoman, who have been compared to MegaMan Zero’s Leviathan and Harupia respectively. The game was first released on the WiiWare service in September 2008, likely as a nod to the Virtual Console’s contribution to the game’s creation. It would release soon after on both the PlayStation 3 and the Xbox 360, via the PlayStation Network and Xbox Live Arcade services, though the Japanese Xbox release was delayed almost an entire year.

MM9-04

Bees: the mermaid’s natural predator.

Since Dr. Wily’s most recent defeat, the Blue Bomber has been able to retire to a world at peace. Unfortunately, one day, robots all over the world begin going crazy once more. However, this time the robots were the creations of Dr. Light. As phone calls began pouring into Light Labs, Dr. Wily hijacked all television signals to announce that he was not behind the latest batch of robotic riots. The mad doctor put the blame on his former rival, Dr. Thomas Light, even producing video evidence of the beloved roboticist trying to recruit Wily in his own plans for world domination. Dr. Wily announced that he would try to build his own army of robots to counter Dr. Light’s, but needed donations to his Swiss bank account to make it happen. It doesn’t take long for the police to arrest Dr. Light, leaving MegaMan, Roll and Auto to find out who was really behind the revolting Light bots. I’ve seen a lot of people criticize the storyline of this game, but personally, I think it’s my favorite in the entire series. I especially like the way that the game’s story is told through several cutscenes after completing a certain number of stages, turning MM9 into what may very well be the most story-driven game in the Classic series.

When I said that Inti Creates took inspiration from MegaMan 2, I meant it. This game practically plays like a ROM hack of the NES classic. As such, MegaMan’s abilities take a bit of a nosedive. The Blue Bomber loses his charge shot and slide abilities, opting for the purely jump-and-shoot gameplay that made MM a household name in the first place. In spite of this, a few elements from future titles do manage to make their way into the game. For example, the pause screen layout matches those of MegaMans 4-6. Also, the game utilizes a save system similar to MM8 and MegaMan & Bass, as opposed to using the traditional password system. There was one popular feature from more recent games that was omitted in MM9: the ability to swap weapons in real-time. Most people assume that this was dropped due to the fact that the game was originally developed for the Nintendo Wii. The standard layout for the console relied on holding the Wiimote sideways, leading to a layout similar to NES controllers, which apparently lacked any viable equivalent to the shoulder buttons generally associated with the feature.

MM9-05

Spin on, you– wait, I already said that.

MegaMan 9 also went for a more traditional approach to Support Items. The Rush Coil and Rush Jet return and are functionally identical to their MegaMan 4 iterations. While the Rush Coil is available from the start, the Rush Jet is unlocked by defeating five of the game’s eight Robot Masters. MM9 also brings back the shop system from the most recent games in the series. Screws (formerly Bolts) can be found throughout stages, either as standard power-up or as items dropped by destroyed enemies. Staples such as the Energy Balanacer, extra lives and both E-Tanks and M-Tanks return, but are joined by new items. The Eddie Call summons MegaMan’s flip-top robot companion, who drops random power-ups for 10 seconds. The Beat Call acts similar to the Beat Whistle in MM7, allowing Beat to save MegaMan from pitfall-related deaths. The Shock Guard prevents death from spikes and the ½ Damage Guard reduces damage by half for an entire stage. There’s also the Costume Change and Book of Hairstyles items, which changes Roll’s outfit and allows MegaMan to remove his helmet respectively. These items must be purchased again – though the Book of Hairstyles gets replaced with MegaMan’s helmet – to reverse their effects, but they don’t really have any effect on gameplay.

With the charge shot being retired, one would expect that the weapons would simply go back to their traditional place of just being stronger weapons. Fortunately, MegaMan 9 decides to offer the best of both worlds – the weapons are still powerful, but many of them have alternate uses as well. As per usual, I’m going to be ranking the game’s weapons by how effective I think they are. The game’s best weapon would have to be Jewelman’s Jewel Satellite – essentially the Leaf Shield taken to its logical conclusion. MegaMan can move freely while using it, and pressing the button a second time fires it off, where it can destroy several weak enemies at once. It can also reflect most enemy projectiles in the game and only costs energy once activated. Coming in second is the Hornet Chaser, obtained after defeating Hornetman. This allows MegaMan to shoot out hornet-shaped robotic drones that can either home in on enemies or retrieve most power-ups. Number 3 would have to be MagmaMan’s Magma Bazooka. MegaMan fires off three fire balls in a spread shot formation. The shots can also be charged, similar to MM2’s Atomic Fire. Fourth best weapon would have to be the Black Hole Bomb, taken from Galaxyman. MegaMan fires off a pulsating purple orb, hitting fire a second time detonates the explosion, which sucks up any nearby enemies and deals big damage. I tend to rank this one so high due to its spectacle more than its practicality, but it’s still pretty useful all the same. Concreteman’s Concrete Shot would have to go down as weapon #5. MegaMan fires a glob of concrete at an arc, which generates a concrete block that acts like a stepping stone. Enemies take a great deal of damage from the attack and those destroyed by it are also turned into blocks. The concrete shot can even petrify certain hazards, like magma barriers and even laser beams. Laser Trident, Splashwoman’s special weapon, is the sixth-best weapon in the game. Effectively acting as a more powerful Buster Shot, the Laser Trident can also pierce enemy shields (and even destroy those aforementioned concrete blocks). Number seven would have to be Tornadoman’s Tornado Blow. A full screen weapon similar to the Centaur Flash and Astro Crush, it fills the screen with tornadoes. MegaMan’s jump height also increases while it’s active and it can be used to activate various air-based platforms. Fire-based enemies are also susceptible to the winds. Finally, there’s the Plug Ball, Plugman’s weapon. Similar to weapons like the Bubble Lead and the Search Snake, the Plug Ball is a spark ball that travels across the ground and can climb up walls and even ceilings. Unfortunately, this means that airborne enemies are practically invulnerable to it. It’s not a bad weapon by any means, but it pales in comparison to the rest of MegaMan 9’s arsenal. Still, that might just make the Plug Ball one of the best “worst weapons” in MegaMan history.

MM9-03

Diamonds are a girl’s robot’s best friend.

What is there really to say about MegaMan 9’s graphics? Inti Creates did a pretty good job trying to recreate the aesthetic of the NES games. They recycled what they could, but aside from a few characters, they pretty much had to either heavily modify existing sprites or draw entirely new ones from scratch. MM9 aimed to emulate MM2 in many ways, to the extent where many of the levels have simpler backgrounds than even the late-era NES MegaMan games. Having said that, the artstyle achieves what it set out to, to the extent where some of the bosses are miscolored due to the limitations associated with the NES’s color palette. While the game was designed with widescreen (16:9) TVs in mind, the game uses the traditional 4:3 ratio, with black bars on the sides of the screen, similar to how older TV programs are displayed on modern televisions. MM9 even adds in a feature strictly meant for retro purists: the option to emulate the NES’s flickering when there are too many sprites onscreen. I personally never used it – like most people, flickering always bugged me in NES games – but it shows the amount of attention they paid to detail when attempting to recreate MegaMan 2 on far more advanced hardware. In that sense, MegaMan 9 was a complete success.

For the most part, a lot of MegaMan 9’s sound effects were recycled from previous games, especially MM2. There were also some sound effects designed exclusively for MM9 itself, though all of the game’s audio was modelled after the NES’s sound chip. The game’s soundtrack was composed by Ippo Yamada, Ryo Kawakami, Yu Shimoda (who also worked on the game’s sound effects) and Hiroki Isogai – all members of Inti Creates’ internal sound team, referred to as III. Ippo Yamada previously worked on MegaMan 7, as well as the MegaMan Zero and ZX series. Of course, some of the game’s music – the menu screen tune, as well as the jingles for selecting a stage, getting a weapon, Game Over and the map screen for Dr. Wily’s Castle – were recycled directly from MegaMan 2. Aside from that, however, I’d say that the musical compositions deviate from MM2’s framework more than any other aspect of the game and frankly, I’d consider that a good thing. Despite the fact that most of Ippo Yamada’s compositions for the MegaMan series were built on more advanced sound hardware, he’s able to slip into the 8-bit style seamlessly. My favorite themes in the game are the stage themes for Galaxyman, Hornetman, Magmaman and Concreteman, as well as the standard boss fight music and the third Dr. Wily stage – though most people tend to prefer the first two. The music that plays over the game’s credits is also amazing. Of course, much like the Zero and ZX games, Inti Creates’ involvement with MegaMan 9 meant that an arranged soundtrack was released around the game’s release. While these tracks weren’t present within the game itself, they do offer some interesting rearrangements to the game’s compositions. Some were even handled by other composers from the Classic series, such as Akari Kaida, Shusaku Uchiyama, Yasuaki “BUN BUN” Fujita and even Manami Matsumae herself. I wish that these could’ve been incorporated into the game itself, but with WiiWare’s size restrictions, it would’ve been completely impossible.

There are also a few bonus features added to the game, to increase replay value. For example, there are 50 challenges hidden in the game – akin to in-game achievements – ranging from beating a boss with the Mega Buster or clearing a stage in a certain amount of time to beating the entire game without taking damage once. There was also a Time Attack mode, which allows players to replay any stage – though the Wily Castle stages have to be unlocked by beating them – in order to rack up the best possible time. Time Attack mode made use of all 3 systems’ capabilities to connect to the internet to maintain online leaderboards, allowing players to compete with people all over the world to complete each stage with the best possible time.

MM9-02

Somehow, I always pictured him being more dignified than this.

MegaMan 9 wasn’t the first game in the series to toy with downloadable content – more on that later – but it was the first to actively charge extra money for it. Having said that, I’d have to say that Capcom actually managed to price things fairly at this point. First off, there were two additional difficulty settings, labelled “Hero Mode” and “Superhero Mode,” which were available for $1 apiece. $1 was also the cost for an additional Special Stage, an extended-length level that pit MegaMan against the devious “Fakeman”, a police robot modelled after the one that apprehended Dr. Light in one of the game’s cutscenes.  Endless Attack was a special mode that pit players against an endless onslaught of stage segments – both taken from existing stages and some completely original – to see just how long they could last for a mere $2. The main attraction, however, was the ability to play through the game as Protoman, MegaMan’s mysterious older brother for a mere $2. Protoman plays fundamentally differently from the Blue Bomber, inheriting both the slide and Charge Shot MegaMan ditched in MM9, as well as gaining the ability to reflect certain shots with his Proto Shield while jumping. In exchange, Protoman takes twice as much damage as his little bro and can only fire two shots at a time, as opposed to the traditional three. He also replaces the Rush Coil and Jet with the Proto Coil and Proto Jet respectively – both themed around his trademark shield as opposed to the Blue Bomber’s canine companion – which he starts the game with. Of course, Protoman also lacks any of the game’s story cutscenes, as well as the ability to use the game’s shop. Honestly, I think that’s kind of fitting: Protoman was always depicted as something of a “lone wolf” character and completely rewriting the story around him seemed like a waste of time. Using Protoman also disables the ability to unlock in-game achievements, but I think that’s a small price to pay for something that should probably be saved for repeat playthroughs in the first place.

MegaMan 9 is really a hard game to gauge. Its Japanese subtitle “The Ambition’s Revival” was definitely fitting, as it provided a necessary in for both the Classic MegaMan series as a whole, which lied dormant for at least a decade – relegated entirely to re-releases and the occasional remake – as well as the retro-inspired aesthetic, which would eventually lead to a throwback trend that still exists to this day. I definitely enjoy it for the most part, but the fact that it essentially tries too hard to be a second MegaMan 2 sort of rubs me the wrong way. Ironically, despite being held up as a stellar example of what developers should try to achieve when building retro throwbacks, it’s a perfect example of one of the flaws so many people criticize when bashing the entire trend: it sticks too closely to the source material. I think most of the negative reviews I’ve seen for this game since its release nearly 10 years ago – has it really been that long? – have claimed that it was nothing more than a ROM hack. Now I’m not stupid enough to go that far when criticizing the game, but it’s obvious that Capcom went out of their way to try to recreate the magic of MegaMan 2. It was definitely a success on that front, but I’d argue that they might have done too well. If I haven’t already made myself clear in the earlier parts of this retrospective, let me make something crystal clear: I think that later games in the Classic series – not all of them, mind you – actually managed to exceed MegaMan 2 in terms of quality. Shooting to match something that’s already been improved on feels pointless to me, regardless of popular opinion. If the teams at Capcom and Inti Creates had been trying to make a game that was better than MegaMan 2, I’d be a lot more forgiving. Unfortunately, that’s not what they were aiming for. They simply wanted to match a standard that was topped years back. As such, I’d say MegaMan 9’s a good game, but definitely not the best the series has to offer.

MegaMan 10

The praise that MM9 received for being “a fresh breath of air for the entire franchise” makes the criticism lobbed at its successor all the more infuriating. Dismissed as a “lazy retread” by most members of the fanbase by the time the game was launched, MegaMan 10 continues the series tradition of later games being dismissed out of hand. In that sense, MegaMan 9 truly was a successor to the legendary second game in the franchise: no follow-up could have possibly lived up to the lofty expectations it inspired. If MM9 planted the seeds for the retro throwback trend that continues to thrive to this day, then MM10 clearly suffered because it hadn’t taken root by 2010. Likewise, whether indirectly or not, MM10 clearly took inspiration from the later games in the series, delivering a more developed project that would go down as my favorite mainline game in the Classic series.

Pleased with the success of the previous game, Capcom commissioned Inti Creates to develop MegaMan 10. Keiji Inafune felt that MM9’s “retro style” had contributed to the game’s success, so they decided to continue the trend in this new title. However, according to Ippo Yamada, while MM9 was developed as a spiritual successor to MM2, 10 was made up of “original pixel art and chip music, neither a remake nor a revival”. The development team decided that when developing this new installment that they should listen both to old-school gamers and former gamers who hadn’t played any video games recently. This led to the inclusion of Easy Mode, due to the complaints surrounding MM9’s extreme difficulty.

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Seriously, this will never not crack me up.

After Dr. Wily’s scheme to frame Dr. Light failed, peace has returned to the future of 20XX. However, soon after Roboenza, an illness that only affects robots, begins spreading throughout the world. Without the assistance of their robot helpers, humanity finds itself incapable of finding a cure. Eventually, even Roll, MegaMan’s sister, is infected with the mysterious disease. Matters only get worse a month after the outbreak begins, as the afflicted robots begin going berserk and attempt to take over the world. One day, Dr. Wily’s flying saucer appears at Light Labs, heavily damaged. Wily claims that one of the robots attacked him and stole the parts to a machine he’d be working on to cure the virus. MegaMan vows to retrieve the stolen parts from eight Robot Masters, but before he’s able to jump into action, Protoman appears. Believing that the job is too big for the Blue Bomber to complete alone, he offers his assistance and the two join forces to acquire the cure.

For the most part, MegaMan 10 – bafflingly subtitled as “Threat From Outer Space!!” in Japan – resembles its predecessor in terms of its gameplay. MegaMan retains his abilities from the previous game, though this time around Protoman is playable from the start, also retaining his quirks from MM9. Both characters have their own unique storylines, which makes Protoman’s involvement feel a lot more organic than it did in the previous game. Aside from that, gameplay is mostly unchanged from the previous game, though the addition of multiple difficulty levels in the base game does allow for more variety than previous games in the series. One welcome addition is the return of the ability to switch weapons without pausing, assigned to the shoulder buttons on most controllers. Considering how easy it was to implement – the Wii Remote uses the A and B buttons – I’m still shocked that the previous game lacked this quality of life feature. Easy Mode actually manages to have more of an effect on the game than previous iterations: special propeller platforms are placed over gaps to make jumps easier, certain enemies are entirely missing from the difficulty setting, some enemies have completely different attack patterns and all damage is halved – just like in MM2’s “Normal” mode. However, beating the game on Normal difficulty unlocks Hard mode, which is the exact opposite of Easy Mode. Item drops are reduced significantly, nearly every enemy has an upgraded version and bosses even have entirely new attacks. These new features definitely add to the game’s replay value.

The support items from the previous game also return in full force: MegaMan has access to the Rush Coil and Rush Jet, while Protoman wields the Proto Coil and Proto Jet. As with the previous game, Protoman starts with both support items, while MegaMan only starts with the Coil. Fortunately, the Blue Bomber only needs to beat four Robot Masters to unlock the Jet this time around. The Shop also returns from the previous game, but this time, Protoman has access to one all his own. Both characters’ shops are completely different: MegaMan’s is run by Dr. Light and Auto, while Protoman’s is run by “?????” – in reality, a disguised Auto wearing a hard hat – accompanied by Tango, the robotic feline from MegaMan V. MegaMan’s offerings are essentially identical to the previous game, except Roll’s Costume Change is replaced with a W-Tank. Protoman’s offerings, however, are significantly more limited: he can buy extra lives, Energy and Weapon Tanks, Beat Calls, Shock Guards and the Energy Balancer. Kind of ironic that the character who takes twice as much damage can’t buy the item that halves it. I guess that would make the game too easy.

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A mystery wrapped in an enigma, wrapped in a Hard Hat.

Just like in its predecessor, MM10’s Special Weapons attempt to bridge the gap between the early games’ power and the later games’ practicality. In this case, it seems like they tend to evoke more of the latter quality compared to the previous game. In the end, they end up coming across like a mixture between the experimental qualities of the weapons found in MM5 with the non-combat applications of those found in MM8. While 10’s arsenal may not be the most devastating of the series in terms of firepower, they’re definitely among the most fun weapons in the entire series. My personal favorite weapon would have to be Pumpman’s Water Shield. A unique take on the traditional “Leaf Shield” weapon, MegaMan (et al) summons 10 orbs of water to act as a shield. Firing again shoots them off in random directions, sort of like a more chaotic version of MM7’s Junk Shield. The unique part is that each hit the shield takes only manages to dissipate one orb, but the wielder can still take damage from attacks that slip in between the gaps left in the barrier. Next up would be the Solar Blaze, Solarman’s weapon. It essentially fires off a bomb that splits into two waves of fire, each careening in opposite directions. It sort of reminds me of the Pharaoh Wave attack from MegaMan 2: The Power Fighters. Coming in at number 3 would have to be Nitroman’s Wheel Cutter. Similar to the Spin Wheel from MegaMan X2, it fires off a buzzsaw that travels across the ground when the fire button is released. However, if the button is held, the saw remains on MegaMan’s buster, which can allow him to scale walls quickly. Then there’s the Chill Spike, taken from Chillman. It fires off a glob of icy gel which forms spikes when it lands on the ground, but hitting an enemy with it directly freezes them temporarily, much like the Ice Slasher. Blademan’s (not that one) weapon, the Triple Blade, is my fifth favorite, firing three katana-shaped blades in a spread shot formation, though the pattern varies depending on whether it’s fired on the ground (straight, diagonal up, further diagonal-up) or while jumping (straight, diagonal-down, further diagonal-down). A little tricky to aim at times because of this, but it works well for the next part. The Rebound Striker, obtained by defeating Strikeman, is essentially an improved version of the Gemini Laser from MM3. The ball still ricochets around the screen, but this time it can be aimed in three different directions from the start – straight forward and diagonally up or down – which can allow for greater accuracy. Coming in at seventh place is Commandoman’s Commando Bomb, an explosive missile that can be aimed after firing by pressing up or down on the D-Pad, forcing it to turn at a 90 degree angle. Once it makes impact with a wall, ceiling or floor, it creates a large explosive wave that follows the contours of the landscape. This is where the majority of the damage comes from: the missile itself is a dud if it hits an enemy directly. Finally, there’s the worst weapon in the game, the Thunder Wool, courtesy of Sheepman. MegaMan fires off a slow-moving thunder cloud that slowly rises into the air and drops a powerful lightning bolt. Two clouds can be combined to increase the attack’s range and damage, but the cloud is so slow and fragile, it’s almost not worth bothering with the attack in the first place.

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A lot of weaknesses feel too esoteric, but this seems way too obvious.

While MegaMan 9 set out to imitate MegaMan 2 exactly, MM10’s aesthetics were clearly meant to be more of an homage to the classic 8-bit games, attempting to ape the classic console’s look while utilizing artistic tricks that the NES was clearly incapable of. For the most part, the game’s graphics are similar to that of the previous game, but the presentation is improved significantly, much to any retro purist’s chagrin. While various traits of the classic 8-bit system are retained in the game’s spritework and cutscenes – particularly the limited color palette – MegaMan 10 also decides to use graphical tricks that the classic console would clearly never be able to do within actual games. I think my favorite bit of presentation of the game is what happens when one of the Robot Masters’ stages are selected. A cyan rectangle, surrounded by a darker blue background above and below it. The background contains silhouettes of each of the eight Robot Masters – four above the cyan part, four below – and the chosen boss hops into the center, introducing itself. As each boss robot is defeated, their shadow is removed from the line-up. I don’t know why, but something about that just struck me as a nice touch. Compared to MM9, the game’s aesthetic clearly draws more inspiration from later games in the NES library but doesn’t tether itself to the system’s limitations. Perhaps the most evident shift away would be the fact that the flicker setting from the previous game is completely absent this time around. As with the previous game, MM10 uses a 4:3 aspect ratio for its gameplay. This time, however, there are graphical borders that vary based on whether the player is on the main menu or selected a character. Some players found this addition distracting, but I didn’t really mind one way or the other.

The sound team from the previous game returns. Ippo Yamada returns as the Sound Director, Hiroki Isogai joins Yu Shimoda on Sound Effect Design and Ryo Kawakami composed many of the game’s tracks. However, this time around, an all-star team of composers from previous MegaMan games return, each providing one of the Robot Masters themes. Manami Matsumae (MM1) composed Nitro Rider, Yasuaki “BUN BUN” Fujita (MM3) wrote Solar Inferno, Desert Commando was MM4 composer Minae Fujii’s contribution to the soundtrack, Mari Yamaguchi (MM5) scored the catchy Cybersheep’s Dream, Yuko Takehara of MegaMan 6 & 7 composed Polluted Pump, Makoto Tomozawa (Dr. Wily’s Revenge, MegaMan X, MegaMan 7 and the Legends games) produced Fireball Strike, Absolute Chill was composed by Shusaku Uchiyama (MM8) and Akari Kaida (MM&B) contributed King of Blades. In fact, Takashi Tateishi, the composer of MM2, even rearranged the standard stage clear jingle, while Manami Matsumae handled the trademark stage selected tune. As such, the game’s soundtrack comes across as eclectic, but also memorable in my opinion. MegaMan 10 also sets the record for having the most unique boss battle songs in the series history: there are unique themes for the Robot Master fights, the fortress bosses, the Wily Machine battle and the Wily Capsule, bringing the grand total to four. likely has my favorite soundtrack in the entire series, which makes it difficult to choose my favorite songs. Sheepman, Nitroman, Pumpman and Chillman’s themes are my top choices, as well as the third Wily Castle level theme (though the first and second theme are also great), the Wily Fortress Boss Battle and Protoman’s unique shop theme. MM10 also received an arranged soundtrack around the time of its release, though it was referred to as an “Image Soundtrack”. It’s a shame that not every song in the game gets remastered, but what manages to make it in sounds great.

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Somehow, Protoman even manages to make the MM4 charge shot look cooler.

The Time Attack mode and in-game achievements also return from the previous game. MegaMan 10 also adds a brand-new challenge mode, consisting of 88 mini-stages, each with their own unique layouts and requirements from completion, generally involving reaching a goal or defeating an enemy. Some of the earlier Challenges end up resembling a tutorial mode for the base game, while later stages put player to the test to prove their mastery of the game. These challenges also have various ranks, which can be unlocked by completing each challenge while meeting specific criteria, like finishing in a certain amount of time or beat it without taking any damage. It doesn’t really add that much to the overall game, but it is a nice extra feature that I would love to see return in future games.

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Did I mention just how much I love the references in this game?

As with the previous game, there is some paid DLC to extend replay value. This time, there are three special stages, which cost $1 apiece. This time, each stage is topped off with a boss fight from one of the three MegaMan Killers: Enker (from the first Game Boy game), Punk (MMIII) and Ballade (MMIV). These stages are only accessible in the game’s time attack mode by MegaMan, but defeating each boss adds their Special Weapons to the Blue Bomber’s arsenal permanently, in every game mode. Endless Attack also returns as additional DLC, costing $3 this time around. The game’s most important addition would have to be Bass as a third playable character, costing $2. Bass retains his aimable shot from MegaMan & Bass, but loses his double jump. He can also dash instead of sliding and comes equipped with the Treble Boost from the get-go. Unlike Protoman in the previous game, Bass even gets his own storyline and has access to a shop, run by Dr. Wily’s robotic bird Reggae. Bass’s shop selection is similar to Protoman’s, though the Beat Call is replaced with the Treble Item and Treble Rescue, which are functionally identical to the Eddie and Beat Calls respectively.

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A literal game-changer.

In the end, MegaMan 10 feels like more of a tribute game than an outright retro throwback. The fact that it was released after MegaMan 9 definitely hurt its reception – especially given the series’ reputation of low-effort sequels – but it seems that unlike the other MegaMan games that went unappreciated, MM10 still suffers from the poor reactions that plagued it upon its original release. I’d like to think that its position was exacerbated by the fact that it was the last true MegaMan release up to the present. While I hope time will heal the wounds this game has suffered in the past seven years, I grow more and more skeptical as time goes on. MegaMan 10 is still presently my favorite game of the entire Classic series and I think a lot of that has to do with just how perfect of a game it was to precede the great hiatus we’ve been suffering for over five years at this point. The game contains references to several earlier games in the series: the Weapon Archive boss fights in the first Wily Castle stage recreate Robot Masters from nine of the previous games; Bass’s gameplay is reminiscent of his previous playable appearance in MegaMan & Bass and Tango, Reggae and the MegaMan Killers all make appearances representing more obscure titles in the series. In a sense, if we had to say goodbye to the Classic MegaMan games – whether permanent or temporary – MM10 felt like a perfect note to end it on as it pays tribute to the franchise’s rich history, instead of just paying lip service to a single title. I’m still holding out hope that we’ll see a MegaMan 11 sooner or later, but until then, this game has left me satisfied for the time being.

MegaMan Powered Up

While MegaMan 9 didn’t arrive on the scene until 2008, there was one other title released between it and the delayed Western release of MegaMan & Bass on the Game Boy Advance. Releasing in 2006 on the PlayStation Portable, MegaMan Powered Up – known as Rockman Rockman in Japan – was a total reimagining of the 1987 classic that started it all. While remaking the first game in the series may seem frivolous by today’s standards with multiple re-releases of the NES version over the years, MMPU delivers a package that I’d count as the gold standard for video game remakes. Powered Up attempts to fix many of the flaws of the original game while maintaining the things that made it great in the first place and adding entirely new elements to keep the game feeling brand-new. In that sense, MegaMan Powered Up feels like the most substantial game in the entire series, no small feat for a game exclusively released on a handheld system.

MegaMan Powered Up was developed alongside a similar remake of the first MegaMan X game – MegaMan Maverick Hunter X – on Sony’s PlayStation Portable fairly early into its lifespan. Both games were intended to start an entire series of remakes, but unfortunately, due to the handheld’s lack of sales in any region when the games were originally released, these plans were inevitably scrapped. MHX was released first and as such, it included a demo for Powered Up as a bonus. The PlayStation Portable’s design actually had quite a significant impact on the development of the game. Due to the PSP’s widescreen aspect ratio, the super-deformed chibi artstyle was chosen to better emphasis the character’s facial expressions. Keiji Inafune expressed interest in using a similar style in the original MegaMan game but was unable to realize his vision due to the limitations of the NES hardware. The game’s aesthetic, especially the character models were designed around the concept of “toys”, specifically trying to design them to resemble “the kinds of characters that you’d see hanging off keychains and such”, according to character designer Tatsuya Yoshikawa. The extra screen space afforded by the widescreen also inspired the developers to expand the sizes of the stages, as they were given more screen space to work with. Keiji Inafune mentioned that there were originally going to be eight Robot Masters in the original MegaMan on the NES, but ended up with six due to tight scheduling. Inafune originally considered using one of the abandoned concepts – Bondman, a adhesives robot – in Powered Up, but decided that due to his cult status, he would leave the character as a “legend”. Instead, Inafune designed two original bosses: Timeman and Oilman – not that one – who had to be slightly redesigned outside of Japan, due to his resemblance to a racial caricature.

As one might expect from a remake, MegaMan Powered Up essentially retells the story from the first game, albeit in greater detail. In the year 20XX – I guess they figured “200X” didn’t sound futuristic in 2006 – humans have been able to create industrial humanoid robots. At the forefront of this technology is Dr. Thomas Light, a brilliant roboticist, who created two human-like robots with highly advanced artificial intelligence: “Mega” – I will never get over this change – an android resembling a young boy built as the doctor’s lab assistant and his sister Roll, a helper robot designed for housekeeping. After the success of these two robots, Dr. Light would build eight more “Robot Masters” designed for industrial use. Dr. Wily, a former colleague and rival of Dr. Light, becomes jealous of Dr. Light’s achievements and decides to attempt world domination. He steals and reprograms the eight Robot Masters to aid him in his megalomaniacal scheme. To add insult to injury, he leaves Mega and Roll behind, declaring them as nothing but useless scrap. With the world in chaos and Dr. Light fearing the worst, Mega volunteers to be converted into a super fighting robot. Rechristened as “MegaMan”, the Blue Bomber sets off to rescue his fellow robots and stop Wily’s evil plot. Of course, this game doesn’t take itself nearly as seriously as other games in the series, and considering that this is a Classic MegaMan game, that’s really saying something. I think MMPU is a pretty big part of the reason why I prefer the Western storyline of the original game – where Dr. Wily was Dr. Light’s assistant rather than just a colleague. I always used to wonder how Wily would’ve been able to steal Light’s robots if he weren’t working for him and ever since Powered Up’s release, I can’t help but think of him literally putting all of them in a giant sack and flying away. It’s both hilarious and impractical, but I really can’t think of any better way for Wily to have reprogrammed the robots if he didn’t do it under Dr. Light’s nose as his assistant.

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What, did you think I was joking?

The gameplay is pretty much what you’d expect from a MegaMan platformer. Stages are generally longer than those of the original game, and returning stages mix new obstacles into existing stages to create entirely new layouts. In fact, elements from future games – namely a few enemies and obstacles – manage to make their way into MMPU, paying homage to other games in the series. For example, the game starts with a unique introduction stage, much like MM7, MM8 and MegaMan & Bass, capped off with a brand-new, yet surprisingly familiar boss fight. Likewise, MegaMan can switch Special Weapons on the fly by using the shoulder buttons. Despite being a relatively early attempt at a 2.5D game – that is, a game with 3D graphics but gameplay limited to a 2D plane – Powered Up pretty much nails everything. It’s especially jarring considering this game was released in 2006 and on a portable game system of all things, when many of the game’s console contemporaries were still suffering from the  problems commonly associated with 2.5D games at this early stage in their development, let alone a platformer which requires more precise controls than most other genres. Look no further than the game’s counterpart – Maverick Hunter X – where the 3D models didn’t allow for the precision 2D platformers are generally afforded with sprites and other more traditional 2D artstyles, leading to ill-timed jumps and other unintentional difficulties for the player. Speaking of difficulty, each stage in the game has three difficulty settings: Easy, Normal and Hard. The difficulty is always chosen at the beginning of each stage and after the eight Robot Masters are defeated, the Wily Fortress stages can only be played on difficulty settings all of the previous stages were completed on or lower. Similar to MM10, each difficulty setting has its own enemy layout and boss characters even gain access to more powerful attacks on the higher settings.

The addition of two new Robot Masters actually changes quite a bit about the game compared to its source material. For starters, the boss weakness order has been heavily modified, even beyond the obvious way of just accounting for the additional bosses. To name a few, Rolling Cutter defeats Bombman now and Oil Slider is Elecman’s weakness, whose Thunder Beam now defeats Timeman. It may feel like just a small inconsequential change to the game itself, but honestly it refreshes the entire concept and keeps long-time fans on their toes. Another important change comes to the boss fights themselves, each Robot Master’s attack pattern has been expanded greatly over the 1987 original. Most importantly, they gain powerful special attacks that render them temporarily invincible. While these attacks are limited to when they’ve lost half their health, the difficulty setting affects how often they’re used. Frankly, I love the entire concept and wish that other games in the Classic series could have done something similar.

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Jump, jump! Slide, sl–whoops, wrong game.

Powered Up brings back a majority of the weapons from the original game, with the sole exception being the Magnet Beam. In its place are two new weapons: the Time Slow, which temporarily slows down time for a brief period and the Oil Slider, which fires a glob of oil that MegaMan can ride like a snowboard. Neither new weapon is particularly useful, but they are interesting concepts. I’d probably put both weapons below even the Hyper Bomb in terms of usefulness, but otherwise, my rankings for the weapons in the original NES version still hold true.

As I mentioned earlier, MegaMan Powered Up’s aesthetics deviate from the series in general, ramping up the cutesiness substantially even when compared to the Tezuka-inspired artwork of Keiji Inafune’s original designs. And yet, it’s probably one of the most gorgeous game in the PSP’s library, despite being released fairly early in the game’s lifespan. The character models are very expressive and all of the stages are colorful, with surprisingly detailed backgrounds despite the system’s small resolution. The lifebar and weapons meter also showcase MegaMan’s remaining lives and how many shots of each Special Weapon MegaMan has left, similar to both MegaMan 8 and the Complete Works games. Some people may be turned off by the game’s aesthetic, but frankly, I still think it holds up even to this day.

The entire soundtrack from the original game returns in MMPU, totally rearranged by Toshihiko Horiyama, who previously worked on MegaMan 7, the original MegaMan X, MMX4 and various other games across the entire franchise. Horiyama’s arrangements have lighter instrumentations, fitting with the game’s more light-hearted tone. Some of the games songs – notably Cutman, Gutsman and Fireman’s – were shifted from minor to major key, leading to them sounding a bit different. What’s really surprising is just how much of the music ends up getting recycled within the game itself. The boss theme from Dr. Wily’s fortress gets rearranged several times, quickly becoming the mad doctor’s leitmotif. So much of the music gets rearranged that there actually doesn’t end up being that much in the way of original music. What’s there – specifically the new main theme (which gets recycled even more heavily than the Dr. Wily theme), Oilman and Timeman’s theme – fits in perfectly with the new takes on the original compositions. My favorite songs in Powered Up’s soundtrack would have to be Timeman’s theme, the Fireman rearrangement, Cutman’s stage, the introduction stage, and the theme for the Wily Fortress boss fights.

In addition, Powered Up was fully voice acted, to an even greater extent than MegaMan 8. There were Japanese and English dubs, though the PSP’s UMD format could likely only handle one version per disc. As such, I’m only really familiar with the English version. The game’s English dub was handled by the Ocean Group, a production company based out of Vancouver, British Columbia, well known for many anime dubs. They also ended up providing the voices for the MegaMan cartoon in the 1990s, as well as the dub for the Rockman: Wish Upon a Star OVA. The game’s voice acting actually manages to give the characters even more personality than they did back in MM8: Elecman is a narcissistic pretty-boy, Gutsman becomes a total workaholic, Iceman becomes bi-polar – see what they did there? – shifting from wimpy snowman to drill sergeant and Fireman turns into a cross between a superhero and a fire and brimstone Southern preacher. Even the Yellow Devil gets voice acting! My personal favorites are easily MegaMan, who manages to sound like an actual child, and of course Dr. Wily, who sort of comes across like a shriller version of Wallace Shawn.

Perhaps the most impressive aspect of MegaMan Powered Up is the sheer amount of extra content crammed into the game. For starters, there are actually two entirely different modes of gameplay. The full-on remake is labelled as “New Style” upon starting a new game, but there’s also an “Old Style”: essentially a perfect recreation of the original MegaMan using MMPU’s art assets and control scheme. Personally, I think it’s the most playable version of the original MegaMan out there, making several concessions to recreate the game as closely as possible. This includes shearing down the PSP’s screen to an accurate 4:3 aspect ratio, bringing back the Magnet Beam as an unlockable support item and even bringing back the original 8-bit version’s music in its full chiptune glory. While a few concessions were made due to the difference in some of the designs between both versions, these have little effect on the actual gameplay. Granted, the gameplay itself did receive a few tweaks, but these were made to make the game more in line with the later NES games, fixing various oversights the version from 1987 never thought to change.

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I’ll never understand why the PSP had so many 4:3 games on it.

New Style has a few extra tricks of its own, mainly in the form of unlockable characters. For starters, all eight of the game’s Robot Masters are playable characters: to unlock them, just defeat them with the Arm Cannon alone. This allows the damaged robots to survive and be brought back to Dr. Light’s Lab and deprogrammed. Each Robot Master is only equipped with their respective weapon, giving each of them unique challenges. Fortunately, they also have other special abilities. These range from the mundane – Fireman’s immune to fire attacks and Oilman doesn’t slip on oil – to the practical – Timeman retains his clock-hands attack and Cutman can wall-jump. The most impressive change would have to be Gutsman, who can summon a set number of tossable blocks at will, turning the Super Arm from a mere gimmick into the devastating onslaught it always should’ve been. Each Robot Master has their own take on the story, fighting a MegaMan doppleganger (referred to as “MegaMan?”) at the end of the stage they usually occupy. Beating the game on each difficulty setting also unlocks a new variant of MegaMan: Easy Mode unlocks “MegaMan S”, capable of sliding like in MegaMan 3; “MegaMan C” is unlocked by clearing the game on normal difficulty, still boasting the slide but also regaining the charge shot from later games in the series; while Hard Mode “rewards” players with “Mega”, who trades his blue armor and Mega Buster for a pair of comfy shorts and a swift kick. MegaMan’s sister Roll was also available as free DLC. She fights by swinging a broom, almost acting as a parody of Zero. Better still, Roll also has access to 12 alternate costumes, ranging from her MegaMan 8 outfit and a raincoat that evokes Toadman.EXE from the Battle Network games to a witch’s robe and a knight costume that resembles Sir Arthur’s armor from the Ghosts ‘n Goblins games. Finally, MegaMan’s older brother Protoman is also unlocked by completing all 100 in-game challenges – more on those in a bit – but Capcom eventually offered him as a free downloadable character too. Unlike other games in the series, Protoman’s only weapon in Powered Up is the Proto Strike, which fires off giant, powerful shots similar to a fully-charged Mega Buster shot, though only two can be on-screen at a time. He can also block various projectiles with the Proto Shield by standing still, though it can be knocked away with powerful attacks, requiring it to be retrieved. To compensate for these advantages, he takes twice as much damage as any other character in the game. Considering the sheer amount of playable characters, not to mention the 3 difficulty settings, some people have claimed that the game has 468 levels, but this seems like a bit of a stretch.

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I’m still a bit rusty, but does fire beat scissors?

There are also two more additional modes. First, there are the Challenges. MegaMan and each Robot Master have 10 unique challenge mini-stages, coupled with 10 Boss Rushes to make a total of 100 overall. The real star of the show has to be Construction mode. Long before games like Super Mario Maker and even the Little Big Planet series, MegaMan Powered Up allowed players the chance to create their own unique stages. While the interface was a bit clunkier than future titles – the PSP’s small screen and lack of touch controls didn’t help matters – the customizability allowed players to create stages on par with the ones already found in the game. There were also various special expansion packs, adding new stage elements, hidden throughout stages in New Style mode. In fact, there were even tilesets based on the original 8-bit NES game stages – even Timeman and Oilman get some love in this regard – that I wish Old Style had used as opposed to the standard Powered Up backgrounds, but you can’t get everything you ask for. On top of this, there was also an Online Infrastructure mode, allowing players to share their stages with each other all over the world. In fact, even Capcom themselves got in on this action, regularly releasing custom-built stages of their own throughout the game’s first year of existence. With these various features, MegaMan Powered Up’s size was only limited by the player’s Memory Stick, which was generally either small or quite expensive, especially when the game was first released.

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Literally hundreds of hours of gameplay. And that’s just figuring out the interface.

I’d generally count MegaMan Powered Up to be among the best games in the entire MegaMan series, as well as one of the best video game remakes of all-time. As such, I’d also say that it’s the perfect game for anyone trying to get into the series: it’s a perfect retelling of the first game, with top-notch gameplay and several bonus features. There’s only one problem: it’s not available on modern platforms, at least outside of Japan. You see, while many PlayStation Portable games are available as downloadable titles on the PlayStation Network, the North American version of MMPU had various technical difficulties that neither Capcom nor Sony were able to fix, leaving it in a state of limbo. While Rockman Rockman did end up seeing release on the Japanese PSN store, the difficult nature of the PlayStation Vita – the only platform still in production at the time of writing capable of playing PSP games – and dealing with other regions will make this difficult to obtain for gamers outside of Japan. Ironically, despite the game’s critical success, Capcom has never attempted re-releasing the game on any other platform, which just seems like a mistake to me. Bundling the game with Maverick Hunter X and selling it as a digital title on modern platforms (including PC) just seems like a brilliant move for these games that many fans of the series never got the chance to play. Better still, platforms like the Nintendo Switch and PC could easily improve the admittedly awkward Stage Construction interface – the mode’s only major limitation. Considering all of the re-releases Capcom’s been doing lately, I hope the PSP MegaMan games eventually get their day in the sun.

Interlude: MegaMan Universe

Of course, while MegaMan Powered Up didn’t see a direct successor, Capcom attempted to revive the stage builder concept in a game years later. MegaMan Universe had a unique artstyle – which I liked personally – and included cameo appearances from characters like Street Fighter’s Ryu, Sir Arthur from Ghosts ‘n Goblins and even the infamous “Bad Box Art” MegaMan from the North American cover of the original game. In addition to these unique features, the game appeared to be taking much of its inspiration from MegaMan 2, including all eight of the Robot Masters from MM2 in the game’s promotional material. In addition to customizing stages, players would also be given the opportunity to build their own playable characters by combining various pieces from existing models and customizing them with a unique name. The game was set to be the next release in the series after MegaMan 10, but it was unceremoniously cancelled soon after it was originally announced.

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Good night sweet prince: And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!

The reason I bring this game up is that I actually played it. Back in late 2010, I attended New York Comic Con for the first time and visited Capcom’s booth. It was quite popular that year, with announcements like Okamiden on the DS, the similarly-cancelled MegaMan Legends 3 Project on 3DS and the original Marvel vs. Capcom 3. I was a Classic MegaMan fan at heart, so I had to get my hands on the game. I only got to play the demo at the kiosk once, but I still remember quite a few details. For example, the demo offered three different stages, each based on their difficulty – I obviously chose the most difficult stage. Each play session afforded the player with the standard 3 lives and I managed to complete the on my last life. For my troubles, I won a nice little prize, given to everyone who completed the most difficult stage: an inflatable lance based on Sir Arthur’s, marked with the MegaMan Universe logo, which I still have to this day. Honestly, there really wasn’t that much to hate about the game. At worst, the controls felt a bit wonky compared to other games in the series, but considering how early in development the game was, it could’ve easily been tightened up in future builds.

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Brown and gray? Has MegaMan finally gone AAA?

However, this wasn’t taken into account by either the gaming press or the public in general. The game was considered an abomination at first glance. The artstyle was “hideous”. The controls were incompetent. Everything about the game was irredeemable. Just ignore the fact that MegaMan 10 was derided for being too similar to the previous game in the series, Universe was far, far too different. Soon after the game was first announced, news about the game began to dry up. I remember a short time before the game was officially cancelled, I asked Christian Svensson – then-Senior Vice President of Planning and Business Development at Capcom USA – about whether or not MegaMan Universe had been cancelled on Capcom-Unity’s “Ask Capcom” forum. He stayed cryptic, simply stating that the game was going in a new direction. Not long after, the game’s cancellation was officially announced. The games media in general was shocked – a MegaMan game getting cancelled? Unthinkable! – but not remotely disappointed. Everyone was more excited about MegaMan Legends 3 anyway, Universe was nothing more than a terrible game that no one wanted.

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Low on cash, Roll scores a part-time job at Build-A-Bot.

Public perception of Universe did a complete 180 after Legends 3 was “cancelled”. Suddenly it had gone from a waste of Capcom’s resources to yet another innocent victim in the wake of the company’s sudden anti-MegaMan sentiment. I still consider most of the people who began mourning the demise of Universe once MML3 had met the same fate to be hypocrites of the highest order. A game that was literally smothered in its crib due to sheer antipathy from the very fanbase holding it up as an example of Capcom’s mistreatment of the franchise in general. My stomach still turns whenever I see people bring up MegaMan Universe and there’s one question on my mind every time I see anyone bring up the game’s existence: did you always care or just when it suited you?

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At the very least, having a bigger screen would’ve been nice.

Of course, there have been more cancelled projects since then. A Korean MMORPG called “Rockman Online” was in development by NeoWiz Games and was set to feature characters from both the Classic and X series was announced around the same time as the other two projects, but wouldn’t be officially cancelled until 2013. There was also a gritty reboot planned for the MegaMan X series, a first-person shooter codenamed “Maverick Hunter”, set to be developed by Armature Studio, comprised of several developers who worked on Nintendo’s Metroid Prime games. The latter was only discovered long after it had been discarded, and while I joke that it’s the game the MegaMan X fanbase deserves, it honestly looked somewhat interesting.

Street Fighter X MegaMan

1987 may very well be the most important year in Capcom’s existence. It was the year that two of the series that led to them becoming household names were first released. I’ve already mentioned that the original MegaMan was released in December 1987, but the first Street Fighter – not Street Fighter II – was first released in arcades that summer on August 30th. Just think about that, most companies these days would kill to start two brand-new highly-successful franchises in the same decade, let alone the same year. In 2012, Capcom celebrated Street Fighter’s 25th anniversary with a massive media blitz and the release of Street Fighter x Tekken. Capcom decided to float MegaMan’s celebration to the following year – the less said on that, the better – but decided to give a small nod to the Blue Bomber during the World Warriors’ massive celebration. On December 17, 2012 – exactly 25 years after the release of Rockman on the Famicom in Japan – Capcom paid tribute to two of their flagship series with Street Fighter X MegaMan, a free downloadable PC game made available exclusively on the Capcom-Unity website.

The game originally began development as a fan-game back in 2009 by Seow Zong Hui, a Singaporean Engineering student going under the alias “Sonic”. He tried to recreate the MegaMan physics engine to practice his programming and due to the prevalence of 8-bit Street Fighter images drawn in the MegaMan style, he decided to put Ryu in the project on a whim. In 2012, he presented a work in progress build of the game to Capcom USA who decided to fund the project, in exchange for providing creative input and the exclusive rights to distribute the game online.

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MegaMan blasting animals? This truly is a PC game.

Pretty much everything about this game resembles the classic 8-bit MegaMan games of the NES era. This time around, MegaMan regains his slide and charge shot from the later games in the series, but considering that he’s facing off with eight of the strongest fighters in the world, he’ll need them. All things considered, Seow Zong Hui did a pretty good job recreating the physics of the Classic MegaMan games. SFxMM takes bosses from various games in the Street Fighter canon: main protagonist Ryu; Blanka, Dhalsim and Chun-Li who made their debuts in Street Fighter II; Rose from Street Fighter Alpha; Rolento from Final Fight – who would go onto appear in the Alpha series; Urien from the Street Fighter III games and Crimson Viper from Street Fighter IV. The Wily Fortress in this game is themed around Shadoloo, with Balrog, Vega and M. Bison – or M. Bison, Balrog and Vega, if you go by the Japanese names – acting as the game’s fortress bosses.

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Balrog’s stage literally just consists of running away from him. It’s perfect.

The game’s stages are standard MegaMan fare, each using settings that are associated with the origins of each Street Fighter. For example, Blanka’s level takes place in a Brazillian jungle, Dhalsim’s stage is a maze resembling his stage from SF2, Urien’s stage takes place in an Olmec temple and Rolento’s stage takes place on a construction site. Most of the stage enemies come from earlier games in the MegaMan series – Sniper Joes armed with laser and Mettools riding bicycles are among the highlights – but there are also some unique enemies, like flying swords, giant roses and even robots based on members of Gill’s Illuminati. The boss fights have also been tweaked from the traditional MegaMan games. In addition to the standard health meter, each boss also has a Revenge Meter – like the one found in SF4 – which fills as the boss takes damage. Once it’s completely full, the boss can perform a powerful Ultra Combo, which deals major damage in MegaMan gets hit by it. I liked this addition, as it managed to implement some elements from the Street Fighter games into the gameplay itself.

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Brown and gray? I already made that joke!

On January 18th, 2013, an updated version of the game – dubbed “v2” – was uploaded to Capcom-Unity, replacing the original. This new version added new features like improved controller support, bug fixes and most notably, a Password system based on those from the NES MegaMan games. Originally, SFxMM was intended as a one session game, but many players requested some kind of a save system. The game was also tweaked to be more user-friendly: confirmation prompts were added to the game’s quit and reset functions and a screenshot function was added, which made keeping track of passwords easy. This new version also increased the difficulty of the game’s final boss, making M. Bison a truly challenging foe.

The game also had a whole host of secrets. Originally, SF3’s Yang was planned as a boss character, but replaced by Chun-Li in the final game. His weapon, the Sei’ei Enbu, can be unlocked in-game via a secret code. There’s also a code to replace the entire game’s soundtrack with a recreation of Guile’s theme, relating to a popular internet meme. MegaMan could also sport a helmetless look with a special code on the boss select screen. There were also two secret bosses that could be unlocked by performing specific requirements before the game’s final stage. To unlock Akuma as the game’s secret true final boss, players must defeat four or more stage bosses with full health, earning a Perfect Victory. V2 added Sagat as a second secret boss, fought right before taking on M. Bison. To unlock that boss fight, players need only score four or more Perfects during the boss rematches in the third Shadaloo Fortress stage.

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Does he or doesn’t he? Only his hairdresser knows for sure.

Of course, defeating each of the initial eight Street Fighters grants MegaMan a Special Weapon. In most cases, they’re actually based on real moves from each character’s moveset, but there are exceptions. As usual, I’ve decided to rank these from best to worst. My favorite weapon is easily Rose’s Soul Satellite, which surrounds the Blue Bomber with two spiritual orbs, acting sort of like a Leaf Shield. While active, MegaMan can fire another orb at no energy cost. The best part is that if MegaMan swaps weapons while using it, the orbs stay out, changing color to match Rock’s current weapon. Aegis Reflector was one of Urien’s Super Arts in SF3 and it produces a shield that reflects projectile attacks, disappearing either after 5 seconds or deflecting 3 shots. As with the Soul Satellite, the Reflector stays active while switching weapons. Then there’s the Optic Laser, originally one of C. Viper’s special moves in Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 – which was, in turn, a reference to the X-Men character Cyclops. MegaMan fires off a powerful beam attack, consisting of four segments, each dealing its own share of the damage. Then there’s Ryu’s classic Hadouken, which can either fired normally or charged to become more powerful. Of course, MegaMan can also use this attack without even defeating Ryu in the first place: just perform the traditional Hadouken motion (down, down-forward, forward) followed by the fire button and MegaMan performs the signature attack, even without equipping a Special Weapon. Then there’s Dhalsim’s Yoga Inferno, which fires a stream of flames, while leaving MegaMan immobile – similar to the Wave Burner from MegaMan & Bass. The trajectory of the attack can be changed by hitting up or down. The Mine Sweeper, obtained after defeating Rolento, lobs a grenade at an arc. When it collides with anything, the bomb explodes, causing multiple hits of damage. Blanka’s Tropical Hazard is a random attack that isn’t really based on any of the Brazilian beastman’s attacks, rather one of his victory poses. MegaMan drops a watermelon right in front of him, which he can slide into or kick. He can also jump on top of it, bouncing into the air. In this sense, it’s much like MM8’s Mega Ball. Finally, there’s the Lightning Kick, Chun-Li’s signature attack. MegaMan does several quick kicks in succession, dealing decent damage at severely limited range. As for the unlockable Sei’ei Enbu technique, MegaMan is capable of moving faster, jumping higher and generating afterimages as he moves. These afterimages mimic MegaMan’s actions and even shoot Mega Buster shots when he does. Of course, MegaMan is limited to his standard weapons while using it and the energy meter counts down while the weapon’s in use. After inputting the secret code correctly, the Sei’ei Enbu can be activated by hitting the Left Weapon Change and Fire buttons at the same time.

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20 takes and that was the best one.

As with pretty much everything else, SFxMM’s artstyle mimics the NES MegaMan games. MegaMan is accurate to the original design, while the sprite work on the Street Fighter characters seem similar to Capcom’s own 8-bit take, but they also manage to be animated fluidly, which is impressive. The game’s backgrounds are hit-and-miss, some stages exceed the NES’s capabilities, while others end up looking a little plain but accurate. The various menus and map screens do a good job of blending 8-bit MegaMan and Super Street Fighter IV aesthetics, which is a nice touch. I also appreciated seeing Dan in the game, even if he was essentially a training dummy to show off all of MegaMan’s new weapons.

The game’s soundtrack was composed by Alex Esquivel, better known by the pseudonym “A_Rival”. If I’m going to be honest, I think it’s perfect for this game. A_Rival essentially transposes various Street Fighter themes into a style that’s practically identical to 8-bit MegaMan. In some cases, he even blends together each Street Fighter’s stage music with classic MegaMan tunes, like Dhalsim who takes riffs from Snakeman’s theme in MM3 or Rolento who takes cues from Heatman’s stage. I think my favorite themes in the game would have to be the Boss Battle music, based on the Drive-In At Night stage in SF4; the Get A Weapon theme, based on Dan’s Stage; the first Shadaloo stage, based on Balrog’s theme; as well as the songs from Rolento, Blanka, C. Viper and Urien’s levels.

There’s really little to complain about when it comes to Street Fighter X MegaMan. Considering it literally costs nothing, it’s actually a really touching tribute to the two franchises that made Capcom a household name in the first place. The only thing that really makes it bittersweet is the fact that many people assumed that this was a sign of big things to come for the Blue Bomber. After Keiji Inafune left Capcom, MegaMan in general has been ignored by the company – quite a massive shift for a series that, at its peak, would receive roughly half a dozen games per year. And yet, the hiatus never really ended. MegaMan’s seen several licensing deals since then, not to mention a major cameo in Super Smash Brothers for 3DS and Wii U, but nothing in the way of actual new releases. The fact that the game’s still just relegated to the Capcom-Unity website also feels like a crime to me. You’d think that Capcom USA would at least consider putting the game on Steam as a free download. Maybe they’ll do that this year for the 30th anniversary. At the very least, it’d be nice to see it on a more permanent and accessible platform. Worse yet, since SFxMM’s release, there have been several other high-profile fangames – which I won’t refer to directly for obvious reasons. I’m surprised that Capcom USA hasn’t considered making similar deals, at the very least, it would probably help to quell the fanbase’s lamentations over the Blue Bomber’s perceived demise.

Interlude: MegaMan Legacy Collection 1 & 2

This brings us to the latest releases in the MegaMan series, which are ironically enough just compilations. On the plus side, the games had been pretty much relegated to the Virtual Console on the Nintendo Wii, 3DS and Wii U for the past few years, so allowing other platforms some form of re-releases is nice. Better still, these are the first official releases of mainline Classic MegaMan games on the PC – the Hi-Tech Expressions games obviously don’t count. At this point, the sheer lack of releases in the franchise has left many fans listless, so seeing the series make an appearance on modern platforms, even if an extremely familiar one, was welcome.

 

Before I get into the Legacy Collections themselves, some of you may be wondering why I didn’t cover the MegaMan Anniversary Collection, released in 2004 on the PlayStation 2 and GameCube, with a delayed Xbox release the following year. Quite frankly, I did bring up the Anniversary Collection twice before – when discussing Rockman Complete Works and the arcade games – and the remainder of the package seems to be hardly worth any mention. The extras consist of a few “interesting” remixes of classic MegaMan songs, an image gallery and a variety of video extras that vary between versions: the first episode of the Ruby-Spears MegaMan cartoon on the PS2, the GameCube version including an interview with Keiji Inafune and bafflingly, the first episode of MegaMan NT Warrior (the English dub of the anime based on the Battle Network games) on the Xbox version. In fact, what few people tend to realize is that MMAC also had several technical issues, including terrible ports of both MegaMan 7 and 8. Various audio cues and songs were distorted heavily in every game and worst of all, the GameCube version reversed the jump and fire buttons and the controls couldn’t be altered. The fact that so many people considered the Legacy Collections to be ripoffs compared to the previous abomination of a compilation reeks of rose-colored nostalgia. And that’s a pretty damning statement coming from someone who has essentially written a novel’s worth of words on a video game series that started in the late ‘80s.

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I love that there’s the option to just fight bosses in these collections.

The first MegaMan Legacy Collection was released in 2015 by Digital Eclipse for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC platforms in North America, Europe and even Japan, where it took on the name “Rockman Classics Collection”. A 3DS version with additional bonus content was released the following year. It was originally billed as having perfect recreations of the first six MegaMan games, when in reality, it used an emulator. While the game did launch with various issues, bug fixes allowed the collection to reach its full potential. Compared to the aforementioned MMAC and the Virtual Console releases on various Nintendo platforms, these are probably the best official releases of the NES games to date. Digital Eclipse also managed to include several visual options. Aspect ratios include Original, a pixel-perfect recreation of the NES’s original resolution; an extended “Full” setting, which increases the resolution while keeping the original’s aspect ratio and Wide, which renders the game in a 16:9 for people who love seeing the 8-bit classics squashed beyond recognition. The first two settings also have the option to add a border, consisting of artwork from the Japanese box arts and there are also three filter options: the option to run the game without a filter, one that emulates a classic CRT TV (fittingly labelled “TV”), and Monitor, which essentially acts as a happy medium. The game also has full controller customization – including a rapid-fire button – and settings are maintained between games. MMLC also included savestates, allowing players to save their game at any time and return to it at their leisure. Digital Eclipse and Capcom would end up partnering for a second collection of NES re-releases – the aptly-titled Disney Afternoon Collection – which released in 2017.

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NES Remix, eat your heart out.

Meanwhile, Capcom ended up developing MegaMan Legacy Collection 2 in-house and released it the same year. This game consisted of MegaMans 7 through 10 and the ports were about on-par with Digital Eclipse’s work in my opinion. The collection, like its predecessor, was released on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC, though oddly, not on the 3DS. The game’s menus are based on MegaMan 8, utilizing existing art assets and music, as opposed to the more generic theming from the first Legacy Collection. The save system is different from the previous game, focusing on checkpoints rather than save states. Many players complained about this change, but I prefer it: it does a much better job of balancing the games’ difficulty, acting more like an infinite lives code than a rewind button. The aspect ratios from the previous game return, though the “Monitor” filter option is removed from the first MMLC. In exchange, players now have the choice of 4 different background borders. Controller layouts differ between games, simply due to the fact that the games themselves had different control options and auto-fire is only an option in MegaMan 7, 9 and 10. Likewise, MegaMan 9 has a different aspect ratio compared to the other games in the collection, appearing smaller in the Original and Full resolutions. This ends up making for a less cohesive package compared to the first MMLC, but everything ends up working out.

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Is it just me or does Frostman’s concept art look way more like Coldman?

Both collections have similar extras. There are music players containing the soundtracks of every game in each respective compilation, as well as art galleries. Digital Eclipse definitely provided a more robust package in the latter’s case, but Capcom managed to scrounge together a decent collection. A nice feature present in both games is the ability to access boss fights through the Database and Art Gallery respectively. There are also a unique set of challenges in both games and this is where the first Legacy Collection really shines compared to its sequel. Due to the fact that the NES games all essentially run on the same engine, Digital Eclipse was actually able to mix and match segments from all six games. The second collection’s challenges are similar, but generally limited to a single game at a time. There are also boss rushes in the challenge mode. To make up for its shortcomings, MMLC2 also includes all of the extra modes from MM9 and 10 in the Challenge section. Likewise, all of the DLC for both games can be unlocked by completing each game once – or by inputting a special code on each game’s title screen, for people not willing to replay the game all over again.

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Not as awesome as the first game’s challenges, but still a nice extra.

Of course, both collections are great additions to modern platforms, bringing back 10 Classic MegaMan games to modern and long-time gamers alike. I’d honestly say that both Legacy Collections are perhaps the ideal way to enjoy the Classic MegaMan series. Some have speculated that Capcom may work on a similar collection for the MegaMan X series next, but personally I’d love to see at least one more compilation for the Classic games. While the first two definitely scratch an itch, there are so many games left in the Classic series that I believe deserve the same treatment – I’d personally love to see an official English translation of the Super Famicom version of MegaMan & Bass, console releases of the Game Boy games, another port of the arcade games and even the first official North American release of MegaMan: The Wily Wars! There’s still so much left that could be put in a third Legacy Collection.

The Future of MegaMan

So we’ve reached the end of the existing games. Before I move on to discuss my own thoughts for the franchise as a whole, there’s one oddity present in MegaMan Legacy Collection 2 that I’d like to discuss. Tucked away in MegaMan 8’s art gallery is a strange piece of artwork. Resembling the Blue Bomber’s design from Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U, but utilizing a transformation not unlike the Soul Unison concept from the Battle Network series. Matters were complicated when a Nendroid figurine of MegaMan’s sister Roll was announced this past September, sporting a brand-new design with a similar artstyle to MMLC2’s mystery artwork. Speculation has run rampant since then and frankly, I don’t know what to make of either image. I guess I’ll just hope for the best.

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Seriously, I’m digging these designs.

As I said in the beginning of this segment, I’m not going to pretend I know what the future holds in store for the Blue Bomber or any of his offshoots. The best I can really do is speculate on the directions I’d love to see the series take. Whatever impact the departure of Keiji Inafune had on the series as a whole will probably remain a mystery for all times, but considering the sheer amount of merchandising associated with the character, as well as the backlash at the 25th anniversary’s anemic offerings, I’m almost positive that Capcom has to be gearing up for something big. Whether that’s a good or bad thing remains to be seen – after all, I obviously wrote all of this before the actual 30th anniversary – so until then, all I can leave you with are my opinions on the franchise itself.

For starters, three sub-franchises in the MegaMan brand have come to a conclusion: MegaMan Zero, Battle Network and its successor, Star Force. Considering the fact that one of the challenges surrounding the MM brand as a whole is the splintering of the franchise, leaving any series that has reached a satisfactory conclusion in hibernation is probably the best bet for the intellectual properties’ health. At best, I could see another compilation title for the Zero games and especially the Battle Network series. Star Force, on the other hand, will likely remain dead for the foreseeable future, considering its overall unpopularity. Likewise, I wouldn’t expect a follow-up to Rockman Xover: the game was so unpopular, that North Americans campaigned to prevent its release in their region and the mobile game ceased operations back in 2015.

The MegaMan ZX series, on the other hand, ended on a cliffhanger. MegaMan ZX Advent, the second and as-of-right-now final entry in the series, seemed to imply that a third game would’ve provided a finale. Unfortunately, out of all of the games I’d consider possible, it’s the long shot. I don’t know if Inti Creates and Capcom have maintained a working relationship – especially considering the former’s partnerships with various other companies, as well as their own independently published titles – but even if that were still viable, the ZX games didn’t have the largest fanbase – though Advent did manage to outperform the original in sales. I would personally love to see a MegaMan ZX3, but I’m pretty sure I’m in the minority as far as the overall MM fanbase is concerned.

Then there’s the game that almost was: MegaMan Legends 3. On the surface, it seems like an obvious choice, especially if Capcom intends to get back on the fanbase’s good side. I’d argue that there are far too many open wounds involving the game’s development and regardless of his present reputation, doing the game without Keiji Inafune would probably be a massive mistake. MegaMan Volnutt was the first iteration of the character that Inafune himself designed and given his schemes to get the game made in the first place – Capcom’s MT Framework engine was even named after MegaMan Trigger – I just feel like there’s a chance that a game without Inafune at the helm wouldn’t live up to anyone’s expectations. The excitement surrounding the MML3 Project and its unreleased prototype only serve to complicate matters. Considering the fact that Keiji Inafune seems to have moved on, supposedly working on the suspiciously similar Red Ash, I think the ship may have sailed on this one. Still, if Capcom’s willing to take the risk and if Inafune managed to create an entire outline for the game’s plot, it could be viable to some degree. I just wouldn’t hold my breath.

Of course, who’s to say that a new MegaMan game would necessarily have to exist within an existing sub-series? Capcom seems to be gearing up for a massive marketing push surrounding the upcoming cartoon, developed by Man of Action Studios, and set to premiere sometime next year. This new animated series is set to take place within its own continuity and several people have speculated that any new MegaMan game would likely be a tie-in game. I’m apprehensive toward the idea: Capcom hasn’t had the best track record with releases and tie-in video games for similar multimedia projects – Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures and Sonic Boom – have generally ended up mediocre at best. The fact that this new cartoon itself seems to have been designed from the ground-up to make me hate it as much as humanly possible doesn’t help matters much. Frankly, I’d rather see a title based around Bad Box Art MegaMan. Honestly, ever since his cameo appearance in Street Fighter X Tekken, I’d been hoping for a title based around the character, maybe designed as a more modern incarnation of the Legends series, combining action-RPG and third-person shooter mechanics. There’s absolutely no chance this would happen, but I can dream, right?

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I’m not kidding. I’d buy a game starring this guy in a heartbeat.

The recent appearances of MegaMan X and Sigma as well as the return of Zero in Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite has led many people to speculate that MegaMan X9 may be a part of Capcom’s upcoming plans for the franchise. I’ve already gone into details about my concerns with the project years ago, and I’d say many issues with the concept still apply to this day. I supposed it would at least be interesting to see what Capcom ends up putting together for this kind of release. A SNES-inspired continuation from X8’s cliffhanger ending seems like the safest bet, though I could also see a full-on reboot based on either the 16 or 32-bit era’s artstyle happening just as easily. Whatever Capcom decides, I’m almost certain some major portion of the MMX fanbase will feel overlooked in the process.

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I wonder if they just recycled Zero’s alternate costume from the last game to make X’s model.

It’s funny, roughly a decade ago, I actually ended up coming up with some concepts for fan-games in the MegaMan series, three in total. MegaMan 9 obviously happened, but the other two were a bit more out there. First off, there was MegaMan VI – quite literally, a successor to the Game Boy games. The other was a MegaMan & Bass 2, which would essentially expand the playable roster to 3, with the inclusion of Protoman, and focus on the first game’s gimmick of different paths per character to a greater extent. The actual design documents I came up with all those years ago don’t really matter in the grand scheme of things, but I’d love it if Capcom effectively did either of these concepts. Of course, by this point, I’d probably prefer seeing Roll as a playable character over Protoman in future MegaMan titles, but honestly, the more the merrier. Unfortunately, as the release of the Nintendo Switch effectively means that there are no longer any dedicated handheld consoles any more, making a successor to the Game Boy games sort of feels pointless. Likewise, MegaMan & Bass’s major gimmick of having multiple playable characters was implemented into MegaMans 9 and 10, so there’s really little point in making a direct sequel to that either.

At this point in time, if you asked me what I feel like Capcom should do with the Classic MegaMan series, I’d have two answers for you, answers that honestly go hand-in-hand. A while back on Twitter, someone mentioned the idea of making a “MegaMan Mania”: not the failed Game Boy Advance compilation, but rather another Classic MegaMan throwback title in the same style as the recent Sonic Mania. I’d essentially pitch the game as a pure anniversary game, effectively taking Robot Masters from the previous games – MegaMans 1 through 10, MegaMan & Bass, MegaMan V and a few others to round things out to a grand total of 16 – built in a style that is inspired by the NES games, except more advanced. The other game would be MegaMan 11, which would essentially deviate from the NES style entirely. People complained about MM10 continuing the throwback trend 9 started, so it’s only fair to finally bring the series back in a more modern light. MM11 would effectively try to modernize the series in the way that 7 and 8 attempted, but without making concessions to the NES era’s pixel-perfect gameplay. I can’t really say much about the concept except that the gameplay would still be 2D. Whether that comes with some sort of faux-retro look more advanced than the traditional 8-bit style, a 2.5D game with 3D models on a 2D plane or even hand-drawn artwork, if the core of the series remains intact, I’d love to see just what kind of crazy directions the series could go through if Capcom decided to try an entirely new style.

That brings my retrospective to its conclusion. I guess I felt the need to speculate on future releases, not only because the MegaMan line-up is sparse compared to the other series I’ve covered – Zelda, Tekken and Ys all had big releases this year – but also to give myself a sense of closure. I wrote this whole thing over the course of a few months to have it ready in time for December 17th, 2017: the 30th anniversary of the day the original Rockman was released in Japan. We’ve all been expecting some big announcement to come either on or around that day. In that sense, that’s essentially my deadline before I decide whether or not Capcom has given up on the series entirely, and I’m sure I’m not alone in that regard. Compared to the other Retrospectives I’ve done so far, this feels bittersweet. It almost feels like I’m saying goodbye to one of the video game franchises that got me into the medium in the first place. Compared to various other series I consider important, MegaMan’s really the only one that seemed to have a distinct point where it felt like it could be ending, and it happened for some very petty reasons. I know that the series may not be dead, but I also worry that if it does come back, it may return as little more than a shambling shadow of its former glory. I guess in that sense, this whole retrospective feels almost like a eulogy. For a while, I considered doing a section on games that were clear spiritual successors to the Blue Bomber’s jump-and-shoot legacy, but it sort of came across to me as bitter. In the end, they do provide comfort: even if Capcom decides to never make another MegaMan game, there are still developers that were inspired by these classics and create brand-new legacies all their own.

[Postscript: Since I wrote these articles, Capcom has announced re-releases of the mainline MegaMan X games, as well as a brand-new 2.5D MegaMan 11 for all major platforms. I’m happy about this news and can’t wait to see what the future has in store for the Blue Bomber, but decided to leave this article intact, simply because I thought it was important.]

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PC Ports Wishlist 2: Lost in New York

Around this time last year, I decided to do a new article in my long-running indulgence: port-begging for PC games. Of course, in the most recent article, I also added in some additional musings. I discussed what my favorite overall “victories” were since I’d originally started doing these lists, as well as focusing on both my overall top 10 most wanted games out of what I’d covered in older lists and the top games for each remaining list. I can’t really remember if I decided I wanted to make it a yearly tradition after the previous article – at the same time, I guess I just sort of assumed I’d be doing it again anyway. I had fun with last year’s lists, so why not?

This time around, I’m going to be focusing entirely on 2017 with the recap. As such, I’ll be starting with my top 5 confirmations of the years, which was a lot more difficult than I would have expected. Little has really moved since last year’s “Best of the Rest” list, but I’ve finally been able to cobble together an entire new list, so it only seems fitting to introduce it in this article. Finally, considering the fact that the top two slots in my previous top ten list – MegaMans 9 & 10 and Ys SEVEN – have since been released, I’ve decided to write up a new list. Not every game is new, but some have switched places.

Before we get on with this year’s lists, I’d like to go over the PC port announcements that were made since August, when I did the list for GOG games. Admittedly, I didn’t really expect that much in the way of announcements, especially considering the major announcements revealed from May until August. That’s not to say there was nothing these past four months. Killer Instinct was finally released on Steam back in September, technically not a new port – as it was previously a Windows Store exclusive. However, putting it on Steam and adding (albeit limited) crossplay with both the Xbox One and Windows Store versions was a nice touch. September also brought us the announcement of Zone of the Enders 2 receiving another re-release, adding a new VR option, on both PS4 and PC. While the ZOE HD Collection was on a previous list, I suppose getting a new release of the game that worked – apparently, the PS3 and Xbox 360’s version of the first game was broken – is better than nothing, so I’ll count that as a win. However, November alone definitely brought me some big-name releases – that ended up forcing me to modify the new game’s list not once, but twice. Capcom announced that Okami HD would be ported to PC, as well as PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. I wish I could say that I had considered this game for my list, but I thought of it as too much of a long shot, given the series’ Japan-centric aesthetic running counter to Capcom’s Western goals. Sphinx and the Cursed Mummy, a Zelda-like adventure game with platformer elements previously released on the GameCube, PlayStation 2 and the original Xbox, also managed to receive a remastered port on PC, Mac and Linux, courtesy of THQ Nordic. The game didn’t fall within my usual criteria for inclusion, but considering the game’s recent cult following, it’s definitely good news from my perspective. Injustice 2, on the other hand, was originally going to be on this year’s list, but it ended up receiving a PC port courtesy of the fine people at QLOC. Unfortunately, the game uses Denuvo, so I’m going to have to hold off on it until WB comes to their senses. And just like last year, the biggest surprise comes from SNK. The Last Blade 2 – based on the PS4 release this time around – was released on Steam completely unannounced. Ironically, this was another game I intended to put on this year’s list but had to swap it for something new at the last minute.

Speaking of last-minute announcements, there were two more PC gaming announcements I’d consider wins literally the day before this article was scheduled to go up. First, both Jazz Jackrabbit games were released on GOG, which means that the GOG wishlist I wrote back in August has finally borne fruit. Here’s hoping it’s the first of many. Earlier this week, XSEED announced a livestream on November 30th, with a mystery announcement. I was hoping for something Falcom-related and once again, I hit the jackpot. 2001’s Zwei!! – now retitled as Zwei: The Arges Adventure – is being translated and set to release on their usual storefronts (Steam, GOG and the Humble Store) sometime in “Winter 2018”. The work that went into bringing this to modern computers cannot be understated: the original game used DirectX5. XSEED managed to collaborate with Matt Fielding of Magnetic Games, the developer behind Exile’s End. As such, a majority of the original applications and mini-games from the original Falcom release have been maintained in this new version, with the exceptions of the calculator and the calendar. Frankly, I’m just surprised at the turnaround on this one and can’t wait for it to be released.

This year’s list of console ports also managed to achieve a win. Owlboy was originally announced for the Switch back in May, but since then, PS4 and Xbox One ports have also been announced. Last year’s list did way better. Back in March, Lethal League was announced for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Team Reptile also announced a sequel – named “Lethal League Blaze” – set to release some time next year on both PC and “console”. Undertale was also announced for release on PlayStation 4 and Vita back during this year’s E3. I was honestly surprised that it didn’t end up hitting the Nintendo Switch, but that’s life. Likewise, while NEO AQUARIUM – The King of Crustaceans – failed to receive a console port, its sequel ACE OF SEAFOOD has been ported to the PlayStation 4, as well as developer Nussoft teasing a future port to the Nintendo Switch.

Top 5 Successes of 2017

Before I get to my actual picks, I’d like to give an honorable mention to Arc System Works in general. They’ve made quite the evolution over the past couple years, going from re-releasing old PC ports of classic games on GOG to outright announcing PC versions of upcoming games – Double Dragon IV and BlazBlue Cross Tag Battle come to mind. I hope more Japanese companies take after their example and decide to offer major PC support for any games they decide to release in the West.

5. de Blob 1 & 2 – THQ Nordic (Wii, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

I honestly didn’t think this was possible, which is why this made the list over ASW. ASW’s transition into a more PC friendly company was alluded to for quite some time, but when Nordic Games rebranded themselves as “THQ Nordic”, the Darksiders III announcement wasn’t remotely surprising. Bringing back not one, but both de Blob games, on the other hand? Absolutely blew my mind. When Nordic first purchased the intellectual property and said they “had plans” for the series, I thought it was merely corporate talk. After all, the game’s rights had languished in purgatory while other major IPs were claimed by other companies at auction. Best of all, they hired Blitworks to handle the ports of both games. Eventually, the first game had ports announced for the Xbox One and PS4, and it wouldn’t surprise me if the second game follows.

4. Bayonetta/Vanquish – Sega/Platinum Games (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii U)

Speaking of amazing turnarounds, Platinum Games managed to grant us not one, but two of their cult classics from last-gen on PC this year. The fact that both games came out so close to one another made this even more amazing. It’s also been heavily rumored that both games will be released as a double-pack on the PS4 and XBO, though confirmation has yet to be made. With Platinum’s Twitter heavily implying that Bayonetta 3 may be on the horizon, it only makes sense to get the game in as many hands as possible. While a Bayonetta 2 PC port is a pipe dream due to Nintendo’s heavy involvement with the game’s development, I hope we can see even more of Platinum’s back catalog hit PC in the near future.

3. The King of Fighters XIV – SNK (PlayStation 4)

It’s funny: I was honestly expecting to put this one on this year’s list of new games: it was even the sole new addition to last year’s list. SNK managed to impress me with a timely Steam port that I assumed would usher in the game’s demise when it came to additional content, but apparently that wasn’t the case at all. With a port handled by Abstraction Games – an underrated company that handled the Double Dragon Neon PC port – KoFXIV is now capable of shining in brand-new ways, thanks to a fledgling mod community. Seriously, what they’ve been able to do with the game has been amazing.

2. MegaMan 9 & 10 (MegaMan Legacy Collection 2) – Capcom (Xbox 360, PS3, Wii)

I’m surprised this is coming in at number 2, but my top request definitely put up a good fight. I’m probably alone in the sense that I’d have been willing to pay $20 for these two games and all their DLC alone. Adding in two more MegaMan games that hadn’t shown up on PC before – MegaMans 7 and 8 – only served to sweeten the deal and make it a can’t-miss proposition for me. For a while, Capcom had been weird about what they’d port to PC – but in recent years, as long as it’s not a Nintendo-exclusive, PC gamers are likely to get love from Capcom. If anything, I wish they’d been a little less generous in some cases…

1. Falcom (in General)

Yeah, I get that it’s kind of cheating to put an entire company in the top slot, but if I’m going to be honest, they deserve it. Sure, the promises of day one parity with the console releases of Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana ended up being a pipe dream, but considering the rumors of the port’s quality (or lack thereof), not to mention the outright poor quality of the original translation, it may have turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Aksys Games’ translation of Tokyo Xanadu eX+ is set to launch the same day as its PS4 counterpart as promised, but considering how late they started their own beta testing (similar to Ys VIII), well, “watch this space”. Even though Ys VIII didn’t hit its original release date on PC, some good did come of it. Ys VIII is actually the first game that NIS America is releasing on GOG, which is amazing. Whether or not that means other NIS games will hit the platform is beyond me, but that seems pretty cool.

Despite these setbacks from one of their new partners, XSEED more than picked up the slack when it came to representing Falcom on PC. The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel, Ys SEVEN and Zwei: The Ilvard Insurrection (formerly “Zwei II” in Japan) all saw release on Windows PC this year. Also, they’ve announced that both Trails of Cold Steel II’s PC port and the first Zwei!! will release some time next year. Good stuff, but that’s not the major reason why they topped it out. In an interview with Techraptor, Toshihiro Kondo – Falcom’s president – said that he wanted “all of [their] games that come out to [release] on Steam”. Not just all future titles, not all of the old games that Falcom previously released on Windows, ALL of their games. Big words, but considering the massive collection of Falcom games we’ve amassed on PC so far, I wouldn’t be surprised if this comes to pass.

Our Feature Presentation

Before we go onto my new list, I feel like it’s worth going over the rules I’ve limited myself to in the past with these lists. It’s odd, I know, but it just ends up making the process of building a list much more fun. For starters, I’m limiting myself to games from the seventh (PS3/Xbox 360/Wii) and eighth (PS4/Xbox One/Wii U/Switch) generations of gaming. Porting anything else seems like it would require a brand-new release across the board and this is more about simple ports. Considering the sheer amount of games from these generations that have been ported to PC in recent years, it only seems fair. I also try to limit myself to one game per company, though considering the sheer number of buyouts we’ve seen, I’ve decided to expand that to one game per “brand” – but only if the buyout happened since the games were made in the first place. For example, I can ask for one game each from Sega and Atlus, but asking for two games from Square Enix is a no-no. I also consider one “series” as an entry, as long as the games themselves were all present in the generations available to me. Finally, no games that are clearly “console-exclusive”. So, even though Sony Music has started that whole “Unties” publishing label for indie games and Nintendo’s willing to do tie-ins on mobiles, I’m not going to be asking for stuff like Parappa the Rapper Remastered or Super Mario Odyssey. It’s just common sense.

Brandish: The Dark Revenant – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Portable)

I mentioned earlier that Falcom’s president wanted to put all of their games on Steam. The main goal most people have their sights set on is getting Trails of Zero and Trails of Azure on the PC platform. A segment of Falcom’s popular “Legend of Heroes” series, these two games – known colloquially as the “Crossbell games”, named after their setting – are quite literally the most commonly requested games. Unfortunately, they also lack any official English translations, so this would be a necessary part of porting the games to PC.

But do you know what Falcom game already has a full English translation and is also currently doomed to exclusivity on the inescapable purgatory that is the PlayStation Portable? That’s right, Brandish: The Dark Revenant. A remake of the first installment in a short-lived Falcom series, the games bring a new perspective to the first-person dungeon crawlers of old with its unique brand of gameplay. Brandish’s translation was a labor of love from Tom “Wyrdwad” Lipschultz, one of XSEED’s most prominent localizers. While the PSP remake saw its original Japanese release in 2009, it only managed to reach America in January 2015 as a digital-only release. It’s a shame that such an interest game was resigned to such a lackluster fate outside of its home market. Considering the fact that we’ve seen Ys SEVEN hit PC this year, I’d love to see Brandish achieve the same thing. At worst, it would at least give XSEED’s new partners a chance to hone their craft while XSEED is working on translating the Crossbell duology.

Rare Replay – Microsoft Studios/Rare (Xbox One)

This almost feels like cheating, considering I put the Banjo-Kazooie games on an earlier list. Considering they’re both included in this compendium of some of Rare’s most beloved titles (not owned by Nintendo), getting this collection would just end up killing two birds with one stone. It may seem unlikely given the fact that it hasn’t already come to PC, but that’s exactly what I thought about the Killer Instinct reboot back on my very first list. If I’m going to dream, I might as well dream big.

Tekken Tag Tournament HD – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3)

This has the exact opposite problem compared to Rare Replay. I’ve already asked for the second Tekken Tag Tournament, so why ask for the original? The answer’s simple: despite being outclassed in every possible way by its sequel, I associate some really happy memories with the classic game. The re-release in the Tekken Hybrid package reminded me of that and so did replaying the game for the Tekken retrospective I did this year. There was just something amazing about the original game, some intangible factor that prevents me from letting go of it. That’s not to say I wouldn’t rather have the second game if forced to choose, but if Bandai Namco considers re-releasing both, I’m not going to complain.

Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir – Atlus/Vanillaware (PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita)

Every list has got to have at least one pipe dream on it. A game that outright transcends any other baffling choice. I’ve got quite a few on this year’s list, but I’d say last year’s re-release of Odin Sphere is the big one this time around. Since I started doing these wishlists nearly four years ago, we’ve seen Atlus’s stubborn refusal to acknowledge the PC market go from the rule to the exception when it comes to Japanese publishers. Having said that, Atlus USA does do a good job of publishing various indie titles on the platform and Sega has apparently been applying pressure on Atlus’s PC-phobia, with various people speculating that we could see a Persona game hit the platform someday. Frankly, I’d rather just have Vanillaware games, considering the developer’s stated openness to releasing their games on PC. Leifthrasir is technically their most recent release, therefore it feels the most likely.

Azure Striker Gunvolt 2 – Inti Creates (Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo Switch)

This was honestly a last resort when it came to PC port requests. Don’t get me wrong: I loved Gunvolt 2 even more than the original game. It’s more that it seems like Inti Creates may have abandoned the platform when it comes to the games they publish themselves. Not to mention the fact that I think I’d rather have a release of the Striker Pack on PC, as opposed to just the second game. The original Gunvolt’s release on Steam was sort of wonky and it looks like the version included in the Striker Pack on Switch is a much more coherent experience, likely due to what Inti Creates was able to learn from their first attempt at transferring the title – which required two screens – onto a single-screen platform and improve their efforts. At the same time, asking for the Striker Pack feels a bit skeevy, considering we already have the first game on Steam. That’s what makes the whole thing so complicated. I mean, ideally, they’d just release the Striker Pack on Steam and give anyone who bought the first game a discount. That’s my opinion anyway.

Yakuza series – Sega (PlayStation 3, Wii U, PlayStation 4)

From what the internet has been telling me, the Yakuza games – better known as Ryū ga Gotoku in Japan – are the best games I’m not playing. I totally want to try them out, but I’m afraid I’m just no longer into playing big experiences like that on console these days and frankly, I wouldn’t even know where to start at this point. Much like Atlus’s Persona series, there is a massive wellspring of support for these games to make their debut on PC. Some people want the games to start with the latest game in the series – either Yazuka 6 (the next game set to hit the West) or Yakuza Kiwami 2, the remake of the second game set to hit Japan in a matter of days. Other people seem to be fine with the series starting up with Yakuza Zero – which has essentially been deemed the perfect place to jump into the series for newcomers. Meanwhile, I’m a little more extreme: I want everything. Start by localizing the Japanese-exclusive HD ports of the first two games on the Wii U, then just continue from there. Ideally we’d be seeing most of the cut content restored to its original glory in the process. It sounds ridiculous, I know, but honestly, a legitimate entry in the Yakuza series hitting PC is a pipe dream anyway.

(P.S. Nice try, Sega. But no one’s counting that smartphone game you’re working on as an actual PC release for the Yakuza series. In fact, most of us were just insulted.)

The Witch and the Hundred Knight – Nippon Ichi Software (PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3)

NIS America still appears to be pretty heavily involved in the PC scene, but personally, I wish they’d port more of Nippon Ichi’s games to the platform. The Witch and the Hundred Knight is a game that friends of mine have been raving about, and considering the fact that it’s an action-RPG, I’m onboard with it too. The game’s sequel released in Japan early this year and is set to release in the West sometime next year, so allowing the PC crowd to get their hands on the first one would be a nice treat. Though frankly, I’m still worried about which Disgaea game we’ll get next – I’m kind of worried that they might just skip right to 5, considering the game’s ESRB listing. I’d rather play through the rest of the old games first, personally.

Final Fight: Double Impact – Capcom/Iron Galaxy Studios (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)

Truth be told, my backlog of PC port requests from Capcom is running pretty low. That’s not exactly a bad thing: it means that most of the recent games I actually want from the company have already been released on PC. Final Fight: Double Impact just seems like a safe choice to make. It contains arcade-perfect releases of both the original Final Fight and Magic Sword, two beat-‘em-ups with significantly different gameplay styles. Factor in the drop-in multiplayer using GGPO and it’s still worth playing to this day, in spite of the DRM present on the PS3 release. Considering that the 360 and PS3 have essentially been retired, it’d be nice to see this collection – or better yet, a bigger collection with more games included – ported to modern platforms, PC included.

Windjammers – Data East/DotEmu (PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita)

Windjammers is among the most underrated multiplayer games of all-time, so when it managed to get a re-release on both PS4 and Vita this past year, it was exciting. The only thing that could’ve made it better would’ve been if PC had been involved in the fun as well. Fortunately, DotEmu’s released a whole lot of their ports on the platform down the line, so I’m pretty confident that we’ll be tossing frisbees in no time. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that out of all of the games on this year’s new list of games, this is the one I’m most confident will hit PC by this time next year.

Let It Die – GungHo Entertainment/Grasshopper Manufacture (PlayStation 4)

Let It Die and I have had a pretty turbulent history. I was originally excited for the game when it was first announced as “Lily Bergamo”, I’m a huge fan of Grasshopper Manufacture after all. Then the game was transformed into Let It Die and touted as a “free-to-play” experience, at which point, I totally lost interest. Flash-forward to earlier this year when I actually hear some actual information about the final product and I’m intrigued all over again. Let It Die may be a free-to-play game littered with microtransactions, but it’s built far more like a classic arcade game than the mobile cash grabs we associate the concept with. Let It Die is effectively a dungeon-crawler with rouge-like elements, you’re limited to a single life – but if you pay in a quarter, you can continue with your current character. Otherwise, you’ve got to start from scratch. Aside from that, the game maintains the typical Grasshopper off-the-wall insanity: for example, the player is guided by a skateboarding grim reaper named Uncle Death. The permadeath mechanic also lends itself to asynchronous multiplayer: dead characters appear in other players’ games. It’s an honestly interesting concept and one that I’d like to see on PC, though given the fleeting nature of games like this, I wouldn’t hold my breath.

Top 10 Most Wanted

Last year, ranking my top 10 list of the games I want ported to PC the most was more haphazard than anything. I’ve never really been all that good at ordering my favorite things in general and in many cases, there wasn’t really much of a difference in how much I wanted many of the games on the list. So to compensate for it, I’ve decided to factor in just how likely I think it would be to see a re-release on PC, which should go a long way toward explaining why various games have switched places from the previous year. Keep in mind that the top two games from the previous list were in fact the top two games I wanted, this new method just helps to keep things feeling a little more structured: I’ve never really been all that good when it comes to rankings and usually by the time I’m done with one list, I instantly regret the final product. Also, don’t view a game being snubbed from the list as a sign that I don’t want the game: it’s safe to assume that I want everything that’s ever been on any of my list, even games like the now-defunct Tekken Revolution. These are just the ten that would make me the happiest to see on PC at this point in time.

10. Catherine – Atlus (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Like I said earlier, Atlus’s Japanese branch appears to be actively against doing PC versions of their games. That setback won’t stop me from holding out hope. But this was clearly the longest of the longshots last year and yet, here we are. Considering the fact that we were teased with a potential new entry in the series back in August, it only seems reasonable to bring the original back for those who missed it or simply want to play it on more modern platforms.  And what platform is more modern than the PC? Come on, Atlus: you’ve literally got nothing to lose – do a modern “HD” port on PS4 and PC, replacing the Xbox brand. It’s a Golden opportunity you can’t afford to miss.

9. Lollipop Chainsaw – WB Games/Grasshopper Manufacture (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Lollipop Chainsaw dropped a fair amount this year and there are a couple of reasons for this. For starters, WB Games’ PC gaming record has been littered with ups and downs in recent years – ranging from the legendarily bad port of Arkham Asylum to hiring QLOC to fix the botched Mortal Kombat X port to adding Denuvo to a QLOC-developed port of Injustice 2 – Warner Bros. just seems to keep me guessing in strange new ways. More importantly, I don’t think WB Games has any interest in reviving the game, particularly given the game’s controversial content and our current social climate. I mean, the game hasn’t even been added to the Xbox One’s library through backward compatibility. Even Catherine managed that. I think our only hope to see this game again is if Grasshopper Manufacture’s new parent company GungHo Entertainment manages to buy the rights from WB Games and that just seems like a pipe dream.

8. Dragon’s Crown Pro – Atlus/Vanillaware (PlayStation 4)

Of course, even though Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir is the most recent Vanillaware release, we do know what their next release is. Last year, I simply had the original Dragon’s Crown on this list, but considering the fact that there’s a re-release coming up with a higher resolution and on a platform with a more PC-friendly architecture, it just seemed obvious to ask for the new version instead. Still seems odd that they’re doing a re-release so soon: they even released a patch for the PS3 and Vita versions allowing for crossplay with Pro. Truth be told, there’s a part of me that wonders if Dragon’s Crown Pro is just being made as a Trojan Horse to allow Vanillaware to toss their hat into the PC gaming market. I’m more than onboard with the concept.

7. NeoGeo Battle Coliseum – SNK (Xbox 360)

This one seemed like an obvious choice. I didn’t have any 2D fighting games on the list last year and frankly, that’s unacceptable. Considering the fact that many of SNK’s old games that have been re-released on this gen have made their way onto PC – particularly the ones handled internally – it only seems fair to ask for something from the previous gen. Hamster’s been killing it with their Arcade Classics releases of classic NeoGeo games, but SNK’s work after their long-running self-made arcade hardware is a rarity these days. Considering the rumors abound that SNK may be working on a second Battle Coliseum game, re-releasing the first on modern platforms seems like a no-brainer. I see it going down like this: initial release on the PS4, followed by a Steam release at some point down the line.  Not an ideal scenario, but perhaps the most realistic.

6. Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo HD Remix – Capcom (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Another significant drop from last year’s list, I just think that seeing either a re-release of the old PC version or a new port of the HD release just isn’t in the cards anymore. Puzzle Fighter’s recently been relaunched as a new free-to-play mobile game with a hideous art style and I’m sure that Capcom would try to avoid any undue competition by releasing the original game. And believe me, this new mobile game is going to need all the help it can get. Maybe we’ll see a re-release if it fails to meet Capcom’s likely insane expectations, but it’ll take some time to gauge the game’s success.

5. Tekken Tag Tournament 2 – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U)

While we did finally end up getting a Tekken game on PC this year, I honestly still would prefer Tag 2 to make its way there as well. Unfortunately, as TTT2 was among the worst selling games in the entire series, it seems like the chances of this game getting re-released on more platforms are pretty slim. At least it’s on the Xbox One via backwards compatibility, but I’m still salivating over the thought of what the modding scene could do with this game.

4. Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles – Konami (PlayStation Portable)

It feels a little weird moving this up, considering Konami’s recent history. This year offered us an omen: Super Bomberman R, one of the Nintendo Switch’s launch titles, was a true return to form for the company. This has led to a great deal of speculation about a return to Konami’s roots, with potentially even more new games in the vein of classic titles. An easy way to test the waters for this kind of revival would be re-releasing actual old titles and I still can’t think of a better choice than the Dracula X Chronicles. Containing a full graphical remake of one of the most beloved Castlevania games, an official English translation of the original PC Engine version, as well as a retranslated version of Symphony of the Night, DXC deserves a better fate than being trapped on the likely-defunct PlayStation Portable line for all eternity. The remake could use a little polish to handle higher resolutions, but aside from that, it would be a perfect package.

3. Splatterhouse (2010) – Bandai Namco (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)

2010’s Splatterhouse reboot did not get nearly as much love as it deserves. The game was a high-adrenaline romp through a horror-inspired environment that both paid homage to and build on the original games. Considering we’ve seen various companies choose seemingly random games for modern revivals, Splatterhouse feels like it could have a chance. The game’s only major flaw, its terrible load times, could easily be fixed on modern platforms and frankly, even if you’re not a fan of the reboot itself, it also comes with perfect ports of all three of the mainline games from the 90s. If that’s not worth a re-release, then I don’t know what is.

2.  MegaMan: Powered Up/MegaMan: Maverick Hunter X – Capcom (PSP)

I wouldn’t have considered putting this so high on the list, but considering the recent re-releases of Okami HD and Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney on contemporary platforms, it looks like Capcom may be raiding their backlog for some big cheap releases. For me, the most obvious choice would have to be a twin-pack of their MegaMan releases on the PSP. Both games were critical darlings crippled by the platform they were released on and their timing. Re-releasing both games with improved resolutions in a two-pack for $20 would sell like gangbusters. Considering the fact that Powered Up isn’t even available as a downloadable title outside of Japan, this would also go a long way to preserve what is objectively the best iteration of the original MegaMan in existence and the fascinating curiosity that is MHX’s Vile Mode. Better yet, don’t just release this on PC – release it on everything: PS4, Switch, and even the Xbox One. Come on, Capcom. It’s the Blue Bomber’s 30th anniversary, let’s celebrate!

1. Ys: Memories of Celceta – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Vita)

It might surprise you to see that while much of last year’s list has remained pretty much the same, Memories of Celceta managed to jump a whopping six places to take the number one slot. For starters, the main reason that it was low was to keep things fair – after all, Ys SEVEN was my second most highly-requested PC port of all, and with that out of the way, MoC could flourish. But beating out a MegaMan game for the top slot? That comes down to pure psychology. With SEVEN coming out this year and Lacrimosa of Dana eventually hitting PC at some point, Celceta is literally the only remaining modern Ys game without a PC version in the West. You ever notice how the most painful losses are the ones where you come so close to victory? The most noticeable gap in any collection is a single entry? Same basic concept: PC is so close to being a perfect platform for the Ys series, it just needs that one last game.

Another element that puts this so high on my list is the sheer possibility of it. Everything else on here feels like a pipe dream to at least some extent – a majority of these games are from last-gen and companies don’t seem quite as keen on re-releasing old content as I’d hoped. With that in mind, I’d easily consider Ys SEVEN to be the less likely of the two missing Ys games when it comes to PC ports and that managed to become a reality. Considering the poor timing of SEVEN’s release date on PC compared to the American release date for VIII on consoles, I’d almost be willing to bet that we might see confirmation of a Memories of Celceta PC port from XSEED around the time NIS America announces the final release date for the PC version of Lacrimosa of Dana.

To put it simply, Memories of Celceta is the only game on this list right now that I don’t see merely as a hope. It’s an inevitability. Falcom has already begun focusing more on the PC market in the West, the fact that day-one PC releases were a big part of what led them to choose Aksys and NIS America only proves it. XSEED has been playing a game of catch-up, effectively proving that they are capable of following through with this new strategy given the fact that they released 3 Falcom games on PC this year alone, with one more set likely to release sometime next year. And while the Trails games are Falcom’s top brand in Japan, Ys is still the more popular brand in the West. The Western demand for Crossbell may be deafening, but there’s a much more viable option left to XSEED. The cry for Memories of Celceta on PC is literally deafening: it was riled up by a Twitter gaffe two years back, Joyoland’s attempt to put their ports on Steam Greenlight with pages entirely written in Chinese were met with salivation in English and SEVEN’s recent PC release proves that XSEED finally has the resources to make this request a reality. It’s time to complete my collection.

Thus concludes this year’s set of lists. It almost makes me wonder what I’d be able to write next year. The sheer amount of new games receiving releases on PC and old games being ported long after their initial release is what caused me to abandon this entire concept in the first place, so in a strange sense, it almost feels good to not have to write these nearly as often as I did in previous years. At the same time, I do miss writing up these lists: that’s why I’ve continued with the yearly April Fools’ list of console ports and managed to put together a wishlist for GOG this past summer. On the plus side, I’ve almost got a full list ready for next April, but as for December 2018, I’m kind of at a loss of what to do to extend an article like this to its usual length. Oh well, at least I’ve got a whole year to figure that out.

 

Top 5 Games That Mastered Remaking

With the announcement of Metroid: Samus Returns and the recently released Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy, remakes have been on my mind recently.  Now there’s quite a bit of a scale in terms of how much effort goes into video game remakes.  Sometimes you get simple remasters that basically just polish the textures so the game looks good in HD.  Sometimes the graphics are completely redone, maybe a few gameplay polishes.  And sometimes you get the holy grail, a game that takes the story, settings, and basic gameplay of an old game and makes what can basically be considered a new game.  These are my strong preference for video game remakes, but as you might expect from the amount of effort involved, they are the rarest type.  But these do exist, and so I’m going to listing my top five remakes that truly mastered the art of… re-ing.  But before we get to that, let’s look at some great game that I feel went just a little too far in their new features and have “condemned” themselves to be new games:

Punch-Out!! (2009)

Punch-Out!! on NES is a great game.  Super Punch-Out!! on SNES is better.  But Punch-Out!! on Wii annihilates the rest of the series.  With the same name as the NES game (and one of the arcade games) and almost every fighter from it, Punch-Out!! is almost a remake, but every fighter is changed so much (and almost a third of them weren’t in the NES game) that it feels more like a Mario game that uses the same level themes than a remake.

Mortal Kombat (2011)

I loved Mortal Kombat when I was a kid in the 90s, but it was more the violence taboo, dark fantasy tone, and seemingly endless secrets that intrigued me than the gameplay.  So the 2011 Mortal Kombat installment that brought back almost every character from the first three MK games (the nostalgia and image peak) and retold their stories, but this time with great gameplay, was pretty freaking fantasic.  However, it’s not really a remake, instead being a weird, nonsensical, but very entertaining in-universe reboot that continues the series’ story by changing the first three games.

Star Fox 64

Star Fox 64 has an essentially identical story to the first game, but aside from that (and the fact that doing a remake as the second installment in a franchise, only four years after the original was released would be really weird) it changes as much as any other direct sequel.  Star Fox 64 is an amazing game that aged very well for a fifth-gen game, but I don’t think it can really be called a remake.

Ys: The Oath in Felghana

I haven’t played this game (make a PS4 version, damn it!), but I’ve been assured it is a vast improvement over its basis, Ys III: Wanderers from Ys, and that it has the same essential story and is now considered canon in the series.  Having played both Ys III and Ys Origin (which has the same gameplay style as Oath in Felghana), however, I can’t really consider this a true remake when the basic gameplay genre has been changed so dramatically.  But I’m sure it’s a great game, and again, want a convenient version for myself released.

Okay, with those out of the way, let’s get to the actual list!  Five games that push the remake envelope to its max without breaking it.  Not much else to say, here we go:

#5.  Ducktales Remastered

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Everyone loves the NES Ducktales game, but I’m just going to come out and say that several parts of it aged badly.  The control for the signature pogo cane is stiff, the hit detection is noticeably off, and the game is really, really short.  Well in 2013 we got a fantastic remake that may not be perfect, but fixed all of the aforementioned issues and of course was promptly condemned for not matching the deified memories people had of the NES game.  Well screw that, Ducktales Remastered is vastly superior to the original.  In addition to things technology’s march made possible (gorgeous art and animation that looks just like the show, full voice acting), the game greatly expands every level from the NES game and adds two completely new ones, making for an experience that could almost pass for Ducktales 3.  With the Ducktales cartoon’s reboot about to launch (which I’m expecting to also greatly outshine the original, the previews have done a very good job of showing the Gravity Falls influence), now is a great time to play through this game.  It’s a fitting last hurrah for the 80s Ducktales as a whole, in addition to being a great remake.

#4. Ratchet and Clank (2016)

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Straddling the line between remake and reboot, I decided to place this game on the remake side because I’m always going to place gameplay first, and no matter how much the story of the original Ratchet and Clank was changed in Ratchet and Clank 2016, it’s obvious that the original game was still the near exclusive focus.  The advancements in control and quality of life that the later games made are intact, but the levels are almost all from the original.  But like all the remakes on this list, they aren’t just graphically upgraded copies, they’re new levels using the settings and elements of the original.  Ratchet and Clank 2016 does a great job expanding the classic levels it covers and makes them feel every bit as good as new levels would.  While having less levels is a somewhat painful tradeoff and prevents this game from placing higher on the list, R&C2016 is still a polished and satisfying action platformer that can serve as a great introduction to the series for 13 year olds who weren’t alive when the original game was released and are now making you feel old.  Let’s hope we get the Going Commando and Up Your Arsenal remakes that everyone wants, and that they’re as good as this one

#3. Mega Man Powered Up

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This game is criminally underappreciated.  Unlike Maverick Hunter X, which made minimal gameplay additions and was based on a game that aged too well to really need a remake, Mega Man Powered Up takes the very first Mega Man game and adds an absurd amount of content.  You get a ton of new playable characters, a level editor, and brand new chibi-style 2.5D graphics that can be placed over an exact gameplay replica of the original game.  But the crown jewel of this game is the “New Style” mode with brand new levels based on the themes and gameplay elements of the original, in addition to two brand new bosses with their own original levels.  This game just offers everything.  Want the original game with new graphics?  You’ve got it.  Want a better game based on it?  It’s there.  Want to play as Roll or a robot master?  Go ahead.  Impossible to please?  Then make your own damn level, you can even do that.  Mega Man Powered Up needs to be rescued from its relative obscurity, it’s a must have for every Mega Man fan.

#2. Resident Evil (2002)

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One of the most positively regarded video game remakes of all time, the GameCube Resident Evil (or REmake, as it’s commonly known) took the 1996 original, which had already aged pretty badly by 2002, and turned it into one of the best games to use the classic Resident Evil formula.  The flow of the game was shaken up, the puzzles were redesigned, new enemies and areas were added, the controls were updated, a colossal amount of secrets were added, the dialogue and voice acting were made competent, and the graphics were completely redone and looked truly amazing, they still hold up today, even without the long-postponed HD remaster.  This set the standard for video game remakes, and every re-release of a Resident Evil game since has been met with wishes that another Resident Evil game would get the kind of monumental remake that the original did.  While the lack of information has made it hard to remember, we do have the mythical REmake 2 announced, hopefully we can once again get something on the level of this, the runner-up master of remaking.

#1.  Metroid: Zero Mission

Metroid Zero Mission

I debated on the order to place the previous games in, trying to decide how much weight to give how much of an improvement over the original game each remake was versus how much I enjoyed the game personally.  Thankfully, Metroid: Zero Mission excels in both areas.  The original Metroid is enormously influential, but it did not age well at all, and the lack of features and quality of life improvements that Super Metroid standardized is glaring.  Metroid: Zero Mission merges the original game with Super Metroid, adding new abilities, areas, bosses, and story elements to make something that functions as both a new entry in the Metroid series, and a replacement for the poorly-aged original.  While the game is a bit short (despite all the expansions, the aimless wandering and cheap deaths really made the NES Metroid feel longer than it was), the gameplay is just as fun and satisfying as the legendary Super Metroid.  Zero Mission is everything a remake should strive to be, the best possible outcome.  After 13 years of wishing for Metroid II to get the same treatment, we’re just months away from that finally happening, and now seems like the time to recognize both Metroid: Zero Mission and the potential of remakes in general.  If more remakes had the effort and care given to Zero Mission, the world would be a better place and the galaxy would be at peace.

So there you have it, my picks for the top five games that show the full potential of video game remakes.  I’m not saying there’s no place for remasters that simply add some modern quality of life features to a classic game, but I consider games like these five to be the holy grail of video game remakes.  There are plenty of classic but questionably aged games that could benefit from full blown remakes, hopefully we’ll get many more remakes like these five games that mastered remaking.

The Year Without a PC Port Wishlist

Christmas has pretty much always been my favorite holiday, especially when I was a child. I was a greedy little boy while I was growing up: one of my favorite holiday traditions was always writing up my list to Santa on my computer. Sure, some years I’d get overzealous and start thinking about it as early as August, but I’d always have a lot of fun just writing the list itself. I’d always try to sort things in the order I wanted them, but that was actually part of the fun for me: one week I’d really want some action figures, the next some new video game caught my eye. The downside to starting a list that early is that as time goes on, new items catch your eye. Even the greed of a child has its limits, so I would often have to pare down my list, trimming the items I could “do without”. (Gotta love child logic, am I right?) In a sense, I think those PC ports lists I wrote for a long time were the evolution of that favored Yule tradition, but eventually I got tired of doing them. Too much wishing, not enough getting. I’ve taken a hiatus on them and now, it’s been over a year. Instead of making an entirely new one, why not look over my previous works and analyze them a little? This year, I’ll be recounting my 5 favorite success stories, my top 10 most wanted and the game on each list I’d consider the most important (excluding those on the aforementioned lists) plus a brand-new one for good measure!

Before we get started (fittingly enough, with my favorite success stories), I’d like to start with some recent successes as well. Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 was released on PS4 earlier this month and it will also be hitting both the Xbox One and Steam in March. Meanwhile, Garou: Mark of the Wolves was also recently released on PlayStation consoles via CodeMystics, but surprise, surprise: an entirely different port hit Steam soon after, from the good folks at DotEmu. In fact, it was such a surprise, I actually had to change a list entry because of it. The DotEmu port is less fancy than the CodeMystics port, but apparently, not only does the Steam version have a more solid netcode, but it’s also getting immediate bugfixes to iron out some of its bizarre glitches. Funny how that works. I expected that to be the last bit of news I got on the PC end of things, but I was wrong: The Legend of Dark Witch 2, another game I’d been salivating over the prospect of seeing a PC port is announced to be hitting Steam sometime during “Q4 2016”. One last big surprise for me.

You’ll also remember that this past April, I did an “April Fools’ Day” article, revolving around 10 PC games I’d like to see receive console ports. Well, like many of my jokes, this one ended up biting me in the ass. During the PlayStation Experience, Ys Origin (the only PC-exclusive Ys game) was announced to be hitting both PlayStation 4 and, amazingly enough, the Vita on February 21, 2017 with the port being handled by the good people over at DotEmu who are utilizing XSEED’s English translation and coming up with original French, Italian, German and Spanish translations as well. (As an aside, DotEmu’s also bringing a favorite of mine – the NeoGeo classic Windjammers – to the same platforms. Let’s keep our fingers crossed for a PC port down the line!) You’d think that would be enough, but the world wasn’t done having fun at my expense: soon after, it was revealed that the indie platformer Kero Blaster would also be coming to the PS4, thanks to its publisher Playism. They’ll also be bringing Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight to PS4, though release windows for both titles have not been announced. Continue reading

Abbott and Costello Meet 10 Games I Want Ported to PC

Hello again, readers. I know I kind of missed out on doing an article earlier this month, but I’m hoping to make up for it with this one. Yep, another article about PC ports. That’s not to say that it’s all been gloom and doom: Sega gave a surprise announcement that the original Valkyria Chronicles would be ported to PC earlier this month, with support for 1080p (and higher) resolutions, the capability to run at 60 frames-per-second, remappable controls (keyboard/mouse support too) and all of the previous DLC included in the base package for the low price of $20. Better still, sales of the game have all but exceeded Sega’s expectations, so there’s a distinct possibility that we’ll see even more delayed ports of Sega games hit PC in the coming months. Tekken 7 was recently announced to be running on two different types of arcade cabinets when it launches in Japan, one that makes use of the System 369 board (used for Tag2, matching the PS3’s specs) and their current System ES (a PC-based architecture), which is fueling existing rumors that Tekken 7 will be hitting PC in addition to PS4 and Xbox One. Finally, in response to Xbox One becoming compatible with Microsoft’s upcoming Windows 10, it’s being speculated that there’s a possibility that more XBO exclusives will be making the jump to PC at some point in the future, either as full ports or through some ability to stream the games on PC from the console itself.

Needless to say, it’s been a good couple of months for PC gaming in terms of news. Best of all, at least from my perspective, is that my streak of game requests getting PC ports announced appears to be unstoppable. Just a couple of days ago, it was revealed that H2 Interactive, the Korean publisher that has been handling the re-releases of Arc System Works’ fighters on Steam, is going to be porting Blazblue: Continuum Shift EXTEND to Steam next month.

Once again, it’s time to go over the rules. This is pretty much second nature to anyone who’s read any of my previous lists, and if you haven’t, you totally should. A lot of gems buried in those older lists and it may even answer the question of why certain games I’ve mooned over don’t show up this time around. My lists stick mostly to third-party companies (aside from Microsoft) with a general focus on companies that have recently released games on PC. Games will be taken from the seventh (360/Wii/PS3) and eighth (WiiU/PS4/XBO) generations of video games, as well as handhelds from those eras and mobile games. Games that weren’t system exclusives are preferred. Finally, games from the same series released on the same console can be packaged together on a single list entry. Well, that was relatively painless, now to hit you with some games.

Shantae and the Pirate’s Curse – WayForward (3DS/WiiU)

I’ve always been kind of interested in the Shantae series, ever since I first saw an ad for the first game in magazines back in Junior High. Unfortunately, due to a strange aversion to playing video games out of release order, I was only able to actually play through the entire series this past year. Since Risky’s Revenge is already on Steam and the fourth game’s already has a confirmed PC release (among many other platforms), it seems reasonable to ask that “Shantae 3” get the same treatment after the announced Wii U release. Use the Wii U version and Risky’s Revenge Director’s Cut as a base and it should turn out just fine. Considering Matt Bozon teased the possibility of Pirate’s Curse on other platforms, I’d say there’s a pretty good shot we’ll be seeing it hit Steam’s storefront in the future.

de Blob series – Nordic Games GmbH (Wii/360/PS3)

Recently, Nordic Games announced that they had purchased the rights to THQ’s colorful platformer duology, de Blob. Honestly, I view that as kind of a relief: we never really heard about the franchise’s fate during the sale of THQ’s assets after they went bankrupt. Other titles like Saint’s Row, Company of Heroes and Darksiders all got picked up pretty quickly. Better still, Nordic Games even teased that they were considering working on new entries in the franchise. What better way to gauge interest in the franchise than re-releasing the first two games on other platforms, like PC for example?

Virtua Fighter 5 Final Showdown – Sega (360/PS3)

Well, for starters, this is the third and final game in that Sega PC Ports petition I keep spamming at you. More importantly, it’s a damn good fighting game of the 3D variety, and the PC could definitely use more of those. Considering the fact that Sega’s planning an update to the arcade version (which unfortunately will be removing the game’s online features), there’s proof that the game still has a little more life left in it. Might as well port it to PC and introduce it to an all-new audience.

MegaMan Powered Up/MegaMan: Maverick Hunter X – Capcom (PSP)

In the wake of Valkyria Chronicles’ recent re-release and success on Steam, it seems only fair that I bring up another two games that I feel deserves another shot and a PC port could be the best way to achieve that. Considering the fact that Capcom’s recent releases in the MegaMan series have been re-releases of old games anyway, this would be a much better way of achieving this sort of thing. MegaMan Powered Up is probably one of the best and most necessary video game remakes of all-time. Maverick Hunter X, not as much, but it was definitely an interesting package, especially with the OVA and Vile Mode. Neither game really found its audience, as they were released exclusively on PSP early in its lifespan before it found its audience in any region.

The Legend of Heroes: Gagharv Trilogy  – Nihon Falcom/Bandai Namco (PSP)

Technically, these are actually three games: Prophecy of the Moonlight Witch (the second game released in North America), A Tear of Vermillion  (the second game in the trilogy, but the first released over here) and Song of the Ocean (third game in both respects). One of the few standard turn-based RPGs made by the folks over at Falcom, I found these games somewhat interesting. Unfortunately, due to my personal aversion to using the PSP, I was never able to finish them. Considering the fact that other games in the Legend of Heroes series have been making their way to Steam (the first game in the Trails of the Sky trilogy has already been released on there and the second part is expected to release soon), it seems reasonable to consider a Steam port. I’m not sure if Bandai Namco still owns the rights to these games, but if not, I’m sure XSEED would do an excellent job on porting them, like they did with the Ys games.

Sunset Overdrive – Microsoft Studios/Insomniac Games (XBO)

This one’s pretty obvious, honestly. It’s a bright and colorful third-person shooter with parkour elements and one of the few Xbox One exclusives that makes the system worth owning, at least in my opinion. Of course, having said that, it’s probably unlikely that we’ll see a port of this game to PC for quite some time, at least until the XBO’s library is healthier. Of course, considering the fact that Dead Rising 3 and Ryse: Son of Rome (both proclaimed “exclusives” at launch) eventually made their way to PC, I wouldn’t be surprised if we saw Sunset Overdrive share the same fate a year or two down the line.

Samurai Shodown II – SNK Playmore (360/iOS)

Considering the fact that they’ve been releasing a lot of other games on Steam lately, this one seems like another slam dunk. Regardless, I might as well discuss it. Aside from the King of Fighters games, the Samurai Shodown games are probably SNK’s most popular fighting game franchise, and SS2 is definitely the most popular game in the entire series. Throw in the bonuses and online functionality that we’ve seen in their recent PC Metal Slug releases, give it a similar pricepoint, and I’m sure it’ll sell like hotcakes.

Princess Crown – Atlus/Vanillaware (PSP)

Ever since I first played Muramasa: The Demon Blade on the original Wii, I’ve been somewhat fascinated by the game’s predecessors. After all, Muramasa’s codename during development was “Princess Crown 3”, while Odin Sphere was referred to as “Princess Crown 2”. Unfortunately, Princess Crown itself has never actually been released outside of Japan. Regardless, I’d still like to see it hit North America at some point in the future, specifically on PC, but seeing it hit other platforms would be great as well.

Bangai-O HD: Missile Fury – Treasure (360)

An interesting take on the bullet-hell genre, Bangai-O is a quirky game from Treasure that seems to keep changing every time they release it. The first game was originally made for the Nintendo 64 as a Japanese-exclusive title, but also eventually release in all three major regions on the Dreamcast with enhanced graphics, remixed music and less slowdown. It involved going through stages in an almost platformer-style fashion, while still utilizing typical shmup controls and movement options. The second game, Bangai-O Spirits, was released exclusively on the Nintendo DS, and was more of a puzzle game than anything else, clearing stages with custom weapon loadouts. Missile Fury resembles the original more than Spirits, and the jury’s out on whether it’s a remake of the original or a direct sequel. Regardless, Missile Fury outclasses its predecessors in one significant way: it finally achieves the twin-stick control scheme it’s been aiming for since it was first released on the N64. Either way, it looks hella fun and considering Treasure’s current proclivity to PC re-releases it would be a fine addition to any bullet-hell fan’s Steam library.

Omega Five – Natsume/Hudson Soft [Konami] (360)

Speaking of twin-stick shmups, Omega Five was an interesting experiment. Controlling your character with the left-stick and their aim with the right-stick, the game otherwise sort of resembles Capcom’s old Forgotten Worlds, one of my favorite early shmups. Unfortunately, since the game was originally published by Hudson Soft, I’m not aware if the rights to this game managed to be retained by Konami. Regardless, I’d love to see Omega Five get a second chance on a more welcoming platform.

I was prepared to accept the fact that my streak was technically dead at the end of this article, but I guess it’s stronger than I could have possibly imagined. Nothing new on my lists had been announced to be receiving any PC ports until the last possible day I could’ve gotten any news otherwise. Regardless, I was fine seeing the streak die, after all three games from my lists got announced back in September, so if I wanted to be technical about the whole “one game per list” gimmick. Considering all of the other good PC news I’ve seen lately, I’m sure things will pick up at some point. Until then, I’ll be waiting for SNK and H2 Interactive to release those new (well, new to PC) fighting games on Steam.

Remaking History

Originally, this article was going to be my own personal take on an earlier piece from KI, where he detailed various sequels he’d like to see for games that have long been ignored or forgotten. Truth be told, I’ve got a similar hunger to see some old games resurface myself. Of course, while I was brainstorming that topic (and don’t worry, my take on that idea will resurface at some point down the line) I eventually decided that it would be more interesting to think up games I’d like to see remade. After all, remakes and sequels are pretty similar when it comes to video games.

I’ve said this in the past, video games are unique in the sense that sequels typically improve on their predecessors. The same can honestly be said with remakes: video game remakes typically improve on the source material, where most other forms of media have a much lower success rate. Unfortunately, video games fall into a similar trap as other forms of media. Commonly if a game is remade, it’s generally already a popular (and by extension, good) game. It’s somewhat pointless to try to reinvent the wheel. Games like Maverick Hunter X and Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles weren’t improvements over the originals. On the other hand, you’ve got remakes like Metroid: Zero Mission and MegaMan Powered Up, which were definite improvements over the games they were based on.

For the purposes of this article, I’ve chosen 5 games which I believe deserve to be remade. Maybe people will disagree that they need remakes, maybe some of you will even think these games are just lost causes altogether. The other thing these games all have in common is that they come from either established franchises or development teams that eventually redeemed themselves after each respective misstep. I’ll be discussing each game’s faults, strengths and how I personally would handle a remake for each game, though the order in which the first two aspects are discussed may vary between entries. The importance of each element will determine which takes precedence in the discussion.

Mother (1) [a.k.a. “Earthbound Zero”] – Nintendo Famicom/Game Boy Advance

The Problems

Just as a bit of a disclaimer, I’ve never actually played the original Mother. I requested that a friend of mine play through it, mainly because after playing through Earthbound on my own, I was curious about the game’s roots. In spite of having no hands-on experience with the title, I can tell that it is definitely a very flawed game. The problems I have with the original Mother can be summarized in a single sentence: it’s an NES-era Japanese RPG. The NES was a part of the last video game generation where the abomination that is random battling could be blamed on hardware limitations. Likewise, while its sequels played around with unique gameplay mechanics that matched the franchise’s off-beat tone, the original Mother feels incredibly generic by comparison.

The Potential

On the other hand, Mother 1 actually gives us a unique opportunity. Shigesato Itoi, the mastermind behind the Mother trilogy, has stated that he has no intention to make a fourth game in the franchise. Considering how Mother 3 ended, it’s safe to say that there may be nothing left to explore in the future of the games’ storyline. However, the Earthbound fanbase is extremely passionate about seeing a new entry in the series. Meanwhile, Earthbound and Mother 3 don’t actually really need remakes: they’re perfectly fine in their current state. That leaves us with the original Mother, a flawed, but still very interesting game. Remaking the original Mother could allow Nintendo a chance to give the fanboys what they want, while avoiding any potential backlash in making a new game without Mr. Itoi’s involvement. It’s also important to keep in mind that Mother has only been released in Japan. I may have ragged on The Dracula X Chronicles earlier (despite the fact that I actually like that game), but there’s one thing that it objectively improved upon its predecessor: the number of regions it was released in. Sure, Nintendo’s supposedly sitting on that complete, unreleased English translation of the original Famicom game, but why just release that when you could do something with much more style?

My Proposal

I think a remake of Mother 1 would work best as a downloadable game for the Wii U. I’d actually prefer it if they kept the story about the same as the original, making as few alterations to the Famicom game’s scenario as possible. I’d say the gameplay should probably emulate Earthbound more than Mother 3, just due to its place in the timeline. Represent enemy encounters on the world map, use the odometer-style HP system, all that good stuff. Graphically, I’d like the game to resemble those clay models used for the Mother series’ concept art. It’s such an interesting aesthetic and Nintendo’s already attempting something similar with Kirby and the Rainbow Curse.

Street Fighter (1) [a.k.a. “Fighting Street”] – Arcade/NEC TurboGrafx CD

The Problems

People say I go way too easy on the original Street Fighter, due to the fact that my first experience with the game was with the even worse PC port. While I don’t think that SF1 is as bad as everyone else says, I must admit it’s an incredibly flawed game. It suffers both from being a late-80’s era arcade game and one of the earliest examples of a modern fighting game. The game suffers from both stiff controls and gameplay, which coupled with the traditional “unfair” difficulty typical of “quarter muncher” arcade games, made the experience even less enjoyable.  While introducing special moves was a pretty cool idea, the lack of playable characters (just Ryu and “Player 2”, later renamed Ken) also hurt the game’s appeal, especially when compared to later fighting games.

The Potential

Of course, Street Fighter’s potential is obvious to anyone who’s ever played its sequels or Final Fight. Once the initial kinks had been worked out, Street Fighter’s core ideas led its successors to become some of the most important fighting games of all time, even to this day. Besides that, SF1 also had some fan favorite characters that haven’t reappeared in more recent titles. I’m sure few people care about such mainstays as Lee, Joe and Mike (who is generally considered the basis for later SF2 character Mike Bison/Balrog, known colloquially as “Boxer”), but we haven’t seen characters like Birdie and Eagle since Capcom’s transition to 3D models in their 2D fighting games. There are even characters that never reemerged in later games that have been requested to some degree. Remember when the internet thought Retsu was the fifth new character in Ultra Street Fighter IV? Geki, the Japanese ninja, is another common request when it comes to returning characters, though he’s not at the top of most people’s lists.

My Proposal

Honestly, I’d kind of want Street Fighter V (which has been alluded to, by series producer Yoshinori Ono) to take a page from the Mortal Kombat reboot and retell the stories of all the previous games, which would lead to having a gigantic roster (and effectively remake Street Fighter 1 unintentionally). However, that would probably take an insane amount of resources, despite the fact that the game could potentially reuse some of the assets from the last game.

So let’s just talk about a straight remake of the original game instead. On one hand, seeing something along the lines of the MUGEN-based remake “Street Fighter One” would be pretty cool. Reuse the graphics from the arcade version, the TGCD version’s soundtrack and create an entirely new gameplay engine that would fix the flaws of the original. There’s also the possibility that there could be a full-on 2.5D remake, made by the team behind the Ultra update, in a case of what some people I know refer to colloquially as “watching the bee”. Think about it, the Ultra team is small and many people have complained about their work being buggy in many cases. Giving them another chance on a less important project to redeem themselves would be far more productive than just disbanding the team. Regardless of which form this remake take, there’s one thing this game should definitely have: the entire SF1 roster playable. Yes, even Joe.

Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest – Nintendo Entertainment System

The Potential

Regardless of my personal feelings towards Simon’s Quest, I must acknowledge that it was an important step in the evolution of the Castlevania series and had a profound impact on the entry in the franchise that most people consider its magnum opus: Symphony of the Night. Granted, it wasn’t the first Castlevania game to focus more on exploratory gameplay as opposed to standard linear platforming, that distinct honor belongs to the MSX2 version of the original Akumajou Dracula, commonly referred to as “Vampire Killer” outside of Japan. Considering that little factoid can easily be filed as “obscure trivia”, it should be pretty clear why SQ is generally considered the proto-“Metroidvania”. Of course, a remake of Simon’s Quest could lead to the most interesting Metroidvania ever, if done properly. Considering the game takes place across multiple mansions, towns and forests, there’s way more potential for this compared to just another romp in Dracula’s Castle.

The Problems

Simon’s Quest falls into the “good concept, awful execution” category. Konami retained the standard lives systems from the first game in the series, despite the fact that it really didn’t add much to the game. The level design also left a lot to be desired, what with all those fake blocks and instant-death pits. The latter appear even in the towns, for some reason. The game allowed you to accidentally skip important (yet cryptic or possibly poorly translated) hints, but not the excruciatingly slow day/night transitions (call me a ripoff of AVGN for complaining about this, if you must). Finally, though the convoluted password system only appeared on the cartridge-based renditions of SQ, the original Famicom Disk System version had load times that would make the PS1 blush.

My Proposal

If Konami ever decides to remake Simon’s Quest, I’d like them to emulate another remake of one of the weaker entries in the series: Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth. Make it a downloadable game, use the same style of faux 16-bit graphics and music. Instead of just aping the old “Classicvania” style of gameplay, I’d like to see a cross between that and the more Metroid-like style of gameplay from later 2D entries in the series. Keep the sprawling overworld and the various puzzles, but maybe include some kind of a “journal” where any clues the game gives you can be re-read at your own leisure. Expand on the mansions, maybe make them into actual stages, either linear Classicvania layouts or labyrinthine exploratory areas. Better yet, use both styles to keep things interesting. Develop on the towns by throwing in more shop mechanics like the ones , keep the day/night mechanic (but make the transitions more immediate) and we could be potentially looking at the best Metroidvania in the series.

Metroid II: Return of Samus – Nintendo Game Boy

The Potential

Let me be perfectly clear on this one, if Zero Mission didn’t exist, the original Metroid would be here instead of its Game Boy sequel. Return of Samus is a significant improvement on the original Metroid in pretty much every way. The controls are significantly improved. There are brand new power-ups including the Spider Ball, which allows Samus to climb walls and the Space Jump, which allows her to repeatedly spin-jump in the air. They join old favorites from the original like the Varia Suit, Ice Beam and Varia Suit, giving the intrepid bounty hunter a much more versatile arsenal. It’s also significantly longer than the original Metroid, with at least twice as many boss fights (that’s assuming you count each variant of a Metroid as a single fight, regardless of how many times they appear in the game) and several other areas to explore.

The Problems

Metroid II’s biggest issue is the fact that its sequel is an even greater improvement on it than it was to the original Metroid. Super Metroid added an in-game map, which allowed for a return to the original’s more non-linear game progression while avoiding its tendency to leave players stranded, added even more iconic weapons to Samus’s arsenal and improved the controls to perfection. There’s a reason why Super Metroid is generally considered the best game in the series. Unfortunately, due to being a Game Boy game and not being the series’ progenitor, Metroid II is generally considered to be the weakest game in the franchise. Its reputation isn’t helped by the fact that Zero Mission is generally considered to be close to the quality as Super Metroid.

My Proposal

At one point, Nintendo had plans to remake Metroid II for the Game Boy Color, as they did with Link’s Awakening. Unfortunately, it was scrapped along with other similar remakes (including MegaMan V, supposedly). I always thought it would’ve been pretty cool to see this idea come to fruition, but honestly, this project wouldn’t make much sense at this point in time.

Instead, I feel like Return of Samus should get the “Zero Mission” treatment. Give it an expanded remake, utilizing a similar engine to Super Metroid. I’d personally keep the more linear layout the game, but maybe throw in some exploits that would allow speedrunners or anyone else who’s looking for a challenge an opportunity to break sequence. Better yet, just make an extra mode that removes the roadblocks. Add some new bosses, but keep the 40 Metroid boss fights intact. Considering most of those were just the same 4 bosses repeated, that shouldn’t be much of a problem. The fact that Metroid’s fanbase has been clamoring for a new game in the franchise, especially a 2D one, pretty much means that if this remake is done well, it’ll relieve some of the pressure on Nintendo when it comes to working on the next real entry in the series.

Knuckles’ Chaotix – Sega 32X

The Problems

To say that Knuckles’ Chaotix was the best the 32X had to offer is pretty much an objective fact. Unfortunately, that’s really not saying much. Though its fellow expansion peripheral the Sega CD had a respectable amount of cult classics, the only other 32X game I find remotely endearing is Kolbiri, a free-roaming game with shump-style controls where you play as a hummingbird. Despite its status as the “one good 32X game”, Knuckles’ Chaotix still has its fair share of issues. Though I don’t really mind the random selection when you decide to switch out your partner, the way the stage order is randomized bugs me: you often switch between zones before you finish whichever one you’ve started with, which messes with the game’s flow. There’s also the fact that, at times, the game just doesn’t feel as smooth as its predecessors on the Genesis and Sega CD, the controls feel a little off at times and there’s also the occasional slowdown.

The Potential

The funny thing is, my first experience with Knuckles’ Chaotix didn’t happen until way after it was released. Even then, it wasn’t actually with Chaotix itself: I played a leaked beta made for the Genesis by the name of Sonic Crackers. While it wasn’t nearly as polished as the final product, I was enamored with its unique idea: controlling two different characters (in that case, Sonic and Tails) tethered together by a pair of rings. Likewise, Knuckles’ Chaotix delivered on that concept in my opinion. It may not have been a perfect game, but it was a way more interesting spin (no pun intended) on the Sonic formula than 3D Blast ever was.

My Proposal

Simply put, give it the Sonic CD treatment. Use the art and sound assets from the 32X version and let Christian “The Taxman” Whitehead work his magic on it, removing any technical limitations and tightening up the controls from the original version. I think the main reason I’d want this one remade is because it’s just not worth the time or effort for Sega to try to emulate 32X games, even though many fan-made Genesis emulators can handle them (to varying levels of success).

There you have it, 5 games I think are worth remaking. Some of them are more flawed than others, but all of them could use a second chance in my opinion. Of course, like I said before, most games that get remade even today are still as good as they ever were. Instead, they should be reserved for games that didn’t age gracefully, fixing their problems while sharing their potential with a new generation of gamers.

 

The Forgotten Universe

For anyone not living under a rock, you’ve probably already heard the good news regarding our beloved Blue Bomber: MegaMan has officially been confirmed as a character in Nintendo’s upcoming Super Smash Bros. for 3DS/Wii U. Frankly, everything about this makes me excited: from his movelist to his revamped design, which seems to be a slightly stubbier and more refined take on MM’s design from the promotional art in the Complete Works re-releases of the NES games on the original PlayStation. Still, it’s perhaps the first real bit of good news that fans of MegaMan have seen for some time, considering we’ve gone 3 years without seeing anything major in the way of new games. And while the wounds have still yet to heal completely, it still seems like a good time to talk about one cancelled game in particular. No, I’m not talking about Legends 3: many have already spoken on that game’s behalf already, it’s a cliche at this point. No, I’m going to be talking about the first game that got cancelled, the one only a few mourned when it was first cancelled. I’m talking, of course, about the ill-fated MegaMan Universe.

For those of you who don’t remember, MegaMan Universe was one of the games announced by Keiji Inafune back in 2010, right before he announced the aforementioned Legends 3. Universe was revealed with a stop-motion animated trailer made by various artists from the “i am 8bit” art movement and with music from acclaimed MegaMan tribute band The Megas. Full of references to various other Capcom games, including trippy bits where a claymation MegaMan turns into Arthur from Ghosts ‘n’ Goblins/Ghouls ‘n’ Ghosts games and Ryu from Street Fighter while fighting off a horde of Metools, Tellies and other old-school MegaMan foes. It also showed off the birth of the now-despised Bad Box Art MegaMan, a good-humored ribbing of the downright bizarre North American boxart for the original MegaMan on the NES.

I’ve always speculated that MMU was planned as a reaction to the then-recent fan backlash against MegaMan 10 for being another NES throwback game like 2008’s MM9, but then, considering it was announced the same year 10 was released, that doesn’t exactly seem plausible. The game’s art-style was also a significant departure from the traditional Inafune-inspired artwork of old. Frankly, I liked it, but there were many others who didn’t. Still, the game was 2.5D, which was definitely a change from the 8-bit sprites. But it also resembled a previous attempt at a Classic revival: MegaMan Powered Up.

The game’s 2.5D format wasn’t the only thing Capcom took from Powered Up. The game had an extreme emphasis on customization. In addition to bringing back the Stage Builder mode from MMPU (and making it a major portion of the game itself), players would’ve also have been able to create their own player character, using parts from MegaMan, various robot masters, characters from other Capcom properties and even alternate versions of MegaMan (like the aforementioned BBA MegaMan and the more Inafune-inspired “Rockman”). Many fans and journalists likened the idea to effectively being a ripoff of LittleBigPlanet. Ironically enough, Powered Up predated LBP by over two years.

Of course, Powered Up wasn’t the only game Universe was inspired by. Pretty much every part of the game was a direct reference to the most famous Classic series game of them all: MegaMan 2. From the various stage builder locales, to the Robot Masters depicted and even the soundtrack, the entire game appeared to be a heartfelt love letter to MM2, not unlike MM9 was. Whether or not this was the entire scope of the game or if this game was an attempt to revitalize the MMPU series, I guess we’ll never know.

What I do know is that I actually experienced the game firsthand. While I was in attendance at New York Comic-Con in 2010, Capcom had a booth there with, what I believe was, an alpha build of MMU. I’ll be honest, the game was a bit rough around the edges, but I could see some real potential there. After all, the game was still in development. I managed to beat the stage I picked: I remember little about the playthrough aside from the fact that there were three stages (easy, normal and hard) and the one I had chosen (one of the latter two) used the MM2 Airman stage motif and I managed to beat it fairly easily, despite losing one of the three lives I was granted in the demo. I was rewarded with an inflatable lance based on Arthur’s from the GnG games with the MMU logo on it. I still have it to this day.

Considering how intrigued I was by the new designs and how much I had enjoyed the demo, I was honestly sad to see the game get cancelled. I can still remember how the entire affair took place. After playing the demo and the announcement of a variant on Japanese childrens TV show character Gachapin (dubbed “Megapin”) was announced as a playable character, news on MMU dried up. Keiji Inafune had left Capcom at that point and the future of the title (both MM titles he had just announced, arguably) was uncertain. I remembered asking Christian “Sven” Svennson about the status of the title on Capcom’s “Ask Capcom” forum. He assured me there would be some big news regarding the title coming soon and that it certainly wasn’t cancelled. About two weeks later, MegaMan Universe was officially cancelled. I’d like to say I was surprised when it happened, but frankly, I was just a little ticked off that I had been lied to, either as an attempt to avoid negative PR or due to Svennson’s own ignorance of what was going on. I already knew that when Inafune left Capcom, the two MegaMan games he announced just before his departure were already dead.

Somehow, I think that the gaming press was somewhat to blame regarding Universe’s demise. MMU honestly got torn apart by a lot of journalists when it first became playable. One major complaint I recall showing up a great deal was the fact that it had stiff controls. Stiff controls in a game that was still in its Alpha phase? What a concept! Whatever it was that got MMU cancelled, it just seemed kind of weird how quickly everyone seemed to turn on the game. First they were griping that MM10 was “yet another” 8-bit throwback game, ala the universally-beloved MM9 and said they wanted a change of pace. MMU does just that, departing from many of the stylistic conventions of past MegaMan games and everyone throws an even bigger tantrum. Then, two years later, we get a free PC game that started out as a fan homage to both Street Fighter and MegaMan and people complain about the 8-bit style used in that as well. I don’t think I’ll ever understand how popular opinion works.

In the end, I think the most insulting part of the cancellation of MegaMan Universe was not so much the way it got cancelled or the way the majority of people reacted to it when it happened. In reality, I think the worst part is what it took to make people start caring: the cancellation of MegaMan Legends 3. It was only after Legends 3’s failure to be greenlit that people started complaining, wailing and moaning that “we’d seen two MegaMan games cancelled”, while when MMU got cancelled, most people responded with a shrug and a resounding “meh”. It wasn’t an outrage until the game you wanted got trashed. It reminds me of the whole Operation Rainfall “movement”: sure, they talked about bringing all three games (Xenoblade Chronicles, The Last Story and Pandora’s Tower) to North America, but let’s face facts: as long as they got Xenoblade and Last Story, they were more than willing to throw Pandora’s Tower (the one game that actually looked interesting to me) under the bus, to the point where they declared total victory once Last Story got confirmed for NA release by XSEED. To them, Pandora’s Tower getting a release down the line was just a happy little bonus.

Of course, regardless of who’s to blame for the game’s cancellation or who used said cancellation to fuel feigned outrage, the point is no amount of ranting will ever bring this interesting little game back. But looking back at that MegaMan reveal for Super Smash Bros. for Wii U/3DS (really wish they had put more effort into coming up with a title), there was one little graphical detail that struck me as a bit strange. Despite the clearly Classic NES-inspired motions and design of the Blue Bomber, there were noticable creases in the cyan part of his armor. Not unlike those seen in the design of “MegaMan” in MegaMan Universe. It’s probably just a coincidence, but part of me still likes to think it’s just Nintendo’s way of paying homage to the cancelled game, sort of like how I believe that the upcoming Sonic Lost World is totally a revival of the cancelled Saturn game Sonic X-Treme, despite Sonic Team head Takashi Iizuka saying he had never even heard of X-Treme beforehand. Just the thought that interesting old ideas that got scrapped can come back in some form just cheers me up, I guess. Maybe one day, we’ll see another attempt at a MegaMan game with a stage builder.