Respect the Unexpected

Sometimes when you look back on a game after the fact, you realize it wasn’t as good as you made yourself believe when you first got it, or you realize it was actually a lot better than you gave it credit for.  Those games aren’t the focus of this list.  This list is for games that instantly changed my strong preconceived notions as soon as I played them.  It can either be a game I went into with hype that was instantly deflated, or a game that I expected to hate or at least be indifferent towards that I ended up liking.  I have three examples for both types, and I’ll be alternating between negative and positive.  Since I always like ending on a positive, I’ll let the negative examples start the pattern.  Let’s get started!

Mega Man X6

What I Expected

I really, really love the Mega Man X series.  I would consider the first three games to be my favorite trilogy in all of gaming, and the original Mega Man X is one of my favorite games of all time.  The first four X games are my four favorite Mega Man games of any type, and Mega Man X5 is a step down but still a great game that I have played through dozens of times.  So, it should go without saying that I had very high expectations going into Mega Man X6, it looked like just a level pack for MMX5, but I was fine with that.  Two console MMX games in the same year seemed too good to be true, but really, what could go wrong?

mmx6

What Actually Happened

I’m still not sure what the hell happened with Mega Man X6.  MMX6 isn’t a lazy level pack, that would be so much better than what we got.  No, X6 is a train wreck that seems to go out of its way to make as many stupid, frustrating level design choices as possible.  Levels range from the same tedious and frustrating mid-boss fought four times in a row to nightmarish extended dashes to safety as a one hit kill ceiling tries to crush you.  Bosses are just as bad.  Even the story is terrible.  I beat X5, X8, and even the infamous X7 on the day I bought them.  I didn’t force myself to beat X6 until over six months later.  I could tell something was wrong right away, and to this day I don’t understand what happened.  This isn’t the result of greed and laziness, it’s a calculated attempt to twist one of the best gameplay systems there is into a horrible parody of itself.

Doom (1993)

What I Expected

I am a console gamer, I have been ever since I stopped being forced to subsist on Hi-Tech PC games, and I always will be.  So, Doom being a PC originating series that only got inferior console ports for most of its existence put up quite barrier to me getting into it.  I wasn’t all that into first person shooters to begin with, so I didn’t feel like I was missing out on much, a mid-90s western PC series didn’t sound like it was going to offer much.  I tried the famously arcade like and over the top Serious Sam games via their console compilation, and enjoyed them.  I decided that it was worth trying the Doom compilation, three games and several expansion packs for around $10 made the risk exceptionally low, so why not?  But I wasn’t expecting that much out of it, especially the original Doom and its very direct sequel.

doom

What Actually Happened

Damn you realism, damn you real guns and human enemies, and damn you every mid-90s magazine dismissing all FPSes as worthless “Doom clones.”  I love old style FPSes.  The varied weapons, the enemies with attacks you can directly dodge, the fast movement and lack of reloading, the creative level design, Doom is everything I wanted in the genre but didn’t know until I played it.  The modern console remasters of Doom and its sequel have everything the PC versions did, and I love them.  Doom and its level pack like sequel are probably my favorite western developed games of the 20th century, and easily my favorite PC originating games of all time.  By extremely good fortune, I got into the series just a bit over a year from the phenomenal DOOM 2016, which I have raved about at length in previous articles.  Doom expanded my horizons in a wonderful way.

Twisted Metal (2012)

What I Expected

I was fascinated by Twisted Metal 2 years before I owned a PlayStation, the characters and concept were very interesting to me and I read all I could about it in game magazines.  My instincts correctly blocked any interest in Twisted Metal 3 and 4, but I eventually got to play TM2 and I liked the gameplay just as much as the characters and concept.  Twisted Metal Black rekindled my interest, even though I once again didn’t have the system it was on when the game was released.  I eventually got it and loved it even more than Twisted Metal 2.  Then the series just disappeared, despite the acclaimed revival.  There was nothing but a decent PSP game for a decade, but then hope came, another reboot of the series.  Not having stories for each car was a big negative, but maybe the unified story mode could make up for it, and the important part was getting more of that signature gameplay, with online I could use!

twistedmetal2012

What Actually Happened

989 rose from the grave and cursed Twisted Metal 2012.  That’s my best guess, anyway.  For one thing, the “real story mode” was actually just three traditional driver stories (previous games had 4-5 times as many, for reference) glued together, ranging from decent to an idiotic pun ending.  But that’s not the worst part.  The controls were extremely slippery and mocked me by putting in the classic style that I wanted to use but making it unplayable with a small change (Human biology trivia: we only have two thumbs.  Do not demand we use both analog sticks and face buttons at the same time).  And the “story” mode put in absolutely atrocious and mandatory checkpoint race missions that the controls made into pure torture.  Assuming this doesn’t kill the series, the next reboot needs to be much, much, MUCH better.

Knack

What I Expected

Knack has been a running joke ever since it was announced alongside the PlayStation 4.  A generic PS1/2-era platformer with a character getting bigger gimmick, this was what Sony chose to showcase their new console!?  Sony giving digital copies away with PS4s and not bothering to tell the people who bought the systems just made the game more of a laughing stock.  While I didn’t think the game looked horrible, it seemed like it focused on mindless combat with minimal platforming.  I had little desire to play it unless I could find it for really cheap, and even then it would mainly be so I could make fun of it while streaming it.  Well, the game was $5 on a PSN Flash Sale, so I jumped on it.  While in my Skype group chat I started the stream, ready to laugh at the infamous Knack.

knack

What Actually Happened

My thoughts upon starting the game were that the controls were actually very good.  Combat was pretty solid, much better than I was expecting and actually a significant challenge on hard mode.  Good enemy variety.  Wow, the levels are really long, and there are a ton of worlds.  I thought, “Maybe people were too harsh on this game, or maybe it all goes to repetitive hell soon”.  It didn’t.  The levels and enemies stayed varied throughout the game, the platforming wasn’t too frequent but there was enough to add variety to the combat.  The combat was fast paced and reminded me of classic beat-em-ups, specifically Turtles in Time for some reason (my favorite game in the genre).  Knack… Knack is a hidden gem.  It’s not a masterpiece, but it’s a very solid game that definitely kicks the crap out of PS4’s other 2013 and 2014 exclusives.  I’m genuinely anticipating Knack 2, which looks like a significant improvement on what turned out to be a solid foundation.  Give this game a chance: the fact that it’s getting a sequel is a miracle.

Grand Theft Auto III

What I Expected

If you’ve been following my articles, you probably saw this coming a mile away.  But if you haven’t, this is probably a pretty big surprise.  The first two negative example games are hated by most people, but not Grand Theft Auto 3.  This is considered one of the most influential games of all time, it basically started a genre and just look at how much you can do!  Being under 17 and having just recently convinced my parents to let me play M rated games when GTA3 came out in 2001, I decided not to push my luck and ignored it while everyone raved about it.  Years later, I finally picked up the game, my first GTA.  Having heard everyone rave about this game for years and intrigued by the length and scale of the game, I had pretty high hopes when I started.  What could possibly go wrong?

gta3

What Actually Happened

Did you realize that I was referencing Bubsy there?  Now don’t worry, I’m not going to be a hyperbolic hater and say Grand Theft Auto 3 is comparable to Bubsy 3D in quality.

…But it is about as good as the original Bubsy.  Now before you tear into me and I retaliate with my story about how I missed out on a genre I really enjoy for years because everyone insisted GTA was the pinnacle of it (the first good GTA game is Saints Row 2), let me go over everything GTA3 does wrong.  Horrific aiming system, absurdly harsh penalty for dying that means you basically have to load your save every time that happens (and save points are NOT frequent), having to drive back to the start of missions every time you want to try again, needing to track down hidden packages that could be absolutely anywhere in the entire game if you want to mitigate that penalty for dying, this open world game from 2001 not having a freaking MAP.  Trying to actually play this game for any purpose besides mindless chaos is a nightmare, and the game still makes said chaos a pain in the ass to accomplish.  The consequences for dying or being arrested being so harsh goes completely against the “freedom” this game supposedly gave players.  And while future GTAs would fix some of the problems from this game, several gigantic ones stayed around until Grand Theft Auto V in 2013, the first game in the series I actually like.  And it would have been so easy to fix these problems (the HD remaster of San Andreas fixes enough to make it enjoyable), but no one seemed to care about them in any way until Grand Theft Auto IV’s fan backlash.  Sorry, but I think GTA3 is a genuinely bad game and probably the most overrated of all time.

Tetris Attack

What I Expected

Puzzle games seemed inherently boring to me when I was new to gaming.  Doing nothing in a game but rearranging blocks seemed completely pointless.  I was aware of Tetris because everyone on the planet is, but I had no desire to play it, similar games, or games that I would later discover only had its name slapped on them for a marketing gimmick (you know, we’d probably have this game on Virtual Console if it was called Yoshi’s Puzzle League).  I never would have chosen to play Tetris Attack, but Blockbuster had a promotion where renting it came with a free other game rental of your choice, so there was no reason not to rent it.  And since I had the cart, why not give it a quick chance?  But aside from the Yoshi’s Island setting, I wasn’t expecting to really enjoy anything in the game, it would probably be a more colorful Wordtris.

tetrisattack

What Actually Happened

Literally the second I started playing I loved it.  I could go on about why Tetris Attack is the best puzzle game of all time, going into how the mechanics fix a massive flaw inherent to almost every other competitive puzzle game, but that wasn’t what I was thinking when I played the game the first time.  The intuitive and addictive base gameplay is what drew me in when I thought I hated puzzle games.  The competitive mode gave things a fighting game feel that I loved.  There was just something so inherently satisfying about the game, I don’t remember exactly what I identified it as on that day over 20 years ago, but I know my love was instantaneous.  My horizons were expanded that day, and Tetris Attack has remained one of my favorite games on my favorite system without ever wavering.  That moment where a game connects with you instantly and against all your expectations is something that can’t be fully recreated at both my age where I have played so many games, and in the age we live in where you can easily watch videos and read all you want about every game before you play it.  There’s a magic in my first encounter with Tetris Attack that I will always remember.

So, there you have it, six games that flipped my perception of them upside down within the first play session.  Aside from my personal reminiscing, the takeaway from this article I want everyone to have is that you can’t really know what a game is like until you play it.  Even with games where my expectations weren’t so radically shattered, nothing except ruining the game by watching a full playthrough can really let you know what a game is like before you play it.  Always be prepared going into a game, it might be a tragic disappointment, but it could also be a magical moment or great surprise that you never saw coming.

 

Lots of Red, No White but Blue

Hello. This is Dari.  I am starting a new series called “Dari-Isms.”  This is going to try to explain the inner machinations of my mind, which apparently a lot of people don’t understand.  Most of these are going to be about gaming, but I may throw some other opinion pieces in, if people want to hear them. Today I’m gonna talk about some of my favorite and least favorite Capcom “mascots” of yesteryear. I am mainly going to talk about Ryu and Ken (of Street Fighter) and Zero and Megaman X (of Megaman X).

Let’s start with Ryu. Ryu is the mascot and the face of Street Fighter. He is most likely the first person anyone thinks of when they think of fighting games in general, not just Street Fighter. This is one of the reasons I hate him. He’s a very boring character. And his moveset, while copied and done better by most of the other characters that share his moveset, is also quite plain. Ryu himself usually moves like an old man with bad arthritis. He’s so stiff; I wonder how he even fights with any sort of speed! (i.e. crossover games like Marvel vs Capcom.) His Hadoken attack is usually very slow, but powerful. His Shoryuken is again, slow but powerful, and invincible on startup depending on the game, but again, it’s very stiff and can easily be stuffed or even just plain dodged, because it’s easily telegraphed. Ryu’s story is just plain sad. He’s a nomad from Japan who doesn’t have a family who just wanders around trying to get stronger, fight strong opponents and fight the ‘Satsui no Hado’ which can (and has depending on the game/timeline) overtake him and turn him evil, like another one of his counterparts, Akuma. But that’s another story for another time. Ryu is a terrible character. I understand he’s the “entry character” and he’s the base for everyone to learn off, but I feel like they’ve added so many more interesting characters that can take his place, that Ryu really would have, and should have faded into the background. He can still be the face of the series, but he can just be that. He doesn’t need half the popularity he has. He needs to sit down somewhere and stay there for a while. Now, again, he doesn’t need to sit out of a game where Street Fighter characters are prominent, but I mean he needs something to make him interesting.

In contrast, let’s talk about Ken Masters. Ken Masters originally started as the Player 2 alternative for Ryu. But he’s grown so much more since then. Ever since Street Fighter 2, he’s grown so much since being Ryu’s copy. He has fire in his shoryukens, which differentiates him from boring old, stiff Ryu. Also it seems like Ken has more mobility than Ryu ever will. It’s possibly because he’s younger than him.  Ken, I feel focuses more on his kicks than his counterpart. He also seems to have evolved more than his sparring partner. He has a shinryuken attack (in some games and media) that has him doing a strong shoryuken attack covered in a pillar of fire. Ryu cannot do this as far as what’s been shown. Ken also has a shin shoryuken which can hit for 2 or 3 times with his fire shoryuken. Ryu only does it once, but while there’s a lot of power behind it, it’s not as flexible or unique as Ken’s. Ken’s story is also fairly interesting. He has a family, a wife and a son. Some people would say that someone with a family shouldn’t be fighting, but he makes money this way and he also keeps up with his buddy Ryu, and keeps him relevant. So it’s fine. Ken is also an American. He met Ryu while at a tournament. They became friends and sparring partners under Gouken. Ken fights for his family and to be stronger in general. See how much better Ken is than Ryu? This is why I like Ken more than Ryu. They may have started as clones of each other but Ken Masters evolved more as a character than Ryu probably ever will.

Time to switch gears and move on to the two robots. I’ll start with Zero.  Zero is the bane of the Megaman X series in my eyes. He is supposedly the only creation of Megaman X that Keiji Inafune made. He wanted him in the beginning of the Megaman X series to be the star, but Capcom told him no. He decided to make him the star anyway. He had to save Megaman X in every game. If he wasn’t trying to save him, X himself was trying to rebuild him because he felt like he needed his friend back to save the world. I find this demoralizing to X and it made him seem like he was trying to steal the main character’s thunder. I find this extremely rude. Zero was so prominent in the grand scheme of things, that Megaman X was an unlockable character in his own game over him! Megaman X8 was the last game in the series. The Character who has been most prominent of the few times that Megaman X was represented was Zero. X appeared in the Project X Zone games, but those games weren’t as popular. Zero was in Tatsunoko vs Capcom, Ultimate Marvel vs Capcom 3 and a few other games. Megaman Zero even got his own very successful series of its own right, even using X as a boss. I find that demeaning but Capcom did what they wanted so I cannot fault them for what gave them a bunch of money in the end, even if they wouldn’t give X a chance.  I feel like Zero was made to steal the thunder of X and make him obsolete in comparison. They succeeded a bit too well. There are some fans who still care about X and remember who he is. These people are the only people who keep X’s spirit alive. And thanks to that X finally appears in a popular game again, Marvel vs Capcom Infinite. The rumors say that X will be very prominent in the story and he was the first character shown, aside Ryu. My personal opinion is that Zero shouldn’t appear in this and let X have his own shine, as he’s never allowed him to do so in his own series besides then. All Zero did was take over someone else’s series, kill it and then get his own series to succeed, to leave the character he stepped on in the dust.

Finally, we’ll talk about X. Megaman X is the Megaman who took over for Megaman Classic in his own series. X is a really good character that’s underestimated. He’s very powerful, yet he also wants peace. Gamers don’t like this aspect of him, even if Megaman Classic had the same attitude, and he was praised for it. Megaman was sadly overshadowed for Zero. And Zero went out of his way to kill his character and his series. Megaman X was a good character, but most people didn’t like him over his counterpart. He had powerful armors and he was great when he did battle. I feel like X needs more recognition and respect. He was unlockable in one of his own games where his name was still prominent in the title! He is a Megaman and he seems to be either bad luck or a curse upon anything he’s been in recently. I still enjoy Megaman X over Zero because he’s the underdog and even though he’s the main character, some people don’t acknowledge him, or will give him its due respect.

In summation, I like Ken Masters because he’s a great evolution of what was literally a palette swap of Ryu, who is a boring nomad who’s trying to control his evil. I enjoy X because he’s disrespected even though he’s the main character. I hate Zero because he stole the show from Megaman X and killed the entire series to spite X. He also apparently took over the entire representation of the series for some odd reason.  Not to say I hate all second fiddles to Capcom games, Protoman was good because he knew his place. He was a second fiddle to Megaman Classic,  but he didn’t outshine his Megaman, and he was still popular in the long run. I wish Zero could have taken this precedent, but sadly he didn’t.

Of Axioms and Idioms: A Breath of Fresh Err

Well, I said I had a second topic in this series and I’m going to use it. Welcome to another entry in “Of Axioms and Idioms” – the series where I detail some of my more less-specific opinions when it comes to video games. Last time, I detailed how playing later games in a series retroactively ruined their predecessors if I’m not familiar with them in the first place. While this seems obvious in hindsight (sequels are supposed to improve upon previous iterations in the series), it is one of those issues that seems to plague me on a wider scale – not merely effecting how I see series of games, but rather entire sub-genres.

Today’s topic is a little more complex and probably more rigid than the previous entry. When it comes to “bad games” in a series – that is, the ones that are generally considered the worst of their series – I’m generally more forgiving of them the more they deviate from their franchise’s standard formula. Quite simply put, if a game is experimental and bad, I’m far more likely to accept its shortcomings and look upon the game more favorably compared to games that are just a shallow and/or flawed recreation of the series’ pinnacle.

The two games that inspired this article were the fourth and fifth games in the Ys series, both released on the Super Famicom. While Ys IV: The Dawn of Ys for the PC Engine is generally considered among the best games in the entire series, the Super Famicom’s Mask of the Sun was developed by Tonkin House – who previously handled the SNES port of Wanderers of Ys, which is generally considered the worst of the fourth-generation console ports. Both games had similar design philosophies: taking inspiration from the first two Ys games. However, the SFC version took more inspiration from the earlier PC releases of those games, which required significantly more precision when landing attacks. This didn’t translate that well given both the Super Famicom’s simpler control scheme and the comparatively more forgiving Ys: Books I & II, which predated Mask of the Sun by almost 4 years. This led the SFC version of Ys IV to be considered among the worst games in the series.

Its sequel, Ys V: Kefin, Lost City of Sand, didn’t fare much better in terms of reception. Discarding the traditional “run-and-bump” gameplay that the series popularized in favor of a more traditional “hack-and-slash” attack mechanic common to action RPGs, Ys V was a significant departure from its predecessors’ established formula – much like the aforementioned Ys III. However, unlike Ys III, this game would have a much more permanent effect on the series – with future games adopting the more standard attacks system, though handling it much better. Ys V’s controls were terrible – Adol’s slashes felt less responsive than those from the original Legend of Zelda in 1986. The jumping mechanics were awkward and worst of all, different sword upgrades would change the style of Adol’s attack: a horizontal slash or a “stab” (though, I thought it looked more like a “poke”) with more forward range. Throw in a magic system that’s essentially useless and you’ve got Kefin in a nutshell. Due to the lack of any other releases, Ys V is generally considered the worst game in the entire franchise – but due to the lack of any companion titles or remakes, it’s kind of an unfair comparison.

Honestly, at first glance, I would probably say that it’s hard to determine which of these two games is worse overall. They’re both essentially blights on their franchise – but neither game really did that much damage to the overall reputation of Ys. Looking back though, I’d probably say that I may have enjoyed Ys V slightly more and my reasoning is simple. Mask of the Sun attempted to recreate gameplay I had seen earlier, but was less competent in the process. It effectively tried and failed to achieve the same level of quality from a previous iteration in its franchise, which gave it no reason to exist. Ys V, for all its flaws, at least attempted something new for the franchise. It may have also have failed miserably, but it tweaked the series’ formula and tried something new. Ys IV had a blueprint for success: its counterpart on the PC Engine proves that. Ys V had no plan, no established formula to follow. While its experiments failed miserably, they led to further games and better titles down the line.

My next example may be a little controversial, as pretty much no one considers one of these games bad anymore. However, for quite some time, it was considered fashionable to bash the Western version of Super Mario Bros. 2 (known as Super Mario USA in Japan) for not being the “true” Mario 2. This title belonged instead to Japan’s Super Mario Bros. 2 (known as Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels elsewhere). The latter is essentially a level pack, with insane stage designs that far exceeded what was possible with the original’s controls left intact. I’d go so far as to say that it’s essentially just a less-playable version of the first Super Mario Brothers. Meanwhile, Super Mario USA was an improved reskin of a Fuji TV collaboration game known as Doki Doki Panic. I know, everyone knows that old story. What’s more interesting, however, was the later reveal that Doki Doki Panic was based on a scrapped Mario prototype that focused more on vertical platforming. So, in the end, Super Mario USA could be considered more of a Mario 2 than the “official” Lost Levels.

Another example is a bit odd: the sixth and seventh games in the MegaMan X series. Let me make myself perfectly clear: I completely despise MegaMan X6. It’s probably the worst MegaMan game Capcom ever made in-house. While X7 seems to be considered a worse game overall, it at least had the excuse of attempting to recreate the classic action of the MegaMan platformers in 3D. It’s hard to argue that it failed in this regard. X6, on the other hand, had absolutely no excuse to be as terrible as it was. It was built using the engine of my favorite game in that entire sub-series (MegaMan X4). X5 may have been a downgrade from its predecessor, but X6 crashed and burned. Terrible level design, unbalanced boss fights, the addition of X’s awkward Z-saber attack, the ability to get completely trapped in an area if you lack the right power-up – the only redeeming factor was probably the soundtrack!

There are even cases where swapping genres can work out well for a series. Take, for example, Double Dragon. After the disappointing Sacred Stones, Super Double Dragon was an attempt to recreate the magic of the first two games. While the SNES had a legendary amount of quality beat-‘em-ups, Super Double Dragon not only failed to stand out among its contemporaries, but even faltered in comparison to its predecessors. Conversely, when Technos Japan attempted to make a Double Dragon fighting game for SNK’s NeoGeo platform, it turned out well: despite the sheer amount of competition in that genre on NeoGeo, “Double Dragon” would do so well that it eventually received a spiritual sequel, Rage of the Dragons. Of course, Tradewest – Double Dragon’s publisher in North America – attempted their own fighting game earlier – Double Dragon V: The Shadow Falls. The less said about that one, the better.

This even applies to games that are generally considered dead-ends. While I liked both the NES Zeldas more than I expected upon playing them, I think I had a slight preference for Zelda II. Frankly, I’m almost certain that that’s because the original Zelda presented itself as a more primitive version of the other 2D games in the series, while Zelda II was strikingly different. Zelda II was effectively a side-scrolling action RPG, compared to the top-down adventure formula that most of the early games in the series encapsulated, and that difference made it stick out a bit more in my mind. The same could be said for Ys III: Wanderers from Ys – to the extent where I constantly compared Zelda II and Ys III while playing both. It doesn’t hurt that they were considered evolutionary dead-ends in their respective series – and by extension, inherently terrible – but to me, they were simply interesting deviations. Even more ironically, both games were followed by what was generally considered the early masterpieces of their respective series: A Link to the Past and The Dawn of Ys, respectively.

Unlike my “Bayonetta May Cry” axioms, there’s a method to my madness. If a successful formula has already been established for a series, ruining it with a mediocre follow-up that attempts to hit the same note should be impossible. Let me be clear: I’m not talking about games that simply don’t live up to their predecessors and are lambasted as retreads. I’m talking about games in existing series that attempt to recreate their established formula and fail miserably. The MegaMan games for DOS are a perfect example – they were intended to resemble the popular NES games, but failed on pretty much every level. When a series’ formula has been established, there’s a blueprint for success. If the game deviates from that formula in a meaningful way – by changing core mechanics or even switching genres, there’s at least an excuse for a piss-poor final product. There’s just no excuse if a company’s creating a copy-paste of a previous title and manages to create something objectively inferior to what came before.

There’s a corollary here as well. Bad games using established formulas can be toxic to long-running series: there’s always the chance that it won’t simply be considered a bad game, but rather the formula itself has gotten stale and repetitive. On the other hand, development mishaps in a title that deviates from the norm can yield better results down the line. The aforementioned Ys V is a perfect example of this – the following games in the series also utilized “hack and slash” and platforming elements and improved vastly over their SFC predecessor, essentially creating a new trilogy of games that are arguably better than even The Dawn of Ys.

Of course, judging whether something is a bad game or if the entire formula has gotten stale gets harder to judge when there’s a generational gap between games. It’s relatively easy to tell if a game is legitimately worse than its predecessor if they were released during the same generation, especially if they’re both on the same system. Comparing an NES game to its sequel on PS4 makes it hard to determine whether the game suffered from being recreated imperfectly or if the original game itself was simply considered good for nostalgic reasons. Obviously, there’s a chance that the formula itself could just become inherently stale and in need of alteration or outright rejection for the series to survive. Of course, this would have little effect on the quality of the original game itself – it’s a simple case of diminishing returns, nothing uncommon when it comes to video games in general.

In the end, I guess it’s a matter of taste. For some people, deviating from an established formula is essentially considered betrayal of what made that particular series great in the first place. I can respect that difference in opinion, but I believe that at the very least failing in an entirely new way is, at the very least, more interesting than watching someone incompetently recreate a game I liked. More importantly, what do you think? Do you agree that failing in a different way is at least more interesting than second-rate reruns? Are established formulas the key to success? Feel free to sound off in the comments below.

 

The Year Without a PC Port Wishlist

Christmas has pretty much always been my favorite holiday, especially when I was a child. I was a greedy little boy while I was growing up: one of my favorite holiday traditions was always writing up my list to Santa on my computer. Sure, some years I’d get overzealous and start thinking about it as early as August, but I’d always have a lot of fun just writing the list itself. I’d always try to sort things in the order I wanted them, but that was actually part of the fun for me: one week I’d really want some action figures, the next some new video game caught my eye. The downside to starting a list that early is that as time goes on, new items catch your eye. Even the greed of a child has its limits, so I would often have to pare down my list, trimming the items I could “do without”. (Gotta love child logic, am I right?) In a sense, I think those PC ports lists I wrote for a long time were the evolution of that favored Yule tradition, but eventually I got tired of doing them. Too much wishing, not enough getting. I’ve taken a hiatus on them and now, it’s been over a year. Instead of making an entirely new one, why not look over my previous works and analyze them a little? This year, I’ll be recounting my 5 favorite success stories, my top 10 most wanted and the game on each list I’d consider the most important (excluding those on the aforementioned lists) plus a brand-new one for good measure!

Before we get started (fittingly enough, with my favorite success stories), I’d like to start with some recent successes as well. Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 was released on PS4 earlier this month and it will also be hitting both the Xbox One and Steam in March. Meanwhile, Garou: Mark of the Wolves was also recently released on PlayStation consoles via CodeMystics, but surprise, surprise: an entirely different port hit Steam soon after, from the good folks at DotEmu. In fact, it was such a surprise, I actually had to change a list entry because of it. The DotEmu port is less fancy than the CodeMystics port, but apparently, not only does the Steam version have a more solid netcode, but it’s also getting immediate bugfixes to iron out some of its bizarre glitches. Funny how that works. I expected that to be the last bit of news I got on the PC end of things, but I was wrong: The Legend of Dark Witch 2, another game I’d been salivating over the prospect of seeing a PC port is announced to be hitting Steam sometime during “Q4 2016”. One last big surprise for me.

You’ll also remember that this past April, I did an “April Fools’ Day” article, revolving around 10 PC games I’d like to see receive console ports. Well, like many of my jokes, this one ended up biting me in the ass. During the PlayStation Experience, Ys Origin (the only PC-exclusive Ys game) was announced to be hitting both PlayStation 4 and, amazingly enough, the Vita on February 21, 2017 with the port being handled by the good people over at DotEmu who are utilizing XSEED’s English translation and coming up with original French, Italian, German and Spanish translations as well. (As an aside, DotEmu’s also bringing a favorite of mine – the NeoGeo classic Windjammers – to the same platforms. Let’s keep our fingers crossed for a PC port down the line!) You’d think that would be enough, but the world wasn’t done having fun at my expense: soon after, it was revealed that the indie platformer Kero Blaster would also be coming to the PS4, thanks to its publisher Playism. They’ll also be bringing Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight to PS4, though release windows for both titles have not been announced. Continue reading

Spinoff Sideshow: The Zelda of Legend

I don’t know why, but it seems like I have this tendency to start new series on Retronaissance, and despite my efforts to continue them, it just never seems to pan out for me. At best, it seems like I just come up with new series that seem like new takes on older ones, almost like a spinoff. With that awkward segue, I bring you yet another series, which hopefully won’t meet the same fate as those others: Spinoff Sideshow – where I will be detailing potential spinoffs for existing video game franchises that just strike me as interesting.

Video games are one of those rare mediums where sequels generally have the potential to exceed their predecessors. Likewise, they have a tendency to be the rare genre where spinoffs can truly deliver a unique experience, as opposed to just being the same ol’-same ‘ol in a new locale or a weak vehicle for the breakout character of an existing property. Throughout my time gaming, I’ve seen my fair share of interesting spinoffs – games that do more than just regurgitate the standard formula and slap a new character on the front (granted, some of those are pretty good, like UmJammer Lammy or MegaMan & Bass). However, I personally prefer to see games that feel like a totally new experience, merely using the existing intellectual properties to make the sale. I’m talking about games like Luigi’s Mansion, The Misadventures of Tron Bonne, Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance and Mortal Kombat: Shaolin Monks.

Our inaugural topic for this series? Well, people have been asking for an official Zelda-led Zelda title for quite some time now. Zelda’s playable appearance in Hyrule Warriors managed to stoke the flames of demand for that one and even Eiji Aonuma, current producer of the Zelda franchise, has expressed interest in such a title. I’ve seen some fan proposals for a game across the internet, most prominently one that turns my stomach by reducing Zelda to a gender-and-palette-swapped Link, stripping the character of her unique properties. Personally, I think I can do better than the others.

First of all, let’s consider the name. Since most people associate Link with the “Legend of Zelda” game, I’d avoid using it. Personally, I’d probably go for “Hyrule Historia” or “Legend of Hyrule”. Though if you want to make sure that Zelda’s name is in the title, we could go with “The Zelda of Legend”. I mean, it’s clever in a not-really clever way. I would personally go for a Hyrule-related name personally.

Now onto the real meat of this spinoff, the gameplay. The basic concept is simple – think of a traditional Zelda game with less of an emphasis on melee combat, focusing instead on slower, ranged combat and stealth. Obviously, the puzzles would also be kept, but Zelda would have a completely different moveset when compared to Link. While Link mostly utilizes on his Master Sword for combat, Zelda would instead mainly use light arrows (which are commonly associated with her) and other forms of magic. After all, we’ve seen Zelda cast various magic spells when acting as an NPC and in playable appearances in other games, such as Hyrule Warriors and especially the Super Smash Bros. games. For example, I could see using her Naryu’s Love attack from Smash to reflect projectiles back at enemies (a common strategy for taking down Zelda bosses) and Din’s Fire could be a potential replacement for bombs and the lantern.

My consideration for the most important aspect of Zelda’s arsenal is something that should be familiar to Zelda aficionados: transformations. After all, Zelda’s had more than her fair share of disguises in previous games, most of which gave her access to brand new powers and abilities. Now, the following examples are just that – examples – but hopefully, they’ll still provide some context. First, there’s the obvious pick, Zelda’s most famous alter-ego: Sheik, the stealthy Sheikah warrior. When disguised as Sheik, Zelda’s stealth abilities would increase and she’d be given access to new attacks. Another form that comes to mind would be Tetra from The Wind Waker, which would allow for direct melee combat, perhaps replacing magical skill for the cutlass and pistol she wielded in Hyrule Warriors Legends. The last concept I had for a transformation would be a monster transformation, not unlike how Zelda possessed a Phantom in Spirit Tracks. This ability would be entirely defensive, unable to attack, but in return, Zelda would be able to walk through dungeons without being attacked by monsters, even gaining the ability to talk to them not unlike the Power of Alter from Ys II, effectively adding a new dimension to the stealth gameplay I mentioned before – hiding in plain sight. This “Phantom” form would also be large, thus able to move certain objects, making it indispensable when it comes to solving specific puzzles.

As I said earlier, puzzles would be a key element for this game, to the extent where there would even be ways to obtain specific items or defeat enemies with little problem by utilizing certain items to solve puzzles. Likewise, the magic and transformations I mentioned earlier would count as dungeon items. Better yet, a Zelda-led spinoff could be the perfect opportunity to experiment with the standard Zelda items, modifying them to some extent. One of the ideas I came up with would be replacing the various effects of the Ocarina/Harp and various rods in the game with minor spells that could be found throughout the overworld map and dungeons, imbuing Zelda with control over fire and ice, the ability to fling herself into the air and to warp to various locations. Another idea would be to bring back old items that haven’t resurfaced in Zelda games in quite some time, like the Cane of Somaria, the Roc’s Cape or the Magnetic Gloves. Zelda could also utilize standard items in unique ways – for example, placing the Mirror Shield would allow Zelda to set up angled shots for her Light Arrows to hit a specific target placed at an angle she couldn’t hit directly. Finally, while I would like to keep Zelda’s standard form’s ability for melee combat limited to distinguish her from Link, I would also like to see the Rapier from Hyrule Warriors emerge in the game at some point, likely as a very-late game item, possibly even in the final dungeon.

Of course, one of the more important elements of the Zelda series with regards to its fanbase has been the story. I’d pretty much leave this blank for the most part, but in spite of the focus that has been placed upon the Zelda timelines, I feel like the stories work best when they come up with the storyline first and try to place in within the timeline later, as opposed to just trying to work a game into a specific point in a specific timeline. I guess this could be in the Adult Link timeline, you know, the one where the Hero of Time disappears? That’s my best guess off the top of my head.

I guess there are still two elephants in the room: what to do with Zelda’s most commonly recurring co-stars – Link and Ganon(dorf). I’m of two minds about Link. On one hand, leaving him out would probably be a far more suitable situation for Zelda taking charge in her own adventure. Likewise, this would also likely cement my suggestion for setting the game in “The Era Without a Hero”. On the other hand, it might be interesting to see Zelda react to a standard incarnation of Link, perhaps she could view him as her rival – not wanting to fall into the traditional role of damsel in distress her eponymous ancestors commonly fell into and instead choosing to save Hyrule all on her own. As for Ganondorf, personally, I wouldn’t mind seeing a different final villain, especially one that could be original to Zelda’s story. Unfortunately, there’s the argument that could be made that saddling Zelda with anyone besides the Great King of Evil, pig demon or not, would likely delegitimize her adventures. I’d consider this a shame, but I can see the argument for making Ganon(dorf) the big bad.

As for the game’s style, for some reason I’ve always pictured this game as more of a 3D game, as you may have been able to guess by my write-up. Having said that, a 2D game could be interesting as well, though aside from A Link Between Worlds, those games have a reputation for being low-rate handheld titles when compared to the 3D games that commonly originate on consoles. Regarding a second quest, I mean that’s a Zelda staple, so it seems like it would be a perfect choice. Instead of just making it a mirrored hard mode, however, I’d like to see an alternate playable character. My personal pick would be Impa, though I’m sure there could be other worthy characters. Having said that, being a Zelda-centered game would be a good excuse to throw in a little fanservice – I know what you’re thinking I mean, but you’re wrong. I mean Nintendo should make the effort to throw in some popular side characters from earlier games into the setting of Zelda’s adventure, whether in the form of identical descendants/ancestors or just extremely similar counterparts.

I’ve always considered the idea of a Zelda-led game to be more interesting than the common request to just “make Link a girl”, due to the simple fact that Zelda’s unique ability set would lead to a far more interesting game in the interest of “promoting diversity” than simply giving Link a pair of X chromosomes ever could. I’ll be honest, the latter always struck me as lazy pandering. Hopefully, Nintendo decides to do a Zelda-led game at some point in the future, either as a fully-featured console title or even as an eShop pilot title which could lead to a full-fledged expansion in the future.

10 Games I’d Like to See Re-Released #2: Capcom

I know I haven’t written one of these since July, but I’ve been meaning to go back to it for some time now. In fact, part of the reason I had such a long hiatus in the first place was because the only thing I felt I could write was another one of these listicles, but I considered it in poor taste to do another one right after the first without anything to break up the monotony. So after kicking out two totally different articles last month, it’s time to climb back into the wishlist game. It isn’t pretty and it’s definitely self-serving, but hey, at this point, this is pretty much my blog. So what I say goes, right? I say it’s time to start begging for some more re-releases.

Once again, let’s go over the rules of these articles. First of all, I’m going to be looking at games from the 6th generation (that is, PlayStation 2, Gamecube and the original Xbox) and earlier. I’ve decided to focus on one company for each article, sticking to the North American regions (So don’t comment that something on these lists got re-released in Japan. I honestly don’t care.) I’ll also be discussing any potential improvements that could be made to these games, in cases where the games themselves would receive an HD re-release. To make things reasonable, I’ll also be avoiding games that saw re-releases on 7th generation and later consoles, via PlayStation Classics, Virtual Console or anything like that. Sure, more substantial re-releases than Sony’s and Nintendo’s emulations would be preferred, but it’s better than nothing.

This time, we’ll be looking at another one of my favorite companies of old. If the title didn’t give it away, we’ll be looking at Capcom. Surprisingly, Capcom’s actually done a pretty good job on the re-release front: we’ve even got an HD version of Resident Evil Zero coming up early next year. Sure, some of their stuff came off as lazy (I’m still kinda bummed that I had to leave all of the Street Fighter Alpha games, just because Capcom put out their inferior ports as PSone Classics, so they are technically available), but for the most part, they’ve done a pretty good job. It actually took me some time to come up with 10 games to put on this list, but I still managed it.

Red Earth (Arcade)

Number one on this list has been a long time coming. It’s the only game released on the Capcom Play-System 3 arcade hardware that didn’t receive a home port in any way, shape or form. Red Earth (or Warzard, as it’s known in Japan) was actually a pretty interesting take on the fighting game genre. Sure, it had the traditional 2-player versus mode, but the real unique part of the game was the single-player quest mode, which was a fairly robust story mode for a fighting game made in 1996. Each character has alternate endings based on various choices made in-game, not unlike Killer Instinct 2. The gameplay was interesting as well, mixing a well-designed Capcom fighting engine with various RPG elements such as the ability to level up your characters, which enhanced their abilities and even allowed them to learn new attacks. Characters could also obtain various items, including meals to replenish HP and elemental orbs that can be used to attack enemies. Red Earth even had a password system akin to that of Midway’s Gauntlet games from the mid-to-late 90s, allowing players to maintain their character’s progress, both in story and experience. Alas, the game’s been lost to the ages for the most part. Best we’ve seen were cameos in Pocket Fighter, SNK vs. Capcom: CHAOS and Capcom Fighting Evolution and a long-standing fan sentiment to fold Red Earth into the Darkstalkers universe.

Potential Improvements: Give this sucker the Darkstalkers Resurrection treatment. Filters, GGPO Netcode, unlockable art gallery, in-game achievements in addition to the standard ones, the works. Replacing the arcade original’s password system with a save function with several slots is the only real major change I’d make to the game’s base functionality. The only real problem would be choosing a game to go with it, but I’d honestly be willing to shell out $10-15 for an arcade-perfect port of Red Earth alone if it came with features like some of Capcom’s earlier re-releases.

Battle Circuit (Arcade)

Perhaps the most underrated of Capcom’s forays into the beat-‘em-up genre (I was always partial to Alien vs. Predator myself), Battle Circuit is basically a spiritual successor to Captain Commando with a much more robust engine, utilizing the same science fiction themes. Players can choose between 5 characters: Cyber Blue, a cyborg bounty hunter; Yellow Iris, an alien catgirl; Alien Green, a bipedal carnivorous plant; Pink Ostrich, exactly what it says on the tin & Captain Silver, a bounty hunter with a stretchy body and ice powers. The game also has beautiful 2D graphics, a comedic storyline and even the ability to purchase upgrades with collectable in-game currency, which can even be retained if you switch characters. You can buy things like upgrades to existing moves, brand new special moves, longer health meters and the ability to buy additional power-up stocks.

Potential Improvements: Give it the same treatment as Final Fight: Double Impact or Dungeons & Dragons: Chronicles of Mystara. You know the drill: unlockables, GGPO drop-in/drop-out multiplayer, in-game achivements, Best of all, it’s even got a perfect companion game: Captain Commando. Then you’ve got a perfect Capcom sci-fi beat-‘em-up duology.

Project Justice (Arcade/Dreamcast)

Probably what I’d consider Capcom’s best attempt at a traditional 3D fighting game, Project Justice was the sequel to the cult classic Rival Schools: United by Fate. It improved on its predecessor in many ways while maintaining the original’s unique take on tag-team combat. Teams were expanded from 2 to 3 characters, allowing for an additional element of strategy with regards to both the game’s allowance of switching characters between rounds and when planning Team-Up Attacks (since you have 2 choices offered to you on a team instead of 1), as well as a new maneuver known as the “Party Up” technique, which involved all 3 party members.

Potential Improvements: Package both Project Justice and Rival Schools together and give them the Darkstalkers Resurrection treatment with solid netcode, unlockable art galleries and the in-game achievements system. At bare minimum, I’d be willing to accept a bare-bones re-release of the first game on the North American PlayStation Network, it’s already out in Japan.

Ring of Destruction – Slam Masters II (Arcade)

You’re probably sensing a pattern by now, and it’s no accident: many of the games on my list never received home ports in any way, shape or form, so re-releases are a good chance to make up for lost time. Case in point, here’s another game, Capcom’s second (and as of yet, final) foray into pro wrestling video games. Ring of Destruction played even more like Capcom’s standard fighting games than the original Slam Masters: unlike the original, opponents could only be defeated by depleting their health, the game didn’t utilize the wrestling setting as much as Saturday Night Slam Masters and the gameplay focused more of Street Fighteresque special moves over the original’s more traditional wrestling grabs. In spite of that, Ring of Destruction was still a well-designed fighting game, even if it abandoned most of what made the original Slam Masters so unique.

Potential Improvements: Same as the last three: GGPO netcode, unlockable art gallery and in-game achievements. The question is what the pack-in title should be. The original Saturday Night Slam Masters seems like an obvious choice, but frankly, I’d prefer the Japan-exclusive enhancement, Muscle Bomber Duo, which allowed for 2-on-2, 4-player action. Better yet, they could include all 3 for a complete package.

Viewtiful Joe 1 & 2 (Gamecube/PlayStation 2)

These two just baffle me. You’d think at least one of the Viewtiful Joe games would’ve been released as a PS2 Classic by now. The original Viewtiful Joe is my favorite of the so-called “Capcom Five”, the five games Capcom promised as Gamecube exclusives (but didn’t quite work out that way, for the most part). In the Viewtiful Joe games, you take control of Joe, a movie fanatic who gets sucked into the colorful Movieland and gains reality-warping superpowers as his alter ego, Viewtiful Joe (natch). Both games were cult classics and fans of the series still hold out hope for a true sequel: there was a spin-off game for the Nintendo DS and a Smash Bros.-clone based on the anime for the GameCube and PSP.

Potential Improvements: Give it the Okami HD treatment. Just upscale the graphics so that they don’t look blurry or pixelated on modern platforms with larger screen resolutions. Achievements would be a nice addition to both games, but not a necessity. Bundling both games into a combo pack would be ideal, but I’d be willing to buy each game separately.

MegaMan Legends 2 (PlayStation)

This one shouldn’t really come as a surprise to anyone. Fans were shocked when The Misadventures of Tron Bonne hit the North American PSN and surprised when the original MegaMan Legends hit as well. Now it’s time to finish the slate of re-releases. Rumors abounded that this game was already being primed for a re-release on PSN, but it turns out that the listing found was an old one marked “Disc Only”, so no confirmation as of yet.

Potential Improvements: Honestly, I’ve got nothing here. Frankly, this is probably the one case where I’d prefer this game be re-released unaltered as a PS1 Classic. HD ports would be appreciated, but without the other 2 games in the series, it seems rather pointless.

Cannon Spike (Arcade/Dreamcast)

Probably the most unorthodox game on this list, Cannon Spike was an interesting niche title released by Capcom late into the Dreamcast’s lifespan. Cannon Spike was effectively a beat-‘em-up/shoot-‘em-up hybrid where players were able to take control of such classic Capcom characters as Cammy White and Charlie Nash from Street Fighter, B.B. Hood from Darkstalkers, Arthur from Ghosts ‘n Goblins and even Mega Man.

Potential Improvements: I’d definitely want enhanced graphics, simply for the sake of the higher resolutions found on modern consoles. Another addition I’d love to see would love to have would be online multiplayer. This would likely require a fair amount of work compared to Capcom’s usual remasters, mainly due to most of them utilizing the existing GGPO middleware, which was mostly designed for 2D fighting games.

19XX: The War Against Destiny/1944: The Loop Master (Arcade)

This one was honestly kind of a toss-up. I decided to look into which classic games in what I call the “19XX” series hadn’t received a proper re-release recently and these were the only two games that fit the bill. The 19XX games were effectively Capcom’s premier entries in the shoot-‘em-up genre and it’s a shame that the last two games from the arcade era have never really received their due attention in terms of home ports.

Potential Improvements: Ideally, I’d like for them to bundle these two games together with 1941: Counter Attack, a game last seen re-released on the PSP. After all, the other 19XX games have been re-released in the compilation Capcom Arcade Cabinet. Include online play, the in-game achievements system we’ve seen in other Capcom remasters and unlockable art and sound galleries.

Killer7 (Gamecube/PlayStation 2)

I’m actually kind of surprised that Capcom holds the rights to this one, but if they’re the ones making it impossible for Grasshopper Manufacture to make a sequel, then they’re probably within their rights to make with a re-release. Killer7 was a cult classic during the sixth generation and propelled Suda51 to the limelight he enjoyed throughout the seventh generation, with such games as the No More Heroes series, Shadows of the Damned, Lollipop Chainsaw and Killer is Dead.

Potential Improvements: I’d ideally like for this one to have an HD makeover, just like Okami did. On the other hand, we could have a Silent Hill HD fiasco on our hands when upscaling the game, due to its unique artstyle. Honestly, I’d welcome a PS2 Classics version, or better yet, a Virtual Console re-release if Nintendo ever decides to add GameCube to their repertoire.

Onimusha: Dawn of Dreams (PlayStation 2)

Now I know what you’re probably thinking: Onimusha: Dawn of Dreams is generally considered the weakest game in the entire franchise. Let’s face facts, it’s also the only one that has at least a snowflake’s chance in Hell of getting a re-release due to the lack of legal hoops due to likeness rights and all that good stuff. So if you’re like me and you want Onimusha 5…or 4…or however you count it, a re-release of this one is probably our best bet.

Potential Improvements: I’d honestly be just fine with a PS2 Classics release on this one. Set the bar low, so we’d be more likely to succeed and show Capcom that there’s still a demand for this series in a more substantial form than an Asia-exclusive browser-based simulation RPG.

A substantially larger amount of honorable mentions this time around: Maximo vs. Army of Zin, Tech Romancer, Cyberbots: Fullmetal Madness and the NES version of Strider. Once again, a fairly good list, but as I said, there are some games that Capcom re-released unsatisfactorily, but since they are still obtainable (albeit not ideally), I’m afraid I had to let them go. Compared to the previous list, I think I had more fun writing this one than the Sega one, just simply because it was harder to find games that fulfilled my own criteria. I do love a good hunt.

Repressious Memories – Mega Man (DOS)

So admittedly, there has been a bit of a hiatus lately. The truth is, I’ve recently started a job, back near the end of January. I don’t have nearly as much free time as I used to, so I won’t be updating the site as regularly as I used to. I’m going to aim for doing one blog post for month. Having said that, this is the last episode of the Repressious Memories mini-series. I do have some ideas for some other videos, but I haven’t really clarified how they’re going to work at this point in time. Hopefully, you’ll be seeing more from me on the video front sometime later this year.

As a quick aside, I am currently working on the next entry in the PC ports series which somewhat diverges from the traditional set-up. Hopefully, it will be done by the end of this month.

Abbott and Costello Meet 10 Games I Want Ported to PC

Hello again, readers. I know I kind of missed out on doing an article earlier this month, but I’m hoping to make up for it with this one. Yep, another article about PC ports. That’s not to say that it’s all been gloom and doom: Sega gave a surprise announcement that the original Valkyria Chronicles would be ported to PC earlier this month, with support for 1080p (and higher) resolutions, the capability to run at 60 frames-per-second, remappable controls (keyboard/mouse support too) and all of the previous DLC included in the base package for the low price of $20. Better still, sales of the game have all but exceeded Sega’s expectations, so there’s a distinct possibility that we’ll see even more delayed ports of Sega games hit PC in the coming months. Tekken 7 was recently announced to be running on two different types of arcade cabinets when it launches in Japan, one that makes use of the System 369 board (used for Tag2, matching the PS3’s specs) and their current System ES (a PC-based architecture), which is fueling existing rumors that Tekken 7 will be hitting PC in addition to PS4 and Xbox One. Finally, in response to Xbox One becoming compatible with Microsoft’s upcoming Windows 10, it’s being speculated that there’s a possibility that more XBO exclusives will be making the jump to PC at some point in the future, either as full ports or through some ability to stream the games on PC from the console itself.

Needless to say, it’s been a good couple of months for PC gaming in terms of news. Best of all, at least from my perspective, is that my streak of game requests getting PC ports announced appears to be unstoppable. Just a couple of days ago, it was revealed that H2 Interactive, the Korean publisher that has been handling the re-releases of Arc System Works’ fighters on Steam, is going to be porting Blazblue: Continuum Shift EXTEND to Steam next month.

Once again, it’s time to go over the rules. This is pretty much second nature to anyone who’s read any of my previous lists, and if you haven’t, you totally should. A lot of gems buried in those older lists and it may even answer the question of why certain games I’ve mooned over don’t show up this time around. My lists stick mostly to third-party companies (aside from Microsoft) with a general focus on companies that have recently released games on PC. Games will be taken from the seventh (360/Wii/PS3) and eighth (WiiU/PS4/XBO) generations of video games, as well as handhelds from those eras and mobile games. Games that weren’t system exclusives are preferred. Finally, games from the same series released on the same console can be packaged together on a single list entry. Well, that was relatively painless, now to hit you with some games.

Shantae and the Pirate’s Curse – WayForward (3DS/WiiU)

I’ve always been kind of interested in the Shantae series, ever since I first saw an ad for the first game in magazines back in Junior High. Unfortunately, due to a strange aversion to playing video games out of release order, I was only able to actually play through the entire series this past year. Since Risky’s Revenge is already on Steam and the fourth game’s already has a confirmed PC release (among many other platforms), it seems reasonable to ask that “Shantae 3” get the same treatment after the announced Wii U release. Use the Wii U version and Risky’s Revenge Director’s Cut as a base and it should turn out just fine. Considering Matt Bozon teased the possibility of Pirate’s Curse on other platforms, I’d say there’s a pretty good shot we’ll be seeing it hit Steam’s storefront in the future.

de Blob series – Nordic Games GmbH (Wii/360/PS3)

Recently, Nordic Games announced that they had purchased the rights to THQ’s colorful platformer duology, de Blob. Honestly, I view that as kind of a relief: we never really heard about the franchise’s fate during the sale of THQ’s assets after they went bankrupt. Other titles like Saint’s Row, Company of Heroes and Darksiders all got picked up pretty quickly. Better still, Nordic Games even teased that they were considering working on new entries in the franchise. What better way to gauge interest in the franchise than re-releasing the first two games on other platforms, like PC for example?

Virtua Fighter 5 Final Showdown – Sega (360/PS3)

Well, for starters, this is the third and final game in that Sega PC Ports petition I keep spamming at you. More importantly, it’s a damn good fighting game of the 3D variety, and the PC could definitely use more of those. Considering the fact that Sega’s planning an update to the arcade version (which unfortunately will be removing the game’s online features), there’s proof that the game still has a little more life left in it. Might as well port it to PC and introduce it to an all-new audience.

MegaMan Powered Up/MegaMan: Maverick Hunter X – Capcom (PSP)

In the wake of Valkyria Chronicles’ recent re-release and success on Steam, it seems only fair that I bring up another two games that I feel deserves another shot and a PC port could be the best way to achieve that. Considering the fact that Capcom’s recent releases in the MegaMan series have been re-releases of old games anyway, this would be a much better way of achieving this sort of thing. MegaMan Powered Up is probably one of the best and most necessary video game remakes of all-time. Maverick Hunter X, not as much, but it was definitely an interesting package, especially with the OVA and Vile Mode. Neither game really found its audience, as they were released exclusively on PSP early in its lifespan before it found its audience in any region.

The Legend of Heroes: Gagharv Trilogy  – Nihon Falcom/Bandai Namco (PSP)

Technically, these are actually three games: Prophecy of the Moonlight Witch (the second game released in North America), A Tear of Vermillion  (the second game in the trilogy, but the first released over here) and Song of the Ocean (third game in both respects). One of the few standard turn-based RPGs made by the folks over at Falcom, I found these games somewhat interesting. Unfortunately, due to my personal aversion to using the PSP, I was never able to finish them. Considering the fact that other games in the Legend of Heroes series have been making their way to Steam (the first game in the Trails of the Sky trilogy has already been released on there and the second part is expected to release soon), it seems reasonable to consider a Steam port. I’m not sure if Bandai Namco still owns the rights to these games, but if not, I’m sure XSEED would do an excellent job on porting them, like they did with the Ys games.

Sunset Overdrive – Microsoft Studios/Insomniac Games (XBO)

This one’s pretty obvious, honestly. It’s a bright and colorful third-person shooter with parkour elements and one of the few Xbox One exclusives that makes the system worth owning, at least in my opinion. Of course, having said that, it’s probably unlikely that we’ll see a port of this game to PC for quite some time, at least until the XBO’s library is healthier. Of course, considering the fact that Dead Rising 3 and Ryse: Son of Rome (both proclaimed “exclusives” at launch) eventually made their way to PC, I wouldn’t be surprised if we saw Sunset Overdrive share the same fate a year or two down the line.

Samurai Shodown II – SNK Playmore (360/iOS)

Considering the fact that they’ve been releasing a lot of other games on Steam lately, this one seems like another slam dunk. Regardless, I might as well discuss it. Aside from the King of Fighters games, the Samurai Shodown games are probably SNK’s most popular fighting game franchise, and SS2 is definitely the most popular game in the entire series. Throw in the bonuses and online functionality that we’ve seen in their recent PC Metal Slug releases, give it a similar pricepoint, and I’m sure it’ll sell like hotcakes.

Princess Crown – Atlus/Vanillaware (PSP)

Ever since I first played Muramasa: The Demon Blade on the original Wii, I’ve been somewhat fascinated by the game’s predecessors. After all, Muramasa’s codename during development was “Princess Crown 3”, while Odin Sphere was referred to as “Princess Crown 2”. Unfortunately, Princess Crown itself has never actually been released outside of Japan. Regardless, I’d still like to see it hit North America at some point in the future, specifically on PC, but seeing it hit other platforms would be great as well.

Bangai-O HD: Missile Fury – Treasure (360)

An interesting take on the bullet-hell genre, Bangai-O is a quirky game from Treasure that seems to keep changing every time they release it. The first game was originally made for the Nintendo 64 as a Japanese-exclusive title, but also eventually release in all three major regions on the Dreamcast with enhanced graphics, remixed music and less slowdown. It involved going through stages in an almost platformer-style fashion, while still utilizing typical shmup controls and movement options. The second game, Bangai-O Spirits, was released exclusively on the Nintendo DS, and was more of a puzzle game than anything else, clearing stages with custom weapon loadouts. Missile Fury resembles the original more than Spirits, and the jury’s out on whether it’s a remake of the original or a direct sequel. Regardless, Missile Fury outclasses its predecessors in one significant way: it finally achieves the twin-stick control scheme it’s been aiming for since it was first released on the N64. Either way, it looks hella fun and considering Treasure’s current proclivity to PC re-releases it would be a fine addition to any bullet-hell fan’s Steam library.

Omega Five – Natsume/Hudson Soft [Konami] (360)

Speaking of twin-stick shmups, Omega Five was an interesting experiment. Controlling your character with the left-stick and their aim with the right-stick, the game otherwise sort of resembles Capcom’s old Forgotten Worlds, one of my favorite early shmups. Unfortunately, since the game was originally published by Hudson Soft, I’m not aware if the rights to this game managed to be retained by Konami. Regardless, I’d love to see Omega Five get a second chance on a more welcoming platform.

I was prepared to accept the fact that my streak was technically dead at the end of this article, but I guess it’s stronger than I could have possibly imagined. Nothing new on my lists had been announced to be receiving any PC ports until the last possible day I could’ve gotten any news otherwise. Regardless, I was fine seeing the streak die, after all three games from my lists got announced back in September, so if I wanted to be technical about the whole “one game per list” gimmick. Considering all of the other good PC news I’ve seen lately, I’m sure things will pick up at some point. Until then, I’ll be waiting for SNK and H2 Interactive to release those new (well, new to PC) fighting games on Steam.

Remaking History

Originally, this article was going to be my own personal take on an earlier piece from KI, where he detailed various sequels he’d like to see for games that have long been ignored or forgotten. Truth be told, I’ve got a similar hunger to see some old games resurface myself. Of course, while I was brainstorming that topic (and don’t worry, my take on that idea will resurface at some point down the line) I eventually decided that it would be more interesting to think up games I’d like to see remade. After all, remakes and sequels are pretty similar when it comes to video games.

I’ve said this in the past, video games are unique in the sense that sequels typically improve on their predecessors. The same can honestly be said with remakes: video game remakes typically improve on the source material, where most other forms of media have a much lower success rate. Unfortunately, video games fall into a similar trap as other forms of media. Commonly if a game is remade, it’s generally already a popular (and by extension, good) game. It’s somewhat pointless to try to reinvent the wheel. Games like Maverick Hunter X and Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles weren’t improvements over the originals. On the other hand, you’ve got remakes like Metroid: Zero Mission and MegaMan Powered Up, which were definite improvements over the games they were based on.

For the purposes of this article, I’ve chosen 5 games which I believe deserve to be remade. Maybe people will disagree that they need remakes, maybe some of you will even think these games are just lost causes altogether. The other thing these games all have in common is that they come from either established franchises or development teams that eventually redeemed themselves after each respective misstep. I’ll be discussing each game’s faults, strengths and how I personally would handle a remake for each game, though the order in which the first two aspects are discussed may vary between entries. The importance of each element will determine which takes precedence in the discussion.

Mother (1) [a.k.a. “Earthbound Zero”] – Nintendo Famicom/Game Boy Advance

The Problems

Just as a bit of a disclaimer, I’ve never actually played the original Mother. I requested that a friend of mine play through it, mainly because after playing through Earthbound on my own, I was curious about the game’s roots. In spite of having no hands-on experience with the title, I can tell that it is definitely a very flawed game. The problems I have with the original Mother can be summarized in a single sentence: it’s an NES-era Japanese RPG. The NES was a part of the last video game generation where the abomination that is random battling could be blamed on hardware limitations. Likewise, while its sequels played around with unique gameplay mechanics that matched the franchise’s off-beat tone, the original Mother feels incredibly generic by comparison.

The Potential

On the other hand, Mother 1 actually gives us a unique opportunity. Shigesato Itoi, the mastermind behind the Mother trilogy, has stated that he has no intention to make a fourth game in the franchise. Considering how Mother 3 ended, it’s safe to say that there may be nothing left to explore in the future of the games’ storyline. However, the Earthbound fanbase is extremely passionate about seeing a new entry in the series. Meanwhile, Earthbound and Mother 3 don’t actually really need remakes: they’re perfectly fine in their current state. That leaves us with the original Mother, a flawed, but still very interesting game. Remaking the original Mother could allow Nintendo a chance to give the fanboys what they want, while avoiding any potential backlash in making a new game without Mr. Itoi’s involvement. It’s also important to keep in mind that Mother has only been released in Japan. I may have ragged on The Dracula X Chronicles earlier (despite the fact that I actually like that game), but there’s one thing that it objectively improved upon its predecessor: the number of regions it was released in. Sure, Nintendo’s supposedly sitting on that complete, unreleased English translation of the original Famicom game, but why just release that when you could do something with much more style?

My Proposal

I think a remake of Mother 1 would work best as a downloadable game for the Wii U. I’d actually prefer it if they kept the story about the same as the original, making as few alterations to the Famicom game’s scenario as possible. I’d say the gameplay should probably emulate Earthbound more than Mother 3, just due to its place in the timeline. Represent enemy encounters on the world map, use the odometer-style HP system, all that good stuff. Graphically, I’d like the game to resemble those clay models used for the Mother series’ concept art. It’s such an interesting aesthetic and Nintendo’s already attempting something similar with Kirby and the Rainbow Curse.

Street Fighter (1) [a.k.a. “Fighting Street”] – Arcade/NEC TurboGrafx CD

The Problems

People say I go way too easy on the original Street Fighter, due to the fact that my first experience with the game was with the even worse PC port. While I don’t think that SF1 is as bad as everyone else says, I must admit it’s an incredibly flawed game. It suffers both from being a late-80’s era arcade game and one of the earliest examples of a modern fighting game. The game suffers from both stiff controls and gameplay, which coupled with the traditional “unfair” difficulty typical of “quarter muncher” arcade games, made the experience even less enjoyable.  While introducing special moves was a pretty cool idea, the lack of playable characters (just Ryu and “Player 2”, later renamed Ken) also hurt the game’s appeal, especially when compared to later fighting games.

The Potential

Of course, Street Fighter’s potential is obvious to anyone who’s ever played its sequels or Final Fight. Once the initial kinks had been worked out, Street Fighter’s core ideas led its successors to become some of the most important fighting games of all time, even to this day. Besides that, SF1 also had some fan favorite characters that haven’t reappeared in more recent titles. I’m sure few people care about such mainstays as Lee, Joe and Mike (who is generally considered the basis for later SF2 character Mike Bison/Balrog, known colloquially as “Boxer”), but we haven’t seen characters like Birdie and Eagle since Capcom’s transition to 3D models in their 2D fighting games. There are even characters that never reemerged in later games that have been requested to some degree. Remember when the internet thought Retsu was the fifth new character in Ultra Street Fighter IV? Geki, the Japanese ninja, is another common request when it comes to returning characters, though he’s not at the top of most people’s lists.

My Proposal

Honestly, I’d kind of want Street Fighter V (which has been alluded to, by series producer Yoshinori Ono) to take a page from the Mortal Kombat reboot and retell the stories of all the previous games, which would lead to having a gigantic roster (and effectively remake Street Fighter 1 unintentionally). However, that would probably take an insane amount of resources, despite the fact that the game could potentially reuse some of the assets from the last game.

So let’s just talk about a straight remake of the original game instead. On one hand, seeing something along the lines of the MUGEN-based remake “Street Fighter One” would be pretty cool. Reuse the graphics from the arcade version, the TGCD version’s soundtrack and create an entirely new gameplay engine that would fix the flaws of the original. There’s also the possibility that there could be a full-on 2.5D remake, made by the team behind the Ultra update, in a case of what some people I know refer to colloquially as “watching the bee”. Think about it, the Ultra team is small and many people have complained about their work being buggy in many cases. Giving them another chance on a less important project to redeem themselves would be far more productive than just disbanding the team. Regardless of which form this remake take, there’s one thing this game should definitely have: the entire SF1 roster playable. Yes, even Joe.

Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest – Nintendo Entertainment System

The Potential

Regardless of my personal feelings towards Simon’s Quest, I must acknowledge that it was an important step in the evolution of the Castlevania series and had a profound impact on the entry in the franchise that most people consider its magnum opus: Symphony of the Night. Granted, it wasn’t the first Castlevania game to focus more on exploratory gameplay as opposed to standard linear platforming, that distinct honor belongs to the MSX2 version of the original Akumajou Dracula, commonly referred to as “Vampire Killer” outside of Japan. Considering that little factoid can easily be filed as “obscure trivia”, it should be pretty clear why SQ is generally considered the proto-“Metroidvania”. Of course, a remake of Simon’s Quest could lead to the most interesting Metroidvania ever, if done properly. Considering the game takes place across multiple mansions, towns and forests, there’s way more potential for this compared to just another romp in Dracula’s Castle.

The Problems

Simon’s Quest falls into the “good concept, awful execution” category. Konami retained the standard lives systems from the first game in the series, despite the fact that it really didn’t add much to the game. The level design also left a lot to be desired, what with all those fake blocks and instant-death pits. The latter appear even in the towns, for some reason. The game allowed you to accidentally skip important (yet cryptic or possibly poorly translated) hints, but not the excruciatingly slow day/night transitions (call me a ripoff of AVGN for complaining about this, if you must). Finally, though the convoluted password system only appeared on the cartridge-based renditions of SQ, the original Famicom Disk System version had load times that would make the PS1 blush.

My Proposal

If Konami ever decides to remake Simon’s Quest, I’d like them to emulate another remake of one of the weaker entries in the series: Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth. Make it a downloadable game, use the same style of faux 16-bit graphics and music. Instead of just aping the old “Classicvania” style of gameplay, I’d like to see a cross between that and the more Metroid-like style of gameplay from later 2D entries in the series. Keep the sprawling overworld and the various puzzles, but maybe include some kind of a “journal” where any clues the game gives you can be re-read at your own leisure. Expand on the mansions, maybe make them into actual stages, either linear Classicvania layouts or labyrinthine exploratory areas. Better yet, use both styles to keep things interesting. Develop on the towns by throwing in more shop mechanics like the ones , keep the day/night mechanic (but make the transitions more immediate) and we could be potentially looking at the best Metroidvania in the series.

Metroid II: Return of Samus – Nintendo Game Boy

The Potential

Let me be perfectly clear on this one, if Zero Mission didn’t exist, the original Metroid would be here instead of its Game Boy sequel. Return of Samus is a significant improvement on the original Metroid in pretty much every way. The controls are significantly improved. There are brand new power-ups including the Spider Ball, which allows Samus to climb walls and the Space Jump, which allows her to repeatedly spin-jump in the air. They join old favorites from the original like the Varia Suit, Ice Beam and Varia Suit, giving the intrepid bounty hunter a much more versatile arsenal. It’s also significantly longer than the original Metroid, with at least twice as many boss fights (that’s assuming you count each variant of a Metroid as a single fight, regardless of how many times they appear in the game) and several other areas to explore.

The Problems

Metroid II’s biggest issue is the fact that its sequel is an even greater improvement on it than it was to the original Metroid. Super Metroid added an in-game map, which allowed for a return to the original’s more non-linear game progression while avoiding its tendency to leave players stranded, added even more iconic weapons to Samus’s arsenal and improved the controls to perfection. There’s a reason why Super Metroid is generally considered the best game in the series. Unfortunately, due to being a Game Boy game and not being the series’ progenitor, Metroid II is generally considered to be the weakest game in the franchise. Its reputation isn’t helped by the fact that Zero Mission is generally considered to be close to the quality as Super Metroid.

My Proposal

At one point, Nintendo had plans to remake Metroid II for the Game Boy Color, as they did with Link’s Awakening. Unfortunately, it was scrapped along with other similar remakes (including MegaMan V, supposedly). I always thought it would’ve been pretty cool to see this idea come to fruition, but honestly, this project wouldn’t make much sense at this point in time.

Instead, I feel like Return of Samus should get the “Zero Mission” treatment. Give it an expanded remake, utilizing a similar engine to Super Metroid. I’d personally keep the more linear layout the game, but maybe throw in some exploits that would allow speedrunners or anyone else who’s looking for a challenge an opportunity to break sequence. Better yet, just make an extra mode that removes the roadblocks. Add some new bosses, but keep the 40 Metroid boss fights intact. Considering most of those were just the same 4 bosses repeated, that shouldn’t be much of a problem. The fact that Metroid’s fanbase has been clamoring for a new game in the franchise, especially a 2D one, pretty much means that if this remake is done well, it’ll relieve some of the pressure on Nintendo when it comes to working on the next real entry in the series.

Knuckles’ Chaotix – Sega 32X

The Problems

To say that Knuckles’ Chaotix was the best the 32X had to offer is pretty much an objective fact. Unfortunately, that’s really not saying much. Though its fellow expansion peripheral the Sega CD had a respectable amount of cult classics, the only other 32X game I find remotely endearing is Kolbiri, a free-roaming game with shump-style controls where you play as a hummingbird. Despite its status as the “one good 32X game”, Knuckles’ Chaotix still has its fair share of issues. Though I don’t really mind the random selection when you decide to switch out your partner, the way the stage order is randomized bugs me: you often switch between zones before you finish whichever one you’ve started with, which messes with the game’s flow. There’s also the fact that, at times, the game just doesn’t feel as smooth as its predecessors on the Genesis and Sega CD, the controls feel a little off at times and there’s also the occasional slowdown.

The Potential

The funny thing is, my first experience with Knuckles’ Chaotix didn’t happen until way after it was released. Even then, it wasn’t actually with Chaotix itself: I played a leaked beta made for the Genesis by the name of Sonic Crackers. While it wasn’t nearly as polished as the final product, I was enamored with its unique idea: controlling two different characters (in that case, Sonic and Tails) tethered together by a pair of rings. Likewise, Knuckles’ Chaotix delivered on that concept in my opinion. It may not have been a perfect game, but it was a way more interesting spin (no pun intended) on the Sonic formula than 3D Blast ever was.

My Proposal

Simply put, give it the Sonic CD treatment. Use the art and sound assets from the 32X version and let Christian “The Taxman” Whitehead work his magic on it, removing any technical limitations and tightening up the controls from the original version. I think the main reason I’d want this one remade is because it’s just not worth the time or effort for Sega to try to emulate 32X games, even though many fan-made Genesis emulators can handle them (to varying levels of success).

There you have it, 5 games I think are worth remaking. Some of them are more flawed than others, but all of them could use a second chance in my opinion. Of course, like I said before, most games that get remade even today are still as good as they ever were. Instead, they should be reserved for games that didn’t age gracefully, fixing their problems while sharing their potential with a new generation of gamers.

 

Sum of Its Parts: MegaMan X9

Originally, the next topic in the Sum of Its Parts series was going to be something completely different. However, both due to some recent developments with the franchise’s owner and because my last article in the series involved the same genre, I felt that this make for a less monotonous article this time around. As this series itself was inspired by one of my Megarants from last year, it seemed only fitting to revisit the series in a full-fledged article. After all, despite the fact that we’ve got Inti Creates’ Azure Striker Gunvolt coming out later this month in North America, as well as Comcept’s Mighty No. 9 set to release sometime next year, people still long to see a new entry in the MegaMan series.

I’ve already covered my wishlist for a potential MM11, but what else is there? The MegaMan Zero and Battle Network series both came to definite conclusions. People are still clamoring for Legends 3, but considering the controversy regarding the cancellation (sorry, failure to greenlight), it would probably be best to let things cool down before deciding to go anywhere with it. The Star Force games were fairly unpopular, even among fans of its predecessor. So I guess that leaves…MegaMan ZX3! Okay, okay, I know, I’m just dancing around the obvious. Despite my personal distaste for the series, if Capcom doesn’t decide to make another Classic MegaMan game, the obvious choice is MegaMan X9.

Why MegaMan X9 over anything else? Well, it’s obvious: the X series is quite popular among many fans of the series, arguably second only to the original Classic series at this point. A better question is why should I, someone who professes to hate MegaMan X (and I do), be considered the arbiter of what would make for an ideal new game in this series? Well, I did like the first 4 MMX games (the fifth was okay, but X6 was so incompetently designed, it killed any interest I had in continuing the series), I do have something of an inkling of where the series came from and where it should be going. There’s also the fact that I was actually a fan of the X games’ sequel series: Zero and ZX. Most important, at least in my opinion, is the fact that the first X game is not my favorite of the franchise.

What’s so important about that particular opinion of mine, you ask? Well, most people (with the exception of an ill-conceived article on Game Informer) I’ve seen write on their opinion of how to create an ideal ninth game in the X franchise tend to say that it should be as close to the original as possible. But why try to imitate the original, when we can try to exceed it? MegaMan 10 is my favorite game in the Classic MegaMan sub-line because it attempted to exceed MM2, where its predecessor only succeeded in aping it. Shouldn’t we try to apply the same principles to the X series?

As usual, gameplay will be the main topic we tackle in this article. First off, let’s discuss the game’s base style. For X9, I feel like as with MM9 and 10, there should be a return to the game’s base roots. Yep, make it a full-on 2D platformer, just like the SNES and PS1 games. Well, the first PS1 game, anyway. Dashing, charge shots, armor upgrades, all that good stuff. Make the engine as solid and responsive as the SNES games, X4 and 5. Actually, speaking of 5, maybe you should bring back the crouch mechanic from X5 (and by extension, X6). Hell, maybe even just make it exclusive to specific characters.

Speaking of which, definitely bring back the multiple playable character options first introduced in X4. I personally preferred being able to choose a single character for the duration of the single-player campaign and the differences seen in X4 (different bosses for specific characters) could be further expanded in X9. X and Zero are both must-haves at this point, but we could have more than just those two. Personally, I found Vile Mode to be the most interesting part of Maverick Hunter X, so bringing him into the fold would be interesting, especially if that led to some sort of alternate universe where the Mavericks in this game were Maverick Hunters instead and there was an entirely different fortress stage, where Vile storms Maverick Hunter headquarters and blasts everything to cinders. Of course, we’ve also got to deal with the elephant in the room, Axl. Since I’ve got very little experience with the games he appeared in, I’m not exactly sure how he plays. From what I can tell, he gets different types of ammo for his guns, somewhat like a cross between X and Vile, but his main ability in X8 appears to be Copy Shot/“A-Trans” which allows him to transform into various enemies. He’s also got an aimable rapid-fire gun, similar to Bass from MM&B in X8. So how do we rectify this? I say, let him keep the rapid-fire pistol, but instead of giving him random weapons from bosses, we implement his A-Trans ability similarly to the way ZX Advent handled it with Model A: allow Axl to transform into the Mavericks he defeats, giving him access to their weapons and some special abilities. Now that would be pretty cool, at least in my opinion.

That brings us to my next point, my ideal X9 would implement some elements from the X series’ direct sequels in order to improve on the original, especially the MegaMan Zero games. Frankly, I’d like to see an X game with the difficulty of the second or even the third Zero game. Hell, give Zero a choice of a secondary weapon he can use. Maybe not anything exclusive to the Zero games themselves, because they would be anachronistic, but hell, getting a MMZ-caliber Z-Buster would be pretty cool. Make it smaller and weaker than the X-Buster for balancing. Some original weaponry would be pretty interesting too, especially if it makes Zero a more versatile character. Throwing in a hub world (like those from the Zero and ZX games) would be an interesting addition as well. Having the option to explore Maverick Hunter HQ would be better than simply being forced to switch between stodgy menus, though I’d leave the menus in, as some people don’t care for that level of detail. Better yet, you could even throw in some optional interactions or even sub-missions with various NPCs, like the Navigators, Signas and various other Maverick Hunters to extend gameplay.

Of course, this leads to an important point I touched on in the MM11 article: the game’s length. Let’s face it, MegaMan X games are typically about as long as their Classic counterparts and in today’s marketplace, you just can’t charge that much for a game that short. So we have two options: charge less for the games or increase their length. This is another area where emulating the Zero games would come in handy for X9. In addition to the typical 8 stages and multi-staged fortress we see in most MM platformers, the Zero games also typically threw in some additional stages that took place outside of that typical format. Considering X3 attempted something like that with Vile’s mini-stage and both X5 and X6 attempted something similar with Dynamo, it wouldn’t be out of the ordinary. Maybe utilize some Mechaniloid bosses as opposed to Reploids, in order to further distinguish them from the main 8 bosses. Though honestly, increasing the number of Mavericks X et al. fight in the ninth game would be pretty cool.

Now typically, I don’t get involved with any sort of a storyline for games I write up in the Sum of Its Parts series, but considering my musings on this topic in previous articles, it’s only fair that I discuss it yet again. For those of you out there who are familiar with this controversy, the eighth (and at the time of writing, latest) game in the MegaMan X series kind of ended on a cliffhanger. As such, part of the fanbase wants to see the conclusion to these plot points in the ninth game of the series. On the other hand, another faction within the MMX fanbase doesn’t really care much for where the storyline went in later games and are much more in favor of a sort of “soft reboot”, ignoring certain games’ effects on the canon. Obviously, there’s no way to please both sides of the audience. While I may not care for many of the story elements of the later games, I think it’ll be easier to win back the soft reboot group if Capcom puts enough effort into the gameplay itself. The people who want to see the plot threads wrapped up are likely more die-hard about how the game’s storyline turns out. It’s probably for the best to just let them have that one.

Next up, let’s discuss the graphics. Again, this will be a bit of a retread for some of you, but it’s still worth revisiting. The majority of the people I’ve seen pitch ideas for how their ideal MMX9 would turn out either want the game to utilize the same artstyle as the SNES games (arguing that they are the equivalent to using NES graphics for MM9 and 10) or they want to see them use the same artstyle from the PS1 games (for the same reasons, I guess?). I’ve also seen some people ask for a 2.5D artstyle, not unlike Maverick Hunter X, because I dunno, wave of the future. My personal choice? I’d love to see some high-definition sprites or some hand-drawn graphics, but as long as the sprite-to-screen ratio remains the same as the SNES/PS1 games, I think I’ll be fine.

There’s one last thing I’d like to discuss on this topic. Which company would be the best to make a brand new entry in the MegaMan X series? Inti Creates is, of course, at the top of my list, due to their work on the Classic, Zero and ZX series. Similarly, I brought up WayForward as a potential company for a Classic game, but they could probably work somewhat well on an X game. Of course, I wish Yacht Club Games’ debut release had been out when I was brainstorming the best company to take over MegaMan Classic, because Shovel Knight leads me to believe they’d be an even better choice for any MegaMan platformer than WayForward themselves. Of course, SNES Master KI once said that he’d love to see Nintendo’s Retro Studios make a MMX game exclusively for Nintendo platforms. I must admit, that would be interesting to behold. I’d personally like to see Treasure’s take on a MegaMan game, and the X series seems like the best fit for their style of run-and-gun games. Hell, Capcom would be better off using them for X9 than just making an expansion for that massive bomb Gaist Crusher. Capcom Vancouver might also be an interesting pick, they seem to be fans of the MegaMan franchise in general and it would be cool to see them work on something besides Dead Rising (as much as I love the series). Of course, considering Capcom’s currently hiring staff for game development, it could even be internally developed. Whoever Capcom ends up going with for this project, hopefully they pay tribute to the better games in the franchise and don’t leave us with just another rushed blunder like X6. Hopefully, if X9 does well, we can see some other MM spinoffs return. Maybe even get the conclusion to the ZX series?