PC Ports Wishlist 2: Lost in New York

Around this time last year, I decided to do a new article in my long-running indulgence: port-begging for PC games. Of course, in the most recent article, I also added in some additional musings. I discussed what my favorite overall “victories” were since I’d originally started doing these lists, as well as focusing on both my overall top 10 most wanted games out of what I’d covered in older lists and the top games for each remaining list. I can’t really remember if I decided I wanted to make it a yearly tradition after the previous article – at the same time, I guess I just sort of assumed I’d be doing it again anyway. I had fun with last year’s lists, so why not?

This time around, I’m going to be focusing entirely on 2017 with the recap. As such, I’ll be starting with my top 5 confirmations of the years, which was a lot more difficult than I would have expected. Little has really moved since last year’s “Best of the Rest” list, but I’ve finally been able to cobble together an entire new list, so it only seems fitting to introduce it in this article. Finally, considering the fact that the top two slots in my previous top ten list – MegaMans 9 & 10 and Ys SEVEN – have since been released, I’ve decided to write up a new list. Not every game is new, but some have switched places.

Before we get on with this year’s lists, I’d like to go over the PC port announcements that were made since August, when I did the list for GOG games. Admittedly, I didn’t really expect that much in the way of announcements, especially considering the major announcements revealed from May until August. That’s not to say there was nothing these past four months. Killer Instinct was finally released on Steam back in September, technically not a new port – as it was previously a Windows Store exclusive. However, putting it on Steam and adding (albeit limited) crossplay with both the Xbox One and Windows Store versions was a nice touch. September also brought us the announcement of Zone of the Enders 2 receiving another re-release, adding a new VR option, on both PS4 and PC. While the ZOE HD Collection was on a previous list, I suppose getting a new release of the game that worked – apparently, the PS3 and Xbox 360’s version of the first game was broken – is better than nothing, so I’ll count that as a win. However, November alone definitely brought me some big-name releases – that ended up forcing me to modify the new game’s list not once, but twice. Capcom announced that Okami HD would be ported to PC, as well as PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. I wish I could say that I had considered this game for my list, but I thought of it as too much of a long shot, given the series’ Japan-centric aesthetic running counter to Capcom’s Western goals. Sphinx and the Cursed Mummy, a Zelda-like adventure game with platformer elements previously released on the GameCube, PlayStation 2 and the original Xbox, also managed to receive a remastered port on PC, Mac and Linux, courtesy of THQ Nordic. The game didn’t fall within my usual criteria for inclusion, but considering the game’s recent cult following, it’s definitely good news from my perspective. Injustice 2, on the other hand, was originally going to be on this year’s list, but it ended up receiving a PC port courtesy of the fine people at QLOC. Unfortunately, the game uses Denuvo, so I’m going to have to hold off on it until WB comes to their senses. And just like last year, the biggest surprise comes from SNK. The Last Blade 2 – based on the PS4 release this time around – was released on Steam completely unannounced. Ironically, this was another game I intended to put on this year’s list but had to swap it for something new at the last minute.

Speaking of last-minute announcements, there were two more PC gaming announcements I’d consider wins literally the day before this article was scheduled to go up. First, both Jazz Jackrabbit games were released on GOG, which means that the GOG wishlist I wrote back in August has finally borne fruit. Here’s hoping it’s the first of many. Earlier this week, XSEED announced a livestream on November 30th, with a mystery announcement. I was hoping for something Falcom-related and once again, I hit the jackpot. 2001’s Zwei!! – now retitled as Zwei: The Arges Adventure – is being translated and set to release on their usual storefronts (Steam, GOG and the Humble Store) sometime in “Winter 2018”. The work that went into bringing this to modern computers cannot be understated: the original game used DirectX5. XSEED managed to collaborate with Matt Fielding of Magnetic Games, the developer behind Exile’s End. As such, a majority of the original applications and mini-games from the original Falcom release have been maintained in this new version, with the exceptions of the calculator and the calendar. Frankly, I’m just surprised at the turnaround on this one and can’t wait for it to be released.

This year’s list of console ports also managed to achieve a win. Owlboy was originally announced for the Switch back in May, but since then, PS4 and Xbox One ports have also been announced. Last year’s list did way better. Back in March, Lethal League was announced for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Team Reptile also announced a sequel – named “Lethal League Blaze” – set to release some time next year on both PC and “console”. Undertale was also announced for release on PlayStation 4 and Vita back during this year’s E3. I was honestly surprised that it didn’t end up hitting the Nintendo Switch, but that’s life. Likewise, while NEO AQUARIUM – The King of Crustaceans – failed to receive a console port, its sequel ACE OF SEAFOOD has been ported to the PlayStation 4, as well as developer Nussoft teasing a future port to the Nintendo Switch.

Top 5 Successes of 2017

Before I get to my actual picks, I’d like to give an honorable mention to Arc System Works in general. They’ve made quite the evolution over the past couple years, going from re-releasing old PC ports of classic games on GOG to outright announcing PC versions of upcoming games – Double Dragon IV and BlazBlue Cross Tag Battle come to mind. I hope more Japanese companies take after their example and decide to offer major PC support for any games they decide to release in the West.

5. de Blob 1 & 2 – THQ Nordic (Wii, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

I honestly didn’t think this was possible, which is why this made the list over ASW. ASW’s transition into a more PC friendly company was alluded to for quite some time, but when Nordic Games rebranded themselves as “THQ Nordic”, the Darksiders III announcement wasn’t remotely surprising. Bringing back not one, but both de Blob games, on the other hand? Absolutely blew my mind. When Nordic first purchased the intellectual property and said they “had plans” for the series, I thought it was merely corporate talk. After all, the game’s rights had languished in purgatory while other major IPs were claimed by other companies at auction. Best of all, they hired Blitworks to handle the ports of both games. Eventually, the first game had ports announced for the Xbox One and PS4, and it wouldn’t surprise me if the second game follows.

4. Bayonetta/Vanquish – Sega/Platinum Games (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii U)

Speaking of amazing turnarounds, Platinum Games managed to grant us not one, but two of their cult classics from last-gen on PC this year. The fact that both games came out so close to one another made this even more amazing. It’s also been heavily rumored that both games will be released as a double-pack on the PS4 and XBO, though confirmation has yet to be made. With Platinum’s Twitter heavily implying that Bayonetta 3 may be on the horizon, it only makes sense to get the game in as many hands as possible. While a Bayonetta 2 PC port is a pipe dream due to Nintendo’s heavy involvement with the game’s development, I hope we can see even more of Platinum’s back catalog hit PC in the near future.

3. The King of Fighters XIV – SNK (PlayStation 4)

It’s funny: I was honestly expecting to put this one on this year’s list of new games: it was even the sole new addition to last year’s list. SNK managed to impress me with a timely Steam port that I assumed would usher in the game’s demise when it came to additional content, but apparently that wasn’t the case at all. With a port handled by Abstraction Games – an underrated company that handled the Double Dragon Neon PC port – KoFXIV is now capable of shining in brand-new ways, thanks to a fledgling mod community. Seriously, what they’ve been able to do with the game has been amazing.

2. MegaMan 9 & 10 (MegaMan Legacy Collection 2) – Capcom (Xbox 360, PS3, Wii)

I’m surprised this is coming in at number 2, but my top request definitely put up a good fight. I’m probably alone in the sense that I’d have been willing to pay $20 for these two games and all their DLC alone. Adding in two more MegaMan games that hadn’t shown up on PC before – MegaMans 7 and 8 – only served to sweeten the deal and make it a can’t-miss proposition for me. For a while, Capcom had been weird about what they’d port to PC – but in recent years, as long as it’s not a Nintendo-exclusive, PC gamers are likely to get love from Capcom. If anything, I wish they’d been a little less generous in some cases…

1. Falcom (in General)

Yeah, I get that it’s kind of cheating to put an entire company in the top slot, but if I’m going to be honest, they deserve it. Sure, the promises of day one parity with the console releases of Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana ended up being a pipe dream, but considering the rumors of the port’s quality (or lack thereof), not to mention the outright poor quality of the original translation, it may have turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Aksys Games’ translation of Tokyo Xanadu eX+ is set to launch the same day as its PS4 counterpart as promised, but considering how late they started their own beta testing (similar to Ys VIII), well, “watch this space”. Even though Ys VIII didn’t hit its original release date on PC, some good did come of it. Ys VIII is actually the first game that NIS America is releasing on GOG, which is amazing. Whether or not that means other NIS games will hit the platform is beyond me, but that seems pretty cool.

Despite these setbacks from one of their new partners, XSEED more than picked up the slack when it came to representing Falcom on PC. The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel, Ys SEVEN and Zwei: The Ilvard Insurrection (formerly “Zwei II” in Japan) all saw release on Windows PC this year. Also, they’ve announced that both Trails of Cold Steel II’s PC port and the first Zwei!! will release some time next year. Good stuff, but that’s not the major reason why they topped it out. In an interview with Techraptor, Toshihiro Kondo – Falcom’s president – said that he wanted “all of [their] games that come out to [release] on Steam”. Not just all future titles, not all of the old games that Falcom previously released on Windows, ALL of their games. Big words, but considering the massive collection of Falcom games we’ve amassed on PC so far, I wouldn’t be surprised if this comes to pass.

Our Feature Presentation

Before we go onto my new list, I feel like it’s worth going over the rules I’ve limited myself to in the past with these lists. It’s odd, I know, but it just ends up making the process of building a list much more fun. For starters, I’m limiting myself to games from the seventh (PS3/Xbox 360/Wii) and eighth (PS4/Xbox One/Wii U/Switch) generations of gaming. Porting anything else seems like it would require a brand-new release across the board and this is more about simple ports. Considering the sheer amount of games from these generations that have been ported to PC in recent years, it only seems fair. I also try to limit myself to one game per company, though considering the sheer number of buyouts we’ve seen, I’ve decided to expand that to one game per “brand” – but only if the buyout happened since the games were made in the first place. For example, I can ask for one game each from Sega and Atlus, but asking for two games from Square Enix is a no-no. I also consider one “series” as an entry, as long as the games themselves were all present in the generations available to me. Finally, no games that are clearly “console-exclusive”. So, even though Sony Music has started that whole “Unties” publishing label for indie games and Nintendo’s willing to do tie-ins on mobiles, I’m not going to be asking for stuff like Parappa the Rapper Remastered or Super Mario Odyssey. It’s just common sense.

Brandish: The Dark Revenant – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Portable)

I mentioned earlier that Falcom’s president wanted to put all of their games on Steam. The main goal most people have their sights set on is getting Trails of Zero and Trails of Azure on the PC platform. A segment of Falcom’s popular “Legend of Heroes” series, these two games – known colloquially as the “Crossbell games”, named after their setting – are quite literally the most commonly requested games. Unfortunately, they also lack any official English translations, so this would be a necessary part of porting the games to PC.

But do you know what Falcom game already has a full English translation and is also currently doomed to exclusivity on the inescapable purgatory that is the PlayStation Portable? That’s right, Brandish: The Dark Revenant. A remake of the first installment in a short-lived Falcom series, the games bring a new perspective to the first-person dungeon crawlers of old with its unique brand of gameplay. Brandish’s translation was a labor of love from Tom “Wyrdwad” Lipschultz, one of XSEED’s most prominent localizers. While the PSP remake saw its original Japanese release in 2009, it only managed to reach America in January 2015 as a digital-only release. It’s a shame that such an interest game was resigned to such a lackluster fate outside of its home market. Considering the fact that we’ve seen Ys SEVEN hit PC this year, I’d love to see Brandish achieve the same thing. At worst, it would at least give XSEED’s new partners a chance to hone their craft while XSEED is working on translating the Crossbell duology.

Rare Replay – Microsoft Studios/Rare (Xbox One)

This almost feels like cheating, considering I put the Banjo-Kazooie games on an earlier list. Considering they’re both included in this compendium of some of Rare’s most beloved titles (not owned by Nintendo), getting this collection would just end up killing two birds with one stone. It may seem unlikely given the fact that it hasn’t already come to PC, but that’s exactly what I thought about the Killer Instinct reboot back on my very first list. If I’m going to dream, I might as well dream big.

Tekken Tag Tournament HD – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3)

This has the exact opposite problem compared to Rare Replay. I’ve already asked for the second Tekken Tag Tournament, so why ask for the original? The answer’s simple: despite being outclassed in every possible way by its sequel, I associate some really happy memories with the classic game. The re-release in the Tekken Hybrid package reminded me of that and so did replaying the game for the Tekken retrospective I did this year. There was just something amazing about the original game, some intangible factor that prevents me from letting go of it. That’s not to say I wouldn’t rather have the second game if forced to choose, but if Bandai Namco considers re-releasing both, I’m not going to complain.

Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir – Atlus/Vanillaware (PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita)

Every list has got to have at least one pipe dream on it. A game that outright transcends any other baffling choice. I’ve got quite a few on this year’s list, but I’d say last year’s re-release of Odin Sphere is the big one this time around. Since I started doing these wishlists nearly four years ago, we’ve seen Atlus’s stubborn refusal to acknowledge the PC market go from the rule to the exception when it comes to Japanese publishers. Having said that, Atlus USA does do a good job of publishing various indie titles on the platform and Sega has apparently been applying pressure on Atlus’s PC-phobia, with various people speculating that we could see a Persona game hit the platform someday. Frankly, I’d rather just have Vanillaware games, considering the developer’s stated openness to releasing their games on PC. Leifthrasir is technically their most recent release, therefore it feels the most likely.

Azure Striker Gunvolt 2 – Inti Creates (Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo Switch)

This was honestly a last resort when it came to PC port requests. Don’t get me wrong: I loved Gunvolt 2 even more than the original game. It’s more that it seems like Inti Creates may have abandoned the platform when it comes to the games they publish themselves. Not to mention the fact that I think I’d rather have a release of the Striker Pack on PC, as opposed to just the second game. The original Gunvolt’s release on Steam was sort of wonky and it looks like the version included in the Striker Pack on Switch is a much more coherent experience, likely due to what Inti Creates was able to learn from their first attempt at transferring the title – which required two screens – onto a single-screen platform and improve their efforts. At the same time, asking for the Striker Pack feels a bit skeevy, considering we already have the first game on Steam. That’s what makes the whole thing so complicated. I mean, ideally, they’d just release the Striker Pack on Steam and give anyone who bought the first game a discount. That’s my opinion anyway.

Yakuza series – Sega (PlayStation 3, Wii U, PlayStation 4)

From what the internet has been telling me, the Yakuza games – better known as Ryū ga Gotoku in Japan – are the best games I’m not playing. I totally want to try them out, but I’m afraid I’m just no longer into playing big experiences like that on console these days and frankly, I wouldn’t even know where to start at this point. Much like Atlus’s Persona series, there is a massive wellspring of support for these games to make their debut on PC. Some people want the games to start with the latest game in the series – either Yazuka 6 (the next game set to hit the West) or Yakuza Kiwami 2, the remake of the second game set to hit Japan in a matter of days. Other people seem to be fine with the series starting up with Yakuza Zero – which has essentially been deemed the perfect place to jump into the series for newcomers. Meanwhile, I’m a little more extreme: I want everything. Start by localizing the Japanese-exclusive HD ports of the first two games on the Wii U, then just continue from there. Ideally we’d be seeing most of the cut content restored to its original glory in the process. It sounds ridiculous, I know, but honestly, a legitimate entry in the Yakuza series hitting PC is a pipe dream anyway.

(P.S. Nice try, Sega. But no one’s counting that smartphone game you’re working on as an actual PC release for the Yakuza series. In fact, most of us were just insulted.)

The Witch and the Hundred Knight – Nippon Ichi Software (PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3)

NIS America still appears to be pretty heavily involved in the PC scene, but personally, I wish they’d port more of Nippon Ichi’s games to the platform. The Witch and the Hundred Knight is a game that friends of mine have been raving about, and considering the fact that it’s an action-RPG, I’m onboard with it too. The game’s sequel released in Japan early this year and is set to release in the West sometime next year, so allowing the PC crowd to get their hands on the first one would be a nice treat. Though frankly, I’m still worried about which Disgaea game we’ll get next – I’m kind of worried that they might just skip right to 5, considering the game’s ESRB listing. I’d rather play through the rest of the old games first, personally.

Final Fight: Double Impact – Capcom/Iron Galaxy Studios (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)

Truth be told, my backlog of PC port requests from Capcom is running pretty low. That’s not exactly a bad thing: it means that most of the recent games I actually want from the company have already been released on PC. Final Fight: Double Impact just seems like a safe choice to make. It contains arcade-perfect releases of both the original Final Fight and Magic Sword, two beat-‘em-ups with significantly different gameplay styles. Factor in the drop-in multiplayer using GGPO and it’s still worth playing to this day, in spite of the DRM present on the PS3 release. Considering that the 360 and PS3 have essentially been retired, it’d be nice to see this collection – or better yet, a bigger collection with more games included – ported to modern platforms, PC included.

Windjammers – Data East/DotEmu (PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita)

Windjammers is among the most underrated multiplayer games of all-time, so when it managed to get a re-release on both PS4 and Vita this past year, it was exciting. The only thing that could’ve made it better would’ve been if PC had been involved in the fun as well. Fortunately, DotEmu’s released a whole lot of their ports on the platform down the line, so I’m pretty confident that we’ll be tossing frisbees in no time. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that out of all of the games on this year’s new list of games, this is the one I’m most confident will hit PC by this time next year.

Let It Die – GungHo Entertainment/Grasshopper Manufacture (PlayStation 4)

Let It Die and I have had a pretty turbulent history. I was originally excited for the game when it was first announced as “Lily Bergamo”, I’m a huge fan of Grasshopper Manufacture after all. Then the game was transformed into Let It Die and touted as a “free-to-play” experience, at which point, I totally lost interest. Flash-forward to earlier this year when I actually hear some actual information about the final product and I’m intrigued all over again. Let It Die may be a free-to-play game littered with microtransactions, but it’s built far more like a classic arcade game than the mobile cash grabs we associate the concept with. Let It Die is effectively a dungeon-crawler with rouge-like elements, you’re limited to a single life – but if you pay in a quarter, you can continue with your current character. Otherwise, you’ve got to start from scratch. Aside from that, the game maintains the typical Grasshopper off-the-wall insanity: for example, the player is guided by a skateboarding grim reaper named Uncle Death. The permadeath mechanic also lends itself to asynchronous multiplayer: dead characters appear in other players’ games. It’s an honestly interesting concept and one that I’d like to see on PC, though given the fleeting nature of games like this, I wouldn’t hold my breath.

Top 10 Most Wanted

Last year, ranking my top 10 list of the games I want ported to PC the most was more haphazard than anything. I’ve never really been all that good at ordering my favorite things in general and in many cases, there wasn’t really much of a difference in how much I wanted many of the games on the list. So to compensate for it, I’ve decided to factor in just how likely I think it would be to see a re-release on PC, which should go a long way toward explaining why various games have switched places from the previous year. Keep in mind that the top two games from the previous list were in fact the top two games I wanted, this new method just helps to keep things feeling a little more structured: I’ve never really been all that good when it comes to rankings and usually by the time I’m done with one list, I instantly regret the final product. Also, don’t view a game being snubbed from the list as a sign that I don’t want the game: it’s safe to assume that I want everything that’s ever been on any of my list, even games like the now-defunct Tekken Revolution. These are just the ten that would make me the happiest to see on PC at this point in time.

10. Catherine – Atlus (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Like I said earlier, Atlus’s Japanese branch appears to be actively against doing PC versions of their games. That setback won’t stop me from holding out hope. But this was clearly the longest of the longshots last year and yet, here we are. Considering the fact that we were teased with a potential new entry in the series back in August, it only seems reasonable to bring the original back for those who missed it or simply want to play it on more modern platforms.  And what platform is more modern than the PC? Come on, Atlus: you’ve literally got nothing to lose – do a modern “HD” port on PS4 and PC, replacing the Xbox brand. It’s a Golden opportunity you can’t afford to miss.

9. Lollipop Chainsaw – WB Games/Grasshopper Manufacture (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Lollipop Chainsaw dropped a fair amount this year and there are a couple of reasons for this. For starters, WB Games’ PC gaming record has been littered with ups and downs in recent years – ranging from the legendarily bad port of Arkham Asylum to hiring QLOC to fix the botched Mortal Kombat X port to adding Denuvo to a QLOC-developed port of Injustice 2 – Warner Bros. just seems to keep me guessing in strange new ways. More importantly, I don’t think WB Games has any interest in reviving the game, particularly given the game’s controversial content and our current social climate. I mean, the game hasn’t even been added to the Xbox One’s library through backward compatibility. Even Catherine managed that. I think our only hope to see this game again is if Grasshopper Manufacture’s new parent company GungHo Entertainment manages to buy the rights from WB Games and that just seems like a pipe dream.

8. Dragon’s Crown Pro – Atlus/Vanillaware (PlayStation 4)

Of course, even though Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir is the most recent Vanillaware release, we do know what their next release is. Last year, I simply had the original Dragon’s Crown on this list, but considering the fact that there’s a re-release coming up with a higher resolution and on a platform with a more PC-friendly architecture, it just seemed obvious to ask for the new version instead. Still seems odd that they’re doing a re-release so soon: they even released a patch for the PS3 and Vita versions allowing for crossplay with Pro. Truth be told, there’s a part of me that wonders if Dragon’s Crown Pro is just being made as a Trojan Horse to allow Vanillaware to toss their hat into the PC gaming market. I’m more than onboard with the concept.

7. NeoGeo Battle Coliseum – SNK (Xbox 360)

This one seemed like an obvious choice. I didn’t have any 2D fighting games on the list last year and frankly, that’s unacceptable. Considering the fact that many of SNK’s old games that have been re-released on this gen have made their way onto PC – particularly the ones handled internally – it only seems fair to ask for something from the previous gen. Hamster’s been killing it with their Arcade Classics releases of classic NeoGeo games, but SNK’s work after their long-running self-made arcade hardware is a rarity these days. Considering the rumors abound that SNK may be working on a second Battle Coliseum game, re-releasing the first on modern platforms seems like a no-brainer. I see it going down like this: initial release on the PS4, followed by a Steam release at some point down the line.  Not an ideal scenario, but perhaps the most realistic.

6. Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo HD Remix – Capcom (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Another significant drop from last year’s list, I just think that seeing either a re-release of the old PC version or a new port of the HD release just isn’t in the cards anymore. Puzzle Fighter’s recently been relaunched as a new free-to-play mobile game with a hideous art style and I’m sure that Capcom would try to avoid any undue competition by releasing the original game. And believe me, this new mobile game is going to need all the help it can get. Maybe we’ll see a re-release if it fails to meet Capcom’s likely insane expectations, but it’ll take some time to gauge the game’s success.

5. Tekken Tag Tournament 2 – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U)

While we did finally end up getting a Tekken game on PC this year, I honestly still would prefer Tag 2 to make its way there as well. Unfortunately, as TTT2 was among the worst selling games in the entire series, it seems like the chances of this game getting re-released on more platforms are pretty slim. At least it’s on the Xbox One via backwards compatibility, but I’m still salivating over the thought of what the modding scene could do with this game.

4. Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles – Konami (PlayStation Portable)

It feels a little weird moving this up, considering Konami’s recent history. This year offered us an omen: Super Bomberman R, one of the Nintendo Switch’s launch titles, was a true return to form for the company. This has led to a great deal of speculation about a return to Konami’s roots, with potentially even more new games in the vein of classic titles. An easy way to test the waters for this kind of revival would be re-releasing actual old titles and I still can’t think of a better choice than the Dracula X Chronicles. Containing a full graphical remake of one of the most beloved Castlevania games, an official English translation of the original PC Engine version, as well as a retranslated version of Symphony of the Night, DXC deserves a better fate than being trapped on the likely-defunct PlayStation Portable line for all eternity. The remake could use a little polish to handle higher resolutions, but aside from that, it would be a perfect package.

3. Splatterhouse (2010) – Bandai Namco (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)

2010’s Splatterhouse reboot did not get nearly as much love as it deserves. The game was a high-adrenaline romp through a horror-inspired environment that both paid homage to and build on the original games. Considering we’ve seen various companies choose seemingly random games for modern revivals, Splatterhouse feels like it could have a chance. The game’s only major flaw, its terrible load times, could easily be fixed on modern platforms and frankly, even if you’re not a fan of the reboot itself, it also comes with perfect ports of all three of the mainline games from the 90s. If that’s not worth a re-release, then I don’t know what is.

2.  MegaMan: Powered Up/MegaMan: Maverick Hunter X – Capcom (PSP)

I wouldn’t have considered putting this so high on the list, but considering the recent re-releases of Okami HD and Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney on contemporary platforms, it looks like Capcom may be raiding their backlog for some big cheap releases. For me, the most obvious choice would have to be a twin-pack of their MegaMan releases on the PSP. Both games were critical darlings crippled by the platform they were released on and their timing. Re-releasing both games with improved resolutions in a two-pack for $20 would sell like gangbusters. Considering the fact that Powered Up isn’t even available as a downloadable title outside of Japan, this would also go a long way to preserve what is objectively the best iteration of the original MegaMan in existence and the fascinating curiosity that is MHX’s Vile Mode. Better yet, don’t just release this on PC – release it on everything: PS4, Switch, and even the Xbox One. Come on, Capcom. It’s the Blue Bomber’s 30th anniversary, let’s celebrate!

1. Ys: Memories of Celceta – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Vita)

It might surprise you to see that while much of last year’s list has remained pretty much the same, Memories of Celceta managed to jump a whopping six places to take the number one slot. For starters, the main reason that it was low was to keep things fair – after all, Ys SEVEN was my second most highly-requested PC port of all, and with that out of the way, MoC could flourish. But beating out a MegaMan game for the top slot? That comes down to pure psychology. With SEVEN coming out this year and Lacrimosa of Dana eventually hitting PC at some point, Celceta is literally the only remaining modern Ys game without a PC version in the West. You ever notice how the most painful losses are the ones where you come so close to victory? The most noticeable gap in any collection is a single entry? Same basic concept: PC is so close to being a perfect platform for the Ys series, it just needs that one last game.

Another element that puts this so high on my list is the sheer possibility of it. Everything else on here feels like a pipe dream to at least some extent – a majority of these games are from last-gen and companies don’t seem quite as keen on re-releasing old content as I’d hoped. With that in mind, I’d easily consider Ys SEVEN to be the less likely of the two missing Ys games when it comes to PC ports and that managed to become a reality. Considering the poor timing of SEVEN’s release date on PC compared to the American release date for VIII on consoles, I’d almost be willing to bet that we might see confirmation of a Memories of Celceta PC port from XSEED around the time NIS America announces the final release date for the PC version of Lacrimosa of Dana.

To put it simply, Memories of Celceta is the only game on this list right now that I don’t see merely as a hope. It’s an inevitability. Falcom has already begun focusing more on the PC market in the West, the fact that day-one PC releases were a big part of what led them to choose Aksys and NIS America only proves it. XSEED has been playing a game of catch-up, effectively proving that they are capable of following through with this new strategy given the fact that they released 3 Falcom games on PC this year alone, with one more set likely to release sometime next year. And while the Trails games are Falcom’s top brand in Japan, Ys is still the more popular brand in the West. The Western demand for Crossbell may be deafening, but there’s a much more viable option left to XSEED. The cry for Memories of Celceta on PC is literally deafening: it was riled up by a Twitter gaffe two years back, Joyoland’s attempt to put their ports on Steam Greenlight with pages entirely written in Chinese were met with salivation in English and SEVEN’s recent PC release proves that XSEED finally has the resources to make this request a reality. It’s time to complete my collection.

Thus concludes this year’s set of lists. It almost makes me wonder what I’d be able to write next year. The sheer amount of new games receiving releases on PC and old games being ported long after their initial release is what caused me to abandon this entire concept in the first place, so in a strange sense, it almost feels good to not have to write these nearly as often as I did in previous years. At the same time, I do miss writing up these lists: that’s why I’ve continued with the yearly April Fools’ list of console ports and managed to put together a wishlist for GOG this past summer. On the plus side, I’ve almost got a full list ready for next April, but as for December 2018, I’m kind of at a loss of what to do to extend an article like this to its usual length. Oh well, at least I’ve got a whole year to figure that out.

 

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10 Games I’d Like To See Re-Released #05: SNK

Man, I’ve been slacking off a bit lately. I intended to have this up by the first of the month, like I usually do, but because I slacked off on next month’s article – and I’ve decided to have the companion piece to that pushed back to next month – I ended up just relaxing and recharging, instead of writing this one. In terms of games I ended up achieving, I can’t really claim victory here, but I am incredibly happy to hear that the original Dead Rising is being re-released on PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. While this technically wouldn’t have made my list, considering it was a last-generation title, it’s good to see that it will no longer be tethered to the Xbox 360 permanently. In addition, both main iterations of Dead Rising 2 (the original and Off the Record) are also hitting PS4 and XB1 – both games were already released on PC. I was kind of hoping we’d also see re-releases of Case Zero and Case West – but DR1 was really what I was most looking forward to in terms of re-releases.

Since I’ve gone on hiatus with PC ports, I feel like I might as well do my bragging about it in here. At the start of July, I got hit with a bombshell I wasn’t really expecting: Aksys Games got the rights to bring Falcom’s Tokyo Xanadu to North America and to make matters even sweeter – they’re financing a PC port of the game on Steam. It’s unknown if it’ll be a direct port of the Vita version, or if it will also include content from Tokyo Xanadu eX+, the enhanced PS4 port, but regardless I am ecstatic for what this may mean for future Falcom releases on PC.

Before we get started with the list, let’s go over the rules I’ve been keeping when writing these articles. I’m going to be looking at games from the 6th generation (Dreamcast, PlayStation 2, GameCube and Xbox) and earlier. I’ve decided to focus on one company for each article, and because I live in North America, I’m not counting any international re-releases, so if anyone decides to be a smartass and tells me I can buy some of this stuff on Japan or Europe’s services, that’s not going to work for me. If I can’t buy it legitimately from America, I’m not counting it. I’ll also be discussing any potential improvements that could be made to these games, in the case that they would receive an HD re-release. To make things reasonable, I’ll also be avoiding games that saw re-releases on 7th generation and later consoles, through PlayStation Classics, Virtual Console or other similar services. Of course, more substantial re-releases than straight emulations would be ideal, but at least the games themselves are easy enough to obtain and play.

To celebrate the recent release of The King of Fighters XIV, I’ve decided to delve into the library of the newly-rechristened SNK. SNK has been starting to re-release some of their classic fighting games on PS4 with full online functionality, as well as some of their arcade classics on PC via Steam and the Humble Bundle. However, I am clearly a very greedy individual, so I just can’t get enough SNK classics. Here are 10 games I’m absolutely hoping they re-release sometime soon.

Crystalis (NES)

I bet you were expecting me to start with a fighting game, weren’t you? Well, Crystalis is perhaps the best Zelda game on the original NES, at least in terms of official releases. The unnamed protagonist awakens in a post-apocalyptic world, where science and technology have been abandoned for magic. In order to defeat the devious machinations of the Draygonia Empire, our hero must combine the powers of the four elemental swords: Wind, Fire, Water and Thunder in order to reform the legendary sword, Crystalis.

Potential Improvements: Considering how poorly done the later GBC remake was, I’d prefer it if they just kept this one as true to the original as possible. Just put this sucker on the Virtual Console on Wii U, 3DS and NX (if it continues the Virtual Console program). That’s pretty much the best we can do for it.

The King of Fighters 2003/NeoWave/XI/’94 Re-Bout (Arcade/PS2)

Admittedly, this is kind of overkill, but these are all great games and since they’re in the same series, why not? 2003 and XI were the first two games in the series’ third arc: commonly referred to as the “Tales of Ash” Saga; ’94 Re-Bout was a remake of the game that started it all, with enhanced graphics, playable bosses and the addition of Edit Mode; while NeoWave was just a pseudo-remake of 2002 made for the Atomiswave arcade hardware.

Potential Improvements: Online play is really the only thing I’d want for these re-releases. Graphical enhancements are optional, but would probably be appreciated by most people. Personally, I’d rather see bonus features like image galleries and sound tests.

SNK Gals’ Fighters (NGPC)

I was a huge fan of the NeoGeo Pocket Color back in the day. In fact, I actually owned one while it was still active in the United States and it really helped me to become the SNK fanboy I am today. To be honest though, a majority of the games SNK released on their slick little handheld were derivatives of arcade titles, with the most popular “original” titles being their crossover games with Capcom. However, there was at least one original fighting game IP on the NGPC I’d love to see re-emerge, even only as a re-release. SNK Gals’ Fighters was another crossover fighting game, this time taking various women fighters from games like King of Fighters, Samurai Shodown and Last Blade and put them into a more comedic setting not unlike Capcom’s Pocket Fighter. A fully realized sequel and/or remake of this game would be my true goal, but that seems unlikely without at least some kind of a re-release to gauge interest.

Potential Improvements: Online play, full stop. Everything else was at a point where it can’t really be improved, due to the small scale of the system it originated on.

Rage of the Dragons (Arcade)

This is probably the most legally murky of the choices on this list, Rage of the Dragons was a spiritual successor to the Double Dragon fighting game on NeoGeo, which was loosely based on the live-action movie adaptation. Playmore couldn’t get the rights to make an actual sequel, so instead they decided to create an homage: starring such original characters as James and William – the Lewis brothers and “Abubo”. All-in-all though, a solid tag fighter from the NeoGeo’s later days.

Potential Improvements: Once again, online play would be the most important thing for me. What would be really cool though, would be if they were able to work something out with Arc System Works (the current owner of the Double Dragon IP) to do a “Double Impact”-style release with the original DD fighting game. That game was great.

Savage Reign/Kizuna Encounter: Super Tag Battle (Arcade)

This is the point in the list where things start getting obscure. First up, we’ve got a fairly unknown duology of SNK arcade fighters. Savage Reign was generally considered a very forgettable fighting game, but its sequel, Kizuna Encounter, was a fairly solid game. The first tag-team fighting game SNK ever made, Kizuna significantly improved over its predecessor with a more interesting cast and improved gameplay engine. I’d mainly include Savage Reign just to show how far Kizuna came.

Potential Improvements: Online play, ‘nuff said. Including both the original arcade and arranged CD soundtracks would also be a nice gesture.

Aggressors of Dark Kombat (Arcade)

Another obscure game, fittingly made by ADK – the creators of World Heroes, who were later acquired by SNK – Aggressors of Dark Kombat is a unique fighting game compared to the majority of those that appeared on the NeoGeo. While some Fatal Fury games allowed characters to jump into the background and foreground, Aggressors allowed players to full-on walk in 3 dimensions, not unlike a beat-‘em-up like Final Fight, Streets of Rage or Sengoku. In addition, the game also utilized a similar control scheme to beat-‘em-ups: one button for attacks, one for grappling and one to jump. The game also featured the ability to grab and use weapons found throughout the battlefield (again, like most beat-‘em-ups). Matches consist of a single round, but both characters’ health bars have multiple layers, leading to long fights. The closest we’ve seen to a revival was the appearance of Kisarah Westfield in NeoGeo Battle Coliseum.

Potential Improvements: Online play is really the only recommendation I can think of, though honestly, this would probably do best in a collection with other ADK-developed titles, not unlike 2008’s Japan-exclusive compilation, ADK Tamashii for the PS2.

Dark Arms: Beast Buster 1999 (NGPC)

SNK’s non-fighting game releases are generally considered fairly obscure, but Dark Arms is probably the weirdest entry on my list. Based on the pre-NeoGeo lightgun shooter Beast Busters (which received a smartphone sequel a few years back), Dark Arms was a top-down action RPG-style game featuring a demon hunter who enters the spirit world in order to prevent an outbreak of monsters in the main world. Your mentor is the Master, a grim reaper-esque fighter who gives you a weapon, called the Catcher, which you can use to collect the souls of felled monsters in order to create an ultimate weapon: the titular Dark Arms. Probably one of the most unique titles on the NGPC, I’d love to see modern audience get the chance to play it.

Potential Improvements: To be honest, I’ve got nothing to add. A straight port of the original would be a great treat, especially as a budget title.

Fatal Fury: Wild Ambition (Arcade/PS1)­

The King of Fighters XIV isn’t SNK’s first foray into 3D graphics. They’ve actually been experimenting for quite some time. While most people argue that the KoF spinoff duology Maximum Impact was their best attempt, I was fond of an older title. Wild Ambition was effectively a remake of the original Fatal Fury, in the sense that MegaMan Powered Up was a remake of the original MegaMan: the basic plot remained the same, but there were some pretty extensive changes made – changes that no one really cares about since it’s not canon anyway. The roster’s been rearranged – with many of the old forgotten characters replaced with more popular ones from later iterations, like Mai Shirunai and Kim Kaphwan.

Potential Improvements: This isn’t going to surprise anyone, but online play is pretty much the only thing I’d add to this, especially if they use the PS1 version as a base.

Breakers Revenge (Arcade)

Probably the most obscure game on this list, Breakers Revenge was a revamp of a 1996 fighting game developed by Visco. The main reason it’s on the list is because it was exclusive to the arcades: there wasn’t a release on the AES or the NeoGeo CD, despite both platforms being active when it was released. I’m not sure exactly who owns the rights to this one, as Visco and SNK co-published it, but considering the fact that Visco’s currently making slot machines and flat screen TVs, I’d guess it would be easy enough for SNK to secure the rights.

Potential Improvements: I’m not even sure if I should continue writing this section, because it’s obvious just going to be online play. Although, honestly, I also wouldn’t mind seeing the original Breakers packed in as a bonus.

Samurai Shodown 64 & 64: Warrior’s Rage (Arcade)

Ever since SNK expressed interest in reviving some of their other old properties, one name has risen to the top of the list: Samurai Shodown. SNK’s #2 fighting game franchise – mostly due to the fact that until now, none of its characters appeared in a mainline King of Fighters game – Samurai Shodown has had a very successful run for the most part. The obvious choice of action would be to re-release the classic 2D games again. Unfortunately, considering the fact that Samurai Shodown Anthology, which contains every major release in the series, was released on the Wii and PSP, they’re still somewhat easy to get one’s hands on. So I’ve decided to ask for the next best thing: the lesser-known 3D releases for the Hyper NeoGeo 64. Samurai Shodown 64 and Warrior’s Rage told their own story, taking place after the second Samurai Shodown game. It also introducted the world to Asura and Shiki, two fairly popular characters that would later appear in NeoGeo Battle Coliseum. Plus, no matter what, it can’t be as bad as Samurai Shodown Sen.

Potential Improvements: Online play would be my main request, but what would be really cool would be if they included the Samurai Shodown games from the NeoGeo Pocket Color, as they were scaled-down remakes of the 64 games. It would at least be interesting to have them compiled, at least for the sake of comparison.

Admittedly, it was harder to narrow this list down than it usually is. So my honorable mentions will be a little more in-depth than they usually are. First, we have Metal Slug Advance for the Game Boy Advance: one of the rarer spinoffs of the series, built from the ground up as a home gaming experience as opposed to the standard arcade run ‘n gun. Then there’s Buriki One, another Hyper NeoGeo 64 game. What appeals to me about B1 is its unique control scheme – buttons are used for movement, while the joystick is used to perform attacks and its tenuous connection to the Art of Fighting series. Finally, there’s The King of Fighters EX2: Howling Blood, another GBA game. It’s effectively the closest thing I’ll ever see to a King of Fighters R-3 and it’s a respectable game in its own right. I’d just love to see it get some more love.

Despite my overall love for SNK as a company, it was harder to make this list than I would have originally expected, but that’s mainly due to the fact that so many of the games I would’ve wanted received re-releases either during the seventh generation or even recently, with their latest round of re-releases on PS4 and Steam. Hopefully, some of the games on this list will be among SNK’s next choices when deciding which games to re-release in the future. By that token, let’s also hope that their classic slogan, “The Future is Now” is more literal than figurative.

Losing (Middle) Ground

If you’ve read quite any of my articles, you probably know by now that I often wax nostalgic in many of my articles, generally longing for what I consider to be gaming’s “golden age”: between the third (NES, Master System) and fifth (PlayStation, Saturn, Nintendo 64) generations, with the obvious sweet spot in the fourth (TurboGrafx-16, Genesis, Super Nintendo). You might also recall an earlier article of mine where I outright said I considered the sixth generation to be a “dark age”. Still, thinking back on that article, there is one thing I have to admit I miss about the previous generation: the mid-tier game. What is the “mid-tier game”, you ask? I guess the best way to explain it would be to explain how it differs from other classifications of video games.

Of course, perhaps the most well-known style of game, at least these days, would be the AAA title: a game with a behemoth budget both in the game’s production and its marketing budget. The Call of Duties, the Halos, the God of Wars, that sort of thing. On the other side of the spectrum, you’ve got the “downloadable game”: a smaller game at a smaller price point. Of course, by this point, simply calling them downloadable games is kind of a misnomer, as you can just download AAA games on consoles and PCs nowadays. Still, that’s the name they were given when they started popping up on consoles and I really don’t feel like coining a new term for it right now. After all, we’re talking about a totally different subject. Then, of course, you’ve got the indie game, which for the most part are just a subset of the aforementioned downloadable game, except it’s made by a developer without any help from a publisher. Well, unless a publisher decides to pick up the game and publish it. Sorry, going off-topic there again.

So, having defined other classes of video games, the question still remains: what is a mid-tier game? Well, in my opinion, it’s sort of a catch-all for any game that, while clearly not a triple-A title, it is also far too large to be viable as a downloadable game. If I had to give it a definition by price point, it would be a $40 game, compared to the $60 AAA game and the $5-20 downloadable/indie game. The “AA game”, another term I’ve heard used but never actually seen a proper example of, would probably fall into this category. I’ve also seen some people refer to them as “budget games”, likely due to the smaller sales price point in addition to the smaller budget involved in the game’s creation. That’s a nice and accurate term and all, but “budget” has a negative connotation: implying that the game is somehow inferior because they didn’t blow $200 million on animating hand signals or paying some celebrity to show up in the TV commercial. I’ll stick to “mid-tier”, thanks.

You’re probably asking why I feel the mid-tier game was important, if I can only define it in the most nebulous of terms. Simple: mid-tier games were safer to experiment with. Rather than giving an untested concept a massive budget to piss away when the game fails to sell, a new idea could be given less resources, sold for less and the concept could be properly tested, perhaps leading to a much more substantial sequel if the game manages to succeed on a significant degree. After all, that’s how gaming started: as a by and large experimental field, where extremely tiny dev teams (typically subsisting of one or two people) churned out several games in succession and from these less-reined titles, the building blocks of gaming were formed. While admittedly the mid-tier games of the recent past weren’t quite as important to the development of gaming’s future, they still played an interesting part in allowing new talent to surface and rise through the ranks.
Why am I defending the mid-tier game with such fervor, you ask? It’s simple, variety is always a good thing, especially when it comes to video games. This is pretty much an objective fact. Water is wet, grass is green and more variety is better than less. At the very least, there’s a better chance that you’ll find something you like. When it comes right down to it, having a vast selection of games that were, admittedly, cheaper to make, there’s a better chance you’ll find a great (or even just inventive) title compared to the bland focus-tested sludge that makes up a vast portion of the AAA market, especially these days. Sure, there were several mid-tier knockoffs of whatever the biggest-selling franchise at the moment was, but chances were, there were also other games that weren’t just rehashes of the flavor of the month. Obviously, there’s also the nostalgia factor: many of the games I loved growing up didn’t have the largest budgets or the most advanced graphics, but rather, they had solid or inventive gameplay. That’s really the most important thing when it comes to video games for me, back then and especially now.

I can only really think of a few examples of what I would consider to be mid-tier games. God Hand for PlayStation 2 is a pretty good example. On the surface, the game is hideous and it’s been said that it was released before Clover Studios was able to complete it, but it’s still an incredibly fun game with a hilarious storyline and serves as the missing link between the side-scrolling beat-’em-ups of yesteryear and the melee combat-based action games (Devil May Cry, God of War, etc.) that began to spring up in the sixth-gen and are still widespread to this day. Tim Schaffer’s Psychonauts is another good example, not only of a mid-tier game, but also of a mid-tier publisher: Majesco. Hell, last generation, established companies made their bread and butter from mid-tier releases. SNK Playmore comes quickly to mind, with console releases of both their classic (Art of Fighting Anthology, Metal Slug Anthology, the Fatal Fury Battle Archives games) and modern (King of Fighters XI, NeoGeo Battle Coliseum) arcade games.

This generation, we’ve seen a significant drop in the number of games that were full retail releases that weren’t classified as triple-A games or some kind of compilation of download-exclusive titles and this trend has only been increasing each year, with no signs of slowing down. The homogenization of the market looks like it might get even worse next generation, especially considering the fact that Nintendo has finally made the jump to high-definition graphics. But what exactly is causing the mid-tier well to dry up? While I praise the advent of downloadable games on consoles for reviving the ability to craft smaller experiences more in-tune with my admittedly more old-school tastes, this had the added side-effect of creating an even more perfect environment for experimental games than the mid-tier of old. Of course, that’s not the only thing killing the mid-tier market. AAA games are becoming more and more pervasive by the year, due in part to a sluggish economy and higher costs for game development than ever before. Add that to the fact that many video game publishers are publicly traded and investors typically value a minor short-term gain overall (over more significant long-term gains and even the continued health of the company they’re investing in) and it’s honestly no surprise that mainstream gaming has become such a wasteland of banal, formulated cashgrabs.

Frankly, I think it’s a shame that as the console industry exists today games can only exist in the form of an bloated paint-by-numbers AAA monstrosity or as some dinky little downloadable game (let’s face it, folks, nine times out of ten, whenever a major publisher decides to make anything in the downloadable range, it’s going to be small, overpriced and on the whole, unsatisfying). From a businessman’s perspective that kind of makes sense: AAA games are where the big bucks are at (when it comes to consoles anyway), and anything smaller simply isn’t worth dumping any significant amount of resources into. They’ve only now begun to drop their stigma of being wholly inferior to disc-based titles, due mostly to a flood of indie titles on both PSN and Nintendo’s eShop (let’s be fair, XBLIG really didn’t do anybody any favors). Still, without the mid-tier buffer, a massive divide has formed in gaming and if anything, it’s hurting the established publishers that can afford to make triple-A games more than anyone else. As they continue to keep up with the absolute apex of what today’s consoles (and doubly so, next generation), every game that doesn’t make back at least twice its own immense budget is considered a financial flop and another nail in the company’s coffin.

Perhaps mid-tier is dead for good, but the concept behind it is certainly important to keep around. Massive AAA budgets are draining most publishers dry, and that’s on top of the fact that HD development has crippled all but the largest companies. All it really takes is one or two AAA bombs to bankrupt a company, which just leads to a more fearful (and therefore conservative) industry, which is especially disappointing for any form of media. We saw games go from a nearly-uniform $50 price point in the PS2-era to mostly $60 (with a significant number of $40 titles as well) last gen, and yet we still hear from most publishers that the prices have to go up in order for them to even break even. Something’s got to give. Perhaps the success of indie games like Guacamelee! and the fact that all three first-party companies are beginning to support indie developers with the amount of fervor afforded to them only on PCs in the past will show the major publishers that not every single solitary game needs photo-realistic graphics and a massive marketing budget in order to deliver a worthwhile experience. Maybe the mid-tier renaissance will be a downloadable one, breaking down the current downloadable stigma with regards to console and handheld games and leading to an increase in satisfying experiences. All I know is that it needs to happen soon in order to prevent another industry-wide crash, we lost too many good publishers and developers last generation.