How The PC Port Wishlist Stole Christmas!

Another year has come and gone and once again, the itch returns: it’s time to go port-begging for the holidays! Admittedly, it’s become a lot more fun doing these write-ups on a yearly basis – well, as long as you don’t count my April Fools console port article and the GOG article in August, but those have different criteria. It’s way less stressful discovering games new and old that were skipped over when it comes to my platform of choice over the course of a year than it was every other month. Of course, that also means that I have to be substantially more careful with my choices, but that adds to the fun. I can’t tell you how much filler there was on my old lists – Tekken Revolution doesn’t even exist anymore!

All three of my lists from last year will be reappearing this time – my top 5 gains of the year, a list of 10 brand-new port requests and even the overall rankings – but I’ll also be adding a fourth. It’s probably going to be a one-time deal: I had a hard enough time coming up with this list in the first place and frankly, given the subject matter, I honestly hope I won’t ever be able to find another 10 games that fit the bill.

But before we move onto the actual meat of the article, I’ve got to brag about what’s been announced for PC since the last list came out. First up on the docket, we’ve got Grasshopper Manufacture’s free-to-play rogue-like Let It Die, which was announced a little more than a week after my last article on August 10th and came out the following month. Later that month, Capcom would announce an HD re-release of Onimusha: Warlords – one of my favorite games from the sixth-generation – on everything, including PC. Things would go quiet after that until the following month where two announcements would come from an unlikely source: a Nintendo Direct. Capcom Beat-‘Em-Up Bundle and Katamari Damacy Reroll were both announced for the Switch and the PC. The former essentially takes care of what I wanted most of all from Final Fight: Double Impact – specifically the original Final Fight arcade game with online play – while Reroll is an HD remaster of the original Katamari Damacy, something I wouldn’t have dreamed could ever come to PC, regardless of how much I wanted it. Beat-‘Em-Up Bundle is already available – despite an unexplained late launch on PC compared to consoles – while Katamari is due out later this month. Tokyo Game Show didn’t bring much on the PC ports front for obvious reasons, but Capcom did announce that an HD release of Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy will be gracing all three major consoles and PC sometime next year. Just shy of a week after that announcement came the big one: ARIKA officially announced that Fighting EX Layer would be coming to Steam, though they implied that this was only possible due to their arcade port and the title’s future may very well depend on the sales of these new releases. Finally, there’s Sunset Overdrive, which wasn’t technically announced officially until the day the game was released – November 16th – but we’ve had leaks going back to May, where it was rated in South Korea. Then it was rated by the ESRB… and then a store page appeared on Amazon. You have to give Microsoft credit for sticking to their guns and still pretending like it was a surprise release, though.

Of course, there were some cool things popping up on GOG as well. The entire Jill of the Jungle trilogy was released there on November 2nd for FREE! Meanwhile, three more King of Fighters games – The King of Fighters ’98 Ultimate Match Final Edition, The King of Fighters 2002 Unlimited Match and The King of Fighters XIII (rechristened as the ”Galaxy Edition” after GOG’s client) – were also added to their library. That’s all I’d consider relevant so far, though considering the fact that Sony managed to nab Battle Arena Toshinden on both the Western and Japanese versions of their upcoming PlayStation Classic, that implies that we know who GOG would need to ask to relicense those games. Also back in August, THQ Nordic released some of Microsoft’s Windows Store-exclusive titles on Steam, as well as physical releases. I mainly cared about Super Lucky’s Tale and ReCore: Definitive Edition out of their first batch, but there were also Disneyland Adventures, Rush: A Disney – Pixar Adventure and Zoo Tycoon: Ultimate Animal Collection. It’s been speculated they might be handling a physical release of Sunset Overdrive on PC as well, but there’s been no concrete information on that front. Speaking of rumors, we’ve also seen evidence that Yakuza 6: The Song of Life may be coming to PC at some point, based on one of their quarterly reports which listed the game as a PS4 and PC title. Nothing new on the console front, I’m afraid. I’m sure that more games that were previously PC-exclusive before getting ported to PS4 and/or the Xbox One have since received additional Switch ports (and vice versa), but that’s not really my scene.

Top 5 Successes of 2018

Time for my usual round of yearly bragging. This time around, three of my picks weren’t even on any previous lists in the first place – so I can’t even really take credit for them. Granted, two games were too old to fall under my criteria in the first place and are only coming to PC due to the creation of new remasters across multiple platforms and one of them was only released this year anyway. I guess if I were to pick an honorable mention, I’d give it to killer7, coming to us courtesy of Grasshopper Manufacture and NIS America (with Capcom’s blessing). Despite NISA’s history with PC ports – still waiting for actual confirmation that their Ys VIII port was legitimately fixed (as opposed to “I played 50 hours and it only crashed 15 times!”) – apparently this game turned out amazing, adding new features and opting for a silky smooth 60 FPS framerate.

5. Ys: Memories of Celceta – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Vita)

Nothing against Celceta – it was a fun game and I’m glad it hit PC – but this probably would’ve ended up being higher if it didn’t feel like a foregone conclusion. Hyde Inc. definitely learned from their PC port of Ys Seven, as this game turned out looking amazing – easily becoming the definitive version of Falcom’s in-house take on the Ys IV legend.

4. Metal Wolf Chaos XD – From Software/Devolver Digital (Xbox)

The former Japanese Xbox-exclusive where players take on the role of the President of the United States as he pilots a mech suit is finally coming out in America – and on modern platforms, no less. Devolver Digital had been showing interest in publishing the game since 2016 and an official announcement was the centerpiece of their E3 conference this year. It’s not due out until sometime next year, but the fact that it’s coming to PC makes it worth the wait.

3. Onimusha: Warlords – Capcom (PlayStation 2, Xbox)

I legitimately freaked out when I heard about this. All things considered, Onimusha was one of those cult classic Capcom franchises that seemed out of reach for legitimate reasons: specifically, the likeness rights of the actor who portrayed the main character, Samanosuke Akechi – who was modeled after and even voiced by Japanese/Taiwanese actor Takeshi Kaneshiro. In fact, the only game that doesn’t have this issue is Dawn of Dreams, the unpopular fourth game and I’m sure that’s why we only have this first game, as opposed to a full-on HD collection. Regardless, I’ve got some good memories playing through this game one night with two of my buddies back in 8th Grade and I can’t wait to go through it again.

2. Fighting EX Layer – ARIKA (PlayStation 4)

I was originally going to put this on this year’s wishlist, as a sort of “gimme” game, simply because ARIKA had expressed interest in releasing FEXL at some point if it did well. I wasn’t even expecting an announcement on this until next year at the earliest, but ARIKA surprised me with a simple trailer on YouTube back in late September. Better still, they only plan on selling the “Full Version” – which includes fifteen Gougi decks (to the Light Version’s five) and Hokuto as an additional character – at $40, the Light Version’s price on PS4 Clearly the best of both worlds. While I likely won’t be able to grab this on day one – despite the generous 25% discount – I do hope to grab it before the end of this year.

1. SEGA’s “Best in Japan” Line-Up at E3 2018

It couldn’t have been anything else. When I listed the Yakuza series on last year’s wishlist, I was honestly being flippant. I never would’ve guessed that Sega would’ve brought one of its big console exclusives to PC but here we are: Yakuza Zero’s already on Steam and Yakuza Kiwami has already been announced. On top of that, they also announced Valkyria Chronicles 4 would be coming to PC and reaffirmed recent releases, claiming that they were bringing “the best Japanese titles to PC”. Hopefully, we’ll see even more announcements next year.

10 Broken/Delisted Games I Want on GOG

This is that new list I mentioned near the start of the article. While I’ll often extoll the virtues of a digital-only future for the PC platform, it’s not a perfect concept. We’ve seen various games removed from storefronts like Steam and GOG due to expired licenses, company closures and various other issues. Worse yet, there are games that are still available that are ridden with defunct DRM programs or worse, incompatible with modern operating systems. Of course, GOG will attempt to circumvent the technical issues of these games, with their re-release of Fallout 3 last year being a chief example. So why not pick 10 digital releases that are either gone or stagnant and point out that, in the end, they’re just some Good Old Games?

Street Fighter IV – Capcom

I’ll be honest with you: SF4 was the game that inspired this list in the first place. Back when I was researching for that Street Fighter retrospective I spent the better part of this year on, I popped in the original home release of Street Fighter IV and had a pretty good time going back to it. These days, it’s more of a curiosity piece – especially due to its exclusive cinematics that didn’t appear in any other iteration of SF4 and its gallery mode – but certainly not worth the $20 Capcom is still asking for it on Steam. Just give it the Blazblue Calamity Trigger treatment: strip out the GfWL-powered online mode entirely and sell that sucker on Steam and GOG for $10, with 50% or higher sales on the regular.

Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions – Activision

I’ll level with you: I’ve yet to play the recent Spider-Man game on PS4 and I’ve got my doubts that I’ll play it before the decade’s through. With that in mind, I feel confident in my assertion that Shattered Dimensions was the best Spider-Man game ever sold on Steam. It’s a shame that the PC port was only compatible with Windows XP and Vista – especially considering that it was on sale on Steam only a few years back. It’s been taken down again – that’s the problem with licensing agreements – but I’d love to see it come back, stripped of Games for Windows Live and able to run properly on modern Windows builds.

OutRun 2006: Coast 2 Coast – Sega

Well, this one’s strictly a licensing issue: Sega clearly didn’t want to pony up to renegotiate their license with Ferrari. I’m still bummed out that I missed picking up this port – the OutRun games are some of my favorite racing driving games of all time – so obviously a straight-up re-release is all I really want here. Granted, the game might have some compatibility issues since it was released back in the days of Windows XP, but as far as I can tell (based on the PC Gaming Wiki), there don’t appear to be any compatibility issues on modern systems, which means that anyone smart enough to pick it up before its removal can still play it to this day.

Stubbs the Zombie in Rebel Without a Pulse – Aspyr

This is one of those games from the sixth generation that I missed out on, but it looked interesting. I mean, zombie games are a dime a dozen, but a game where you take control of a zombie would be an original concept today, let alone today. It’s also got a sense of humor, which is also a plus for me. It was also apparently on Steam at one point – but it looks like it was taken down because it can’t run on modern hardware. So yeah, this is absolutely perfect for this list: maybe a GOG release will mean a complete removal of its SecuROM DRM.

Wolfenstein (2009) — id Software (Bethesda)

Apparently, the only reason this game has been taken down is because Bethesda – the current rightsholder for Wolfenstein and id Software’s other IPs – is ashamed of it. All I’ve got to say to that is that both versions of Doom 3 are still up for sale on Steam and the BFG Edition is up on GOG – so using “quality concerns” as an excuse is invalid. Frankly, I’d just want it as a curiosity piece more than out of sheer enjoyment. I mean, every other Wolfenstein game since 3D is available on digital storefronts in one form or another and I’ll never believe that the 2009 game was so much worse than every other game in the series.

Ghostbusters: The Video Game – Atari

I mean, I already own this game on Steam, so I can vouch for its quality. Granted, I think it was taken down in the first place to help boost sales of the 2016 game, which was apparently a slapdash cash-in on a box office bomb. And now that’s even down as well. Might as well allow audiences to enjoy the best Ghostbusters-related video game ever released in North America once again. There’s not even any way to implement the multiplayer from the console versions and I even played through the game on an OS no older than Windows 8.1, so it should be as simple as literally flipping a switch.

Driver: San Francisco – Ubisoft

I’ll be honest, I never really got into the Driver series that much – but I did like Burnout Paradise. Driver: San Francisco looks like a game made in a similar vein and given all of the good reviews I’ve seen regarding it – for both the console and PC versions, no less – it’s made me curious about the game’s quality. Unfortunately, it looks like the game may be bound by Ubisoft’s own proprietary DRM, Uplay: so the chances of the game hitting GOG are pretty low, even though it’s only available on Amazon as a digital download at the moment – and the reviews on there seem to imply that there are compatibility issues with Windows 7 and its successors.

Mortal Kombat Arcade Kollection – WB Games

Hey look, another game I already own on Steam! I’m not sure why WB took down this collection off of Steam – maybe because the online multiplayer was handled on Games for Windows Live – but even if it weren’t, it does offer something different from the current line of classic PC ports available on GOG. While that collection contains the original Mortal Kombat 3, a childhood favorite of mine, the Arcade Kollection has Ultimate MK3 – the much more popular version – instead. Granted, I think the best thing WB could do would be to just re-release it on Steam and GOG with improved online multiplayer – but just making it available to the masses again would be nice.

Midnight Club II – Rockstar

Man, I’ve got a real thing for racing games this time. Did you know that Rockstar used to make games that weren’t sprawling open-worlds? It’s true! From what I’ve heard about it and seen in gameplay footage, it seems like a pretty good arcade racing game – the type I like. Midnight Club II was apparently the only game in the series to receive a PC port, which makes it a prime candidate for re-release.  Again, the issue stems from the age of the game – apparently this port’s so old, the non-Steam releases aren’t even stable on Windows Vista, let alone 10.

Narco Terror – Deep Silver

This game actually came as a recommendation from my editor: while I wasn’t opposed to having two games from the same developer on this list, making it to nine without any repeats made me reluctant to resort to that. From what I’ve seen, Narco Terror is a twin-stick shooter inspired by top-down, free-movement shoot-‘em-ups like Ikari Warriors, Commando and Renegade Ops. It doesn’t necessarily have the best reviews, but that kind of pedigree makes it sound like an interesting game. I’d give it a shot if it resurfaces at a reasonable price. Besides, Deep Silver seems to be pretty chummy-chummy with GOG. I’m not sure why the game was removed from Steam in the first place – but Steam keys can still be bought on Amazon for some reason, so I’m not sure what problem there was with the game.

The Main Event

With those lists out of the way, it’s time for a fresh batch of PC port-related wishes. Before we begin, let’s recap the rules I’ve tried to keep since I started doing these lists a few years back. I’ve been sticking to the seventh (PS3/Xbox 360/Wii) and eighth (PS4/Xbox One/Wii U/Switch) video game console generations, as well as their portable counterparts. Porting anything else would likely require a remaster – like Onimusha and Katamari Damacy – and these lists are more about run-of-the-mill ports. I also generally limit myself to a single game per company, though given the sheer amount of mergers we’ve seen, I will often allow entries from wholly-owned subsidiaries and their parent companies in the same list. In other words, you could see entries from Sega and Atlus on the same list, but not Square Enix and its various divisions, except maybe Taito – Squenix seems to have given them a lot of headway. I generally consider a “series” an entry, so every game would be considered together, as long as all of the games fall into the console generations I’m covering. Last and certainly not least, I’ll be keeping this limited to third-parties and Microsoft – who seem to have gotten even better about putting the games I care about on PC. Asking for Nintendo and Sony first-party content is a waste of time, so don’t expect to see stuff like Super Smash Bros. Ultimate or Marvel’s Spider-Man on this list. That being said, let’s get down to business.

Spyro: Reignited Trilogy – Activision/Toys for Bob (PlayStation 4, Xbox One)

…what? I always stack the deck in my favor whenever possible. We’ve already seen evidence hinting to the existence of both a PC and Switch version in development and while the game is currently exclusive to the HD Twins of PS4 and XBO, I’d much rather grab it on PC all things considered – especially after the whole debacle surrounding just how much of the content is actually on-disc. On the other hand, I worry I may not be able to spare the 67.455GB needed to download the game (on PS4, anyway) at this point. Either way, I liked what little I played of Spyro on the PlayStation 1 and would love to experience the rest of the original trilogy in full HD.

SNK Heroines: Tag Team Frenzy – SNK/NIS America (PlayStation 4, Switch)

Sure, it’s another game where we’ve got at least minor evidence that a PC port could be in the works. I told you I don’t always play fair with these. In an E3 magazine special, it was mentioned that Abstraction Games handled the Switch version of SNK Heroines and the same write-up mentioned that they were working on a PC version as well. Considering they were the dev team behind The King of Fighters XIV, it only makes sense that they could be making a PC version of this game as well. Taking all that into consideration, I’ll assume that we’ll hear some kind of confirmation about SNK Gals’ Fighters’ spiritual successor hitting PC sometime next year.

Lunar: Silver Star Harmony – Game Arts/XSEED Games (PlayStation Portable)

This is usually the point in the list where I beg for yet another PC port of a Falcom console-exclusive. Alas, I’ve already exhausted all of their games that have been translated into English in recent history – and I’m not enough of a fool to suggest that anything besides the Japan-only Kiseki games receive even a passing glance by any translation company at this point. What’s an Icepick to do? Easy: dig up another XSEED translation of a game I’m fond of. Granted, I would obviously prefer seeing a re-release of the old PS1 version – because that’s “me nostalgia” – packed in with the original Sega CD version, but honestly: the PSP release is not only the newest release of the game, but it’s the only one I haven’t played at all – “Lunar Legend” was a mistake. Game Arts has mentioned interest in bringing more of their games to Steam and XSEED’s been doing a bang-up job of bringing their stuff to PC, so let’s just kill two birds with one stone.

Ghost Trick: Phantom Detective – Capcom (DS, iOS)

When it comes right down to it, I’ve got enough requests for Capcom games to keep them in the running for years to come – it’s just difficult to narrow down which one gets the nod each year. I almost considered putting Ace Attorney on this year’s list, but even before Capcom announced a re-release on every modern platform that matters, my gut went in a completely different direction. Ghost Trick is easily one of the most underappreciated games in the DS’s library and the fact that it’s only seen a re-release on iOS feels like a mystery not even Sissel and Lynne would be able to solve. Use the iPhone version as a base, add mouse support and improve the resolution and BAM! You’ll introduce another of Shu Takumi’s masterpieces to a much wider audience. Think of it as a well-deserved tribute to the late, great Missile.

The Legend of Dark Witch Episode 3: Wisdom and Lunacy – INSIDE SYSTEM/M2 (3DS)

This was honestly my first pick for this year’s list – a choice that was solidified when the game was first released on the 3DS last year. I’m fond of the first two Dark Witch games and would love to play the latest entry on my PC, even if its gameplay supposedly deviated significantly from previous titles. Considering the fact that the second RPG spinoff in the series, Brave Dungeon: Seigi no Imi, has already been confirmed to be releasing on PC via Steam next year, I like the odds that this game will hit the platform as well at some point. I just hope it’s sooner rather than later.

The Prinny Duology – Nippon Ichi Software (PlayStation Portable)

Prinny: Can I Really Be the Hero? And Prinny 2: Dawn of Operation Panties, Dood! were two of Nippon Ichi’s more interesting releases. Spun off from their popular Disgaea series, these games were actually platformers starring the series mascot in a similar vein to the Ghosts ‘n Goblins games of old, both in terms of platforming mechanics and apparently difficulty. It would be a shame to keep these games constrained to a handheld long gone like the PSP, especially when the PC is so enduring. I’ve honestly been wondering if NIS America bailed on releasing the rest of the older Disgaea games and just skipping straight due to issues with porting games from the Vita or because they just wanted to focus on their latest release. Well, the Prinny games don’t have either issue – NISA’s ported games from PSP before and there aren’t any more recent titles in the series to worry about – so they’d be a perfect choice for a new project.

3D Dot Game Heroes – From Software/Silicon Studio/Atlus USA (PlayStation 3)

Man, I’ve been holding onto this one for a while. 3D Dot Game Heroes is essentially a voxel-based version of classic action-RPGs, borrowing elements from Final Fantasy Adventure, The Legend of Zelda and even Dragon Warrior to create something both familiar and new. Best of all, the player character can be completely customized using the game’s 3D sprite editor. This is such a cool little game, it deserves a re-release on modern platforms and a PC port would probably be the easiest way to make that happen. Better yet, it would give Atlus USA a little needed cred among the PC gaming community, given their consistent failure to do anything with the platform besides publishing ACE Team’s games on Steam.

Sonic Colors – SEGA (Wii)

Truth be told, before I decided to go all-out and ask Sega for the Yakuza series last year, I originally planned on asking for Sonic Colors. Colors is probably my favorite Boost-formula Sonic game – no small feat, given my general distaste with the mechanics in general – and I definitely think it deserves a release on modern platforms. Of course, many publications assumed that this port might already be in the cards, simply because promotional art from a Sonic-themed Steam sale included artwork from the DS version of Colors. Not necessarily the smoking gun I was hoping for, so I figure there’s no harm in asking Sega directly.

Mighty Gunvolt Burst (Gal*Gunvolt Burst) – Inti Creates (3DS, Switch, PlayStation 4)

I feel like this might’ve been telegraphed with one of my choices last year. Either way, from what I’ve heard, Mighty Gunvolt Burst – rebranded as Gal*Gunvolt Burst when it was released on the PS4 – is the closest thing we’ll ever see to redemption for Mighty No. 9. As one of the thousands of people suckered into contributing to that second-rate MegaMan knockoff – even though I think the widespread response to it was overblown, to put it mildly – I’d love something resembling vindication on this front, particularly on my platform of choice. It doesn’t hurt that much like Gunvolt 2, we’ve already got the game’s direct predecessor on Steam as it is. So, come on Inti Creates, hook us up – you don’t even have the excuse of this game being a “Nintendo-only” thing, given its presence on the PS4.

Persona series – Atlus (PlayStation 3/Portable/Vita/4)

I’ll be honest: I struggled with this one. I almost opted out of doing listing this game this year for a couple of reasons. First, despite the fact that I do count Atlus and Sega as separate companies – despite the latter owning the former at this point – I just feel a little sketchy doing both in a single list, even if all but one of the games I’m even considering asking for here were made prior to that buyout. There’s also the fact that despite my (limited) success with Yakuza last year, I always worry about getting greedy with these.

Regardless, I’ve seen my opportunity and I’m taking it, because that’s what heroes do. Atlus USA has recently undergone a bit of a reshuffling in terms of its corporate structure – with key figures at Sega America and Sega West taking over as President and CEO, respectively. Considering Sega’s own implied emphasis on PC as of late, not to mention the fact that both Yakuza and Persona were on “that list of games Sega wants to bring to PC” and Atlus USA’s downright impotent acknowledgement that PC gamers wanted to play Persona 5 after trying to shut down a PS3 emulator, I think this could go either way. Still, if it happens sometime next year (or later, I’m not picky), I wouldn’t mind being able to claim at least a modicum of credit for it coming to pass.

Since I’ve only played the original English release of Revelations: Persona, I’d love to see Atlus start with an upscaled port of its PSP remake, if only so I can play through the Snow Queen quest at some point. I’d be willing to guess that Atlus would probably just end up starting with Persona 5 though. As for other games I’d want, I’d like to see PC ports of both Persona 2 remakes on PSP – with Eternal Punishment receiving a new English translation, obviously – Persona 3 Portable (with the additional content from FES, if possible) and Persona 4 Golden. I guess I’d also like to see their fighting game spinoff Persona 4 Arena Ultimax, but I’m sure Arc System Works would be willing to handle that with Atlus’s blessing.

Top 10 Most Wanted

I’ll be honest with you, I almost considered dropping this list, at least for this year. After all, only one of last year’s entries – Ys: Memories of Celceta, the former number one – managed to come to pass. However, upon further reflection, I decided a reshuffle was worth the effort anyway. A few other entries from previous years have been dropped from consideration for various reasons – something I probably should’ve considered doing last year anyway – and I decided to look into other older lists to replace them. As with last year, I’ve decided to rank them not only based on how much I want them, but also on how realistic I think it is that they might receive some form of a PC port in the near future. Here’s hoping next year’s list changes even more – for the happiest of reasons, of course!

10. Splatterhouse (2010) – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Considering this went from number 3 last year all the way down to the bottom spot, you’re probably assuming that I’ve fallen out of love with the 2010 reboot of Splatterhouse. Valid guess, but it’s more like I just think it’s become less likely of a port as of late. Maybe in 2020 – the game’s tenth anniversary – things will change, but for now, I just don’t see Bandai Namco revisiting this game. I mean, Katamari Damacy was a popular game but considering the last we’ve heard of Splatterhouse was as an understated part of the Namco Museum on Switch and that was last year, I don’t like the odds.

9. Dragon’s Crown Pro – Atlus/Vanillaware (PlayStation 4/3/Vita)

I’m not saying it’s impossible, but I think the critical moment to get a Dragon’s Crown PC port has passed, especially given Vanillaware’s lack of a partner willing to port games to the platform, not to mention the fact that development on 13 Sentinels, their next title, seems to be swinging into full gear. I’ll keep the faith alive but I’m not expecting this any time soon.

8. Tekken Tag Tournament 2 – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U)

You could easily argue that Tekken 7’s continued success will probably kill any chance of a TTT2 re-release anywhere, but honestly, who can really say? Tekken’s one of Namco’s big series, so I guess I could see some kind of a revival – after all, they did a re-release of the original Tekken Tag on PS3 years back to help promote a Tekken animated film. I doubt it’ll happen until Tekken 7’s done receiving new content and considering its second season just started and it reached another sales milestone, that might be a ways away.

7. Catherine: Full Body – Atlus (PlayStation 4/Vita)

This is probably the largest jump forward of any of the games from last year and it’s due to a number of factors. Aside from the shift in Atlus USA’s leadership I mentioned previously, there’s the fact that a new version of the game was announced altogether, one that Atlus USA confirmed would be making its way to the West but offering no other details, particularly which platforms it would appear on. Since then, Sony’s begun censoring some of their racier titles after moving their headquarters to California – even ones that aren’t intended for the Western market, which has led to some pushback from both Japanese developers and fans. Worries began to surface over Catherine: Full Body receiving a similar treatment, something which wasn’t assuaged by Atlus’s recent response to these new policies. I’m not sure if all of these factors will finally put Atlus over the edge, but here’s hoping.

6. Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo HD Remix – Capcom (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Huh, this one is in the same exact spot as it was last year. I guess the more things change, the more they stay the same. While the death of the Puzzle Fighter mobile game could have positive or negative repercussions regarding a re-release of the seventh-gen HD version, Capcom does seem to be on a roll when it comes to re-releasing their older titles in general. Of course, that could mean a straight release of the latest release of the original game, but I think it’s equally possible that we could see some other releases. I’d personally champion an “Ultra Puzzle Fighter” which would combine elements from all previous releases: the Street Puzzle Mode from the PS1/Saturn version and its various unlockable bonuses, the “X/Y/Z” game modes present in the Dreamcast and HD Remix versions and the ability to choose between the classic 2D sprites (with various filters) and the redrawn graphics from the latest release. On the other hand, they might also do a compilation package similar to their Beat-‘Em-Up Bundle, packaging the original arcade release with various other arcade games that could be considered “puzzle games”. I guess as long as I’m able to play Puzzle Fighter online with friends on PC, I’ll be happy.

5. NeoGeo Battle Coliseum – SNK (Xbox 360)

I guess something similar could be said for NGBC, which jumps ahead two spots from last year. SNK has been focusing on a single new game at a time but reinforcing their finances with various re-releases. We’ve got the SNK 40th Anniversary Collection on Switch handling the pre-NeoGeo era and the various NeoGeo Mini consoles representing their Golden Age, but we’ve still got a significant lack of their games from the Playmore era at hand. Given the rumblings of a NGBC2 being a potential project after Samurai Shodown and the all but inevitable King of Fighters XV, it would only make sense to re-release the original game, just to remind people how awesome it was.

4. Cyber Troopers Virtual-On/Virtual-On Oratorio Tangram/Virtual-On Force – Sega (Xbox 360, PlayStation 4/3)

Oh wow, our first legitimately new title! Ironically, Sega recently announced that these three games – the exact three games I requested from the Xbox 360 way back when – would be making their way to the PlayStation 4 in Japan very recently. That makes them even more primed and ready for port-begging. We don’t have any details about a Western release at this point, which is why they end up so low on the list, but I wouldn’t be surprised if this ends up being a one-year wonder on the cumulative list. I wonder if those crowdfunded controllers that recreate the classic Virtual-On control scheme will work on PC…

3. Rare Replay – Microsoft Studios/Rare (Xbox One)

The hits just keep on coming. With Sunset Overdrive having just made its way to PC, this is the only Xbox One exclusive I still want – well, aside from Super Ultra Dead Rising 3′ Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX + α, but I don’t think Capcom even remembers that spinoff. A collection of some of the best games from Rare’s halcyon days, lovingly recreated on modern platforms? Yes please. This would even manage to kill three birds with one stone, considering how I requested the Xbox 360 versions of the Banjo-Kazooie games way back when, and that’s just a fraction of what Rare Replay has to offer.

2. Brandish: The Dark Revenant – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Portable)

I mean, you kind of had to be expecting this. With all of the modern Ys games available on Steam, I was clearly going to branch out into XSEED’s other Falcom offerings. Fortunately, most of those have either already been ported to PC or are just essentially exclusively available on the platform at the moment. The only game they’re holding back from me would be the 2009 remake of the original Brandish on the PSP, which XSEED localized back in… 2015? Strictly a digital-only release, it’s a shame that this game didn’t get more love, especially considering how the translation was literally a labor of love by Tom “Wyrdwad” Lipschultz. This would probably have ranked at #1 – given Falcom’s emphasis on releasing their games on PC – but with Tom leaving XSEED, I’m not so sure it’s a slam dunk anymore.

1. MegaMan Powered Up/MegaMan: Maverick Hunter X – Capcom (PlayStation Portable)

These two are literally the perfect storm. We’ll be celebrating another MegaMan milestone this December – MegaMan X’s 25th anniversary, which has its own logo and everything – Capcom’s been knocking it out of the park with re-releases (even games like Onimusha that I’d long given up on seeing again in a legitimate form) and MegaMan managed to rack up another 2 million franchise-wide sales as of late. Honestly, I’d say more, but since I’ll be discussing this concept in-depth later in the month, I’ll just hold my tongue for now. I’ve had a pretty good track record with my number one picks on these cumulative lists, so here’s hoping for a three-peat.

And with that, my itch to talk about PC ports has been sufficiently scratched. Here’s hoping that I get enough announcements in the next four months to overshadow my next list – my traditional April Fools’ tradition of mentioning PC games that should be ported to consoles. I’ve nearly got that list completely planned out as it is.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Remaking History Repeats Itself

When it came to revisiting older articles that I intended to make into series, Remaking History was my white whale. Trying to figure out a way to write a follow-up to the concept was difficult, simply because it revolved around finding five games in franchises that would be worth covering in minor detail, as opposed to doing full write-ups for each of them. Fortunately, I’m more of a sequel man in that regard, but coming up with a list of five games worthy of remaking in the first place managed to be my major hurdle. Still, I ended up persevering and I can finally share the fruits of my labor.

The fact that I considered Remaking History viable as a series in the first place is a testament to my hubris roughly four years ago. Effectively, the concept behind the original article – and by extension, this humble successor – is to pick out five existing games from popular series that don’t live up to the reputation of other titles, both past and present. Personally, I think it’s a crime when games that are already great are given remakes. We’ve managed to get so much joy out of overhauls of weaker and more forgettable titles. MegaMan Powered Up recreated the 1987 classic while learning from later games in the series; Metroid: Samus Returns brought the forgotten Metroid II – a game from the original Remaking History article! – back to prominence; and Ys: The Oath in Felghana easily redeemed its source material, turning the black sheep that was Wanderers from Ys to one of the most popular games in the entire franchise, while still retaining many distinct elements from the source material. Remaking games that were popular in the first place and hold up under modern scrutiny just feels like an utter waste of resources.

I’ve decided to modify the format from the original article. Originally, I broke each entry up into three headings: the problems, the potential and my proposal. Looking back, I wasn’t really a fan of the formatting or the way that each section was broken up. While I’ve still got three subheaders in this new format, they focus more on simpler questions. What game should be remade? Why bother remaking it in the first place? How should a remake be handled? Not an exact match but talking about each game’s problems and potential separately felt redundant. I also wasn’t a fan of rearranging the headers depending on importance, keeping everything standardized should allow for an easier read. With all that being said, let’s move onto the first entry:

MegaMan 7

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What?

The seventh game in the MegaMan franchise’s original “Classic” line and the first game in that particular continuity to appear outside of the original Nintendo Entertainment System. By the time it was released, two games in the follow-up “MegaMan X” series had been released on the Super Nintendo and a third came out within a year of MM7. It’s generally considered one of the weaker games in the Classic series (if not the entire franchise).

Why?

The game was clearly rushed, with a development cycle lasting roughly three months. Obviously, this led to MegaMan 7 having a fair amount of issues. Stiff controls and wonky jumps made the game feel like a parody of the Classic NES games when compared to the X trilogy available on the same platform. The interesting thing about that is these minor issues appear to be the only real problem: a fan remake called Rockman 7 Famicom actually recreates the majority of the game – aside from the introduction and intermission mini-stages – and when transposed into the classic 8-bit style associated with the NES games, it’s honestly an excellent game.

How?

You’re probably expecting me to suggest going a similar route to the fan-game and have Capcom do a similar 8-bit demake. Honestly, I liked MM7’s graphics too much to ditch them, so I’d instead suggest going the “Sonic CD 2011” route. Take the existing game assets and rebuild the game using an improved engine. Simply put, make MegaMan 7 feel like one of the NES games while retaining the SNES aesthetic in both art and sound design. On top of that, expand the resolution to modern proportions, so that the irrelevant complaint about the screen being too cramped can finally be put to rest.

Considering the recent re-release of the original MM7 in the second MegaMan Legacy Collection, I think this is an unlikely project. A shame, considering just how amazing of a budget title this could be.

Shantae

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What?

The first Shantae was originally released on the Game Boy Color back in June 2002, over a year after the Game Boy Advance was released. A cult hit that pushed the aged hardware to its limits, Shantae was cut from the same cloth as games like Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest and Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, pushing the concepts found in early “Metroidvanias” exploratory platformers to their limits, combining labyrinthine dungeons with an overworld brimming with character. Future titles only served to expand on the storyline and gameplay, but the original game serves as a clear bedrock for the franchise. On top of that, it’s easily one of the best games in the Game Boy Color’s library.

Why?

Two reasons. For starters, compared to every other game in the series, the original Shantae is only available on a few platforms. Aside from the initial Game Boy Color release, the game was only re-released on the 3DS’s Virtual Console. Compare that to other games in the series, which are available on pretty much all modern platforms. Since the original game was built from the ground-up on the GBC, a remake just seems more viable than a direct port – I have a feeling that Nintendo wouldn’t allow emulation.

On top of that, as good as the first Shantae was, there were a few weird design decisions which a remake could easily iron out. I can think of a whole host of Quality of Life improvements that I’d recommend, making this diamond in the rough truly shine, but I’ll stick to my two main issues to keep things short. The lives mechanic – present in Zelda II and Simon’s Quest – just doesn’t make sense in that type of game. My other major issue is that there wasn’t a map in-game, which is distressing considering that the first Shantae easily boasts the most treacherous overworld of the entire franchise.

How?

Think a Super Mario All-Stars style revamp of the original Shantae, using newer graphics and quality of life improvements, but otherwise leaving the level designs completely untouched. Best way to handle this would be as a budget project: recycling assets from other games in the series seems like it could work. My only question is which art style should they use: the pixel art from Risky’s Revenge/Pirate’s Curse or the new hand-drawn style from Half-Genie Hero?

I’d personally prefer the former, simply because the sprite work from those two games was clearly inspired by the GBC game’s look in the first place, but I worry that they’d need to create more original content compared to recycling HGH’s assets. On the other hand, it might be possible to rehab the original game’s existing graphics to the enhanced style as opposed to outright drawing brand-new assets, which would be a necessity for using the hand-drawn artwork of the most recent game.

Dragon Slayer: The Legend of Heroes II

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What?

Clearly the most obscure of my choices by a wide margin, The Legend of Heroes II was one of Falcom’s early turn-based RPGs. I’ll be honest, I’ve never played the game myself, but I am familiar with its legacy. These days, the Legend of Heroes series is probably Falcom’s most popular franchise, at least in their home region. Before all of that, it was just another spinoff from Falcom’s Dragon Slayer “series” – which was really less a series and more of an umbrella term for a variety of projects headed by producer Yoshio Kiya.

Why?

Once again, it all comes down to availability. Oddly enough, every other game in the series was re-released on Windows PC, with the fifth game and the “Trails of the Sky” trilogy debuting on the platform as well. After that, the “Gagharv Trilogy” (the third, fourth and fifth games) and the “Trails in the Sky” trilogy would see enhanced ports on the PlayStation Portable, likely to accompany future titles in the series that would debut on that platform. I just think it’s absolutely weird that the original Legend of Heroes would see a PC port, while its sequel was completely ignored.

Admittedly, the 1997 Windows PC version of the first game isn’t its most recent release: a two-pack of both Dragon Slayer: The Legend of Heroes games were released on the Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn in 1998. When it comes right down to it, it’s still easily the most easily accessible version, still being sold on Japanese software sites like DMM to this day.

How?

For inspiration, I’d look to another similar Falcom remake: Ys I & II Chronicles. Simply put, remake both games with a low-budget rerelease in mind. Keep the base gameplay the same as the original games, improve the graphics to the same level as Chronicles and rearrange the soundtrack. That or Falcom could also just re-release the Mega Drive or PC Engine versions ad infinitum. Either way, it’s more about making sure that future generations could enjoy these classic RPGs.

Mortal Kombat Mythologies: Sub-Zero

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What?

Back in the 1990s, Mortal Kombat was a worldwide phenomenon. Don’t get me wrong, the franchise is still popular today, but the sheer amount of promotional material that accompanied the first three games in the franchise is absolutely staggering. Two theatrical films (and at least one direct-to-video), two television series, toy lines, it was truly something else. Midway didn’t rest on their laurels however, deciding to further cash in on their cash cow with Mortal Kombat Mythologies. Speculated to be a pilot for an entire series of spin-offs, the first game chronicled the life of Sub-Zero, the ice ninja, prior to the first Mortal Kombat tournament. The concept seemed like a slam dunk – Sub-Zero is probably the second most popular character in the entire franchise, acting as the Ken to Scorpion’s Ryu. Alas, it was not to be.

Why?

The original game sucked. That’s really all there is to it. The game was essentially a side-scrolling beat-‘em-up with fighting game controls. Add in awkward platforming sequences and the game become annoying to play. In fact, Mythologies reminds me of Acclaim’s Batman Forever game on the Genesis and Super Nintendo, with its cryptic and awkward controls. To make matters bleaker, Mythologies was eventually followed up by Special Forces, a 3D action game that somehow managed to be even worse.

The thing is, the entire concept was still interesting. I owned this game when I was a kid, simply because of just how much the idea of a Sub-Zero-centric adventure grabbed me. Years later, Midway would revisit the concept of a Mortal Kombat action game spinoff with Shaolin Monks, a 3D co-op action game that took place during the second Mortal Kombat, which was substantially more successful.

How?

Mortal Kombat’s already gone through a reboot, so I’d say do the same with Mythologies. Just remake the game as a 3D action game, taking more inspiration from beat-‘em-ups than usual. In other words, use Shaolin Monks as a template. Ditch the poorly implemented fighting game controls in favor of more traditional action game controls. Most importantly, keep those cheesy full-motion video sequences from the PlayStation version – preferably as bonus content, but I wouldn’t reject them being made a part of the new game itself.

Bloody Roar

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What?

Bloody Roar (known in North American arcades as “Beastorizer”) was another also-ran in the era of the 3D fighting game, a period ushered in by heavy hitters like Virtua Fighter and Tekken. Created by the fine people at Hudson Soft, Bloody Roar wasn’t particularly obscure among fans of the genre, but its popularity didn’t reach the dizzying heights the concept deserved. Effectively, the game took cues from other 3D fighters with looser engines – Fighting Vipers comes to mind – but incorporated a unique gimmick: filling an energy gauge allowed the fighters to transform into anthropomorphic animals, giving them access to new attacks as well as boosting their strength and speed. The original Bloody Roar managed to spawn 3 sequels – I personally can’t tell if the second or third game in the series was the most popular – but eventually, even its cult audience wasn’t enough to sustain it.

Why?

Since “Because Icey want!” was rejected by my editor, I’ll give some “valid” reasons. We’ve recently seen a 2D fighting game renaissance, but their 3D counterparts have languished: at this point, Dead or Alive and Tekken seem to be the only active franchises, with Soul Calibur preparing a seventh entry for release sometime this year. We’ve recently seen a boom in 3D platformers on the heels of a similar revival of the 2D variety, so it only stands to reason that there’s an underlying demand for 3D fighters: Virtua Fighter fans have been clamoring for a new game for the better part of a decade now.

How?

Maybe I’ve still got Mortal Kombat on the brain after the last entry, but I’d love to see the series get a full-on reboot, starting from the first game. Ideally, we’d be seeing something exactly like Mortal Kombat 9: a retelling of the first 3 games in the franchise, with many (if not all) of the characters from all three games. After all, Bloody Roar was one of those rare fighting games where most of the characters in its first entry never returned. So, starting from the beginning and working up to the game’s peak in popularity would allow for an interesting roster. It’s not like there were that many characters in the series to begin with, so recreating all of the old characters shouldn’t be that difficult of a feat.

…of course, Konami owns all of Hudson’s IPs these days, so this seems like just another pipe dream. Though I guess if Bomberman can come back, it’s not quite as impossible as some of my other entries on this list.

While the original Remaking History had a 20% success rate – at best, I’d argue “25%” if the Street Fighter I-themed Arcade ladder in the recent Street Fighter V expansion counts as a remake (and it doesn’t) – I’m not quite as confident that anything from this article will come to pass. I’d argue that only Shantae is within the realm of possibility, and even then, it just seems much more likely that WayForward would rather work on a sequel instead. Having said that, I’d love to be proven wrong and that we’ll see these remakes or others like them.

The Top Ten Most Overrated Games of All Time and What You Should Play Instead (Part 2)

Here we are, Part 2, hopefully in a more reasonable timeframe. I’m continuing counting down my top ten most overrated games of all time and listing antidote games that do what the overrated games are doing, but better. Let’s get right into it!

Number 5: Metroid

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Told you more Nintendo games were coming. Now there’s no way to deny how important the original Metroid is, it expanded what a platformer could be with its non-linear, interconnected world and myriad of upgrades that were needed to progress in the game. But damn it, that doesn’t mean we have to pretend it aged well. Metroid laid a great foundation, but the house is absolutely not up to code. The endless stretches of identical looking rooms with no map make navigating the game a nightmare, the control is too clunky for the game’s high difficulty level and starting at the first room of the game with 30 health (out of a possible 800 by the end of the game) are crippling flaws. I’ll give it a pass on the password issue, since the original disk-based version had saving. There are plenty of NES games that are much more playable today, to say nothing of later games using the Metroid formula. This hasn’t stopped people from acting like the original Metroid is the timeless classic that later games in the series are, and that’s why I’m putting it on this list. It deserves appreciation and respect, but you don’t have to pretend none of its flaws exist just because it came first.

Instead You Should Play: Super Metroid

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Here it is, the game you remembered the original Metroid as. Super Metroid takes the formula from the original game and fixes everything wrong with it. A fun to explore world with a map, excellent controls, a balanced difficulty level, worldwide saving. Plus great new abilities that the game uses to their fullest, great boss fights, and one of the most iconic emotional moments in gaming. Super Metroid is everything the first game wanted to be, the seeds of potential that the first one planted sprouted and produced one of the best series in all of gaming. There’s even a remake of the original Metroid using the elements from Super Metroid, which I considered for this position, but using a remake didn’t feel right. But whatever your preference is in that area, there are Metroids out there that will give you exactly what you remember from the original game and require much less nostalgia filtering.

Number 4: Secret of Mana

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Yeah, this is what I was talking about when I mentioned those supposed action-RPGs that may as well be turn-based. In the 90s, any RPG that wasn’t literally turn-based would be labeled a Zelda-style game, and that’s what I went into Secret of Mana expecting. Yeah, that’s not what I got. My sword needing to recharge after every swing and magic attacks freezing everything on the screen while they connect (and this includes bosses freezing you to get in their unavoidable attacks) was not my idea of Zelda. But genre preference isn’t my only reason for putting Secret of Mana on here. You have a three-person party in the game, with the option of co-op play. But if you don’t have two friends you can summon to your side whenever you want to play, you’re going to have to deal with the AI, and dear God. Now, I understand that a hyper-competent companion AI in a SNES game wasn’t a realistic request, but my issue is that the game puts the responsibility on you for the AI characters dying. And this is one of those RPGs where bringing a party member back from the dead is a huge pain in the ass early in the game. You can swap which character you control, but there will always be two vulnerable, AI-controlled characters during fights if you’re in single-player. Oh, and you not only have to individually level up several different types of elemental spells, the game sucker punches you by basically requiring you to have maxed out several elements to beat one of the last bosses. The grinding I endured when I got there… never again. Secret of Mana simply does not deserve the praise it gets, there are so many better RPGs on SNES. But for the antidote, I decided to go with the three-person party theme…

Instead You Should Play: Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana

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There are a lot of great things about this game, but for the purpose of being an antidote to Secret of Mana, I’m going to focus on the combat. Like Secret of Mana, Ys VIII is an action-RPG where you have three party members fighting at once, which you can freely switch between at any time with the other two being AI-controlled (there’s no co-op option, but that allows for the single player mode to be better balanced). However, the CPU-controlled characters have greatly increased defense and can’t be knocked out while the computer is controlling them, because the game isn’t a complete asshole. And the combat, it’s night and day. Fast action game-style combat where every attack is avoidable, you can combo enemies, link in special moves, dodge and parry, even activate something like Bayonetta’s “Witch Time” mechanic. This is what an action-RPG should be, and modern action-JRPGs thankfully seem to be adopting this style as a whole. The fourth generation was a golden age for many genres, but action-RPGs are doing much better in the present.

Number 3: Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater

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I’m still in a dream, and I want to wake up and get the Metal Gear I loved back. I’m not talking about the universally acknowledged monstrosity that modern Konami has turned Metal Gear into, I’ve felt this way ever since Metal Gear Solid 3 was first released. After loving the first two console Metal Gear Solid games and the Game Boy Color one for their fast-paced stealth gameplay and insane stories, Metal Gear Solid 3 messed everything up and the series never recovered, although MGS3 remained the low point until Konami really went demonic. The story was much simpler than the previous games with a one-dimensional main villain, zero dimensional bosses, and far fewer plot twists with the one the game presented as its biggest being insultingly obvious. But the gameplay was worse. Fast-paced stealth? Yeah, screw that, now we have to tip toe up behind enemies to avoid alerting them and worry about our supplies so that we can micromanage camouflage and recovering health, with long load times for the menu we constantly need, of course. And we lose the radar from the earlier games while at the same time getting much more open environments that the overhead camera is absolutely not suited for. I just want the old Metal Gear back.

Instead You Should Play: Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty

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Well, this should have been pretty easy to guess after what I wrote above. Metal Gear Solid 2 is one of my favorite games of all time, and one of the most unfairly bashed in its heyday. Raiden not being Snake doesn’t change that the gameplay of the Metal Gear series, which is at its peak in MGS2, with fast paced stealth that still gives you real options (as opposed to “do you want to use the camouflage that the game demands on this specific texture or be handicapped?” in a certain later game). The story doesn’t give a shit about realism, and that’s exactly how it should be, and it doesn’t hinder it at all when it wants to be philosophical. The fact that this game never got a faithful sequel saddens me to this day, and I can only hope that by some miracle Death’s Stranding turns out to play like this (not like we have any gameplay information to prove it won’t). Easily the best game of 2001, and the fact that people nitpicked it to death while giving a pass to… never mind, we’ll get to that in a bit.

Number 2: The Legend of Zelda

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I’ve had this issue in articles before, the Zelda and Metroid series parallel each other so well in their early days that it’s hard to think of unique things to say about one after covering the other. The original Zelda is an incredibly important game that laid the foundation for an incredible series, but the house is nowhere near up to code and if you go into that basement known as the second quest, you’re as good as dead. The original Zelda has barely any puzzles, control that is too stiff for the level of difficulty, obnoxiously scarce resources, and cheap “do something in a random place with no indication” roadblocks that try to pass themselves off as puzzles. It not holding your hand does not make up for all of this, it does not even come close. When I first played this game (with the very much needed help of a guide) I assumed that I was just bad at it since I was still fairly inexperienced with adventure games. When I came back to it years later, I realized that it was actually just not well designed. This led to some pretty strong feelings towards it, and it was actually my pick for the most overrated game of all time for a good number of years, before a certain game (I feel like I’m trying to hide Wily or Sigma being the final boss of a game by refusing to name it) took that spot.

Instead You Should Play: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

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I was originally going to put A Link to the Past in this spot, but I decided to try something different (if you want the ALttP writeup, go to the Super Metroid one and replace every mention of Metroid with Zelda). For all my issues with Breath of the Wild, there’s no way to deny that it completely annihilates the original Zelda at everything the latter game is praised for. More freedom, more non-linearity, way more open world to explore. This game was clearly made to please the people who loved the original Legend of Zelda, and while there are some parts that weren’t done as well (the original Zelda had way more dungeons and I don’t remember your sword breaking) it unquestionably obliterates the original game in pretty much category that gets it so much praise. Now just please fix the weapon durability and lack of dungeons so I can feel confident in the future of my second favorite series.

Number 1: Mega Man X

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Well, what can I say? People change. After a while you have to come to terms with what the games you played as a kid were really like, even if it means having an unpopular opinion. Yes, there was a time when I thought the control, level design, boss fights, secrets, and aesthetics in this game were enough to earn it all the praise it absorbs, but after REALLY taking a long look at it, you realize… you’re not buying this, are you?

The Real Number 1: Grand Theft Auto III

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Yeah, I know, this was a really, really obvious pick. I’ve actually called this my pick for the most overrated game of all time in previous articles. But I am not going to pretend I have a different pick just to surprise people… not for longer than it takes to set up a joke, anyway. Well, I think this is where I should lay it all on the line and tear into Grand Theft Auto III as much as I can and try to thoroughly explain why I hate this game so much.

Basically, the game has a similar decent structure but completely unsafe building issue to the original Metroid and Zelda. But this game isn’t from the 80s, it’s from 2001 and it’s not the first game in its series. Yes, it was the first 3D one, but many of its issues are unrelated to that (although some certainly are). The game not only has an appalling lack of checkpoints, it is actually designed so that even the meager checkpoint you do get is worthless. Die during a mission? You wake up at the hospital and have to drive back to the mission. Except you lost pretty much everything (all your weapons and money), so what you really have to do is load your save, which may be even farther away, since there are only three save points in the entire game. And you’ll have to drive to one after every mission, so even more pointless trekking back and forth. A Retry option would have made this game so much better, but nope, you’re going to spend exponentially more time driving to missions than actually playing them. Also, there’s no full map. Yes, you get a mini-map to guide you to missions, but I hope you never have to visit a gun store or Pay ‘n’ Spray after the one time the game points out the location of a single one to you. You’re also treated to the worst lock-on system I have ever seen in a game. Winning a firefight is nearly impossible, you’ll be quickly shot to death while the camera has a seizure and all of your bullets miss. The driving controls aren’t as bad, but they’re still lacking considering how easy it is to get caught on objects or get flipped over. And let’s talk about the hidden packages. They are the codifier for the worst type of collectable in all of gaming, tiny objects that could be hidden ANYWHERE in an open game world. And they aren’t even confined to masochistic 100% runs in GTAIII, if you want simple quality of life features like being able to restore health at save points, you’re going to need several of them.

Now, some people dismiss these issues by saying you’re really supposed to ignore the missions and enjoy causing chaos with no other objective. I have two responses to that. One, if a game puts in the amount of content and effort into its story mode that Grand Theft Auto III did, and it turns out the game is at its most fun when you ignore it, that is an abject failure on the developer’s part. Two, even this is held back by the awful controls and ultra-strict penalties for dying. And you’re going to need to find a lot of those hidden packages if you want good chaos tools without playing the story. I get it, being able to kill any character in a 3D game was mind-blowing at the time, but that doesn’t change that GTAIII is a genuinely bad game. Innovation can’t replace quality, at least not in the long term, and while the sequels to GTAIII fixed some of my many issues with it, several others remained for no reason. I genuinely think the lack of demand for Grand Theft Auto to fix its issues held the series and genre back for years. It took until Grand Theft Auto IV in 2008 for the gaming community (not reviewers, they still worshipped it) to finally say that the sandbox emperor had no clothes. Not that anyone admitted that about the prior GTA games. Thankfully, the sun was about finally rise and eliminate the shadow GTAIII cast on its genre…

Instead You Should Play: Saints Row 2

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Yep, this was also pretty predictable if you’ve read my past articles. But like my pick for most overrated game of all time, just because it’s predictable doesn’t mean Saints Row 2 hasn’t earned its spot. Saints Row 2 is incredibly similar to the PlayStation 2 Grand Theft Auto games, in most circumstances a game so similar would be a shameless rip-off. But Saints Row 2 had the radical, groundbreaking idea of making the gameplay style good. Almost every single issue I mentioned about GTAIII is fixed. Solid control in every area, checkpoints, a fully functional map, the hidden package equivalents are still there but at least the gameplay doesn’t depend on them in any way. This means you can enjoy the over-the-top story, massive gameplay variety, content packed quest, and all the senseless chaos you want without crippling flaws holding you back at every turn. Saints Row 2 is what Grand Theft Auto always should have been, and between it and the backlash against Grand Theft Auto IV, the genre finally evolved into what it had the potential to be. Saints Row 2 is not only an antidote to Grand Theft Auto III, it cleansed its entire genre of GTAIII’s illness. It earns the number one spot on its list as much as GTAIII earned its number one spot.

So, there you finally have it, my ranked picks for the top ten most overrated games of all time and the antidotes to their flaws. I’m very relieved to finally be finished, see you next time for an article that hasn’t been hanging over me for almost two years.

Top 10 Games I Want Ported FROM PC III: Beyond Thunderdome

It’s that time of year again. It’s funny: I originally intended these lists as a tongue-in-cheek parody of the recurring PC port lists I did years back, yet they’ve become one of my favorite traditions on this site, right up there with the collaborative wishlists we do here at the end of the year. I think part of what I like about these lists stems from the fact that it’s my way of sharing the wonders of games currently exclusive to PC with SNES Master KI, a man who would sooner gnaw an arm off than consider gaming on PC regularly. I don’t know what’s going on here, but these lists of mine seem to have some kind of mojo – for crying out loud, Double Dragon Neon was announced on Steam literally days before my first list came out – so it feels good to share the love, even a little bit.

Before we get to this year’s list, I might as well go through what’s been announced since December. The PC-to-console front has been pretty quiet as of late. The only major gain that’s been made is Streets of Red: Devil’s Dare Deluxe, which appears to be an expanded port of the rogue-like beat-‘em-up Devil’s Dare. It was released on both PlayStation 4 and Nintendo Switch just a couple of days ago. There was also the recent announcement that GameMaker Studio 2 was going to be compatible with the Nintendo Switch, which was preceded by the announcement of Undertale on Switch. Granted, Undertale was already released on PS4 and Vita before that, but it’s good to see it reach a wider audience. Since then, Hyper Light Drifter has also been announced for Switch, but again – it was already available on consoles.

The PC ports fared way better these past four months. First, there was the announcement of Devil May Cry HD Collection back in late December – less than a week after my last article went up – though it’s also coming to Xbox One and PS4. Then a few days later, they announced that the Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection would be coming to all four major platforms this May. I bring this up simply because it includes Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike (with online play!) – thus essentially giving us Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike Online Edition on PC. Of course, between this and the upcoming MegaMan X re-releases, I think that kills off any chance of those older conversions from my GOG wishlist – particularly Eurocom’s classic release of Super Street Fighter II Turbo and those old MegaMan X PC ports – being re-released, unless Capcom decides it’s worth the effort to try to exploit the few of us willing to double-dip, either out of nostalgia or curiosity.

After that, February brought us Puyo Puyo Tetris on PC. March brought us Senran Kagura: Peach Beach Splash and the announcement that Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy would be coming to PC (as well as Switch and Xbox One). Speaking of exclusives, Super Bomberman R – arguably the Switch’s break-out third-party launch game – will be coming to Steam (as well as PS4 and Xbox One) this June, with a nifty little P-Body (from Portal 2) Bomber as exclusive content. XSEED also announced that Ys: Memories of Celceta – my #1 most anticipated PC port from last year’s overall list – will be coming to PC (via Steam, GOG and the Humble Store) sometime this summer. In fact, the same day they announced Celceta on PC, DualShockers released an interview with XSEED’s Executive Vice President Ken Berry, focusing on their recent round of PC ports. Berry said that XSEED wanted to bring as many titles as possible to PC due to the ease of releasing a game worldwide and the lifecycle of PC games lasting much longer than consoles. He also hinted that the gap between console releases and PC ports will continue to shrink as time goes on.

Now that I’ve sufficiently patted myself on the back, it’s time to go over the rules I hold myself to when writing these lists. I’ll be sticking to games that were released on PC during the seventh and eighth generations – so pretty much from 2006 onward – that have not appeared on home consoles or portables by the time this article has been released. I’ll also list the platforms I think would be the best fit for each one, in the case that a game becomes exclusive to a single platform.

Spark the Electric Jester

I’ve always been a fan of the Sonic the Hedgehog series, but for years, Sega has struggled to recreate the magic of the Genesis-era 2D platformers in the modern day. While Sonic Mania – a game that was a collaboration between the creators of some of the most beloved Sonic fan games – managed to finally score Sega some acclaim last year, there have also been some attempts at recreating the style of the 16-bit Sonic games’ magic with various new IPs. Freedom Planet made it to the Wii U and PS4 in recent years, but one game that hasn’t been so lucky is Spark the Electric Jester.

In what I can only summarize as the love child of Sonic the Hedgehog and Kirby raised by MegaMan X, Spark the Electric Jester was developed by Felipe “LakeFeperd” Riberio Daneluz, the man behind such acclaimed Sonic fan games as Sonic Before the Sequel, Sonic After the Sequel and Sonic Chrono Adventure. The game itself skates the line of clearly taking inspiration from Sonic without feeling like a knockoff. Spark came out a few months before Sonic Mania did and felt like a good buffer game while waiting for Freedom Planet 2 – which was pushed back to 2019 at the beginning of the year.

Best Platform: Unfortunately, support for Spark has been discontinued by LakeFeperd, as he’s moved onto new projects, including a 3D sequel Fark the Electric Jester, which is clearly inspired by the Sonic Adventure games. The game was built in Clickteam Fusion 2.5 – the same engine used for the original Freedom Planet. Since it looks like there’s an (admittedly convoluted) way to port games from that engine onto all three modern platforms, it seems possible that it could make it to anything.

My money’s on Switch though, as Freedom Planet’s first console port was on the Wii U. Nintendo seems like the kind of company that would throw money at getting a game like this on consoles.

OmniBus

Weird and wacky games spawn on PC all the time, but it seems like there’s a decent market for them on consoles as well. Goat Simulator, I am Bread and Surgeon Simulator all seemed to do pretty well on PS4 and even the licensed Rick and Morty game Virtual Rick-ality is making its way to PlayStation VR later this month. So why not Omnibus? It’s a game that looks like a PS1 throwback – honestly, some of the models remind me of MegaMan Legends – where players take control of a bus and perform various tasks, mostly involving flipping the bus into the air and crashing through anything in sight. It’s stupid, but it’s fun stupid.

Honestly, I’m kind of surprised this one isn’t already on consoles. The game’s built in Unity; it runs on Windows, Mac and Linux and it was published by Devolver Digital of all companies.

Best Platform: PlayStation 4, hands down. The visuals look distinctly like something out of an early-to-mid PS1 game and Sony’s the main company taking risks with more bizarre PC games. I could see it coming to other platforms later on, but Sony would definitely insist on at least a timed-exclusive.

Super Star Path

For some reason, I’ve always felt like shoot-‘em-ups and puzzle games are a match made in heaven. Ikaruga and Zoop were two games that seemed to blend some elements from one genre into the other, though neither went far enough. Enter Super Star Path: a perfect combination of the two. Players are tasked with blasting through waves of alien enemies and when one enemy is hit, all adjacent enemies of the same color are also destroyed, while enemies of different colors essentially get turned into “garbage blocks” that block the path through the level. Super Star Path is a game that relies on quick thinking and quick reflexes.

Best Platform: Unfortunately, the game’s developer has yet to release any of their games on consoles. The game was built in GameMaker Studio, so it’s easy enough to port to any of the current three consoles. In fact, because of that, I’ll probably go with the Switch, simply because they seem to be making a big deal about how it’s compatible with the GameMaker engine now.

Zwei: The Ilvard Insurrection

With a heavy heart, this will probably be the last Falcom game I can actually include on these lists, unless XSEED manages to pull off some kind of miracle and gets their hands on a Falcom game that’s extremely old and PC exclusive. Zwei: The Ilvard Insurrection – née Zwei II – was the second and final entry in Falcom’s obscure action-RPG series and the last game they developed on the PC, both as an exclusive and overall. The franchise’s primary gimmick involves constantly swapping between two characters: one that focuses on physical attacks, while the other focuses on magic, hence the name (“Zwei” is German for “two”). I’m actually surprised that Zwei II didn’t receive any sort of console ports, especially considering the fact that many of Falcom’s Windows games were ported to the PSP when they pivoted to console development.

You’re probably wondering why I’m only doing the second Zwei game and not the first (subtitled “The Arges Adventure” in the West). For starters, the game was technically ported to consoles in Japan, with Taito handling the 2004 PS2 port and Falcom porting the game to the PSP themselves in 2008. Of course, those were Japan-exclusive releases, but considering the sheer number of hoops XSEED had to go through the get the game working on modern OSes, not to mention several PC-only features that aren’t viable on consoles, it would be easier to base a port of the first game on the existing console versions as opposed to the current Western release.

Best Platform: PlayStation 4 and the Vita are the obvious choices here. Even if you discount the fact that the game likely wouldn’t be ported by Falcom themselves and handed off to a partner, Falcom still tends to primarily focus on the Sony brand, as that’s where they think most of the domestic audience is. Having said that, I wouldn’t count out a Switch port down the line, if Falcom decides to revisit the series on consoles.

Verdict Guilty – 유죄 평결

When Street Fighter II ruled arcades back in the early 90s, it spawned numerous imitators – ranging from great to terrible. In fact, there was practically an entire subgenre of mediocre fighting games available on the Super Famicom, both licensed games and original properties. Verdict Guilty feels like a love letter to these games. In the near future, Neo Seoul has been hit with countless terrorist attacks and a massive crime wave, with few police officers willing to protect the people. Players can choose between 4 cops and 4 criminals in their search to unmask the crime lord responsible for the mayhem.

Verdict Guilty may be based on bad games, but it elevates the wonky mechanics of its inspirations into an artform. The game prides itself on being “easy to pick-up and play” with various interesting mechanics that make for a poorly balanced but still extremely fun game.

Best Platform: This is a difficult one. Verdict Guilty was coded from scratch in C++, the developer hasn’t released anything on consoles before and while the game has a clear SNES aesthetic, I’m not sure who would want exclusivity if any. I guess the Switch wins based on that last point alone.

Rosenkreuzstilette/Rosenkreuzstilette Freudenstachel

Admittedly, I wouldn’t have considered either of these games for console release – just due to the fact that I’d be concerned about whether they would be considered original releases or fan games, given its material – but if the games are allowed for sale on both Playism and Steam, then I think the game’s safe for consoles.

While the rebirth of MegaMan is nigh, the original Rosenkreuzstilette was actually released back in 2007, before the Blue Bomber went into hibernation. Both games are essentially love letters to not only the MegaMan series, but include references to various other Japanese retro games like Castlevania, Bomberman and even Super Mario Bros. Both games are among the best MegaMan tributes of all time and the fact that they both managed to get official English releases last year was amazing.

Best Platform: Playism is the games’ English publisher, so my pick would probably be PlayStation 4. While Playism has also published games on the Xbox One and the Switch, most of their console output has been on the PS4, so that just seems like the most obvious release platform, at least at this point.

Odallus: The Dark Call

Speaking of spiritual successors, Odallus: The Dark Call is a game built from the ground up to pay homage to the Castlevania series, mixing elements from Metroidvania and Classicvania to form an experience that’s both new and familiar. Developed by one of my favorite indie developers, JoyMasher – the same people who brought us Oniken – Odallus has been called “the best Castlevania game in years”, acting almost as a Shovel Knight to the franchise. While I hope Bloodstained doesn’t meet the same fate as Mighty No. 9, Odallus has certainly kept us busy while waiting for a “true” successor.

Best Platform: JoyMasher hasn’t released any of their games on console at this point and the game was made in Clickteam Fusion, so if I had to hazard a guess, my money would have been on the Switch. Danilo Dias seems to take a lot of his inspiration from the 8-bit and 16-bit eras of gaming, so I was sure he’d favor Nintendo over Sony or Microsoft.

However, seeing that JoyMasher’s upcoming game, Blazing Chrome – a love letter to the best Contra game, Hard Corps for the Sega Genesis – is being published by DotEmu’s new publishing arm, known as The Arcade Crew, I have to say that PlayStation 4 has become a lot more likely. While no platforms have been confirmed for this new game, DotEmu tends to favor the PlayStation brand when it comes to consoles. If Blazing Chrome does well, I could see them doing something similar with JoyMasher’s previous games.

Them’s Fighting Herds

In most lists, I’d consider this game to be a dark horse, but considering the sheer amount of off-the-wall choices I’ve made so far, I think it’s got a decent shot. Originally conceived as a fighting game starring the mane cast of My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, Them’s Fighting Herds received a complete overhaul after a cease and desist came from Hasbro. Entirely new designs were conceived by Lauren Faust and Lab Zero licensed them their proprietary “Z-Engine” to improve on the game’s design. The game’s recently entered Steam Early Access – due to issues with implementing the story mode, something Skullgirls fans should remember quite well – but the game should launch in full sometime this year.

Best Platform: Another difficult choice. Humble Bundle is the game’s publisher and as far as I know, they don’t have any preferences regarding platforms. The Z-Engine doesn’t help matters: Indivisible is set to debut on all three modern consoles this year. My gut tells me that Switch would be more likely, simply because of the sheer number of fighting games already available on PS4. TFH’s quadruped gimmick might help it stand out there, but not in a positive way.

River City Ransom: Underground

Developed by Conatus Creative Inc., a Canadian team, River City Ransom: Underground is a game that managed to be released despite having the entire world against it. After managing to receive a license from Million (the successor of RCR originator Technos Japan), all of Technos’ IPs would end up in the hands of Arc System Works. Fortunately, ASW signed off on the game anyway. While other modern River City games have merely felt like extensions of the NES classic, Underground feels like a true sequel. Taking place years after the original game, there’s an entire new generation of fighters waiting for players – each with their own unique fighting style. With four-player co-op, an arena mode for head-to-head fights and a total of 44 fighters to unlock, RCR:U takes the Kunio-kun franchise to new heights.

Best Platform: I’m torn between two extremes here. While the River City games seem to be released more reliably on Nintendo platforms, the PlayStation line is clearly the platform of choice for Arc System Works. What really complicates matters is the fact that the game itself was programmed using Microsoft’s XNA game engine, using the open source FNA for the Mac and Linux ports. Fortunately, all three platforms can use MonoGame, an engine that’s compatible with XNA games, so there are no hardware limitations.

In the end, I’d give the edge to the Switch. The game’s emphasis on co-op and the series’ history with Nintendo makes it seem like the much more logical choice.

Aliens Go Home Run!

I think the best way to describe the game is written on the store page itself: it’s a cross between Breakout, a shoot-‘em-up and baseball. Aliens Go Home Run! is an arcade-style game with less emphasis on branching storylines and more emphasis on clearing stages. It’s a game that’s clearly evocative of a simpler time and looks like a lost NeoGeo game. That’s really all I have to say about it.

Best Platform: This one easily goes to the Switch.  ANIM・ACE hasn’t released any games on console as of now, but considering their mission statement involves releasing games in the style of “Sega, Taito, Namco, Treasure and Nintendo”, it seems like the Big N is the safest bet.

Thus concludes another list of 10 PC games I’d like to see ported to consoles. As with last time, I own every game on this list – which makes sense because I’m recommending that they be made available to a larger audience. Doing lists like this is actually pretty fun: since I’ve already got the games in question, there’s less stress about choosing specific games. Clearly if I own them, I already enjoy them on some level, right? The only real limitations I have are choosing from the increasingly shrinking number of PC exclusives. However, as long as there are hobbyists and small independent developers, with budgets far too small to cough up the licensing fees to work on consoles from the beginning, there will always be games exclusive to PC. Whether they stay that way for good is anyone’s guess.

Of Axioms and Idioms: Best but Not Least

Well, it certainly has been awhile since I’ve written in this series. The funny thing about this article is that the concept behind it was originally completely different from what I’ll be writing about today: in fact, the original concept was going to be the third article in this series, but eventually, I just ended up discussing the bulk of the content in other articles. There was still some facet of the earlier iteration that I hadn’t explored, so I decided to change my approach to this whole concept and workshopped it into an entirely new direction. Unfortunately, my brain waits for no idea – I was originally going to write this up back in November but came up with an entirely new topic instead – so it just ended up sitting in my drafts folder, as I was working on other projects up until now. I just hope it was worth the wait.

It’s still difficult to articulate my thought process here, but I’ll try to summarize.  Put simply, this article’s topic is about how my favorite games in a particular series generally aren’t the ones I would consider the best. I think the most prominent example I have of this is the comparison between the second and third MegaMan games. For years, I’ve had difficulty explaining my exact feelings on the subject: the most accurate take I’d been able to articulate is that “while MM2 was a better NES game, MM3 was a better ‘MegaMan’ game”. A bold, ham-fisted statement, yes, but still the best I could do until recently. These days, I’ve got a much better handle on my thought process – my favorite game in a series and the “best” game are two distinct concepts that have been intertwined for far too long, so it’s just better to handle both of these indicators separately.

I’m not sure exactly when it started, but as far back as I can remember, I’ve always held preferences that aren’t particularly mainstream. When asked if I wanted Coke or Pepsi, I asked for Sprite – or more accurately, Lemon-Lime Slice. When it came to pizza toppings, I generally shied away from the standards of cheese, pepperoni and sausage. I’m not sure if it stemmed from a need to be different, rebel against the status quo or what have you, but I’d always pick things I enjoyed – even if it wasn’t on the menu. The thing is, this wasn’t just limited to food choices: I felt the same way about media. If there was ever anything resembling a consensus about the best entry in any fictional series I enjoy, chances are I’ll end up disagreeing. I never liked the seventh Friday the 13th film; my take on The Simpsons’ “dark age” is totally out-of-whack with the general consensus and I think Sonic Lost World may have been the best 3D Sonic since the first Sonic Adventure. At the same time, I’ve always acknowledged any widespread agreement on any such topic, albeit with varying levels of contempt. If I’m going to be honest, agreeing with it has always been something of an uncomfortable realization – even when default opinions shift with time – to this day, I feel strange whenever my personal favorite ends up being “the best”.

Perhaps the best way to illustrate this distinction is by defining both terms I’ve been using so far. Let’s start with the simpler of the two: “favorite”. It’s the pinnacle of subjectivity: my personal choice for what I like the most. Given the fact that what I personally consider best can vary based on anything from my mood to seemingly random criteria at any moment – if you could see how many drafts any top ten list I’ve written has gone through, your head would spin – in my case, the concept’s far more nebulous than subjective most of the time. As such, “favorite” lives and dies by personal preference. It’s strictly a personal opinion, one that varies from person to person, one that shouldn’t need to be defended or even explained (but this world is far from perfect). In the end, it’s useless with regards to objectivity – but that’s not the point.

Conversely, the concept of being the “best game” is much harder to define. It’s safe to say that it’s a much more objective concept than being a mere favorite, but that’s a gross oversimplification. In my eyes, the title of best game doesn’t depend on things like personal preference or any sort of quality that can be concretely proven. Instead, it relies on a general consensus – and one that is outright agreed upon by those familiar with the series at large. Going beyond that, this opinion must be stated out loud, repeatedly to the extent that it essentially becomes a “meme” – of course, I’m referring to the original definition (a cultural item transmitted repeated, similar to the biological transmission of one’s genetic code) as opposed to the more commonly-known one (running jokes on the internet). For all I know, there could be a widespread silent minority that considered the second Devil May Cry, Final Fantasy VIII or even (God forbid) MegaMan X6 to be the most beloved games in their respective series, but the deafening silence surrounding such opinions disqualifies them from being considered the “best game” of their franchises.

Of course, I personally disagree with this concept, but this is my gut reaction when describing a “best game”. However, this isn’t the only way to characterize this idea. In fact, there is a much more simplistic way to look at things that doesn’t revolve around the mob mentality of my original definition, but in most cases would lead to the same results, if not choices that are much more representative of each intellectual property in question. At this point in time, the most accurate definition I have for describing the “best game” in a series would the one that you would recommend to a complete newcomer that would give them the best representation of the series as a whole. But more specifically, they serve as the best example of what you – or I or anyone, for that matter – like about the games in question regarding their core concepts. Once again, this isn’t a perfect answer to the question at hand, but it’s the best that I’ve been able to come up with when properly defining the concept at large. At this point, that’s good enough for me.

Of course, the best way to define this entire concept is by, as usual, going through various examples from my own questions. When it comes to the Ys series, the fanbase generally recognizes three distinct “flavors” – Classic (the games that use the bump mechanic, along with black sheep Wanderers from Ys); the “3D” games (utilizing the hack-and-slash Napishtim engine with pre-rendered sprites on fully 3D backgrounds) and “modern” (which utilize a party system – switching between up to 3 characters on the fly – and incorporate 3D models into the game’s themselves). While there’s a recurring joke about “every Ys game being the best game of the series”, the most vocal segments of the fanbase swear by those Napishtim engine games, specifically the second game: The Oath in Felghana, a remake of the third game. Personally? I prefer Ys Origin, a far-flung prequel to the first two games and the last game to make use of the engine. That being said, due to the sheer amount of references to the first two games in Origin, I’d generally recommend Felghana to people interested in finding out about the series. There are other cases that just boil down to preference. For example, while it’s safe to argue that both Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super Mario World are among the best representations for 2D Mario games as a whole, I always find myself gravitating more towards SMB2 (or Super Mario USA, as the Japanese know it). The unique game mechanics just make it that much more enjoyable for me, but it’s probably the worst representation of the Mario series as a whole. This also manages to skew my views on even the most niche titles. Of the Darkstalkers games, I will always prefer playing Night Warriors over its more-lauded sequel, Vampire Savior – even while acknowledging that the latter has some much more interesting game mechanics.

The weird thing about this entire concept is just how much it ends up helping me understand some of my own opinions and biases. Separating my personal favorites from a much more objective ranking of things has been pretty helpful in the long run, keeping me from twisting myself into intellectual knots in order to just why I’d acknowledge other things as being better than my personal favorites. Having struggled with articulating the concept for well over a decade, it’s honestly relaxing to be done with the mental gymnastics I’d often associated with trying to justify why I liked certain games more than ones that were often considered “the best”, but the added benefits of being able to apply this to other opinions I’ve had that are out of the ordinary is a significant bonus. Thanks to this new perspective – that personal preference and widespread consensus can exist separately and simultaneously – I’ve honestly become a bit less defensive about my own opinions. Who knows, maybe the same could be true of anyone who shares this perspective. If this article causes anyone to reconsider these two concepts as being separate rather than identical, then I think it was worth the wait.

PC Ports Wishlist 2: Lost in New York

Around this time last year, I decided to do a new article in my long-running indulgence: port-begging for PC games. Of course, in the most recent article, I also added in some additional musings. I discussed what my favorite overall “victories” were since I’d originally started doing these lists, as well as focusing on both my overall top 10 most wanted games out of what I’d covered in older lists and the top games for each remaining list. I can’t really remember if I decided I wanted to make it a yearly tradition after the previous article – at the same time, I guess I just sort of assumed I’d be doing it again anyway. I had fun with last year’s lists, so why not?

This time around, I’m going to be focusing entirely on 2017 with the recap. As such, I’ll be starting with my top 5 confirmations of the years, which was a lot more difficult than I would have expected. Little has really moved since last year’s “Best of the Rest” list, but I’ve finally been able to cobble together an entire new list, so it only seems fitting to introduce it in this article. Finally, considering the fact that the top two slots in my previous top ten list – MegaMans 9 & 10 and Ys SEVEN – have since been released, I’ve decided to write up a new list. Not every game is new, but some have switched places.

Before we get on with this year’s lists, I’d like to go over the PC port announcements that were made since August, when I did the list for GOG games. Admittedly, I didn’t really expect that much in the way of announcements, especially considering the major announcements revealed from May until August. That’s not to say there was nothing these past four months. Killer Instinct was finally released on Steam back in September, technically not a new port – as it was previously a Windows Store exclusive. However, putting it on Steam and adding (albeit limited) crossplay with both the Xbox One and Windows Store versions was a nice touch. September also brought us the announcement of Zone of the Enders 2 receiving another re-release, adding a new VR option, on both PS4 and PC. While the ZOE HD Collection was on a previous list, I suppose getting a new release of the game that worked – apparently, the PS3 and Xbox 360’s version of the first game was broken – is better than nothing, so I’ll count that as a win. However, November alone definitely brought me some big-name releases – that ended up forcing me to modify the new game’s list not once, but twice. Capcom announced that Okami HD would be ported to PC, as well as PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. I wish I could say that I had considered this game for my list, but I thought of it as too much of a long shot, given the series’ Japan-centric aesthetic running counter to Capcom’s Western goals. Sphinx and the Cursed Mummy, a Zelda-like adventure game with platformer elements previously released on the GameCube, PlayStation 2 and the original Xbox, also managed to receive a remastered port on PC, Mac and Linux, courtesy of THQ Nordic. The game didn’t fall within my usual criteria for inclusion, but considering the game’s recent cult following, it’s definitely good news from my perspective. Injustice 2, on the other hand, was originally going to be on this year’s list, but it ended up receiving a PC port courtesy of the fine people at QLOC. Unfortunately, the game uses Denuvo, so I’m going to have to hold off on it until WB comes to their senses. And just like last year, the biggest surprise comes from SNK. The Last Blade 2 – based on the PS4 release this time around – was released on Steam completely unannounced. Ironically, this was another game I intended to put on this year’s list but had to swap it for something new at the last minute.

Speaking of last-minute announcements, there were two more PC gaming announcements I’d consider wins literally the day before this article was scheduled to go up. First, both Jazz Jackrabbit games were released on GOG, which means that the GOG wishlist I wrote back in August has finally borne fruit. Here’s hoping it’s the first of many. Earlier this week, XSEED announced a livestream on November 30th, with a mystery announcement. I was hoping for something Falcom-related and once again, I hit the jackpot. 2001’s Zwei!! – now retitled as Zwei: The Arges Adventure – is being translated and set to release on their usual storefronts (Steam, GOG and the Humble Store) sometime in “Winter 2018”. The work that went into bringing this to modern computers cannot be understated: the original game used DirectX5. XSEED managed to collaborate with Matt Fielding of Magnetic Games, the developer behind Exile’s End. As such, a majority of the original applications and mini-games from the original Falcom release have been maintained in this new version, with the exceptions of the calculator and the calendar. Frankly, I’m just surprised at the turnaround on this one and can’t wait for it to be released.

This year’s list of console ports also managed to achieve a win. Owlboy was originally announced for the Switch back in May, but since then, PS4 and Xbox One ports have also been announced. Last year’s list did way better. Back in March, Lethal League was announced for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Team Reptile also announced a sequel – named “Lethal League Blaze” – set to release some time next year on both PC and “console”. Undertale was also announced for release on PlayStation 4 and Vita back during this year’s E3. I was honestly surprised that it didn’t end up hitting the Nintendo Switch, but that’s life. Likewise, while NEO AQUARIUM – The King of Crustaceans – failed to receive a console port, its sequel ACE OF SEAFOOD has been ported to the PlayStation 4, as well as developer Nussoft teasing a future port to the Nintendo Switch.

Top 5 Successes of 2017

Before I get to my actual picks, I’d like to give an honorable mention to Arc System Works in general. They’ve made quite the evolution over the past couple years, going from re-releasing old PC ports of classic games on GOG to outright announcing PC versions of upcoming games – Double Dragon IV and BlazBlue Cross Tag Battle come to mind. I hope more Japanese companies take after their example and decide to offer major PC support for any games they decide to release in the West.

5. de Blob 1 & 2 – THQ Nordic (Wii, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

I honestly didn’t think this was possible, which is why this made the list over ASW. ASW’s transition into a more PC friendly company was alluded to for quite some time, but when Nordic Games rebranded themselves as “THQ Nordic”, the Darksiders III announcement wasn’t remotely surprising. Bringing back not one, but both de Blob games, on the other hand? Absolutely blew my mind. When Nordic first purchased the intellectual property and said they “had plans” for the series, I thought it was merely corporate talk. After all, the game’s rights had languished in purgatory while other major IPs were claimed by other companies at auction. Best of all, they hired Blitworks to handle the ports of both games. Eventually, the first game had ports announced for the Xbox One and PS4, and it wouldn’t surprise me if the second game follows.

4. Bayonetta/Vanquish – Sega/Platinum Games (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii U)

Speaking of amazing turnarounds, Platinum Games managed to grant us not one, but two of their cult classics from last-gen on PC this year. The fact that both games came out so close to one another made this even more amazing. It’s also been heavily rumored that both games will be released as a double-pack on the PS4 and XBO, though confirmation has yet to be made. With Platinum’s Twitter heavily implying that Bayonetta 3 may be on the horizon, it only makes sense to get the game in as many hands as possible. While a Bayonetta 2 PC port is a pipe dream due to Nintendo’s heavy involvement with the game’s development, I hope we can see even more of Platinum’s back catalog hit PC in the near future.

3. The King of Fighters XIV – SNK (PlayStation 4)

It’s funny: I was honestly expecting to put this one on this year’s list of new games: it was even the sole new addition to last year’s list. SNK managed to impress me with a timely Steam port that I assumed would usher in the game’s demise when it came to additional content, but apparently that wasn’t the case at all. With a port handled by Abstraction Games – an underrated company that handled the Double Dragon Neon PC port – KoFXIV is now capable of shining in brand-new ways, thanks to a fledgling mod community. Seriously, what they’ve been able to do with the game has been amazing.

2. MegaMan 9 & 10 (MegaMan Legacy Collection 2) – Capcom (Xbox 360, PS3, Wii)

I’m surprised this is coming in at number 2, but my top request definitely put up a good fight. I’m probably alone in the sense that I’d have been willing to pay $20 for these two games and all their DLC alone. Adding in two more MegaMan games that hadn’t shown up on PC before – MegaMans 7 and 8 – only served to sweeten the deal and make it a can’t-miss proposition for me. For a while, Capcom had been weird about what they’d port to PC – but in recent years, as long as it’s not a Nintendo-exclusive, PC gamers are likely to get love from Capcom. If anything, I wish they’d been a little less generous in some cases…

1. Falcom (in General)

Yeah, I get that it’s kind of cheating to put an entire company in the top slot, but if I’m going to be honest, they deserve it. Sure, the promises of day one parity with the console releases of Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana ended up being a pipe dream, but considering the rumors of the port’s quality (or lack thereof), not to mention the outright poor quality of the original translation, it may have turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Aksys Games’ translation of Tokyo Xanadu eX+ is set to launch the same day as its PS4 counterpart as promised, but considering how late they started their own beta testing (similar to Ys VIII), well, “watch this space”. Even though Ys VIII didn’t hit its original release date on PC, some good did come of it. Ys VIII is actually the first game that NIS America is releasing on GOG, which is amazing. Whether or not that means other NIS games will hit the platform is beyond me, but that seems pretty cool.

Despite these setbacks from one of their new partners, XSEED more than picked up the slack when it came to representing Falcom on PC. The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel, Ys SEVEN and Zwei: The Ilvard Insurrection (formerly “Zwei II” in Japan) all saw release on Windows PC this year. Also, they’ve announced that both Trails of Cold Steel II’s PC port and the first Zwei!! will release some time next year. Good stuff, but that’s not the major reason why they topped it out. In an interview with Techraptor, Toshihiro Kondo – Falcom’s president – said that he wanted “all of [their] games that come out to [release] on Steam”. Not just all future titles, not all of the old games that Falcom previously released on Windows, ALL of their games. Big words, but considering the massive collection of Falcom games we’ve amassed on PC so far, I wouldn’t be surprised if this comes to pass.

Our Feature Presentation

Before we go onto my new list, I feel like it’s worth going over the rules I’ve limited myself to in the past with these lists. It’s odd, I know, but it just ends up making the process of building a list much more fun. For starters, I’m limiting myself to games from the seventh (PS3/Xbox 360/Wii) and eighth (PS4/Xbox One/Wii U/Switch) generations of gaming. Porting anything else seems like it would require a brand-new release across the board and this is more about simple ports. Considering the sheer amount of games from these generations that have been ported to PC in recent years, it only seems fair. I also try to limit myself to one game per company, though considering the sheer number of buyouts we’ve seen, I’ve decided to expand that to one game per “brand” – but only if the buyout happened since the games were made in the first place. For example, I can ask for one game each from Sega and Atlus, but asking for two games from Square Enix is a no-no. I also consider one “series” as an entry, as long as the games themselves were all present in the generations available to me. Finally, no games that are clearly “console-exclusive”. So, even though Sony Music has started that whole “Unties” publishing label for indie games and Nintendo’s willing to do tie-ins on mobiles, I’m not going to be asking for stuff like Parappa the Rapper Remastered or Super Mario Odyssey. It’s just common sense.

Brandish: The Dark Revenant – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Portable)

I mentioned earlier that Falcom’s president wanted to put all of their games on Steam. The main goal most people have their sights set on is getting Trails of Zero and Trails of Azure on the PC platform. A segment of Falcom’s popular “Legend of Heroes” series, these two games – known colloquially as the “Crossbell games”, named after their setting – are quite literally the most commonly requested games. Unfortunately, they also lack any official English translations, so this would be a necessary part of porting the games to PC.

But do you know what Falcom game already has a full English translation and is also currently doomed to exclusivity on the inescapable purgatory that is the PlayStation Portable? That’s right, Brandish: The Dark Revenant. A remake of the first installment in a short-lived Falcom series, the games bring a new perspective to the first-person dungeon crawlers of old with its unique brand of gameplay. Brandish’s translation was a labor of love from Tom “Wyrdwad” Lipschultz, one of XSEED’s most prominent localizers. While the PSP remake saw its original Japanese release in 2009, it only managed to reach America in January 2015 as a digital-only release. It’s a shame that such an interest game was resigned to such a lackluster fate outside of its home market. Considering the fact that we’ve seen Ys SEVEN hit PC this year, I’d love to see Brandish achieve the same thing. At worst, it would at least give XSEED’s new partners a chance to hone their craft while XSEED is working on translating the Crossbell duology.

Rare Replay – Microsoft Studios/Rare (Xbox One)

This almost feels like cheating, considering I put the Banjo-Kazooie games on an earlier list. Considering they’re both included in this compendium of some of Rare’s most beloved titles (not owned by Nintendo), getting this collection would just end up killing two birds with one stone. It may seem unlikely given the fact that it hasn’t already come to PC, but that’s exactly what I thought about the Killer Instinct reboot back on my very first list. If I’m going to dream, I might as well dream big.

Tekken Tag Tournament HD – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3)

This has the exact opposite problem compared to Rare Replay. I’ve already asked for the second Tekken Tag Tournament, so why ask for the original? The answer’s simple: despite being outclassed in every possible way by its sequel, I associate some really happy memories with the classic game. The re-release in the Tekken Hybrid package reminded me of that and so did replaying the game for the Tekken retrospective I did this year. There was just something amazing about the original game, some intangible factor that prevents me from letting go of it. That’s not to say I wouldn’t rather have the second game if forced to choose, but if Bandai Namco considers re-releasing both, I’m not going to complain.

Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir – Atlus/Vanillaware (PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita)

Every list has got to have at least one pipe dream on it. A game that outright transcends any other baffling choice. I’ve got quite a few on this year’s list, but I’d say last year’s re-release of Odin Sphere is the big one this time around. Since I started doing these wishlists nearly four years ago, we’ve seen Atlus’s stubborn refusal to acknowledge the PC market go from the rule to the exception when it comes to Japanese publishers. Having said that, Atlus USA does do a good job of publishing various indie titles on the platform and Sega has apparently been applying pressure on Atlus’s PC-phobia, with various people speculating that we could see a Persona game hit the platform someday. Frankly, I’d rather just have Vanillaware games, considering the developer’s stated openness to releasing their games on PC. Leifthrasir is technically their most recent release, therefore it feels the most likely.

Azure Striker Gunvolt 2 – Inti Creates (Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo Switch)

This was honestly a last resort when it came to PC port requests. Don’t get me wrong: I loved Gunvolt 2 even more than the original game. It’s more that it seems like Inti Creates may have abandoned the platform when it comes to the games they publish themselves. Not to mention the fact that I think I’d rather have a release of the Striker Pack on PC, as opposed to just the second game. The original Gunvolt’s release on Steam was sort of wonky and it looks like the version included in the Striker Pack on Switch is a much more coherent experience, likely due to what Inti Creates was able to learn from their first attempt at transferring the title – which required two screens – onto a single-screen platform and improve their efforts. At the same time, asking for the Striker Pack feels a bit skeevy, considering we already have the first game on Steam. That’s what makes the whole thing so complicated. I mean, ideally, they’d just release the Striker Pack on Steam and give anyone who bought the first game a discount. That’s my opinion anyway.

Yakuza series – Sega (PlayStation 3, Wii U, PlayStation 4)

From what the internet has been telling me, the Yakuza games – better known as Ryū ga Gotoku in Japan – are the best games I’m not playing. I totally want to try them out, but I’m afraid I’m just no longer into playing big experiences like that on console these days and frankly, I wouldn’t even know where to start at this point. Much like Atlus’s Persona series, there is a massive wellspring of support for these games to make their debut on PC. Some people want the games to start with the latest game in the series – either Yazuka 6 (the next game set to hit the West) or Yakuza Kiwami 2, the remake of the second game set to hit Japan in a matter of days. Other people seem to be fine with the series starting up with Yakuza Zero – which has essentially been deemed the perfect place to jump into the series for newcomers. Meanwhile, I’m a little more extreme: I want everything. Start by localizing the Japanese-exclusive HD ports of the first two games on the Wii U, then just continue from there. Ideally we’d be seeing most of the cut content restored to its original glory in the process. It sounds ridiculous, I know, but honestly, a legitimate entry in the Yakuza series hitting PC is a pipe dream anyway.

(P.S. Nice try, Sega. But no one’s counting that smartphone game you’re working on as an actual PC release for the Yakuza series. In fact, most of us were just insulted.)

The Witch and the Hundred Knight – Nippon Ichi Software (PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3)

NIS America still appears to be pretty heavily involved in the PC scene, but personally, I wish they’d port more of Nippon Ichi’s games to the platform. The Witch and the Hundred Knight is a game that friends of mine have been raving about, and considering the fact that it’s an action-RPG, I’m onboard with it too. The game’s sequel released in Japan early this year and is set to release in the West sometime next year, so allowing the PC crowd to get their hands on the first one would be a nice treat. Though frankly, I’m still worried about which Disgaea game we’ll get next – I’m kind of worried that they might just skip right to 5, considering the game’s ESRB listing. I’d rather play through the rest of the old games first, personally.

Final Fight: Double Impact – Capcom/Iron Galaxy Studios (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)

Truth be told, my backlog of PC port requests from Capcom is running pretty low. That’s not exactly a bad thing: it means that most of the recent games I actually want from the company have already been released on PC. Final Fight: Double Impact just seems like a safe choice to make. It contains arcade-perfect releases of both the original Final Fight and Magic Sword, two beat-‘em-ups with significantly different gameplay styles. Factor in the drop-in multiplayer using GGPO and it’s still worth playing to this day, in spite of the DRM present on the PS3 release. Considering that the 360 and PS3 have essentially been retired, it’d be nice to see this collection – or better yet, a bigger collection with more games included – ported to modern platforms, PC included.

Windjammers – Data East/DotEmu (PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita)

Windjammers is among the most underrated multiplayer games of all-time, so when it managed to get a re-release on both PS4 and Vita this past year, it was exciting. The only thing that could’ve made it better would’ve been if PC had been involved in the fun as well. Fortunately, DotEmu’s released a whole lot of their ports on the platform down the line, so I’m pretty confident that we’ll be tossing frisbees in no time. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that out of all of the games on this year’s new list of games, this is the one I’m most confident will hit PC by this time next year.

Let It Die – GungHo Entertainment/Grasshopper Manufacture (PlayStation 4)

Let It Die and I have had a pretty turbulent history. I was originally excited for the game when it was first announced as “Lily Bergamo”, I’m a huge fan of Grasshopper Manufacture after all. Then the game was transformed into Let It Die and touted as a “free-to-play” experience, at which point, I totally lost interest. Flash-forward to earlier this year when I actually hear some actual information about the final product and I’m intrigued all over again. Let It Die may be a free-to-play game littered with microtransactions, but it’s built far more like a classic arcade game than the mobile cash grabs we associate the concept with. Let It Die is effectively a dungeon-crawler with rouge-like elements, you’re limited to a single life – but if you pay in a quarter, you can continue with your current character. Otherwise, you’ve got to start from scratch. Aside from that, the game maintains the typical Grasshopper off-the-wall insanity: for example, the player is guided by a skateboarding grim reaper named Uncle Death. The permadeath mechanic also lends itself to asynchronous multiplayer: dead characters appear in other players’ games. It’s an honestly interesting concept and one that I’d like to see on PC, though given the fleeting nature of games like this, I wouldn’t hold my breath.

Top 10 Most Wanted

Last year, ranking my top 10 list of the games I want ported to PC the most was more haphazard than anything. I’ve never really been all that good at ordering my favorite things in general and in many cases, there wasn’t really much of a difference in how much I wanted many of the games on the list. So to compensate for it, I’ve decided to factor in just how likely I think it would be to see a re-release on PC, which should go a long way toward explaining why various games have switched places from the previous year. Keep in mind that the top two games from the previous list were in fact the top two games I wanted, this new method just helps to keep things feeling a little more structured: I’ve never really been all that good when it comes to rankings and usually by the time I’m done with one list, I instantly regret the final product. Also, don’t view a game being snubbed from the list as a sign that I don’t want the game: it’s safe to assume that I want everything that’s ever been on any of my list, even games like the now-defunct Tekken Revolution. These are just the ten that would make me the happiest to see on PC at this point in time.

10. Catherine – Atlus (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Like I said earlier, Atlus’s Japanese branch appears to be actively against doing PC versions of their games. That setback won’t stop me from holding out hope. But this was clearly the longest of the longshots last year and yet, here we are. Considering the fact that we were teased with a potential new entry in the series back in August, it only seems reasonable to bring the original back for those who missed it or simply want to play it on more modern platforms.  And what platform is more modern than the PC? Come on, Atlus: you’ve literally got nothing to lose – do a modern “HD” port on PS4 and PC, replacing the Xbox brand. It’s a Golden opportunity you can’t afford to miss.

9. Lollipop Chainsaw – WB Games/Grasshopper Manufacture (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Lollipop Chainsaw dropped a fair amount this year and there are a couple of reasons for this. For starters, WB Games’ PC gaming record has been littered with ups and downs in recent years – ranging from the legendarily bad port of Arkham Asylum to hiring QLOC to fix the botched Mortal Kombat X port to adding Denuvo to a QLOC-developed port of Injustice 2 – Warner Bros. just seems to keep me guessing in strange new ways. More importantly, I don’t think WB Games has any interest in reviving the game, particularly given the game’s controversial content and our current social climate. I mean, the game hasn’t even been added to the Xbox One’s library through backward compatibility. Even Catherine managed that. I think our only hope to see this game again is if Grasshopper Manufacture’s new parent company GungHo Entertainment manages to buy the rights from WB Games and that just seems like a pipe dream.

8. Dragon’s Crown Pro – Atlus/Vanillaware (PlayStation 4)

Of course, even though Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir is the most recent Vanillaware release, we do know what their next release is. Last year, I simply had the original Dragon’s Crown on this list, but considering the fact that there’s a re-release coming up with a higher resolution and on a platform with a more PC-friendly architecture, it just seemed obvious to ask for the new version instead. Still seems odd that they’re doing a re-release so soon: they even released a patch for the PS3 and Vita versions allowing for crossplay with Pro. Truth be told, there’s a part of me that wonders if Dragon’s Crown Pro is just being made as a Trojan Horse to allow Vanillaware to toss their hat into the PC gaming market. I’m more than onboard with the concept.

7. NeoGeo Battle Coliseum – SNK (Xbox 360)

This one seemed like an obvious choice. I didn’t have any 2D fighting games on the list last year and frankly, that’s unacceptable. Considering the fact that many of SNK’s old games that have been re-released on this gen have made their way onto PC – particularly the ones handled internally – it only seems fair to ask for something from the previous gen. Hamster’s been killing it with their Arcade Classics releases of classic NeoGeo games, but SNK’s work after their long-running self-made arcade hardware is a rarity these days. Considering the rumors abound that SNK may be working on a second Battle Coliseum game, re-releasing the first on modern platforms seems like a no-brainer. I see it going down like this: initial release on the PS4, followed by a Steam release at some point down the line.  Not an ideal scenario, but perhaps the most realistic.

6. Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo HD Remix – Capcom (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Another significant drop from last year’s list, I just think that seeing either a re-release of the old PC version or a new port of the HD release just isn’t in the cards anymore. Puzzle Fighter’s recently been relaunched as a new free-to-play mobile game with a hideous art style and I’m sure that Capcom would try to avoid any undue competition by releasing the original game. And believe me, this new mobile game is going to need all the help it can get. Maybe we’ll see a re-release if it fails to meet Capcom’s likely insane expectations, but it’ll take some time to gauge the game’s success.

5. Tekken Tag Tournament 2 – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U)

While we did finally end up getting a Tekken game on PC this year, I honestly still would prefer Tag 2 to make its way there as well. Unfortunately, as TTT2 was among the worst selling games in the entire series, it seems like the chances of this game getting re-released on more platforms are pretty slim. At least it’s on the Xbox One via backwards compatibility, but I’m still salivating over the thought of what the modding scene could do with this game.

4. Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles – Konami (PlayStation Portable)

It feels a little weird moving this up, considering Konami’s recent history. This year offered us an omen: Super Bomberman R, one of the Nintendo Switch’s launch titles, was a true return to form for the company. This has led to a great deal of speculation about a return to Konami’s roots, with potentially even more new games in the vein of classic titles. An easy way to test the waters for this kind of revival would be re-releasing actual old titles and I still can’t think of a better choice than the Dracula X Chronicles. Containing a full graphical remake of one of the most beloved Castlevania games, an official English translation of the original PC Engine version, as well as a retranslated version of Symphony of the Night, DXC deserves a better fate than being trapped on the likely-defunct PlayStation Portable line for all eternity. The remake could use a little polish to handle higher resolutions, but aside from that, it would be a perfect package.

3. Splatterhouse (2010) – Bandai Namco (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)

2010’s Splatterhouse reboot did not get nearly as much love as it deserves. The game was a high-adrenaline romp through a horror-inspired environment that both paid homage to and build on the original games. Considering we’ve seen various companies choose seemingly random games for modern revivals, Splatterhouse feels like it could have a chance. The game’s only major flaw, its terrible load times, could easily be fixed on modern platforms and frankly, even if you’re not a fan of the reboot itself, it also comes with perfect ports of all three of the mainline games from the 90s. If that’s not worth a re-release, then I don’t know what is.

2.  MegaMan: Powered Up/MegaMan: Maverick Hunter X – Capcom (PSP)

I wouldn’t have considered putting this so high on the list, but considering the recent re-releases of Okami HD and Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney on contemporary platforms, it looks like Capcom may be raiding their backlog for some big cheap releases. For me, the most obvious choice would have to be a twin-pack of their MegaMan releases on the PSP. Both games were critical darlings crippled by the platform they were released on and their timing. Re-releasing both games with improved resolutions in a two-pack for $20 would sell like gangbusters. Considering the fact that Powered Up isn’t even available as a downloadable title outside of Japan, this would also go a long way to preserve what is objectively the best iteration of the original MegaMan in existence and the fascinating curiosity that is MHX’s Vile Mode. Better yet, don’t just release this on PC – release it on everything: PS4, Switch, and even the Xbox One. Come on, Capcom. It’s the Blue Bomber’s 30th anniversary, let’s celebrate!

1. Ys: Memories of Celceta – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Vita)

It might surprise you to see that while much of last year’s list has remained pretty much the same, Memories of Celceta managed to jump a whopping six places to take the number one slot. For starters, the main reason that it was low was to keep things fair – after all, Ys SEVEN was my second most highly-requested PC port of all, and with that out of the way, MoC could flourish. But beating out a MegaMan game for the top slot? That comes down to pure psychology. With SEVEN coming out this year and Lacrimosa of Dana eventually hitting PC at some point, Celceta is literally the only remaining modern Ys game without a PC version in the West. You ever notice how the most painful losses are the ones where you come so close to victory? The most noticeable gap in any collection is a single entry? Same basic concept: PC is so close to being a perfect platform for the Ys series, it just needs that one last game.

Another element that puts this so high on my list is the sheer possibility of it. Everything else on here feels like a pipe dream to at least some extent – a majority of these games are from last-gen and companies don’t seem quite as keen on re-releasing old content as I’d hoped. With that in mind, I’d easily consider Ys SEVEN to be the less likely of the two missing Ys games when it comes to PC ports and that managed to become a reality. Considering the poor timing of SEVEN’s release date on PC compared to the American release date for VIII on consoles, I’d almost be willing to bet that we might see confirmation of a Memories of Celceta PC port from XSEED around the time NIS America announces the final release date for the PC version of Lacrimosa of Dana.

To put it simply, Memories of Celceta is the only game on this list right now that I don’t see merely as a hope. It’s an inevitability. Falcom has already begun focusing more on the PC market in the West, the fact that day-one PC releases were a big part of what led them to choose Aksys and NIS America only proves it. XSEED has been playing a game of catch-up, effectively proving that they are capable of following through with this new strategy given the fact that they released 3 Falcom games on PC this year alone, with one more set likely to release sometime next year. And while the Trails games are Falcom’s top brand in Japan, Ys is still the more popular brand in the West. The Western demand for Crossbell may be deafening, but there’s a much more viable option left to XSEED. The cry for Memories of Celceta on PC is literally deafening: it was riled up by a Twitter gaffe two years back, Joyoland’s attempt to put their ports on Steam Greenlight with pages entirely written in Chinese were met with salivation in English and SEVEN’s recent PC release proves that XSEED finally has the resources to make this request a reality. It’s time to complete my collection.

Thus concludes this year’s set of lists. It almost makes me wonder what I’d be able to write next year. The sheer amount of new games receiving releases on PC and old games being ported long after their initial release is what caused me to abandon this entire concept in the first place, so in a strange sense, it almost feels good to not have to write these nearly as often as I did in previous years. At the same time, I do miss writing up these lists: that’s why I’ve continued with the yearly April Fools’ list of console ports and managed to put together a wishlist for GOG this past summer. On the plus side, I’ve almost got a full list ready for next April, but as for December 2018, I’m kind of at a loss of what to do to extend an article like this to its usual length. Oh well, at least I’ve got a whole year to figure that out.

 

Top 5 Games That Mastered Remaking

With the announcement of Metroid: Samus Returns and the recently released Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy, remakes have been on my mind recently.  Now there’s quite a bit of a scale in terms of how much effort goes into video game remakes.  Sometimes you get simple remasters that basically just polish the textures so the game looks good in HD.  Sometimes the graphics are completely redone, maybe a few gameplay polishes.  And sometimes you get the holy grail, a game that takes the story, settings, and basic gameplay of an old game and makes what can basically be considered a new game.  These are my strong preference for video game remakes, but as you might expect from the amount of effort involved, they are the rarest type.  But these do exist, and so I’m going to listing my top five remakes that truly mastered the art of… re-ing.  But before we get to that, let’s look at some great game that I feel went just a little too far in their new features and have “condemned” themselves to be new games:

Punch-Out!! (2009)

Punch-Out!! on NES is a great game.  Super Punch-Out!! on SNES is better.  But Punch-Out!! on Wii annihilates the rest of the series.  With the same name as the NES game (and one of the arcade games) and almost every fighter from it, Punch-Out!! is almost a remake, but every fighter is changed so much (and almost a third of them weren’t in the NES game) that it feels more like a Mario game that uses the same level themes than a remake.

Mortal Kombat (2011)

I loved Mortal Kombat when I was a kid in the 90s, but it was more the violence taboo, dark fantasy tone, and seemingly endless secrets that intrigued me than the gameplay.  So the 2011 Mortal Kombat installment that brought back almost every character from the first three MK games (the nostalgia and image peak) and retold their stories, but this time with great gameplay, was pretty freaking fantasic.  However, it’s not really a remake, instead being a weird, nonsensical, but very entertaining in-universe reboot that continues the series’ story by changing the first three games.

Star Fox 64

Star Fox 64 has an essentially identical story to the first game, but aside from that (and the fact that doing a remake as the second installment in a franchise, only four years after the original was released would be really weird) it changes as much as any other direct sequel.  Star Fox 64 is an amazing game that aged very well for a fifth-gen game, but I don’t think it can really be called a remake.

Ys: The Oath in Felghana

I haven’t played this game (make a PS4 version, damn it!), but I’ve been assured it is a vast improvement over its basis, Ys III: Wanderers from Ys, and that it has the same essential story and is now considered canon in the series.  Having played both Ys III and Ys Origin (which has the same gameplay style as Oath in Felghana), however, I can’t really consider this a true remake when the basic gameplay genre has been changed so dramatically.  But I’m sure it’s a great game, and again, want a convenient version for myself released.

Okay, with those out of the way, let’s get to the actual list!  Five games that push the remake envelope to its max without breaking it.  Not much else to say, here we go:

#5.  Ducktales Remastered

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Everyone loves the NES Ducktales game, but I’m just going to come out and say that several parts of it aged badly.  The control for the signature pogo cane is stiff, the hit detection is noticeably off, and the game is really, really short.  Well in 2013 we got a fantastic remake that may not be perfect, but fixed all of the aforementioned issues and of course was promptly condemned for not matching the deified memories people had of the NES game.  Well screw that, Ducktales Remastered is vastly superior to the original.  In addition to things technology’s march made possible (gorgeous art and animation that looks just like the show, full voice acting), the game greatly expands every level from the NES game and adds two completely new ones, making for an experience that could almost pass for Ducktales 3.  With the Ducktales cartoon’s reboot about to launch (which I’m expecting to also greatly outshine the original, the previews have done a very good job of showing the Gravity Falls influence), now is a great time to play through this game.  It’s a fitting last hurrah for the 80s Ducktales as a whole, in addition to being a great remake.

#4. Ratchet and Clank (2016)

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Straddling the line between remake and reboot, I decided to place this game on the remake side because I’m always going to place gameplay first, and no matter how much the story of the original Ratchet and Clank was changed in Ratchet and Clank 2016, it’s obvious that the original game was still the near exclusive focus.  The advancements in control and quality of life that the later games made are intact, but the levels are almost all from the original.  But like all the remakes on this list, they aren’t just graphically upgraded copies, they’re new levels using the settings and elements of the original.  Ratchet and Clank 2016 does a great job expanding the classic levels it covers and makes them feel every bit as good as new levels would.  While having less levels is a somewhat painful tradeoff and prevents this game from placing higher on the list, R&C2016 is still a polished and satisfying action platformer that can serve as a great introduction to the series for 13 year olds who weren’t alive when the original game was released and are now making you feel old.  Let’s hope we get the Going Commando and Up Your Arsenal remakes that everyone wants, and that they’re as good as this one

#3. Mega Man Powered Up

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This game is criminally underappreciated.  Unlike Maverick Hunter X, which made minimal gameplay additions and was based on a game that aged too well to really need a remake, Mega Man Powered Up takes the very first Mega Man game and adds an absurd amount of content.  You get a ton of new playable characters, a level editor, and brand new chibi-style 2.5D graphics that can be placed over an exact gameplay replica of the original game.  But the crown jewel of this game is the “New Style” mode with brand new levels based on the themes and gameplay elements of the original, in addition to two brand new bosses with their own original levels.  This game just offers everything.  Want the original game with new graphics?  You’ve got it.  Want a better game based on it?  It’s there.  Want to play as Roll or a robot master?  Go ahead.  Impossible to please?  Then make your own damn level, you can even do that.  Mega Man Powered Up needs to be rescued from its relative obscurity, it’s a must have for every Mega Man fan.

#2. Resident Evil (2002)

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One of the most positively regarded video game remakes of all time, the GameCube Resident Evil (or REmake, as it’s commonly known) took the 1996 original, which had already aged pretty badly by 2002, and turned it into one of the best games to use the classic Resident Evil formula.  The flow of the game was shaken up, the puzzles were redesigned, new enemies and areas were added, the controls were updated, a colossal amount of secrets were added, the dialogue and voice acting were made competent, and the graphics were completely redone and looked truly amazing, they still hold up today, even without the long-postponed HD remaster.  This set the standard for video game remakes, and every re-release of a Resident Evil game since has been met with wishes that another Resident Evil game would get the kind of monumental remake that the original did.  While the lack of information has made it hard to remember, we do have the mythical REmake 2 announced, hopefully we can once again get something on the level of this, the runner-up master of remaking.

#1.  Metroid: Zero Mission

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I debated on the order to place the previous games in, trying to decide how much weight to give how much of an improvement over the original game each remake was versus how much I enjoyed the game personally.  Thankfully, Metroid: Zero Mission excels in both areas.  The original Metroid is enormously influential, but it did not age well at all, and the lack of features and quality of life improvements that Super Metroid standardized is glaring.  Metroid: Zero Mission merges the original game with Super Metroid, adding new abilities, areas, bosses, and story elements to make something that functions as both a new entry in the Metroid series, and a replacement for the poorly-aged original.  While the game is a bit short (despite all the expansions, the aimless wandering and cheap deaths really made the NES Metroid feel longer than it was), the gameplay is just as fun and satisfying as the legendary Super Metroid.  Zero Mission is everything a remake should strive to be, the best possible outcome.  After 13 years of wishing for Metroid II to get the same treatment, we’re just months away from that finally happening, and now seems like the time to recognize both Metroid: Zero Mission and the potential of remakes in general.  If more remakes had the effort and care given to Zero Mission, the world would be a better place and the galaxy would be at peace.

So there you have it, my picks for the top five games that show the full potential of video game remakes.  I’m not saying there’s no place for remasters that simply add some modern quality of life features to a classic game, but I consider games like these five to be the holy grail of video game remakes.  There are plenty of classic but questionably aged games that could benefit from full blown remakes, hopefully we’ll get many more remakes like these five games that mastered remaking.

Of Axioms and Idioms: The New Sub-Standard

While I’ve been having fun revitalizing older series that I abandoned awhile back, it would be hypocritical of me to orphan my latest series. This time, it’s not so much a lack of topics that has caused me to forgo writing Of Axioms and Idioms, it’s more a lack of time. I’ve got so many ideas for new articles that I’ve managed to leave a good number of worthwhile topics on the back-burner for quite some time. It doesn’t help that I seem to be coming up with more new ideas quicker than I can write the existing ones. Worst of all is the fact that I tend to find my newest ideas the most intriguing, which pushes things back even further in many cases. Still, it’s been roughly half a year since the last time I wrote an article in this series, so it seems like it’s the right time to bring it back.

This one’s been rolling around in the back of my mind for quite some time, yet ironically, it’s also the latest topic I’ve managed to come up with for this series. Basically, there’s something of a stigma when it comes to long-running series. Specifically, when it comes to their latest iterations. The issue isn’t specifically liking the current games in an old series, that seems to be alright by most accounts. Rather, considering the most recent entry in well-established franchises to be the best that said franchise has to offer seems to be frowned upon among die-hard fans. Likewise, when a more or less “objective” best game is chosen, it’s generally a relatively early title in the series’ history.

To show you just how long this idea has been sitting around, the original example that inspired this topic is no longer relevant. Tekken Tag Tournament 2, while still currently my favorite game in the Tekken franchise – ironically, I’ve yet to pick up Tekken 7 – is no longer the latest game in the franchise. Still, I felt a little ashamed to acknowledge that the latest entry in the series had become my favorite, simply because I was a long-time fan and therefore, was familiar with the earlier games in the series. Meanwhile, ask the average Tekken fan and chances are they’ll name a much earlier game as their favorite: specifically, Tekken 3. If you’ve read my Tekken retrospective from earlier this year, you’d know that I was never really quite as enamored with the game as the majority of the Tekken fanbase, even if I did recognize its quality.

Another slightly more relevant example would relate to MegaMan, specifically the Classic series. Personally, I think the tenth game in the franchise – which has been the most recent game for a whopping 7 years at this point – is the best that the series has to offer. Most of the Classic faithful, on the other hand, are still hung up on MegaMan 2. Honestly, I don’t even think MM2 is the best of the NES games, let alone the best in its entire series. MegaMan 2 made the most significant improvements over its predecessor, but the franchise still had room to grow. What I find especially ironic is that MegaMan 9 – a game that was essentially built to perfectly emulate an MM2 ROM hack – received much greater acclaim, despite having weaker level designs. Worst of all, it seems like if you don’t accept 2 as the “one true Classic MegaMan game”, you’re bound to be accused of being a contrarian, or worse still, a hipster. Don’t get me wrong: MM2 is a great game, I just think that some of the later games in the series made vast improvements to the formula, but they’re generally cast aside as inferior copies. As a side note, I think it’s a crying shame that the Game Boy games (namely IV and especially V) don’t receive as much attention as they deserve: I think both of those games blew MM2 out of the water, in spite of their hardware limitations.

A slightly less relevant example would be the near-deification of Super Mario 64 among the 3D Mario platformers. Sure, people recognize the quality of both Galaxy games – to at least some extent – but for whatever reason, 64 is still somehow the golden standard to which all future Mario games of that type are held against. I’ll never understand it: honestly, I never thought SM64 was that good in the first place and I think every other game of that type in the Mario series surpassed it in some way, even the abomination/cult classic Super Mario Sunshine. To make matters worse, I actually consider 3D World to be my favorite in that particular batch of games, though I’ve seen more than a few people dismiss it as an inferior knockoff of 3D Land which was, ironically, my previous favorite. I’d argue that the 3D Marios keep improving with each game and that makes 64 the worst by default. Yet it is still the clear favorite for some reason.

Of course, perhaps the most famous example of this phenomenon is the fan reaction to the Legend of Zelda games. While both A Link Between Worlds and especially Breath of the Wild have seemingly put it to rest, the so-called “Zelda cycle” is, by and large, the most prevalent and observable example of this mentality I’ve seen on the internet. The Zelda cycle, as I understand it, can be broken down thusly: after enough time has passed since the release of the latest Zelda game, the fanbase begins its backlash against the game itself, deeming it terrible. This, in turn, allows the previous game in the franchise – the one that was previously dubbed the worst the franchise had to offer – to be viewed as an acceptable game for the series. The game that came before that will then usually take its place at the series favorite, the stated “gold standard” for what the next Zelda game should attempt to be. The former “gold standard” is then considered to be overrated (but still good) and everything before that seems to just fade into the ether, effectively just becoming acceptable in general but not a major focal point for the franchise. A safe choice, considered “good for their time” and generally otherwise ignored.

As for a counterpoint to this particular attitude, the best I’ve really been able to observe would have to be within the Ys fanbase. Put simply, “every Ys is best Ys”. Given the fact that the series has gone through at least two major gameplay shifts in its 30-year existence, it only makes sense that most of the fanbase would generally be pretty chill about liking the newest games in the franchise, as Falcom always seems to strive to improve upon mistakes made in the previous games and avoids change strictly for its own sake, rather only fundamentally shifting the gameplay style once they’ve reached the limits of their current format. Of course, this isn’t a perfect example by any means: there’s a distinct faction that considers The Oath in Felghana (and to a far lesser extent, Origin) as the one true Ys game(s), disavowing anything that came after and, bafflingly enough, before. I guess there are problem children in every fanbase.

Then there’s the Sonic fanbase, which I supposed also acts both as an example and a counter-balance to this perspective. There are essentially three major camps contained within the Sonic fanbase: those who enjoy the original Genesis-era games and feel that this is the best direction for the franchise moving forward, those who cut their teeth on the series during the Adventure games and want the games to go back to that style (in spite of the fact that Sega already tried to recreate said formula twice and ended up with the games generally considered the worst in the entire franchise in the process) and finally, fans of the modern games who consider any references to older titles to be meaningless pandering to a bygone era. If it’s not obvious, the former two camps clearly act in support of my theory, while the third and final camp appears to be its Bizarro doppelganger rather than a nuanced reaction. Of course, these three factions don’t encompass the entire Sonic fandom – there is room for nuance elsewhere – but they definitely make things difficult for Sega moving forward.

Of course, there is a certain level of forgiveness allowed when it comes to committing the grave sin of liking the latest game in a long-running series in general. This is generally reserved for those new to the series. After all, you always remember your first and as they’re new to the series, they have time to learn the “right way” to consider the series. Older fans, on the other hand, generally aren’t afforded the same level of leeway. They’re already familiar with the franchise and its history, so the entire concept of long-time fans disagreeing with the status quo is inconceivable to the hiveminds generally associated with these fanbases. It’s almost like to prefer a game that was intended as an improvement to earlier games in the series is to completely discount the series’ entire history in one fell swoop.

So what exactly is the cause for this animosity towards the most recent games in a franchise? An obvious culprit would be the rose-colored glasses of nostalgia. Unfortunately, that logic doesn’t necessarily follow: if nostalgia were to blame, then every fan would generally consider the first game they played to be the best in the franchise, which would be a particularly difficult move for those who had been playing games in the series since its inception. Not to mention the fact that if the first game in a franchise is its best, then there’s really no point in continuing to produce them, diminishing returns and all that. Likewise, given the fact that many video game franchises tend to have one or two games that are considered the best at large, that would also imply that most of the fanbase started playing the series upon the release of that specific game, which seems a bit farfetched if you ask me. So clearly there’s more at work here than simple nostalgia.

A much more likely explanation is equally simple: credibility as a fan. With well-established series – regardless of medium – knowledge of the series’ origins has a tendency to give the impression of legitimacy with regards to any particular fan’s adoration for the works in the general. The same could be said for general consensus: as with most group dynamics, a lack of dissention among the ranks has a tendency of creating a much stronger sense of community, an element that fandoms require to thrive at any stage in their life cycles, from their humble beginnings on. Whether or not this means that most fans legitimately believe that the designated best game in the franchise is their actual favorite, they’re simply giving the game lip service to fit in or that they’ve been essentially railroaded into considering said game to be the best in order to align themselves properly within the group tends to vary – all are clear and distinct possibilities, though I’d consider the former two to be the most likely.

This leads to a much more pertinent question: why is there such resistance to the idea that modern entries of an existing series could potentially surpass their forebearers? I mean, it just seems logical to me that games should constantly strive to improve over what came before them, so maybe I’m missing something. Does acknowledging the strength of newer games make the older ones retroactively worse? Is one’s credibility at stake if they acknowledge improvements made to an existing formula if they just happen to be implemented to close to current year? I’m at a bit of a loss here.

Maybe newer games are just being held to a higher standard in general. After all, they do have years of experience to fall back on, so I can’t argue that they should be held to a higher standard than the games of old. However, there is also the potential to take things way too far in this regard: while nostalgia isn’t completely to blame, they can generally build classic games up to be better in fans’ memories than the reality – take a look at how well various re-releases for more obscure games have been received. Put both the overinflated quality of older games with an expectation for every game to exceed the previous entries in their series to an obscene degree, and you’ve got a recipe for disaster.

I mostly wrote this article to essentially dispel any shame, perceived or otherwise, I’ve felt when liking the latest games in series I’ve been following for quite some time. The sheer sense of elitism when it comes to long-time fans vis-à-vis newer entries has always just struck me as weird. I suppose that this was more of an exercise in trying to justify my own preferences to myself. Of course, this is a fitting use of the “Of Axioms and Idioms” banner, as they’re generally meant to explore my various opinions, unorthodox or otherwise. But what do you think? Do you think I’m completely off-base or am I on to something? Feel free to sound off in the comments below.

Retrospective: Ys – Part I

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Growing up, RPGs were never really my thing. Sure, there were the occasional games I liked – the Lunar games on PS1 and Evolution on Dreamcast come to mind – but for the most part, the genre eluded me. That is, aside from one subgenre: the action RPG. Now being a child and, by extension, having a fairly low budget for video games meant that I had to choose my purchases wisely and quite frankly, I tended to prefer platformers, puzzle games like Tetris and especially fighting games. Fortunately, I did manage to cement my love for the genre via various demo discs, with my introduction to the franchise at the hands of such games as Brave Fencer Musashi and Threads of Fate – games, ironically enough, made by the main purveyor of RPGs I found bland: the company then known as Squaresoft.

Since then, I’ve been able to better explore the action-RPG genre and have found many of the titles of old to be enjoyable. One series stands above the rest in my eyes: Ys. Developed by the good people at Nihon Falcom – a Japanese development team that cut their teeth developing for various PC platforms – Ys stands out as one of the longest-running action-RPG series of all-time, effectively the subgenre’s equivalent to Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy. Unfortunately, aside from a few early releases, the series never managed to gain a major foothold in the West until the days of the PSP, which saw the release of a whopping 4 titles in North America – most coming from the good folks at XSEED. Before that, it was mostly relegated to the perpetually third place TurboGrafx-16 system when it came to American releases, though the third game also saw releases on the Genesis and Super Nintendo outside of Japan. I can’t quite recall if this is wishful thinking or a repressed memory, but I somehow recall seeing the box art for the Genesis version of Wanderers from Ys up for rental at a mom-and-pop video store back during my childhood. I almost wish I could’ve gotten into the series sooner, but considering the lack of options I would have had for obtaining the games back then, it’s probably for the best that I waited.

Since I started playing the series, I’ve become something of a journeyman with regards to it. I’m by no means an expert on the series, but among my group of friends, I’m generally considered the best direct source of information. As of yet, I haven’t played the “full 3D” games in the series – specifically Ys Seven and Memories of Celceta – but aside from that, I’ve played at least some version of every other game in the series. Granted, in many cases, it wasn’t “the original” – I would generally aim for the “definitive versions”. So, considering that today is the 30th anniversary of the original release of Ys: Ancient Ys Vanished and with the North American release of Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana coming later this year, it seems only fitting to discuss the series or at least as much of the series I’ve played thus far.

Compared to the previous two Retrospective articles I’ve written for Retronaissance, this Ys article will be handled slightly differently. In the earlier entries, I sorted the games by release date. This time, however, I will be sorting them in the order I played them. While this will lead to an effectively identical ordering throughout the majority of the article, I feel that this format will better serve to illustrate my thoughts on the franchise as a whole, with each consecutive game adding to my insight regarding the series as a whole.

Ys I & II Chronicles+

Ironically, the first Ys game I ever played was not the first one I purchased – it was a remake of the first one I ever owned. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise: Steam sales are a hell of a drug. Admittedly, I bought the Ys games that were available on Steam at that point due to my interest in the series and because I felt like if I was going to play the games on any platform, it would be PC. What I’d heard of the soundtracks intrigued me, action-RPGs were always a passing interest of mine and the unique combat mechanics of the early games in the series piqued my interest enough to start me on the series, a whopping 2 years after I’d purchased the game on Steam. Looking back, I regret nothing.

Chronicles+ has a unique history behind it. In 1998, Falcom developed an enhanced remake of the original Ys for Windows computers, dubbed Ys Eternal. It was followed by a remake of the second game – fittingly dubbed Ys II Eternal – in 2000, which made even more improvements to its source material than the first release. The following year, Ys Eternal was further improved and bundled with the second as “Ys I & II Complete”. This release was ported to a few consoles by various developers: the PS2 saw Ys I & II Eternal Story from DigiCube; Interchannel ported both games separately to the Nintendo DS – and both of these ports would later be released in North America on a single cart by Atlus USA as Legacy of Ys: Books I & II and finally Falcom themselves would further enhance their original PC version on the PSP as Ys I & II Chronicles. Falcom would eventually port Chronicles back to the PC themselves, but this isn’t the version available in the West. Instead, XSEED – the company responsible for the most recent batch of Falcom releases in North America – went back to the original release of Complete and managed to rebuild Chronicles in its entirety with a host of further enhancements: hence “Chronicles+”. It’s kind of impressive when you consider this was done for a remake that, at best, was already over a decade old. Since then, Chronicles would be re-released on iOS and Android by DotEmu as two separate games.

Unlike later games in the franchise, Ys I & II are linked to the extent where it’s difficult to truly understand the story of the latter without the former. Ys introduces us to a young swordsman by the name of Adol Christin – dubbed “Adol the Red” due to his crimson hair – as he ventures to the small island nation of Esteria. Hearing rumors of the fabled lost Kingdom of Ys – which once existed alongside Esteria according to legend – Adol recklessly ventures there by boat, only to end up shipwrecked in the port town of Barbado. He eventually makes his way to the Town of Minea, where he finds the fortune teller Sara who shares what she knows of Ys: legend states that six books were left behind when Ys disappeared and the location of Ys will be revealed to the one who obtains every tome. Upon searching for the first book, Adol meets a mysterious young woman by the name of Feena, who was being held captive by the demons that have invaded the once-peaceful land of Esteria. After collecting the first three books of Ys, Adol soon learns that the remaining three are locked away in Darm Tower – a colossal fortress said to be built by demons that reaches far into the sky. What evils will Adol confront at the tower’s summit?

Ys II continues directly after the events of the first game. After collecting the six books of Ys, Adol is forcibly teleported to the mystical land of Ys – the continent now resides in the sky, floating effortlessly above the world below. Drained from both the arduous trials he faced in Darm Tower and the journey to Ys, Adol falls unconscious. He’s then rescued by Lilia, a young girl from nearby Lance Village, who helps to nurse him back to health. After recovering from his wounds and exhaustion, Adol continues his journey – after returning the six books of Ys to their resting place and conferring with the spirits of the priests that once ruled Ys in its infancy, he explores more of the mystical continent, including the labyrinthine Solomon Palace. Eventually, Adol discovers the true plan of the demons: they seek to revive their master Darm, an unimaginably powerful demon who caused such calamities that the people of Ys had no choice but to raise their great nation to the skies to escape his malice. Darm seeks to steal the powers of the twin goddesses of Ys to achieve world conquest and the destruction of humanity.

The gameplay in the original Ys is simple but unique. At first, it appears to be a standard top-down action RPG, not exactly uncommon for its time. There is, however, one simple difference: there’s no attack button. To attack enemies, Adol must ram into them – but there’s a caveat, he must attack from off-center. Attacking dead-on allows the demons to trade hits, which will generally work in their favor. This makes boss fights particularly grueling – as it can be difficult to determine what doesn’t count as a direct attack with some of them. Fortunately, Adol is also capable of recovering his health by standing still – but only outside of dungeons. The game also allows players to save their game at any time, though one must be careful when saving: the game can be saved directly over an enemy spawn point, which will render the save absolutely worthless and force players to restart from an earlier save – or worse, from the beginning of the game. Trust me, this has happened to me not once, but twice.

Of course, the game also has various elements that are common to the RPG genre. Adol still gains experience by defeating enemies and can level up to increase his strength. Adol can also equip swords, armors and shields to further augment his power – new swords increase his attack, while armors and shields increase defense. The ability to improve Adol’s arsenal remains a consistent throughout the series. Adol can also find an assortment of rings, which he can wear to grant various abilities. The Power Ring doubles his attack, Shield Ring halves the damage he takes, the Heal Ring allows him to heal within dungeons, the Timer Ring halves the speed of most enemies and the Evil Ring …slowly taints and destroys whoever wields it. So maybe just ignore that last one. Switching between these rings and determining which is best for your current situation is perhaps the closest thing to actual strategy the game requires. There’s also a standard inventory, which keeps track of all of the minor items Adol collects on his journey – only one of them can be equipped for active use at a time. A few key items from the original Ys include the Mask of Eyes, which allows Adol to see secrets at the cost of being able to see enemies (also color); the Blue Necklace, which protects Adol from demonic traps and the Monocle, which allows you to decipher the ancient text of the six books of Ys.

The second Ys builds on these mechanics, adding entirely new wrinkles to change things up. Perhaps the most prominent of these would be the Magic system. Throughout the game world, there are six different magical staffs found during Adol’s journey – each associated with one of the six priests of Ys. The Fire Magic allows Adol to shoot fireballs – which completely changes the dynamic of combat and becomes essential to completing most of the boss fights in this game; Return Magic allows Adol to warp to any towns or villages he’s previously visiting; Light Magic illuminates dark areas and reveals secret exits; Shield Magic protects Adol from any and all attacks and Time Magic freezes enemies in place temporarily – far outstripping the Timer Ring from Ys I. The most interesting of the magics is the Alter Magic, which transforms Adol into a Roo: a creature as demonic as it is adorable. This leaves you defenseless, but also prevents standard enemies from attacking you and even allows you to understand the language of the demons, which even becomes relevant to the plot at various points in the game. However, this new mechanic comes with the addition of magic power (MP), which helps to balance things out. For example, though Shield Magic renders Adol invincible, it also consistently drains MP at a steady rate, and taking damage reduces it significantly.

The Rings from the previous game are replaced with a new set of “accessories”, which by and large serve the same purpose. The Spirit Cape – like the Heal Ring from Ys I – allows Adol to heal in dungeons. The Hawk Idol adds homing capabilities to Adol’s Fire Magic, which can be further augmented by the Falcon Idol. The Cleria Ring allows for random attacks to be parried, avoiding damage. The Ring of Ease – ha! – halves the consumption of MP. Finally, there’s the Goddess Ring, which increases Adol’s strength and defense. Likewise, the Inventory system from the previous game returns, effectively serving the same purpose. Some items return from the first game, but there are also some brand-new ones: for example, the Roda Leaf filters out poisonous gas; the Stone Shoes give Adol traction when navigating slippery areas; and the Elixir can revive Adol after he runs out of health – but there’s only one available in the entire game.

Having said all that, Chronicles+ is not a perfect representation of how the original Ys I & II played – and I mean that in the best way possible. Various improvements were made to the game engine: including the ability to move diagonally, the addition of a bestiary and character log allowing the collection of information on both the game’s enemies and various NPCs respectively and even expanding on the story with some additional content. Chronicles+ even gives players the ability to choose between two separate user interfaces: the more compact one seen in the PSP version and a more ornate border, based on the one present in the earliest releases in the Ys series. I personally went with the latter, but offering players the option between the two seemed like a nice touch overall.

For the most part, Chronicles recycles the art assets from the Eternal and Complete releases, including character sprites, backgrounds and even the animated cutscenes. Fortunately, none of them really show their age: one of the advantages of pixel art from that era. In addition, entirely new CG art was drawn for the various major characters in the game specifically for the PSP release. Chronicles does offer players the choice between both versions, which further cements its status as the definitive version of the Eternal line of remakes. Both art styles differ only slightly: Complete better resembles a JRPG from that era, while Chronicles has a style more befitting a manga. The stylistic differences are visible, but difficult to properly articulate – both are clearly Japanese, but illustrate this cultural origin in different ways. I personally preferred the new artwork for Chronicles, simply because the characters’ posture looked a little more realistic and less staged. Still, having both options was great.

Perhaps one of the most acclaimed aspects of the Ys franchise would be its music. Best described as “symphonic metal”, much of Adol’s adventures have been accompanied by a soundtrack that perfectly characterized their tone – equal parts epic and relentless. The first game in the series started this tradition, ranging from the courageous overworld theme “First Step Towards Wars” to the downright imposing “Tower of the Shadow of Death”, effectively the theme of Darm Tower. Ys II would further expand on this, with songs like the anxious “Companile of Lane”, the melancholic “Apathetic Story” – which I’m sure was meant to be “A Pathetic Story”, but whatever – and the imposing theme of the battle with Darm himself: “Termination”. The soundtracks of both Ys I & II were expanded upon in Complete, adding a variety of unused tracks intended for the first game to improve the already exceptional soundtrack. These include “Tension” and “Dreaming” – both used to break up the monotony of Darm Tower – as well as “Over Drive” which was given to Dalles – Darm’s second in command – as a unique theme for his boss fight. Technically, only one piece of music was exclusively arranged for Complete: “Colony of Lava”, which itself is simply a serene take on “Moat of Burnedbless”, better suited to its village setting. As with the artwork, players are given the option of three soundtracks: the original version used in the PC-88 release – composed by Mieko Ishikawa and the legendary Yuzo Koshiro – as well as the arranged soundtrack made for the Eternal games (and by extension, Complete) which was handled by Falcom’s Sound Team J.D.K. and finally, a brand-new arrangement from Yukihiro Jindo that uses actual instruments in addition to synths. Again, I personally used the soundtrack unique to Chronicles, but having the option to use all three is a major plus.

Chronicles itself appears to be something of an anomaly at this point: a pure throwback to the early games of the Ys franchise. As such, it’s generally not recommended as a first game for most people just getting into the series, as the game just doesn’t offer an accurate representation of what the series has evolved into since then. Personally, I found the bump system engaging as an introduction to the series, simply because it differs so much from the norm of the action RPG subgenre. It was a unique method of attack that clearly influenced the trajectory I took when further exploring the series itself: focusing on the older games in the series, before working my way to more modern iterations.

Ys: Book I & II

Having played through the first two games on Steam, I’d become a huge fan of the Ys series in general. With the long-awaited English release of the original PC version of the sixth game in the franchise finally arriving on digital storefronts, I decided that I would dedicate a significant chunk of my free time in 2015 to playing through some of the older games in the franchise to prepare myself: to experience the storyline of the Ys games for myself and to scope out the series’ evolution through the ages. This would also finally give me the chance to right a self-inflicted wrong and finally play through Ys: Books I & II on the original Wii’s Virtual Console. This was the first Ys game I ever received, given to me as a gift some Christmas past – I’m still a bit angry that Nintendo removed gifting from future platforms, but that’s a delusional rant for another time – and since then, it had rotted away in my backlog, effectively forgotten. As I was going to be playing through the other games in the series released during the fourth generation of consoles and because I was otherwise starting from scratch, it only felt right to start my streaming marathon with the duology where it all began …again.

Ys: Ancient Ys Vanished was originally released in 1987 for various Japanese computer platforms – particularly NEC’s PC-8801 and PC-9801, but also Fujitsu’s FM-7, Sharp’s X1 and the MSX2. The following year, Ys II: Ancient Ys Vanished – The Final Chapter would be released on the same platforms. These would eventually be followed by a variety of ports for other platforms. Both games would be ported to the Famicom in 1988 and 1989 and Sega’s Master System would receive a port of the first game in 1988 as well: this would be the first game in the series released in North America. 1989 would see English PC ports for Ys I on both Apple IIGS and DOS computers, handled by Kyodai. The very same year, the two games would be ported to the PC Engine CD by Alfa Systems and published by Hudson Soft. In 1990, it would be released in North America as “Ys: Book I &II”. Future releases of the two games would include a port of the original to Sharp’s X68000 in 1991 – this version had some bizarre mish-mash of graphical styles, including pre-rendered 3D bosses and poorly-digitized photographs for CG art – as well as the Falcom Classics collections on Saturn, which included enhanced remakes of Ys and Ys II on the first and second volumes respectively. These would later be followed by the Ys Eternal remakes on Windows, which I mentioned earlier.

The story is identical to the game’s remake, but I guess it’s worth mentioning the differences between the two versions. For example, while Adol ends up shipwrecked in Barbado in the remake, he uneventfully arrives in Minea Town’s port at the beginning of the original version. As such, the town of Barbado didn’t exist in the original game, leaving Minea and “Zeptic” Village as the only two towns in the entire game. One major difference that only exists in the TurboGrafx-CD version would be the fate of the fortune teller Sara: she survives in this version, while she dies in every other version. I assumed that this was a case of censorship for the Western release – specifically because she just essentially disappears for the remainder of your adventure regardless – but it turns out she survived in the original Japanese release on the PC Engine as well. Aside from that, Chronicles simply expands on the original’s story, which could be taken as a testament to how well they handled the story in the first place.

As a bit of an aside, I’d like to discuss the final boss of Ys I’s campaign: Dark Fact. The first time I played through the Ys games, I found him intriguing, simply because he was an enigma – you had no real interaction with him until the end of the game, but you heard vague references to him throughout the story: the mysterious cloaked man stealing anything made from “silver”. Adol was a hero fighting simply for unknown reasons and Dark Fact served as a perfect foil, performing evil deeds to further equally mysterious ends. The fight with him was perhaps the hardest thing I had to deal with in the entirety of Chronicles – maybe even the entire series – and then I ended up beating him on my first try in the TG-CD version. I was staggered by that. Looking back, Dark Fact was unique in the Ys series – simply because he was the only case where the main villain you face ends up being the game’s final boss. His backstory, detailed in future releases, would also prove interesting: born Siegue Fact, a descendant of one of the Six Priests, he sought power to avenge the death of his parents, who were killed by a mob for preventing the mining of what the people of Esteria knew only as silver – in reality, Cleria, a holy metal sealing off the evil that would eventually spawn the demons he would end up commanding. Kind of ironic in the grand scheme of things.

As with the story, the gameplay in Ys Book I & II is, for the most part, identical to the later release. Motion is limited to the cardinal directions in this version – no diagonal movement – which in turn helps to better define the strategy associated with the “bump” system. Being able to move diagonally outright breaks this method of attack, which is likely why they dropped it in future games. However, the TurboGrafx version of the first two games were generally considered an improvement over the previous PC versions of the game, strictly because there was a lot more leniency given to aiming the bump attack – these early versions would require exact aiming to deal damage without being harmed in response. This change is perhaps a big part of the reason why this version was considered the definite version of the first two games before the Eternal re-releases, though being readily available in English was likely the biggest factor.

Of course, as with most early translations of Ys games, there were a few misnomers in the TurboGrafx version, though thankfully not nearly as many as in the earlier Master System and Kyodai releases – the former referred to Adol as “Aron” and Dark Fact as “Dulk Dekt” for some inexplicable reason and apparently the latter had so many translation issues, it’d be worth discussing in detail at a later point. Reah is renamed “Lair” – clearly just a poor translation – but Dogi has been rechristened “Colin” for reasons I don’t entirely understand. Thankfully, his name was reverted in Ys III, but in retrospect, that makes the earlier change even more baffling. A few items have also been renamed, but these are relatively minor by comparison. The most significant example would be the Rod that allows you to travel through the mirror maze near the end of Darm Tower is reclassified as a “brooch”. Aside from these minor quibbles, the translation appears to be relatively accurate, which is a pretty remarkable feat given both the game’s relative obscurity and the period it was translated during. Perhaps both the minor reputation of Ys and the TurboGrafx itself worked to the localization process’s advantage.

I think what I found the most interesting about this version of Ys I & II is the fact that it outright links the two – both adventures have been combined into a single narrative. This led to some balancing changes between the two games: in most versions of Ys I, Adol’s ability to level up is generally capped at 10, but this version allows for a much higher limit, allowing a much more gradual boost in power compared to most versions of the first game. As Adol maintains his experience when shifting over to the Ys II portion of the game, the beginning of that game also had to be rebalanced to allow a smooth transition. This direct continuity is unique to the TurboGrafx release – even the current Chronicles releases packaged both Ys I & II as separate titles. As such, I found the concept unique and thoroughly satisfying – it had always struck me as odd how you could technically play the games in any order in most other bundled re-releases.

The graphics in-game aren’t particularly spectacular, though they do far outstrip all of its predecessors. The TurboGrafx-16 itself wasn’t exactly a powerhouse, especially when directly compared to its contemporaries during the 16-bit era. This coupled with the fact that the game was released roughly one year after the PC Engine’s CD add-on – the first video game home console to use the CD-ROM format – makes the graphics a little more impressive by comparison. Of course, the game’s true graphical star would have to be the animated cutscenes. Boasting 20 minutes of fully animated cutscenes – an impressive amount given the game was originally released in 1989 – Ys Book I & II typifies what I’d expect all CD-based games of the time should look like: that distinct anime style common in the 1980s and 1990s, the limited yet fluid animation, even the limited color palette representative of video game consoles and home computers at the time. The game even managed to sneak in animated character portraits for important moments within the game itself.

The TG-CD version of Ys I & II retains the amazing soundtrack the games were known for – for the most part. In addition to lacking the tracks that were clearly added in the Eternal releases, Book I & II is missing a few tracks: the original game over theme from Ys I – which is, honestly, forgettable – as well as the standard boss fight theme from Ys II. These tracks were just replaced with the counterparts from their respective pack-in. On the plus side, another unused track from Ys I – “Theme of Adol” – was rearranged for one of the game’s opening cutscenes. The soundtrack is split between the TurboGrafx’s internal sound chip and Redbook Audio courtesy of the game’s CD format. To many, the TurboGrafx-CD arrangements are considered the best versions of each game’s soundtracks – though I’m not clear on if they mean the direct TG-CD soundtrack or the extremely similar “Perfect Collection” albums. However, as both were arranged by Ryo Yonemitsu, it may not matter in the long run.

The sound effects are pretty much what you’d expect from the hardware: nothing too spectacular. Fortunately, the game’s CD format added something quite impressive to the mix: voice acting. While most of the game isn’t voice acted, there’s still a fair amount – with 24 minutes in total, many major characters receive their fair share of voice work. What’s more impressive is the big names they got for a variety of roles: Debi Derryberry plays Feena, Dan Gilvezan plays the rogue demon Keith, Dark Fact is played by Michael Bell, Alan Oppenheimer plays both the narrator and Darm and, most surprisingly, his lead servant Dalles is played by none other than Jim Cummings! Unfortunately, the quality of the audio is fairly poor – which was to be expected, considering the TG-16’s weak audio processor – but the fact that the game was dubbed in the first place (and with such big names) is still impressive to me.

One might expect that I’d consider replaying an earlier version of the game that got me started on the franchise a waste of time, but honestly, it served a few purposes for me. For starters, it was technically still on my backlog, so it felt good to put that behind me. Secondly, it did provide a decent start to the stream marathon – considering I was playing the remainder of the games that saw at least some form of a release during the 16-bit era, it only seemed right to show off its respective form of the first two games. Most importantly, it gave me an even deeper insight into the games that started it all. While it’s unlikely that I’ll ever go back and play these two games in any other form – barring some ill-conceived future remake – Ys: Book I & II gave me an insight into what caused the cult following of the series in North America to get its start in the first place. Likewise, I’d have to acknowledge that even if I would probably say I preferred Chronicles+ overall, the earlier release on the all but forgotten TurboGrafx-CD did some things better than the later release would: in addition to the downright ‘90s presentation of the game, the seamless connection and subsequent rebalancing of the first Ys games made it feel like one truly grand adventure, rather than the two parts they’re separated into in practically every other iteration. It’s just a shame that, as of right now, the only ways to find this version would be to trawl for used copies in the usual fashion or hope that the original Wii’s Virtual Console stays on long enough to grab a copy digitally – which seems to grow more difficult by the day.

Ys III: Wanderers from Ys

Once considered the black sheep of the entire Ys franchise – Wanderers from Ys isn’t, at least in my opinion, really that bad of a game. It’s just a very stupid one. I’m aware of just how insulting that last statement is, but honestly: I mean it in the best way possible. Ditching the top-down overhead perspective of the previous Ys games, Wanderers resembles Zelda II – another controversial sequel in a beloved series – more than anything that came before it. A side-scrolling action RPG; what Ys III lost in overall complexity, it more than gained in pure “stupid fun”. Adol no longer rams askew into his foes, rather now he can just rapidly hack-and-slash, while also gaining the ability to jump – and by extension, a killer downward stab. Keep those additions in mind for later.

This was the second game I tackled in my retro Ys marathon back in 2015 and I was determined to play it early, simply due to both the poor public opinion surrounding the game and the existence of a “far superior remake” (more on that later). I chose to play the TG-CD version, handled again by Alfa Systems and Hudson Soft, which was generally considered the easiest of the three Western released versions. I ended up choosing that version mainly due to the animated cutscenes and the (admittedly terrible) voice acting, but also because I wanted to play as many Ys games on the TurboGrafx as I possibly could.  The Genesis version –  published by Telenet Japan (the company behind the Valis series among others) and developed by their RiOT division – is generally considered the definitive version of the game, due to proper difficulty balancing and improvements over both the TG-CD and SNES versions in various technical areas. The SNES version, developed by Advance Communication and published by Tonkin House, is generally considered both the hardest version of the game and the worst home version available in North America, despite having the most accurate translation by far. As with the first two games, the game was originally developed for the NEC PC-8801 and PC-9801 – with further ports made to the MSX2, the Sharp X68000 and even Nintendo’s Famicom.

The game’s story is fairly simple: at the behest of a fortuneteller, Adol and Dogi travel to the nation of Felghana (Kenai) to visit the city of Redmont (Sarina), Dogi’s childhood home. Unfortunately, the local economy has suffered due to mysterious weather patterns, a poor harvest and the local quarry being infested with monsters. Despite all that, Dogi returns home to a warm reception, except for Elena (Ellena), a young girl Dogi knew when they grew up together who has grown distant and indifferent. To make matters worse, the wicked Lord McGuire (King McGuire) has been terrorizing the townsfolk and the wicked knight Chester, Elena’s brother and – at one time – Dogi’s childhood friend, is leading the charge to fulfill the count’s evil ambitions. At the behest of Redmont’s mayor, Adol investigates the mysterious happenings and stumbles upon a plot to revive an ancient demon known as Galbalan (Demonicus).

There are a few things one must understand before the above paragraph makes complete sense: Wanderers from Ys was the one of the few early games in the series to actually receive an official contemporary English release – on the TurboGrafx-CD, Sega Genesis and Super NES – as well as the last game to receive such a treatment until XSEED gained the license in the 2000s. As such, many names were changed in a few of the translations – TurboGrafx changed the most, Genesis kept many of those changes, while the SNES probably has the most accurate translation of the three. To make things more coherent in the future, I decided to use the original Japanese names, while putting the new names devised for the translations in parentheses.

Having said that, Wanderers from Ys’s story has a few odd quirks behind it. Most notably, Adol’s characterization – he actually has one this time. No longer the essentially silent protagonist, Adol actually gets a fair amount of dialogue in this game. It just comes across as awkward, as Adol is portrayed as more invested in the fates of the people of Redmont than anyone else. This is only compounded by the outright apathy displayed by Elena, who is the most prominent supporting character in the entire game. The worst example comes fairly late in the game: when it appears that her brother Chester has died, Adol seems to care more about his demise than Chester’s own little sister. Furthermore, the game itself has little to do with the games that precede and follow it – effectively acting as an odd little shaggy-dog story. To make matters even more confusing, Wanderers from Ys wasn’t originally intended to be deemed the third Ys game: its Roman numeral was added in later releases. This would make sense given the game’s placement in the timeline, which I’ll elaborate on later.

As I said earlier, the game can be best described as “pure, dumb fun”. It plays like a Zelda II with far looser controls –  while Zelda II had stiff controls, Ys III goes too far in the opposite direction –  but isn’t quite as far removed from its predecessors. The game starts out difficult, because the game itself generally only consists of the Town of Redmont and the dungeons: travel between these areas is handled via a map that acts like a stage select. The general rules of the first two Ys games apply: you can heal by standing still, but only outside of dungeons. Unfortunately, the lack of substantial overworld space (you’ve got about a screen or two’s worth before each dungeon) makes this ability useless and as you need to be within the dungeon to spawn the enemies you need to gain experience and power up.  As a result,  you’re pretty much forced to constantly enter and exit the dungeon to gain your first few levels without dying at the beginning of the game. Boss fights range from insane to just plain boring – quite a few bosses are stationary, which could have posed a suitable challenge in the earlier Ys games, but not so much in the context of a side-scroller.

Ys III chooses to eschew the magic system from Ys II in favor of the rings from the first game. Most are identical to the assortment from Ys I, each granting Adol a specific ability. The Power Ring, Shield Ring, Heal Ring and Timer Ring all return with their respective enhancements from their previous appearance. However, like the Magic system from the second game, Adol’s rings require magic power – or ring power, as it’s called this time around – to activate and different abilities exhaust his RP at different rates.  They are joined by the Protect Ring, which shields Adol from any damage at a high RP cost – much like Ys II’s Shield Magic. Adol can also carry limited-use items as in previous games, including an herb that heals him to full health, medicine to restore RP, a mirror that can freeze enemies temporarily and an amulet that can destroy nearby enemies. The inventory system from previous games also returns, simply keeping track of any and all passive items Adol needs in his quest.

This brings us to perhaps the greatest flaw in the entire game: it fails to take advantage of both the shift in gameplay and the most popular features from the first two games. Switching from a top-down perspective to a side-scrolling game could have allowed for some interesting new game mechanics, but aside from some extremely stiff platforming – to the extent where it makes the original Castlevania feel like Super Mario Bros. – things stay relatively linear throughout, ditching the treacherous labyrinthine level design from the first two games. It’s not like side-scrolling games weren’t capable of complex layouts: imagine if Ys III’s dungeons were designed as if they were miniature versions of the maps you’d find in Metroid. Likewise, Wanderers from Ys ditches the then-iconic bump system, exchanging it for a fairly simple slash attack, which makes up for its lack of range with its ability to be “rapid fired” by holding down the attack button. What if, instead, holding down the attack button simply allows Adol to hold out his blade and ram into enemies for extra damage, effectively combining the more versatile slash with the more traditional bump mechanics of Ys I & II?

The one aspect of the game that is rarely criticized would be its soundtrack. Even the most discriminating Ys fans generally consider the music in this game to be among the best in the entire series, if not the best. While I personally don’t rate it quite that high, I do recognize the quality of the game’s soundtrack. Falcom’s legendary Sound Team J.D.K. – at the time, still led by the incomparable Mieko Ishikawa – was firing on all cylinders and delivered a soundtrack so memorable, even those entirely put off by the game it accompanied could not help but admit its quality. My favorite tracks in the game would have to be “The Boy’s Got Wings” – played at the entrance of each dungeon; “Sealed Time” – the theme of the Clock Tower; “Behold!!” – the introductory theme for the game’s final boss; and most of all, “The Theme of Chester”. The only real shortcoming I’d have to attribute to the soundtrack would have to be the fact that many of my favorite tracks only have fleeting appearances in the game itself – “The Theme of Chester” didn’t even appear in the TurboGrafx-CD version.

Regardless of the game’s flaws, I still had a blast when playing the game. The voice acting was horrible to the point of having a kitschy charm, the gameplay provided some good mindless hack-and-slash fun, the game’s short length meant that it didn’t overstay its welcome and best of all, the soundtrack is amazing. In retrospect, I enjoyed Ys III despite its flaws. It was just pure dumb fun – almost like an intermission, providing something of a breather between the first two games and the later, more complex entries in the series. While I acknowledge its shortcomings, I can’t say that I’d consider Ys III the worst game in the franchise’s history. Unfortunately, for me, the worst is yet to come.

Ys IV

Finally, we reach the end of the “classic Ys” era. After the quick diversion that was Wanderers from Ys, Ys IV would return to the classic overhead gameplay of the first two games, “run and bump” and all. Of course, Ys IV’s development was complicated by several factors: the most major of which being that there isn’t a singular Ys IV, rather two entirely different games were released by two entirely different companies at the behest of Falcom themselves. As such, Ys IV was the first game in the series to only be available on consoles – Falcom themselves did not develop a version for any Japanese computer systems. At this point in time, Falcom’s finances were struggling and while they did wish to create a fourth game in the Ys series, they lacked the necessary funds for development. As such, they created a story outline and a soundtrack, which they provided to both licensors of Ys IV.

The first company to license the creation of a fourth Ys game was Hudson Soft. They handed off development to Alfa Systems, who handled the development of the previous Ys games on the PC Engine, the Japanese counterpart to the TurboGrafx-16. They titled their treatment of the game “Ys IV: The Dawn of Ys” and created a game that managed to surpass the quality of their previous Ys treatments – no small feat, given the fact that their ports were generally considered the definitive versions of the previous Ys games. Unfortunately, in doing so, Dawn managed to stray significantly from Falcom’s original outline for the game. In response, Falcom also licensed the game to Tonkin House – the company that published the Ys III port on SNES – who once again handed development to Advance Communication, the developer that handled every Ys port on Nintendo platforms. Christening their own version as “Ys IV: Mask of the Sun”, Tonkin House stayed truer to Falcom’s original vision, but still deviated in some ways. Though Tonkin House’s version of Ys IV entered development after Hudson Soft’s, the game managed to release first on Super Famicom – and believe me, the difference in development time is reflected in the disparity of quality between the games.

Perhaps the most interesting tidbit about Ys IV’s development was that there was a third version planned as well, but it never came to fruition. At this point in time, Sega and Falcom had partnered up to port various Falcom games to Sega consoles, including MegaDrive ports of Lord Monarch and the first two Legend of Heroes games. The most famous product of this collaboration was, of course, the Sega CD version of Popful Mail, which actually managed to see release in the West via Working Designs. Very little is known about the Sega-Falcom version of Ys IV, aside from the fact that it was also developed under the title “Mask of the Sun”. Many speculate that the game was being developed for the Mega-CD in Japan. Admittedly hearing about this makes me feel sad: given the fact that Sega’s version of Popful Mail is generally considered the definitive edition of the game, not to mention Working Designs’ partnership with Sega – not only could this have been the best version of Ys IV, it could’ve been the only version that would’ve seen release in the West.

Regardless, due to the differences between the two versions that saw release during the fourth generation, I will be covering both games separately, followed by a direct compare-and-contrast, detailing what I liked more about each respective iteration of Ys IV.

Mask of the Sun

When I was doing my series of retro Ys streams, there was only one major question I had to ask myself: which version of Ys IV should I play first? Admittedly, my arguments for starting with the PC Engine version were weak – both keeping the systems together and the fact that Dawn had entered development first – but there was one particular reason I chose to start with Mask of the Sun: most people said it was garbage compared to its counterpart. Not specifically that the game itself was terrible, but just so underwhelming compared to the other iteration that it might as well not even exist. This essentially meant that I felt I owed the Super Famicom version the first playthrough, simply to make sure that I could be as unbiased as possible when comparing the two games. The thing is, they were right. In fact, even when I could only reasonably compare this game to the TurboGrafx version of Ys I & II, something just felt inherently wrong with this game.

Despite being called Ys IV, this game actually takes place between Ys II and Wanderers from Ys. Two years after his adventures in Esteria and the legendary continent of Ys, Adol Christin is reminiscing about his old adventures while looking at the ocean. Suddenly, a bottle washes ashore, containing a message in a language Adol didn’t recognize. He took the letter to Luta Gemma, who determined that it was written in the Celcetan language and translated it: “Celceta is in dire need… please, if a great hero lives among you, send him to aid us…”. Adol’s natural sense of heroism implored him to do what he could to help, so he immediately prepared to journey to Celceta. He leaves Esteria through Minea Port, but is joined by Dr. Flair – the doctor who cured Lilia of her mysterious yet deadly illness with medicine created from the Celcetan flower. He decides to join Adol to further study the flower in its natural habitat. The two arrive in Promalock, a port town near Celceta. There he first encounters some soldiers representing the Romun Empire – a kingdom with aspirations for world domination – who have stationed themselves across Celceta to protect the villagers from the demons that have sprung up. They quickly imprison Adol, having been ordered to lock up anyone suspicious. When locked in his cell, Adol meets Duren, a roguish “information vendor” who helps him make his escape. Fortunately, the Romun Captain meets with Dr. Flair who convinces him that Adol is nothing more than a harmless adventurer. The unnamed captain frees Adol (and Duren), offering him items from their armory as compensation, but warns Adol not to interfere in the Romun Empire’s affairs. Along the way, Adol learns of the legend of Lefance, the hero of Celceta, by stumbling upon the ruins of a temple built in his honor. He also meets various allies: Karna, a warrior from the Wind Village of Komodo searching for people who have gone missing from her village and Leeza, the caretaker of the mysterious Eldeel, the last of the angelic “winged ones”. Likewise, both Dogi and Lilia return to offer what assistance they can. However, in the background, three mysterious figures – the brutish Gadis, the steamy sorceress Bami and the small but sinister Gruda – appear to be working alongside the Romun Empire to unknown ends.

I’ve heard people compare the base gameplay of Mask of the Sun to some of the early computer versions of the first two games in the franchise, with walking controls that were significantly more clunky than the later console versions. The game also only allows players to move in the four cardinal directions. Likewise, the aiming required to properly attack enemies is significantly more sensitive – you need to line up exactly when attacking enemies or you’ll either miss or take damage yourself. Truth be told, I’ve tinkered with a few of the early PC versions of Ys and frankly, a keyboard generally allows for more precise control in this style of game when compared to the D-Pad, likely the reason why earlier console releases tended to fudge the minutiae of the targeting. Unfortunately, this in turn leads to a case of the worst of both worlds. Given the lack of quality control in the previous Ys game on the SNES, it’s not really much of a surprise. Regardless, having to essentially fight with the game’s controls to progress puts a damper on the game’s fun factor. An odd change that I found annoying is that after dying, instead of simply respawning you with your latest save, the game sends you back to the title screen. Seems kind of like an odd decision for a game that lets you save at any point – it just adds tedium to continuing.

It doesn’t help that for whatever reason, they decided to add poison effects to this game. I’m not entirely sure who was behind this addition, but it definitely ended up being a thorn in my side. To make matters even worse, Adol’s ability to heal while stationary outside of dungeons has been severely hampered compared to previous iterations. To be honest, I was well into the game before I even realized he still had this ability. The amount of time Adol needs to stand still to start recovering health is downright ridiculous. Even Wanderers from Ys handled it better than Mask of the Sun did! In the end, all of these small issues I had with the game ended up consolidating in a game I don’t think I’d ever want to replay. Honestly, while I was playing through the game, I essentially had to cheat in order to make progress: if you level up to a certain extent in each area, weaker enemies do minimal damage, no matter how poor your aim. I’m not sure if this was an intentional exploit designed into the game itself, but it still felt like cheating to some extent. I don’t particularly hate breaking a game’s rules, but it feels a little different when it’s the only way to make any progress.

The item and inventory system are essentially functionally the same in this game. This time, however, the “Equip” menu only allows you to equip Adol’s sword, shield and armor – no extra items, rings or magic this time around. Of course, in this game, some of the higher level swords contain special magics of their own. For example, the Flame Wind Sword acts like the Fire Magic from previous games, the Thunder Sword fires off two balls of lightning and the Hero’s Sword allows Adol to heal himself. Of course, all of these abilities come at the cost of MP. The Wing from the original Ys returns as an inexhaustible standard item, though for some reason, it now has the functionality of the Return Magic from Ys II – lacking the MP cost. The items also work like they do in previous games: Adol can only equip one at a time and uses it by hitting a specific button. Overall, this is somewhat simpler than previous games, due to the lack of additional items in the equipment menu – however, due to the fact that there is a total of 8 sets of swords, shields and armor and certain swords offer special abilities, it seems to even out in the end.

The graphics in this game are average for a SNES game: nothing impressive, but at times they represent the capabilities of the system fairly well. There are a few segments in the game that even utilize Mode 7, to my dismay. It’s kind of a mixed bag to compare the two games in this field – due to the Super Famicom being more powerful than the PC Engine, there are some things it does better than the other version. For example, the various character sprites have more detail and better coloring in Mask compared to Dawn. Likewise, the SNES can display a wider color palette than the TG-16, and there are some areas where this is clearly visible. Of course, the fact that Dawn of Ys used CD media gave it some advantages Mask of the Sun simply could not match, but there are some other odd stylistic choices that Tonkin House made when developing their version of Ys IV. For example, while most Ys games up to this point would use a single, static but detailed image to represent specific shops and homes in game, MotS elects instead to maintain the overhead view for the entire game. This decision diminishes the impact of a lot of scenes, given the limited range of expression allowed by the overworld sprites.

Likewise, many in-game areas have dull designs that don’t really utilize the SNES’s graphical capabilities very well: most dungeons are dominated by at least one shade of brown or gray – kind of a let-down given the diverse terrains Adol normally explores. Even the game’s standard border is dominated by a particularly dull shade of gray. I believe their intent was to draw greater attention to the gold trim, but it’s particularly sparse. There was one thing that sort of bothered me about the game in general, but it’s not entirely unique to Mask of the Sun. The way the game handles dialogue is somewhat awkward: during conversations in the game, new dialogue boxes will generally spawn on top of existing ones. It’s another choice that just seems a bit ugly. To make matters worse, this is another game that decides to grant Adol the full power of speech, which definitely negatively affects his character this time around – even more so than Wanderers from Ys did. Maybe this is just my opinion, but at this point particularly, Adol worked better as a silent protagonist.

I’ve got mixed feelings on the sound design as well. Falcom’s soundtrack for Ys IV contains many of my favorite songs in the entire series. Unfortunately, Mask of the Sun uses a relatively small number of these tracks – and consequently, quite a few of my favorite songs don’t appear in this version. However, they do manage to not only use one original track that wasn’t utilized in any other version, a song from a previous game that also didn’t appear anywhere else, and even managed to make an entirely original opening theme, as well as a few other original tracks. Likewise, the instrumentation is a little on the weak side compared to other arrangements of what appears in the game. Now, it’s not fair to compare the SNES’s sound chip to Redbook-quality CD audio, but many of the tracks have also been reproduced on weaker sound chips – hell, Falcom provided a version of the soundtrack that utilized the PC-88’s hardware – to a far better effect. This isn’t to say that Mask of the Sun does a bad job on its soundtrack, I actually enjoyed many of the game’s arrangements while playing. It’s just been outclassed by essentially every other iteration of the Ys IV soundtrack.

Of all the Ys games I’ve played so far, I think I’d have to consider Mask of the Sun to one of the worst games in the franchise, if not the worst. While I can understand the hatred for Wanderers from Ys, the game was at least enjoyable to charge through, even if it didn’t particularly represent the rest of the series. Mask of the Sun is essentially the exact opposite in its design: it tries too hard to represent the previous games in the franchise, at the expensive of creating an enjoyable experience. Tonkin House’s previous work on Wanderers from Ys is generally considered one of the worst of the versions, with two of its major flaws being high difficulty and non-responsive controls. With issues like this in their previous release, why would they consider making a “run-and-bump” style Ys game – a style of game that relies entirely on good controls and proper difficulty balance? I’ve heard some Ys fans claim that without its counterpart on the PC Engine overshadowing it, Mask of the Sun would be considered a far better game – but if I were to be honest, I played this version first, so I think I’m justified when I say that’s an exaggeration, if not an outright lie.

The Dawn of Ys

From what I can tell, The Dawn of Ys is considered the best iteration of the original Ys format – the games that utilized the unique “run-and-bump” system found early on in the franchise – by the majority of the fanbase that has played it. I’m inclined to agree with that assessment: if Hudson deviated from Falcom’s original vision more than Tonkin House did, it was clearly to the game’s benefit. Dawn of Ys was the last game in the franchise to make use of the classic gameplay style from the first two games, effectively perfecting it to the point where it could no longer be improved. Likewise, unlike the other follow-ups to the first two games before it, it pays homage to the first two games in the franchise in a way that would not be surpassed for over a decade. The PC Engine’s take on Ys IV is a love letter addressed to Adol’s original adventure in its entirety, in terms of its gameplay mechanics, its storyline and various other elements of the game. Yet, in spite of this, the game itself also manages to carve out its own niche within the franchise, certainly earning its reputation as one of the best games in the entire series.

Ironically, the game’s storyline is similar to its Super Famicom counterpart in many ways. I’ve read conflicting information about whether or not DoY takes place before or after Wanderers from Ys, but like Mask of the Sun, it takes place two years after the first two Ys games. Likewise, there is a throwaway line where Dogi tells Adol about Felghana – his homeland and the setting of Ys III – which would seem to imply that it predated that game as well. Another major difference is that instead of finding a message in a bottle, Adol is told to go to Celceta by Sara, the fortune teller from the first game who, if you’ll remember, only managed to cheat death in the TurboGrafx-CD port. Furthermore, you start off with all of the Cleria items – the top-level items from Ys II, a nice little continuity nod.  You also end up encountering Karna earlier, as she’s being detained by the Romun Empire. The Romun Empire’s captain also has greater characterization: he is now known as Leo and comes across as both power-hungry and arrogant. Of course, as with Mask of the Sun, the Romuns imprison you, but not before displaying their military strength and stealing your high-level equipment for good measure. Once in prison, you meet up with Duren again – this time, he regales you with the legend of Celceta’s fabled Golden City. Soon after, Karna returns the favor by assisting you in your escape – you’re only able to steal a new sword, shield and set of armor on your way out – only to be surrounded by 6 guards. Durna bails on you, and as a result you and Karna are left to face off with the guards. This time around, Gruda, Bami and Gadis are working independently of the Romun Empire – this time, they take a far more active role in fighting Adol. Another major difference would be the location names: aside from Promalock, Dawn of Ys renames all of the shared locations that appear in both games. An odd quirk, considering most other versions use the names from Mask of the Sun, but I’m not going to judge. Finally, Adol’s ability to speak has been reverted to the same levels as Ys: Book I & II, which makes him significantly more charming: somehow our red-haired swordsman is much more charming when he’s essentially mute.

While Mask of the Sun’s gameplay was more unwieldy than the previous games in the series I’d played, Dawn of Ys goes in the exact opposite direction – essentially taking the responsive controls from Ys: Book I & II and further streamlining them. This is the first game that allows Adol to move (and attack!) in 8 directions – this is the key improvement Alfa Systems made over their previous ports. While this ability would be added into future remakes of the first 2 Ys games, this was the first release in the Ys series that allowed players to move in more than just the standard 4 directions. Even without this new ability, Adol effectively glides around the game world effortlessly, a decided contrast from the somewhat clunky controls from the Super Famicom release. Unfortunately, there are times where this can be detrimental: there have been times where the responsiveness of the controls inadvertently got me trapped right near an enemy, effectively wiping out my health in one shot. On the other hand, the addition of diagonal attacks also proved to be the undoing of the “run-and-bump” system: when walking diagonally, it’s essentially impossible to line up with a standard enemy in such a way where Adol takes damage from the enemy. Of course, bosses are generally immune to this sort of trickery – they’re generally large, so it’s far easier for them to reposition themselves in such a way that ramming into them from any angle will result in a quick suicide – but it does put a bit of a damper on the strategy behind fighting standard-sized enemies. Another unique addition to Dawn of Ys was that, at various points in the adventure, Adol can be joined by a partner character, essentially mirroring Adol’s movements like Tails in Sonic the Hedgehog 2 and randomly locking onto and attacking various enemies. This is a double-edged sword: while you gain no experience for demons felled by your partner; they can also effectively act as a shield when Adol’s low on health, providing cover when escaping from a dungeon. Something similar showed up in Ys II Chronicles+, though it was simultaneously simpler and more complex: one escort mission allowed you to attack enemies using your charge, who was even capable of leveling up and getting stronger as he defeated more enemies. I’ll never know whether that optional side-quest was inspired by Dawn of Ys, but I’d like to think it was.

The equipment system once again adheres to the standards of previous games, but this time, the line-up is slightly different. Sword, Shield and Armor all return – but Dawn of Ys also adds in the Rings (acting as they do in the original Ys) with Ys II’s Magic. All other items are essentially shunted over to the inventory, allowing Adol to choose one of each at a time. Most of the Rings and Magic return from previous games, but there are also some new power-ups as well. The Ring of Roda replenishes magic points, similarly to how the Heal Ring allows Adol to recover HP in dungeons; the Magic Ring increases the strength of magic attacks; the Seeker Magic uncovers secret entrances – effectively a less useful version of the already situational Light Magic; and my favorite of the new items: Freeze Magic. Freeze Magic allows Adol to fire ice bolts which, while they do less damage than the Fire Magic’s fireballs, will freeze standard enemies in place, leaving them open to other attacks. Likewise, the Inventory contains a lot of old items, though there are some new ones. One interesting item is the Flute of Wind, which allows Adol to send messages via a messenger bird. This is actually crucial to obtaining an optional but powerful set of weaponry. Aside from that, many of the items are mostly contextual – the usual set of recovery items, various keys and items that are otherwise functionally identical to keys. The Mask of Eyes reappears, and actually factors pretty heavily into the storyline: its true name is the Mask of the Sun and along with its sister relic, the Mask of the Moon, holds the very key to the lost civilization of the winged ones.

I’d argue that the graphical style of Dawn of Ys suffers from the exact opposite issues Mask of the Sun had: Hudson Soft clearly understood the PC Engine’s hardware, but despite its add-ons, it was severely limited when compared to its fourth-generation contemporaries. As such, for the most part the graphics are only marginally better than those of Books I & II and those improvements that were made appear to be more due to being allowed to make an original title, rather than matching the artstyle of a game originally designed for weaker hardware. Having said that, Alfa Systems still managed to create a fairly vibrant game world with loads of variety in its settings. Of course, the true star of game would have to be the animated cutscenes, which have been significantly improved since the previous title in the franchise. I’m still impressed with the video quality the TurboGrafx-CD could achieve, especially when compared to the more powerful Sega CD. Dawn of Ys is perhaps the greatest example of what the system was capable, dwarfing even what was considered the PC Engine CD’s quintessential masterpiece, Dracula X: Rondo of Blood.

Once again, the music takes center stage in Dawn of Ys. In addition to using the most songs from Falcom’s original soundtrack of any iteration of Ys IV, the tracks that managed to utilize the Redbook CD audio have been once again lovingly rearranged by the incomparable Ryo Yoneimitsu. Unfortunately, a significant amount of the soundtrack had to be reproduced on the PC Engine’s built-in sound chip, leading to a less impressive sound. Oddly enough, I’d probably say I preferred even these takes on the songs over the arrangements found in the Super Famicom version. In order to enjoy the game as much as possible, I played the game using a fandub – a unique concept in general, but extremely rare with PC Engine CD games – as opposed to the original Japanese voiceovers. Since then, I’ve listened to snippets from the original audio and I was floored with how good both the voice acting itself and the audio quality was in the game. The fandub, on the other hand, also felt like it was handled perfectly: it was mostly the work of enthusiastic amateurs, but they managed to create a product that truly sound like it could’ve been a commercial dub of a video game from the mid-1990s. In the end, that’s exactly what I would’ve hoped from a labor of love like that.

In the end, perhaps “The Dawn of Ys” was an ironic title: it marked the end of the first stage in the Ys franchise’s development. Even though only 4 games in the franchise – Ys I, II and both versions of IV – utilized a unique method of attack that set it apart from other action RPGs, this was considered the franchise’s trademark in its early days. As such, it was perhaps fitting that Dawn would be the last original (i.e. non-remake) title in the franchise to make use of it, but at the same time pushing the design to its logical conclusion. Hudson’s last Ys game was perhaps its best – ultimately paying homage to the first Ys games, while crafting their own new experiences at the same time. My only real criticism was that by pushing the classic “run and bump” mechanic to its limits, Dawn ultimately exposes the limitations of this system – leading Falcom to essentially reinvent the wheel in future titles. In the end, I feel The Dawn of Ys is really the best ending to the initial era of the Ys series anyone could have asked for. Even today, the game is considered among the best games in the entire series, which is a testament to just how well it was crafted.

Comparison

Considering both the glowing praise I’ve heaped upon Dawn of Ys and the scorn I’ve leveled at Mask of the Sun, one might suggest that attempting to compare and contrast the games would be a fool’s errand. Regardless, I still think it’s worth doing, simply because it’s fascinating to detail the differing paths both games took in the development process. Interesting side note: there are even a few things I thought Mask handled better than Dawn anyway, so those could be fun avenues to explore as well.

It would seem like the best place to start would be cataloging the various references both games made to Ys I & II, their direct predecessors both in terms of gameplay mechanics and timeline placement. Both games contain cameos of varying degrees from Dogi, Lilia and Dr. Flair. As I said, Dr. Flair has a much more important role in Mask of the Sun – acting as Adol’s travelling companion during the first leg of his journey – but he appears as a traveler tending to the wounded in Karna’s village in Dawn of Ys. Likewise, both Dogi and Lilia’s roles are far more limited in MotS compared to DoY: they make various small appearances through the Super Famicom release, while Dogi acts as Adol’s constant companion in the PC Engine version and Lilia ends up as a damsel in distress at one point. Interestingly, both games do send Adol back to locations from his previous adventures during his journey in Celceta. Mask of the Sun sends him back to Rance Village from Ys II, which is accompanied by its classic tune “Too Full with Love”. Dawn of Ys, however, manages to outdo it: not only does Adol return to Minea Town in his adventure, but has to once again scale the dreaded Darm Tower – scored by a new arrangement of “TOWER OF THE SHADOW OF DEATH”. The way both of these games handled these throwback segments were suited to their general developmental approach as well. Mask of the Sun took a far less detailed approach, keeping in line with the game’s basic structure, while many familiar faces reemerged in Minea Town, including the pawn shop owner Pim and the aforementioned Sara.

This brings me to my next point: world-building. Mask of the Sun tended towards a more minimalistic approach – each character, no matter how major or minor, has about the same level of detail to one another. I guess this is somewhat fitting, considering that future games in the Ys series (particularly Ys I & II Chronicles) would take a similar approach, only with more detail applied to even the most minor characters, as opposed to reducing the characterization of every character in the game. Dawn of Ys, on the other hand, had different aspects that fleshed out the various denizens of the game world: voice acting wasn’t strictly limited to major characters, a few minor characters also got some lines of dialogue. Some minor characters even had in-game artwork dedicated to them, particularly the shopkeeps. Both elements helped to flesh out the world, but clearly favored certain characters over others. DoY only chose to highlight specific characters while MotS’s approach led to a far less vivid world but treated each character equally, regardless of their importance to the story.

Of course, essentially building a game’s story from an outline can lead to some weird quirks when portraying various characters in the game, especially with two completely different creative teams working entirely independently of one another. Therefore, we’ve got multiple versions of various characters that appeared in both games, with their own unique traits and storylines. For example, as I mentioned earlier, the villainous trio of Gruda, Bami and Gadis are affiliated with the Romun Empire in Mask, but act independently in Dawn. This actually manages to have an effect on the portrayal of the Romun Empire itself: in MotS, they are an outright evil faction, unwitting pawns to the Clan of Darkness’s true machinations; DoY portrays them as a powerful group as well, but one that’s more greedy than megalomaniacal – searching for the fabled Golden City and its treasures rather than focusing on their usual goals of world domination. Likewise, while the Romun Captain in Mask was essentially just a generic bad guy, Dawn’s General Leo had actual characterization behind him – not to mention a name. Duren’s effectively a source of exposition in the Super Famicom version, but his involvement is a lot more personal in the PC Engine version: he was a former member of the Clan of Darkness.  Karna receives roughly equal characterization in both games – she just manages to show up earlier in Dawn of Ys. Leeza, on the other hand, is much more important in Mask of the Sun: she acts as Eldeel’s caretaker, a responsibility passed on from generation to generation in her village. She also wrote the message that brought Adol to Celceta in the first place. She’s still got the relationship with Eldeel in Dawn of Ys, but aside from finding Adol after a severe injury and nursing him back to health, her involvement is much more limited.

As I said before, both games essentially shared the same basic storyline, but the way they handled discussing various aspects of their stories differed greatly. For example, Dawn of Ys essentially has Adol commune with the spirits of Lefance’s disciples: fleshing out various aspects of Celcetan history, including the role of the “winged ones” in building the Golden City as well as the role they played in building the ancient human society, the Clan of Darkness’s war with winged ones and their motivations, as well as some information about the role Adol’s adventures in Esteria and Ys played in his current situation. Even Dark Fact’s true identity was essentially stated in DoY – his original name was Siegue Fact. The Clan of Darkness even attempt to resurrect Dark Fact by using his long-removed relative Keith’s body as a vessel. Feena and Leah resurface when Adol visits Darm Tower, which heavily hints that they too were members of Eldeel’s race. Mask of the Sun essentially implies a lot about the history of Celceta, but doesn’t really state outright nearly as much information as its counterpart.

I also mentioned earlier that the gameplay between both games, while using the same core concept, varied significantly in terms of execution. It may seem like gloating to bring this up again, but in the end, I speculate that both games when taken together were what caused Falcom to depart from their traditional mechanics in future iterations of the series. Mask of the Sun favored a more classic approach to the gameplay, essentially emulating the gameplay schema of the original PC versions of the first two Ys games. While this reliance on more precise controls didn’t quite lend itself well to the twitchier style of gameplay expected of console games, it did manage to make the game more difficult. Conversely, Dawn of Ys took the simplified version of these mechanics and expanded on them, essentially making them even more user-friendly with the addition of diagonal movement. Unfortunately, in turn this broke the balancing of the entire concept: the ability to walk diagonally makes it essentially impossible to not run into an enemy off-center which, in turn, essentially makes Adol invincible throughout most of the game. This would essentially leave Falcom in an awkward position for future titles if they decided to retain this mechanic: either essentially crippling players with an archaic concept while retaining a sense of difficulty or throwing any sense of balance out the window while modernizing the concept. Perhaps playing both versions of Ys IV essentially makes the shift to new gameplay styles feel like less of a betrayal of their trademark concept and more like a pragmatic shift in order to keep the series moving.

One final contrast I feel is a bit of a necessity to explore, though I guess it relies significantly more on spoilers than anything else I’ve mentioned so far. Then again, as this article is a retrospective on a series that’s been around for 30 years now, spoilers had to be expected. Each game approached its climax in very different ways, leading to substantially different final bosses. Mask of the Sun sets Eldeel as the game’s final boss – a choice that is definitely a significant improvement over how they used him in Dawn of Ys. In Dawn of Ys, Eldeel was essentially the pawn of the Clan of Darkness and gets unceremoniously stabbed to death by Gruda. Kind of weird seeing a god-like being get taken out so easily. Dawn of Ys, on the other hand elects to use an original character: Arem, the legendary leader of the Clan of Darkness during their war with the Golden City. Again, this sort of elevates the Clan of Darkness significantly when compared to Mask, where they’re essentially staged in such a way where they’re getting ready to betray Eldeel and steal his powers but never actually manage to pull off their schemes, which just ends up making them look stupid. In both games, the Clan of Darkness are the ones who persuade Eldeel to turn on the people of Celceta, but it is interesting to see how both games took this story prompt in completely different directions.

Personally, I always found it amusing that Falcom would consider Mask of the Sun to be the “canonical” take on Ys IV. I mean, it’s understandable – Tonkin House more closely followed Falcom’s outline than Hudson Soft did, so it’s only fair that their version would earn the title of the “true” Ys IV – but at the same time, it’s a little baffling. Not exactly from a quality standpoint, that’s irrelevant. Rather, a majority of the merchandising surrounding Ys IV in general appeared to favor Dawn of Ys over its Super Famicom counterpart. The “Perfect Collection” albums used the PC Engine’s selection of songs as its basis, but this may have been due to the fact that Ryo Yoneimitsu handled them as usual. Of course, that didn’t explain the fact that the soundtracks that showcased Falcom’s own original PC-88 compositions were also named for DoY. Perhaps the most baffling aspect of this whole affair is the fact that Falcom themselves produced several videos focusing on Dawn, not to mention the fact that their pitch trailer for an anime based on the fourth game was named “The Dawn of Ys” and utilized designs that clearly resembled that version more than those from Mask of the Sun. In the end, the arguments are irrelevant in general, simply because Falcom ended up releasing their own version of Ys IV several years later: Foliage Ocean in Celceta, or “Memories of Celceta” as it’s known in the West.

Ys V: Kefin, Lost City of Sand

While Ys IV would mark the end of the classic Ys formula, Falcom had one last game in the series planned for the fourth generation of video game consoles. Whether Falcom themselves knew that they had reached the logical conclusion of the original “run-and-bump” system present in the previous games or simply believed that the franchise needed to be refreshed, Ys V would take things in an entirely new direction. Of course, it didn’t exactly work out for the best: the game shares a Black Sheep status with Wanderers from Ys. The game was so bad, I even managed to write an entire article on what I feel the best course of action would be if the game were ever remade – and believe me, it desperately needs a remake. Yet, despite all its problems, Ys V would have a profound impact on future entries in the series, albeit not an entirely positive one.

Released at the tail end of 1995, Ys V: Ushinawareta Suna no Miyako Kefin – generally translated as “Kefin, Lost City of Sand” – was the first game in the series developed exclusively for consoles by Falcom themselves. This was may very well have been Falcom’s first attempt at developing directly for the Super Famicom, Tonkin House handled the previous Ys games and Koei would handle the ports of the first two Brandish games on the platform. This simple fact entirely foreshadows the game’s quality. To make matters worse, I’ve heard speculation that Kefin had a particularly short development cycle, leading to the excision of various content, including an appearance from Adol’s constant travel companion Dogi, whose absence was particularly worrying. Apparently, many fans complained that the game was too easy, so Falcom would release “Ys V Expert” the following year: in addition to raising the game’s difficulty level, Expert also included various bug fixes, a hidden dungeon and a brand-new Time Attack mode – essentially a Boss Rush, the first (but not the last) in the series. Surprisingly, the game took a long time to receive a fan translation, due to various technical difficulties found while editing the game itself. Aeon Genesis, the same team that handled the translation for Mask of the Sun, managed to release a fully playable translation in 2013. To put that in perspective, the English fandub project for The Dawn of Ys was completed the previous year. Currently, the fan translation is the only way to play the game in English in any form, which is very telling.

Ys V lives up to its name, in the sense that it takes place after both Ys III and IV. This time around, our hero Adol lands in the Xandria region in the continent of Afroca – don’t ask me, I didn’t name it. Adol has built quite the reputation, earning the attention of a wealthy merchant named Dorman. Dorman hires Adol for the expressed purpose of finding a special set of crystals that are said to be related to the lost civilization of Kefin, a legendary city in Afroca’s desert said to have disappeared over five hundred years ago. In fact, the desert where Kefin was said to reside has been expanding recently, ruining various towns across the continent and displacing their residents. Dorman believes that the secrets of the people of Kefin, who are said to have discovered the magic of alchemy, should be able to revive the land. On his quest to find the crystals, Adol meets various people who help him on his journey. Niena, a young shopkeeper with a mysterious past; Massea, a wise woman who teaches Adol the ways of alchemy, and the Evil gang, a family of thieves consisting of young Terra acting as a decoy, her older brothers Dios and Nortis as the muscle and their mother Alga who acts as their leader. Throughout his journey, Adol also encounters Stoker, a spirit from 500 years in the past, whose motives are unclear. Of course, things may not be as they seem, which seems to be the case with most RPGs. Can Adol discover the secret of Kefin and save Xandria from desolation?

Perhaps the weirdest part of Kefin, Lost City of Sand’s story is the fact that outside of a few character appearances, it doesn’t really relate to anything that came before it or, even more surprisingly, follows it. I’ve heard some Ys fans categorize the fourth, fifth and sixth games in the franchise as a “trilogy”, but the story of Ys V just sort of comes across as a bit of a non-sequitur in a lot of ways. For example, apparently Dogi was originally planned to be involved in the game, with minor character Effy even planned to be his girlfriend at that point in development. Aside from Adol, the only character or story element from this game that even reappears is Terra, who ages 3 years and becomes a pirate in the process. It doesn’t really help that the game’s true villain – the captain of Dorman’s guards: Rizze – doesn’t really do anything of importance after her reveal as the true mastermind. The game’s final boss is a random henchman of hers, who Adol ends up fighting twice in succession. I’ve joked in the past that playing an Ys game strictly for the story entirely misses the point of the series, but even the most threadbare of storylines from previous games were at least coherent.

Just like Wanderers from Ys before it, Ys V departs from the established Ys formula, though not quite to the extent of its predecessor. The game maintains its top-down overhead perspective, as well as various staples of the series such as the ability to regain health by standing still outside of dungeons, as well as the standard inventory system shown in games past. However, Ys V did ditch the classic attack system, going for a more traditional attack button, mimicking games like The Legend of Zelda, Crystalis or Secret of Mana. Adol’s attacks would often vary based on which weapon he has equipped: either a traditional sword slash or a stab, which offer more range sideways and straight forward, respectively. The shield is also given a tangible use in this game, allowing our red-haired adventurer to block oncoming attacks. He also gains the ability to jump, allowing for simple platforming in a slightly isometric style. Jumping would also come into play in several of the game’s boss fights. On the surface, all these changes sound like they would be positive additions to the series – as I said earlier, both iterations of Ys IV showcased the impending limitations of the traditional “run-and-bump” gameplay from previous titles in the series. Unfortunately, they came with a caveat: terrible controls. Ys games are traditionally fast-paced affairs, relying far more on reflexes than thoughtful planning, and Ys V is no exception. Unfortunately, Adol’s new slash and stab attacks both move at a glacial pace, giving players only a short window of opportunity to attack without trading hits. Compared to the original Zelda, which came out nearly a decade prior, the attack speed is abysmal. Likewise, the jumping controls are incredibly clunky, which makes the mercifully few segments that require pixel-perfect platforming a nightmare to complete.

The game’s magic system is also significantly overhauled. While previous games, even Ys III, tied specific effects to specific items, Ys V utilizes a brand-new system it dubs “alchemy”. Throughout the course of his adventure, Adol finds various elemental stones, each representing one of six elements: Fire, Water, Earth, Wind, Light and Dark. Three of these can be combined to form a Fluxstone, which contains the spell itself. These Fluxstones can be attached to Adol’s current weapon, allowing him access to their magic. Unfortunately, once a Fluxstone has been attached to a weapon, it’s no longer usable on any future weapons. Also, due to the addition of various elemental weaknesses and strengths, as well as relying upon specific locations to create Fluxstones in the first place, I just ended up ignoring the magic system throughout the clear majority of the game, only really making use of it when it was first introduced. The fact that Adol levels up both his physical and magical strength separately only served to encourage this decision – for the first time, I was perfectly happy battling through the game with only Adol’s sword. Ys V also dismisses the ability to save anywhere at any time, instead using various locations such as inns to allow for saving. Players can also make quick saves, but these only last for as long as the system is left running. The game’s inventory is also slightly modified: Adol can now hold multiple healing items at one time and pause the game at any point – even during boss battles – to make use of them. I’m not sure if I would consider this a change for the better, because though the game’s poor controls make things difficult, this is a game-breaking feature. Finally, enemies no longer drop money – instead they drop gems, which can be sold, which essentially just adds another step to the process of grinding to buy new items.

Ironically, despite having terrible controls, Kefin, Lost City of Sand is significantly easier than previous Ys games, to the point where it almost makes me wish that translation patch worked on the Expert version instead of the original release. The weirdest part about the game is just how front-loaded the difficulty is. The boss fights I had the most trouble with were among the earliest in the game – particularly the fourth boss, the fire dragon from the Se-Be Ruins.  It only gave me so much trouble because I wasn’t levelled high enough. Of course, boss fights that are nearly impossible without the proper levelling are practically an Ys staple, so I can’t really say that that bothered me quite so much. On the other hand, many of the later bosses were fairly easy by comparison. It’s to the extent where I ended up beating the final boss on my first try. That’s not even the worst part: to this day, I don’t even know how I ended up doing it. I just sort of flailed around and ended up winning. Maybe this is another one of my weird opinions, but the only thing I find more annoying than losing without knowing why is winning for the same reason. I can’t really explain why, it just ticks me off.

The graphics are also an extreme departure from previous games in the series. For starters, the character sprites are significantly less “super deformed” than previous games in the series, going for slightly more realistic proportions. Personally, I’m not a fan – the realism doesn’t really go far enough, so it just ends up coming across as a half-measure in the long run. The game’s setting also suffers in the process. Graphically, everything looks just fine, to the extent where I’d say it has the best-looking in-game graphics of any Ys game up to this point by a wide margin. Some of the magic spells’ special effects are particularly impressive, especially given Falcom’s small team of artists. Unfortunately, in the process, the game loses a lot of its charm: even the traditional border from previous games in the series disappears, expanding the playing field. There is also a distinct lack of even the rudimentary cutscenes seen in the earliest releases in the series. Ys V ends up resembling a knockoff Squaresoft RPG in the worst ways, coming off less as a logical extension of the previous settings in the series and more like a generic fantasy setting, almost bordering on parody with its sheer genericity. I’ve heard various speculation as to why this was the case: some said it was an attempt at attracting a broader audience; others think this was simply Falcom’s attempt at improving the graphics. Regardless, the graphics have definitely improved since Mask of the Sun and Wanderers from Ys on Nintendo’s 16-bit powerhouse – it just happened to come at the cost of the Ys series’ unique charm.

The sound design fares similarly. Many sound effects present in previous Ys games return, effectively recreated using the Super Famicom’s hardware – but this is the only common audible thread this game shares with its predecessors. The music doesn’t really seem to match with that of the rest of the series. The soundtrack’s tone better resembles your standard SNES-era RPG, both in terms of composition but especially in instrumentation. I’ve heard many people compare it to the songs found in most Squaresoft and Enix RPGs released that generation, and I’m inclined to agree. Once again, the music found in this game isn’t necessarily bad, but I’d have to say Ys V may have among the most forgettable soundtracks in the entire franchise, simply because while deviating from the traditional tone found in the Ys series, it does so by creating a far more generic sound. The fact that this was the first game in the franchise not to receive a fully arranged album doesn’t really help matters.  Only two albums – one orchestral, the other an “image album” that contained both original recordings from the SFC version as well as a few arrangements that were standard around this era – even attempted to revisit the game’s compositions. Having said that, I do have a few tracks I enjoy: “Field of Gale”, the first overworld theme; the Evil gang’s theme “Thieves of Brotherhood”; “Turning Death Spiral” and “Bad Species”, two of the game’s boss themes and “Break into Territory”, a theme from one of the game’s later areas. It’s a shame, honestly – even black sheep of the franchise Wanderers from Ys was praised for its soundtrack, while Ys V is woefully misrepresented when even Falcom themselves reflect on the series’ most popular songs. Perhaps more of the game’s soundtrack would be better received if it had been rearranged into the Ys series’ traditional symphonic metal style. I would argue that this is another major reason why it should be remade.

Despite Ys V’s lack of polish – especially egregious given how late into the Super Famicom’s lifespan it was released – I can’t honestly say that I hold any major ill will against it. Even though I would probably consider Kefin, Lost City of Sand to be the black sheep of the entire Ys franchise, I should give it credit for at least attempting to change up the formula. While Mask of the Sun was a terrible effort at recreating the magic of previous games in the series, Ys V failed in entirely brand-new ways for the series. At the very least, one could argue that Falcom was out of their depths on this release: developing an Ys game with completely new gameplay mechanics on a platform they were unfamiliar with. More importantly, in spite of its failings, Kefin would influence later games in the series: games that would definitely handle the changes it introduced in a much more favorable way. If you look back at Ys V less as a fully-formed entry and more of a rough draft for what would follow, the game’s importance becomes clear. A backhanded compliment, I admit, but perhaps the one the game best deserves. Considering the fact that Falcom president Toshihiro Kondo has already expressed interest in making a remake of the sixth game in the series, hopefully Adol will revisit Xandria in the next project from the Ys series.

Ys VI: The Ark of Napishtim

Ys V definitely took its toll on the series as a whole. Aside from a few remakes, the franchise laid dormant throughout the entirety of the fifth generation. Meanwhile, Falcom returned to PC development – mostly focusing on porting various older games to Windows with various enhancements. However, the development staff behind the Ys Eternal remakes found themselves with a sudden urge to create an entirely new title in the series. Deciding to build on the concepts present in Ys V and using the same technical knowledge they gained while creating those remakes, Falcom ended up with Ys VI: The Ark of Napishtim. Ys VI would end up kicking off an entirely new trilogy of Ys games that are generally considered among the best in the series to this day. Surprisingly, it would also be the first game in the series to be released outside of Asia in over a decade.

Made in 2003, nearly 8 years after Kefin, Lost City of Sand, The Ark of Napishtim represented a true return to form for the Ys series. For starters, the original version was developed in-house by Falcom themselves for PC, something that hadn’t occurred since Wanderers from Ys was released in 1989. The game was originally released for the Windows XP OS, though later releases optimized for Vista and Windows 8 would be released in 2007 and 2013 respectively. The game also saw a couple of console releases. First, it came to the PS2 in 2005 with a few additional features, including a new 3D CG opening – which looks horrifying if you ask me – voice acting and replaces the sprite work with 3D models that end up reminding me of various pre-rendered games from the late ‘90s. These models have even more realistic proportions than the sprite work from Ys V, but given the fact that the background elements are retained from the original version, it comes across as a little awkward. This version also adds several new challenges in the form of “Alma’s Trails”, which comes with their own unique music – which doesn’t match up well with the existing tracks. There was also a PSP release in 2006 that more closely resembled the PC version, aside from a zoomed-in playing area and terrible load times, but includes the Sealed Caves, an extra dungeon with various trials. Both of these console ports were handled by Konami and managed to make it to both North America and Europe, receiving full English dubs in the process. Finally, in 2015, XSEED managed to acquire the rights to the original PC version and localized it on both Steam and GOG. They also managed to make a few additions to the game, improving the game’s resolution, adding warp points through the improved “Wing of Alma” item and the new “Catastrophe Mode”, which limits Adol from carrying healing items in his inventory, forcing him to use them as soon as he obtains them. Every version also contains the “Time Attack” Boss Rush mode – returning from Ys V Expert and Ys I & II Complete – which would be cemented as a key feature for future titles.

Taking place roughly 3 years after his previous adventure, Adol Christin has finally reunited with his old friend Dogi and the two plan on exploring more of the continent of Afroca. While planning their new adventure during a brief layover in the port city of Ediz, they encounter the pirate captain Ladoc who makes a counteroffer. The archipelago known as the “Canaan Islands” is an uncharted land shrouded in mystery due in large part to a strange weather pattern similar to the Stormwall that left Adol shipwrecked when he first travelled to Esteria. Dubbed “The Great Vortex”, little is known of it aside from two rumors: that it means certain death for anyone foolish enough to enter it and that it contains an unprecedented treasure at its center. Intrigued by the Vortex of Canaan, Adol and Dogi agree to accompany the pirate’s crew – which just so happens to include young Terra, who has grown since Adol last saw her. The group board Ladoc’s ship, the “Tres Mares” and begin their expedition. Unfortunately, the Romun Empire have also set their sights on Canaan and intend to remove any and all threats – even one as insignificant as a ragtag crew of pirates and adventurers. The Tres Mares is attacked at sea and in the process, Adol is knocked overboard into the Vortex, seemingly left for dead.

Fortunately, Adol manages to survive and washes ashore on Quatera, one of the three Canaan Islands. There, he is rescued and nursed back to health by two natives: Olha, a high priestess, and her younger sister, Isha. The two are the nieces of their tribe’s chief, Ord, who has a massive distrust for “Eresians” – the name he has given to humans. For Canaan is home to the Redha, a race of humanoid creatures with elven ears and fluffy tails. While Olha is rare among her kind in that she doesn’t mistrust humans innately, Isha is frightened by Adol’s presence, mostly due to visions of the future she’s had relating to his arrival. This all changes when Isha sneaks off and encounters Demi-Galba the Wandering Calamity, a giant monster that also happened to the one that killed Olha and Isha’s father. Adol manages to find her just in time, but despite his best efforts, he is unable to kill the monster and he breaks his sword in the process. Fortunately, Chief Ord and the other warriors of his tribe destroy the monster once and for all with one final blow. At this point, the Redha accept Adol as a friend and Ord explains that he is impressed by Adol’s strength and bravery: steel swords were incapable of killing the beast he fought, as it could only be truly destroyed by weaponry forged of Emels, the same material the monster itself was composed. Ord grants Adol Livart – a sword that is a sacred relic of the Redha and capable of utilizing the power of the wind –  and asks the red-haired swordsman a favor as he continues to explore the Canaan Islands. He is tasked with recovering another relic of the Redha, the Mirror of Zeme. The Mirror of Zeme is passed from priestess to priestess, so in addition to being an important artifact, it’s also a keepsake of Olha’s mother, the previous head priestess.

Adol also learns that he was not the only one to survive the Great Vortex and that the surviving Eresians have set up their own colony on one of the other islands. The same day the Mirror of Zeme went missing, the suspension bridge connecting the two islands was destroyed. After searching their own island thoroughly, Ord and the Redha assumed that the Eresians on “Canaan Island” had stolen the Mirror of Zeme for their own purposes: they were, after all, destroying temple ruins to gather building materials for their own village. Adol is also told that he can travel between the two islands by a subterranean tunnel unearthed in the battle with the Wandering Calamity. He sets off for Canaan Island at the chief’s behest, but there are questions still left to be asked. What happened to Dogi and Ladoc’s crew? Will he ever be able to escape from the Canaan Islands? Just what is the Great Vortex and can it be overcome?

I could easily describe Ark of Napishtim’s gameplay in a single phrase: “Ys V, done right.” Unfortunately, as the fifth game is perhaps the most obscure of the series’ mainline entries, I will go into greater detail. Ys VI maintains the attack button and the jump introduced in its direct predecessor, but manages to go about using them in far greater ways. For starters, Adol’s attack is much more responsive this time around – effectively allowing for the game’s action to reach the breakneck speeds the series was acclaimed for from its humble beginnings. The game also introduces the controversial “lunge attack” – performed by tapping forward lightly, then pausing briefly before hitting the attack button, to do a single strong thrust attack. The reason it’s controversial is because the in-game instructions detailing how to perform it are confusing at best and misleading at worst. I can confirm that with the English translations, but I can only say that I’ve heard it was merely a direct translation of the information as it was detailed in the original Japanese release. The PC versions also offer players the option to play the game on keyboard, mouse or a combination of the two. Personally, I stuck with my gamepad.

Throughout the game, Adol gains access to three different swords and unlike in previous games in the series, each has their own use throughout the entirety of the adventure. They offer different attack styles and provide Adol with both unique elemental attacks and powerful magical spells. Each sword has its own magic meter, which can be filled by attacking enemies, but can eventually gain the ability to replenish passively when equipped. As these three swords are obtained fairly early in the game, they’re also capable of being upgraded by taking them to a blacksmith and be upgraded in return for Emel, which is collected by defeating enemies and can also be found in treasure chests. The three swords are the aforementioned Livart, a wind-based sword that allows Adol to string together fast combos and allows him to summon a short-range tornado slash attack; Brillante, a heavy fire-based sword that has the strongest individual attacks and allows Adol to fire off a wave of fire, but slows down Adol’s strikes; and Ericcil, a fencing foil with electric attacks, Adol can generate a more powerful thrust attack with consistent strikes and its magic attack is a chain lightning strike that can hit multiple enemies if they’re all close enough. Some enemies are more vulnerable to one sword than the others, but fortunately, Adol can switch swords on the fly with the push of a button.

Adol’s jumping ability, on the other hand, is more of a mixed bag. The jump is far more responsive this time around and it’s easier to gauge exactly where you’re going to land this time around. The game also offers more options for Adol to attack when in the air: if he attacks while ascending he’ll slash upward, but if he attacks on the descent, he’ll do a downward stab which deals multiple hits if aimed properly. This technique ends up being important, as it affords Adol a means of escape if he gets swarmed by enemies and allows him to breach certain enemies’ defenses. Unfortunately, there’s another new technique that is substantially more complex, but fortunately isn’t quite as prominent in the game: the dash-jump. To perform a dash-jump, players must perform a lunge attack while hitting the jump and attack buttons simultaneously. While the lunge attack is easily ignored by most players as an optional technique, mastery of the dash-jump is necessary to complete the game, with one dungeon focusing a great deal on its proper application. Aside from that, the jumping mechanics have not yet entirely been perfected, though the difference from Ys V is essentially night and day and it’s easy to see that a lot of work went into rebuilding this mechanic.

While the swords in Ys VI are far more versatile than those of previous entries in the series, the armor and shields retain their traditional disposability: each can be easily discarded once the next one is found. Likewise, the blocking mechanic from Ys V has been dropped, with the game’s defensive options once again focusing entirely on dodging. The ability to equip accessories also returns from previous games, though this time it works somewhat differently. Near the beginning of the game, Adol can only equip a single accessory at a time, but additional slots can be found during gameplay, allowing multiple accessories to be equipped simultaneously. They all have passive effects that aid Adol in his journey: for example, the Thief’s Glove increased the drop rate for gold, the Starlight Medal increases the amount of experience gained and the Bloody Nail allows Adol to heal by killing enemies. There are four additional slots in total, allowing players to customize Adol’s loadout to best suit their play style. Adol is also able to set a single type of item that he can use in the heat of battle – most of these are items that either replenish HP or curse status effects. There are also three items that permanently increase Adol’s stats: the Seed of Vitality raises his HP by 5 points, the Seed of Power raises his strength by 1 and the Seed of Defense raises his defense by 1. The traditional Inventory of event-related items also returns, with the only truly perpetual item being the Wing of Alma, which allows Adol to escape from dungeons.

As with Ys V, players can no longer save their game at any point during gameplay, but instead of only allowing saves in inns, Ys VI offers a much more agreeable compromise: important areas are littered with monuments to Alma, which allow players to heal and save the game. Fortunately, the game still allows players to load saves at any point. Another difference from previous games is that Adol can no longer heal while standing still anywhere. This was likely changed to properly balance the ability to store healing items and equip them for use at any point in the game. While poison was introduced to the Ys series all the way back in both iterations of Ys IV, new status effects also join the fray: Heavy limits Adol’s speed and jumping, Confusion reverses the game’s controls and Curse drops Adol’s strength and defense significantly. While the Poison, Heavy and Confusion status effects wear off given enough time, the Curse must be cured. The game’s world is relatively small – taking place mostly across two islands – but requires an extreme amount of backtracking. As I mentioned earlier, the most recent release from XSEED gives Adol the ability to warp between any save point he previously used, which makes traversing the Canaan Islands significantly less of a chore. Therefore, I can’t really discuss this problem in-depth, it just didn’t apply to my playthrough.

As I mentioned earlier, the development team used a lot of the knowledge they gained while developing the Ys Eternal remakes when crafting Ys VI and it shows in some ways. In other ways, however, it shows just how far the art team had come. I’ve heard some fans of the series refer to Ark of Napishtim as “the first 3D Ys game”, but that just doesn’t sit well with me. At best, I’d probably consider it more of a “2.5D game”: the character sprites, most of the enemies and many of the smaller in-game objects are rendered as 2D sprites – that loosely resemble the prerendered 3D style generally seen during the transition period between the fourth and fifth generations, but are 2D all the same – while the game’s environments, bosses and larger objects are fully rendered in 3D. Sure, that description doesn’t really make the game’s aesthetic sound all that cohesive, but believe me, it manages to create a look that aged well, even when rendered in high definition for the most recent re-release. As I mentioned earlier, the PS2 replaced all the sprite work into full 3D models, but frankly I prefer the original look. The character sprites all take on a super-deformed appearance – like older games in the series – but for once, this allows the game’s cast to be much more expressive compared to previous games. The 3D models present in the PS2 version make such expressions vaguer, if even visible. Honestly, the graphical changes present in that release end up looking more stilted and pre-rendered than the original 2D sprites they replaced. I do have to give Konami credit for their version though: Adol’s current equipment is represented in his in-game model in their version, which is a nice touch all things considered.

After the admittedly generic sound present in Ys V wasn’t nearly as well received as the soundtracks from previous games, one might expect that Ark of Napishtim would revert to the more traditional symphonic metal sound associated with the Ys franchise. You may also recall that I declared that Ys VI was “Ys V, done right”. This statement also applies to the music: while it does invoke much of the theming present in the more famous soundtracks of the series, it also manages to create its own niche by incorporating a number of other genres. Napishtim’s soundtrack is the furthest thing from “generic”. The instrumentation is synthesized, but the music combines elements of techno, rock ballads, drum and bass, as well as the traditional blend of classical, metal and video game music present in the most memorable of Ys soundtracks. Even new arrangements of classic themes like “SO MUCH FOR TODAY” and the Romun Empire’s theme make their way into the game. My favorite tracks in this game would have to be the main boss theme, “MIGHTY OBSTACLE”; “WINDSLASH STEPS”, one of the overworld themes; “MOUNTAIN ZONE”, the song associated with the Grana-Vallis Mountains; “DEFEND! AND ESCAPE!” which plays while Adol in fighting with the Romun Empire and “SPREAD BLUE VIEW” which plays over the credits. Of course, my favorite song in the entire game – maybe even the entire franchise – would have to be the final dungeon’s theme: THE RUINED CITY “KISHGAL”, a song that blends genres to perfectly represent the ancient yet futuristic technology found within the game’s final area, while presenting a theme that’s upbeat, yet represents the danger found in the area. The original PC version utilized the OGG Vorbis file format, an open source audio file format. As such, both the game’s music and sound designs were far more advanced than previous games in the series, as they could utilize actual recordings as opposed to relying on on-board sound chips for anything. As such, while the sound effects do resemble those found in previous games, they also sound more realistic, a nice touch in my opinion.

What I personally find so impressive about Ys VI is just how much it manages to tie things together. While clearly not the beginning or end of Falcom’s attempts at consolidating the Ys canon, Ark of Napishtim does more than its fair share of heavy lifting – fitting given the fact that it also had to pick up the slack from the fifth game. For starters, the game expands on a lot of the mythology of the series. For example, Alma is one of the “winged ones”, properly known as the “Eldeen” – not to be confused with Eldeel, who happens to be an Eldeen. The Clan of Darkness also gets some more exposure – fully detailing just how they led to the fall of the Eldeen. Geis and Ernst also represent two different sides of the Clan, effectively cementing the dichotomy in motivations – redemption and megalomania – that Falcom still explores when portraying the tribe to this day. Even the Romun Empire gets involved in the action, effectively implying that the members of the empire we’ve seen thus far have their own motivations and don’t necessarily represent their true values. Ernst is merely using the Romuns for his own purposes, while Admiral Agares is a hedonistic moron who cares for little more than his pet, a giant frog monster. Furthermore, other elements from Ys games make subtle appearances. I already mentioned the inclusion of Terra, providing a clear reference to Ys V. The Pikkards that were first introduced in Ys Eternal make a significant appearance in a major sidequest, effectively cementing their place as a replacement to the Roos as Ys’ official cutesy animal mascot. Even more significant would be the naming conventions of two of the game’s bosses: Demi-Galba and Galba-Roa. Galba-Roa is even given the title of “The Original Galbalan”, outright referencing the final boss of Wanderers from Ys and implying that perhaps the franchise’s infamous prodigal game isn’t as far removed from the rest of the series as people were led to believe.

Some people may think that I’m being easy when looking back at Ark of Napishtim. I can completely understand why: it’s all just a matter of context. Ys VI wasn’t particularly popular during its first Western run on PS2 – the series didn’t really gain any traction in the West until XSEED began localizing games on the PSP. As such, most people played later games before getting around to Napishtim. Meanwhile, I didn’t get into the series until later than that and after getting into the series, I decided to play the rest of the games in something resembling chronological order. In retrospect, the game is obviously a step down from its follow-ups in what’s referred to as the “Felghana Trilogy” – for reasons that will be made clear later – but everything has to start somewhere. That’s the only bit of advice I would have to give to anyone looking to play it: keep the original release order in mind, even if the latest release came out in 2015.

I think that regardless of how the game’s overall quality is perceived – whether it’s compared to its predecessors or sequels – Ys VI: The Ark of Napishtim is among the most important games in the entire series, perhaps even on par with the first two games. Not only did it revive the franchise, feared dead after Ys V, it also represented a shift in gameplay that would influence the series for quite some time. Having said that, the game isn’t really all that bad even if it is objectively outshone by its successors. I’m actually a little offended that Falcom’s considering remaking it: I would personally argue that Napishtim is the first game in the series that doesn’t really need one, especially given the improvements XSEED made in their most recent release. The game deviated from the original conventions of its most popular forbearers, but did manage to bring the series into modernity, eschewing the conventions that gaming itself had outgrown, but maintaining the very spirit behind these decisions. In the end, that’s what a good sequel and any good revival should do and as such, Ys VI is most certainly both.

Interlude: The Taito Remakes

These next few games aren’t exactly “canon” in any sense – Falcom doesn’t even appear to recognize them in any real capacity. Still, they’re interesting little curiosities that seemed like they were worth exploring. Now for full disclosure’s sake, I must warn you: I didn’t complete any of these versions of the games. I managed to beat the first boss in each one before calling it quits. I figured it was at least giving them a chance just to get a feel for their respective gameplay styles, but lacking any complete translation – hack or even a text file – it just doesn’t seem worth the headache of trying to play through it, since I wouldn’t be able to understand any of the game’s stories and navigating the menus by memory can be something of a chore at times. Having said that, these games were, in fact, the latest games in the series I’ve actually tried out as I’m writing this – but considering that I didn’t even bother completing them and they were never even considered official releases in the first place, they were worth just covering as a curiosity.

If you’ll recall, I mentioned that back in 2003, Falcom had Ys I & II Complete ported to the PS2 as “Ys I & II Eternal Story”, which was published by DigiCube. You’ll also recall that Konami ported Ys VI: The Ark of Napishtim to the same console in 2005. This left a pretty significant gap that Taito was more than willing to bridge. As such, they licensed the rights to remake Ys III, Mask of the Sun and Ys V for PS2, which I assume Falcom was more than happy to accept because it essentially earned them money and allowed them to release games on the most popular console at the time without any effort on their part. The interesting thing is that Taito’s remake of Wanderers from Ys actually came out the same month as Konami’s Ys VI port: March 2005. Taito’s take on Ys IV, rechristened “Mask of the Sun – a new theory –“ came out two months later and the remake of Ys V, now subtitled in English as “Lost Kefin, Kingdom of Sand” came out in March of the following year. These releases, while essentially ignored now, are at least interesting to discuss as a curiosity – for a brief period in 2006 in Japan, the PlayStation 2 had access to every single Ys game in some form or another.

Ys III: Wanderers from Ys

Fittingly enough as the first of their three remakes, Taito’s take on Wanderers from Ys is the one that most closely resembles its source material. Ys III retains its odd gameplay, better resembling Zelda II than any previous game in the series. However, there are some changes made as well. For starters, the original town layout – which was just one straight line – has been replaced with a map. This does make navigating the area a lot easier, but also kind of cuts down the game’s immersion as now travel is essentially handled entirely by menu, which kind of takes away from any sense of exploration in a game that was already lacking in this respect.

Taito does manage to make some changes to the gameplay mechanics. For starters, the enemies can get stunned when attacked and Adol gains a brief flicker period – a short burst of invincibility after taking damage – that makes the quick deaths of the previous versions a thing of the past. The rapid-fire slash attack has been removed. In its place, Adol can now perform up to a five-slash combo, which is almost just as fun to perform. He also gains a new upward slash attack by holding up and attacking at the same time. His jumping slash is also significantly improved from the original game. Aside from that, the game’s control is roughly unchanged. The level layouts are also essentially identical to previous iterations of the game, which is a bit disappointing in retrospect: given the fact that the original game came out back in 1989 – more than a decade prior – one would expect that a full-on remake would attempt to iron out any of the flaws from the original game.

The game’s graphics are interesting to put it mildly. The in-game sprite work reminds me of various independent “doujin” PC games for some reason. That’s not meant to be an insult, but it is kind of an interesting look for the game, effectively going for something contemporary yet familiar. One flaw I do have to point out is that the game lacks the scrolling present in every other version of the game: even the original PC-88 version was capable of it to some extent. It just seems like a weird omission, especially given the fact that the PlayStation 2 is the most powerful platform the game appeared on. Many of the more ornate details in various stage’s backgrounds – particularly the parallax scrolling – are also absent in this version. A significant majority of characters are given character portraits during dialogue scenes in this game. This doesn’t add much in the grand scheme of things, but it is a nice touch that helps to differentiate the various personalities that appear throughout the game. They’re drawn with a somewhat generic anime aesthetic in mind – it’s nothing particularly special, but it does its job. Most of the game’s dialogue is also voice acting, even Adol’s. Now the oddity of Adol speaking in Wanderers from Ys is further compounded with actual voice work behind it. The soundtrack has also been rearranged, but unfortunately, they only seem to use the tracks found in the earliest versions of Ys III. The arrangements themselves are passable – nothing that impressive, but they represent the original compositions well enough.

Before playing this version of the game, I had heard some relatively positive things about this game, essentially comparing it to the Ys Eternal releases in terms of modernizing the original game. I must admit, Taito’s remake does its best to recreate the original game in an aesthetic more pleasing for modern audiences, for better or worse. If you’ve yet to play any iteration of Ys III, can understand Japanese and can obtain this version more easily than any other, I’d recommend it. Ironically, this licensed remake of Ys III would end up being blatantly overshadowed for reasons I’ll explain later.

Ys IV: Mask of the Sun – a new theory –

Even before I popped this one in, I knew I was in for a wild ride. Up to this point in time, I considered Mask of the Sun to be among the worst that the Ys series had to offer and all the things I had heard about this game seemed to imply that this was even worse. I’d even heard jokes that the only reason this game was even made was so that the Super Famicom version would no longer be considered the worst version of Ys IV. Of course, given the awkward history of Ys IV in general, it’s only fitting that Taito’s attempt at recreating it would suffer from a lot of problems.

Unlike the Wanderers from Ys remake, Taito’s take on Ys IV is more of an original product that mostly takes the source material from the Super Famicom version and does its own thing with it. As I mentioned before, I didn’t really play all that far into this one, but there are a few changes I can address. Duren, the informant that frees Adol from the Romun Prison near the start of both 16-bit versions of the game has been completely excised from this version. In fact, the beginning of the game is entirely different. The game starts with Adol travelling by ship, when he spots a message in a bottle – an action the player must take, and believe me, it’s hard to register properly. From there, the ship docks in what I assume is Promalock – the port city where the game truly begins in previous versions of Ys IV – where Dr. Flair appears to make the acquaintance of some random NPC who is willing to lead a search party: again, my inability to read Japanese sort of thwarts any attempt at understanding anything more than broad strokes. After purchasing supplies for the upcoming journey – the usual sword, shield and armor – the two set off with a search party, when they are robbed by bandits. Adol goes after them and manages to track them down to their hideout, an abandoned mine.

Upon encountering the bandit’s leader, soldiers from the Romun Empire show up to arrest them and assume that Adol is working alongside them, so he’s thrown in the stockades as well. It doesn’t take long for Dr. Flair to explain Adol’s innocence and he is freed …directly into the first boss fight. Yeah, I’m certain that even if I was fluent in Japanese, this game’s story would still be incomprehensible. After defeating the boss – a giant creature with one long hand-like claw and a giant bloodshot eye acting as its weak point – Adol meets with the Romun captain, a man by the name of Brutus – acting as a paper-thin replacement for Leo and expansion on the original Mask of the Sun’s unnamed captain – who appears to apologize for the confusion and offers Adol a new shield, some money and a healing herb as a peace offering. From there, Adol and Dr. Flair end up in an entirely new town. It was at this point that I essentially gave up on the game: I’d played enough to understand the gameplay mechanics and it didn’t enamor me enough to ignore both the language barrier and weird narrative. “a new theory” was a fitting subtitle for this game, but from what I’ve read, many of this game’s attempts at changing the Super Famicom version were ill-conceived at best.

The changes Taito made to the gameplay weren’t much better. Now, I’m not exactly going to defend the original Mask of the Sun’s mechanics, but all things considered, they worked given their environment. Taito was clearly inspired by Ys VI while making this game, so they decided to ditch the traditional “run-and-bump” for the hack-and-slash mechanics found in both Ys V and VI. As such, they decided to give Adol three different attacks: pressing square allows Adol to slash, a quick but weak attack; the X button allows Adol to stab forward, an attack that’s slightly stronger but also slightly slower than the slash; and finally hitting circle allows Adol to perform an overhead lunge with his sword, his strongest but slowest attack. Each of these attacks can be strung together into a combo in any order, but the fact that weaker and faster attacks are able to string follow-ups more easily limits what can be considered a viable combo. Having said that, the controls manage to feel less responsive than either 16-bit version of Ys IV. The other controls are somewhat odd as well. Adol walks at a snail’s pace when using the D-Pad, but is only capable of running when using the left analog stick. A single item can be set to an item slot, which can be activated by pressing the triangle button. Speaking of slow, for some reason, Adol’s ability to heal on the overworld manages to be slower in this game than even the SFC version. Also, Adol can equip three swords at a time, which he can swap between by using the L1 and R1 buttons. These last two additions are clearly an attempt to emulate Napishtim, but when juxtaposed against the more traditional menus from earlier Ys games, they come across far more awkwardly. This problem is only compounded by the game’s ridiculous load times: they appear at an alarming rate and are nearly the same length as those of many late-era PS1 games. I guess the addition of Adol doing things to pass the time is a cute touch, but I wish they’d used that effort on cutting down the load times instead. Perhaps the oddest change is the number of save slots – the game only allows for 3 in total, as opposed to the 5 found in Taito’s other two remakes. I know that’s a minor nitpick, but it just struck me as odd.

The game’s artstyle also appears to have taken inspiration from Ys VI, blending 2D sprites with 3D backgrounds and bosses. I’d argue that this didn’t quite work as well as Falcom’s take on it, but considering that this was a budget remake, I feel uncomfortable comparing the two directly. The sprites in this game take on a far more 2D appearance, rather than the pre-rendered “faux-3D” look present in Ark of Napishtim, which may have caused a bit of a clash of styles when set against the 3D backgrounds. Having said that, most of the 3D models I’ve seen in the game aren’t exactly eye-catching themselves: perhaps this game would’ve been better served if it were entirely rendered in 2D. The character portraits from Wanderers from Ys also return with the same vaguely anime art style. Likewise, this game also has voice acting, which is still a nice touch. The game’s soundtrack has also been rearranged again. The interesting part about all of this is that the PS2 takes a different assortment of tracks from the Ys IV soundtrack compared to the original Mask of the Sun, with some of my favorite omitted tracks reappearing. Not quite as good as the PC Engine version, but an objective improvement over the Super Famicom’s.

While I’m not particularly a fan of what I played from this game, it does represent something interesting regarding Falcom’s take on Ys IV in general. As I mentioned earlier, it appeared that The Dawn of Ys was generally considered the canonical version of Ys IV, simply due to the merchandising blitz it had when compared to Mask of the Sun, which made it all the more surprising when Falcom declared the latter as the version they acknowledged as canon. As such, considering they chose Mask of the Sun as the version they would allow Taito to remake for the PS2, this offers concrete evidence of their opinion.  While in most cases, official timelines and retcons are generally offered without any tangible evidence, while Falcom used a set of remakes created by an entirely different company to cement which outsourced game they held as canon. Of course, that choice would be moot in the long run. as they went and made their own iteration of Ys IV, but that’s a story for another time.

Ys V: Lost Kefin, Kingdom of Sand

Finally, we come to the last of Taito’s remakes. I said earlier that if any Ys game needed a remake, it was the fifth in the series, so it’s kind of fitting that this one is generally considered the best of the trilogy. Unfortunately, this is essentially nothing more than a back-handed compliment: while Taito managed to fix many of the problems present in the original game, they would end up replacing them with entirely new problems that would plague the game. It’s almost like this entire remake was only developed as the result of a wish on a monkey’s paw.

Kingdom of Sand’s story seems to have found a happy medium between being an exact replica of its source material like Wanderers of Ys and completely going in its out direction like – a new theory – did. The game begins with Adol and Dogi – yes, Dogi manages to make it in this time – entering Xandria by ship. From there, the game ends up skipping Foresta Village and Foresta Cave, with Adol going to Dorman from the start and happening upon Massea’s cabin to learn magic fairly early on, before encountering Terra, pulling a scam on Adol with her two brothers. From there, the story continues almost as normal, with Adol fighting a beast in an arena. This time, however, instead of fighting a small boar, Adol ends up fighting Valtemos, the first boss from the Super Famicom version – who originally resided in the excised Foresta Cave – as opposed to the boar-like “Desert Wolf” originally found in this section. After defeating that first boss, I gave up on the game – once again, due to the language barrier. I must admit, of the three first bosses, Valtemos was definitely the most difficult to defeat, even after I understood its pattern. From what I can tell, Taito’s version of Ys V seems to excise just as much as it adds to the original game’s story. Stoker is completely absent from the game, which takes away one of the interesting plotlines from the original game. Dogi appears at the beginning of the game, but apparently for the most part, he mainly appears through letters – apparently, he decided to go off on his own adventure. While a significant amount of the material added to the game was taken from Falcom’s original design documents, it also appears that Taito also added their own spin on various story elements. The most damning information I’ve heard about this version is that Taito manages to cut so many areas and plot points that it manages to be shorter than the original SFC version, which is disappointing, all things considered.

Fortunately, the gameplay has been significantly improved in this version of the game.  Taito apparently decided to emulate Ys VI even further in this regard: a good choice given the fact that Ark of Napishtim owes a lot of its pedigree to the Super Famicom version of Ys V. The game reverts to a single attack button, which simplifies combat compared to the remake of Ys IV, but is a fair trade given how much more responsive the controls are. This game also manages to retain the somewhat awkward d-pad/analog stick dichotomy for movement. Jumping returns from the Super Famicom version, though the responsiveness of this mechanic lies somewhere between that of the SFC version of Ys V and Ys VI. The jump attacks from Ys VI have also been implemented into the game for good measure. Adol also retains his ability to block with his shield – though this time it’s mapped to the L1 button, the Triangle button brings up the equipment menu.

The magic system has been overhauled from the previous game. There are only four common elements for crafting spells this time around – fire, water, wind and earth – as well as a fifth element strictly used for upgrading Adol’s sword at a blacksmith. You can still install multiple spell orbs per weapon, but each one has their own individual meter this time around, so you can use each attack consecutively. Likewise, you can also equip far more spells to a sword, which incentivizes using the spells more often in general. Unfortunately, while the original game had multiple alchemists throughout the game map willing to craft new orbs for you, only Massea exists in this game – though there are many one-way warps that make travelling back to her easy enough, albeit at the cost of any progress you’ve made in the game. One more improvement made to this game over the original is that now, in addition to being able to save at inns, there are various save statues scattered across the land – clearly inspired by those found in Ys VI. In addition, quick saving is still an option.

Unfortunately, these improvements come at a price: the map design in this game is both generic and confusing at times. It is incredibly easy to get lost, even early in the game. When a game’s overworld is difficult to navigate, there are clearly some major design issues at work. The fact that the camera will often reorient itself at random times only manages to make matters worse when it comes to navigation, due to the lack of any distinguishing landmarks within the game. Worst of all, there’s no map – so at times, finding one’s way through the game relies upon trial and error at best or dumb luck at worst.

The graphics have also improved since the previous game – what a difference a year makes. While most of the 2D sprite work is essentially identical – literally in a few cases – to the previous game, the 3D models have improved significantly from Taito’s take on Mask of the Sun. The portrait work from the previous two games also return with the same art style. The same can be said for the voice acting, as well as the rearranged soundtrack. In fact, the soundtrack for this game is generally held in higher regard compared to the other remakes, likely due to the lack of existing arrangements for Ys V in general. The interesting thing is that the adjustments made to both the game’s artstyle and soundtrack actually end up meaning that the licensed remake actually better resembles an Ys game than the original game made by Falcom themselves.

The funny thing about Taito’s Ys V remake is that if you managed to mix its improvements with the things that the original did well, you would have a suitable game. In the end, while this remake is generally considered the best of the three, it’s more of a lateral move than an actual improvement on its predecessor. That says more about these remakes than anything else ever could. In the end, I’d only moderately recommend III and V, but only in the case where you’re unable to find any other version and are fully fluent in Japanese. Since Wanderers from Ys is available in English in several official capacities, while the Super Famicom version of Ys V has a fan-made translation, it’s hard for me to recommend either of these remakes as anything more than a curiosity. Steer clear of the Ys IV remake though – literally every other version available is superior.

Ys: The Oath in Felghana

Wanderers from Ys had always been considered the misfit of the Ys series. Despite not being the worst game in the franchise in terms of quality, its sin was absolute: it deviated too far from the series’ established formula – with two games under its belt, the style of the Ys franchise had been forever set in stone – and therefore was considered an abomination in the eyes of the fanbase. Of course, in their infinite wisdom, Falcom decided to rectify this mistake of theirs several years later – essentially transforming the pariah of the franchise into one of its most popular games – with the creation of Ys: The Oath in Felghana. Utilizing an improved version of The Ark of Napishtim’s engine, Oath in Felghana was the first Ys game of its kind: a true remake. While previous remakes – both those made by Falcom themselves and ones developed by other companies – would often try to maintain the basic framework of the original game, Felghana outright overhauled the entire concept, while somehow maintaining its spirit. Combined with the game’s relative pervasiveness – at least compared to other games in the Ys series – this led Felghana to be considered among the best games in the entire series, if not the best.

The Oath in Felghana was first released on Windows PC in Japan in early July 2005. Yes, just over 3 months after Taito’s more traditional remake of the very same game hit the PlayStation 2, Falcom blew them out of the water with their more modernized take. Originally, the game was released with a limited edition that included an 8-CD boxset dubbed Ys Premium Music CD Box in Felghana, a behemoth that included nearly every version of the Ys III soundtrack – including the prototype “pre-arrange” music used during the development of Felghana itself. A standard version that only included the game was also available. In 2007, a version updated to run on Windows Vista was released. In 2010, however, Falcom took it upon themselves to port it to Sony’s PlayStation Portable. This version added new features including voice acting, additional versions of the soundtrack – specifically the PC-88 and Sharp X68000 versions – easier difficulty options and rebalanced gameplay. Better still, later the same year, the localization firm XSEED released the game in North America, using an existing English fan translation – written by a future employee – as a base and even redubbing the dialogue for good measure. Falcom also released a new PC version of the game, this time optimized for the then-current Windows 7 operating system. In 2012, XSEED obtained the rights to release Falcom’s original PC version worldwide, utilizing their existing translation and incorporating widescreen resolutions into the game and sold it on a variety of digital storefronts, their first release on Windows PC. The following year, Falcom would release updated versions of some of their older PC games, now optimized for Windows 8: Oath in Felghana was among them.

The story essentially takes on the same framework as Wanderers. Adol and Dogi venture to his hometown of Redmont in the land of Felghana, where demons have somehow started to rampage. However, this game’s take on the story both expands and alters various plot points. For example, in Wanderers, Adol and Dogi stroll into Redmont after an uneventful voyage. In Felghana, Adol finds Elena surrounded by a pack of wolves and protects her. The game also expands on multiple characters, differentiating and fleshing out various background characters and refining the motivations of some of the more important characters. For example, Elena came across as somewhat cold in Wanderers – I’m still not sure if that was bad writing in the source material or just bad translations – but in Felghana, she clearly cares very deeply for her older brother, Chester. Likewise, the game’s first boss, Dularn, gets heavily expanded on, essentially promoted to a primary antagonist and becoming Garland’s second-in-command, challenging Adol on multiple occasions. Chester’s motivations become fleshed out, but in turn, his actions become far more villainous. Count McGuire – demoted from King – is also significantly humanized, given motivations for his actions in the form of his beloved wife and children. Meanwhile, various new characters – like Margo, the innkeeper who raised Dogi when he was an orphan; Fran, a maid from Valestein Castle and Sister Nell, a nun who has known Elena and Chester since they were young – help to flesh out the world in the same way that many of the minor characters in Ys I & II Eternal (et al.) made both Esteria and the lost continent of Ys themselves feel organic.

In addition to expanding the original story, Oath in Felghana also attempts to connect the game to the Ys mythology and setting as a whole, making various references to games that take place earlier and later in the game’s timeline. For example, now Count McGuire, his family and new character Antonio – a merchant with more ambition than common sense – hail from the Romun Empire. As an additional bonus, this continues the trend that started back in Ark of Napishtim: Falcom would begin humanizing individual members of the Empire, while still treating the Empire itself as a megalomaniacal threat. Originally, Genos’ backstory was essentially veiled in mystery in Wanderers – he was merely the legendary hero who stopped Galbalan the first time – but in Felghana, we discover that he too was chosen by the Eldeen as their champion, just like Adol was in the first two games. Likewise, the reference implied in Ark of Napishtim comes full circle, as Galbalan is confirmed as a creation of the Clan of Darkness, their ultimate weapon during their war with the Eldeen. Some weren’t particularly enamored with these attempts at integrating the game’s plot into the franchise’s wider storyline. Personally? I loved it: Ys IV’s status as a prequel and reliance on references to the first two games seemed to be a response to how poorly received Wanderers from Ys was. By extension, trying to wedge it back into the greater continuity was the only logical decision to redeem the game in the eyes of the fanbase.

Oath in Felghana used an improved version of the engine Falcom pioneered for Ys VI. The chief improvement in this game over its predecessor would have to be the jumping controls: they’re now as tight and responsive as possible given the game’s overhead/isometric perspective. The game’s combat also feels tighter, though considering how well it worked in the first place, it appears to have received only minor tweaks. The lunge attack returns – awkward instructions and all – but is entirely optional this time around. The ironic thing about choosing to work with the Napishtim engine is that it allowed Falcom to create a remake that was both faithful to Wanderers from Ys and the Ys series in general. While Wanderers was originally criticized for being effectively linear in its stage design – a definite step down from the previous game’s more labyrinthine dungeon layouts – it did offer unique obstacles for Adol to overcome, fitting with its new gameplay style. Considering Ark of Napishtim’s platforming capabilities, this allowed Oath in Felghana to recreate many of those obstacles seen in the original source material, yet incorporate them into a more complex setting. Better still, the game ditches the map found in Ys III, opting for an (admittedly small) overworld, that even manages to use the stage intro music “The Boy’s Got Wings” to a much more prominent extent than in previous versions. Likewise, the town of Redmont has been expanded beyond its incredibly linear design, feeling far more alive and expansive than any previous iteration.

Keeping with the theme of blending new and old elements into something greater than the sum of its parts, the map does still play a role in Felghana. At one point in the game, Adol acquires the Wing Talisman, an item that allows him to teleport to any save point he’s previously visited, making backtracking to previous locations less of a chore – which happens far more often than one might suspect. The game also returns to the previous method of finding new stronger equipment to replace Adol’s current sword, shield and armor – but this time around, you’re capable of upgrading your existing equipment to make it more powerful, by paying Adonis, Redmont’s blacksmith, in gold and supplying him with precious Raval Ore, which can be found by defeating enemies and mass quantities are hidden in treasure chests. Of course, the next new set of items are always more powerful than even the previous ones – even at their highest level – but it can be quite helpful when fighting strong enemies. Due to the disposability of swords in this game, magic is now contained within three bracelets: the Ignis Bracelet allows Adol to shoot fireballs from his sword; the Ventus Bracelet allows him to spin like a tornado and the Terra Bracelet, which allows him to charge into opponents at high speeds. These bracelets can be enhanced by finding gems – Rubies, Emeralds and Topazes respectively – which improve their attacks strength and allow Adol access to more powerful attacks The game also ditches the dash-jump in favor of two new power-ups: the Brocia Serum allows Adol to run at high speeds – which can be set to either be permanently on (my preference) or activated by holding a button – and the double-jump, which is exactly what it sounds like. Both of these new abilities definitely add to the overall improved movement in this game. Adol also gains the ability to charge a Boost meter by attacking enemies. Once full, it can be activated at the push of a button to increase Adol’s speed and attack power. Felghana also does away with Adol’s ability to hold healing items: while herbs and other healing items can be found throughout the game world, they’re used up immediately. In addition, enemies often drop items that improve Adol’s attack, defense, or MP regeneration for a brief period. Long combos also multiply the amount of experience points Adol receives by defeating enemies, allowing for a maximum of 199% the normal rate.

The tweaks made to Wanderers from Ys’ story also find their way into the gameplay as well. The addition of the overworld, allows Adol to perform various sidequests – including a couple (mercifully short) escort missions – adding to the depth of the game’s overworld. My favorite addition to Felghana compared to previous versions is the fact that there are boss fights against Chester in this version – not one, but two! This change rectifies a problem that always struck me as weird: in Wanderers, Chester acted as the main antagonist for most of the game and was clearly built up as Adol’s rival, yet he only really seemed to fight Adol in cutscenes, making quick work of him. I’d say that the lack of a legitimate boss fight with Chester was perhaps Wanderers from Ys’ biggest flaw – even moreso than anything else Ys III “did wrong” – so it’s great to see the new version rectify this mistake.

Meanwhile, the graphics haven’t really improved all that much from The Ark of Napishtim. Which is expected, considering the fact that this game was originally designed by a niche Japanese developer on a platform that is famously unpopular in its region of origin. The 2D sprites maintain their pre-rendered look and some of the graphics reappear from Ys VI. Surprisingly, Adol’s graphics get redesigned – most notably adding a blue scarf that becomes a common design element in later games. Even more impressive is the fact that if Adol has a matching set of equipment equipped, his in-game appearance changes to reflect his loadout – a feature previously seen in the PS2 version of Ark of Napishtim. The 3D models do seem have improved slightly, likely owed to Falcom having greater experience with the medium by this point. Overall, things haven’t really changed much since the last game.

As I mentioned earlier, the music from Wanderers from Ys was not only considered the best part of the game, but among the best soundtracks in the entire series. Likewise, the TurboGrafx-16 version was generally accepted as having the best arrangements of these songs. However, The Oath in Felghana’s music managed to at least match, if not exceed, the quality of that incarnation. It was arranged by Yukihiro Jindo, the man who previously arranged the Ys I & II Chronicles soundtrack. As such, the game combines both synth with actual instruments to bring forth a much more organic sound than is generally associated with these compositions. Better still is the fact that many tracks that were extremely situational in the original versions of Wanderers from Ys have greater presence in this version. I already mentioned how “The Boy’s Got Wings” became Felghana’s overworld theme, but “The Theme of Chester” finally lives up to its name – no longer relegated to a secret song found in only a handful of versions of the game, it instead plays when Chester appears in various cutscenes. “Behold!”, originally used in the cutscene that introduced Galbalan, also received a significant promotion: it’s now a boss theme in its own right, accompanying the fight with Garland, the game’s penultimate boss. The sound effects in general are about on par with those found in The Ark of Napishtim, which makes sense given the fact that it was developed on the same hardware. They still work within the game’s context, so this was likely a case of decided not to fix what wasn’t broken.

Of the three games that comprise what many Ys fans refer to as the “Felghana Trilogy”, it’s obvious that Oath in Felghana was the most popular. The reasons behind this are a lot more obvious than one might expect. Felghana represents the final step in the evolution the series began undertaking with Ys V. While Ark of Napishtim played a huge part in refining the gameplay to a respectable level, Felghana would take things even further, essentially perfecting this playstyle. Oath in Felghana also owes a great deal of its popularity to its Western release. While the North American release of the PS2 version of Ys VI managed to release before even the original Japanese version and the PSP release wasn’t far behind, both localizations were handled by Konami. As such, they weren’t particularly well advertised and given the state of both systems when it was released – respectively, the most popular console with an onslaught of titles and Sony’s struggling experimental handheld – it’s easy to see how games like this could’ve been lost in the shuffle. Conversely, while XSEED is a much smaller company than Konami, they put a lot more effort into advertising even their most niche releases. Furthermore, The Oath in Felghana was the second Ys game they published – allowing them to build on their previous work with the brand in their target regions. Likewise, by 2010, the PSP had finally found its footing as a home for lower-budget niche titles, especially those from smaller Japanese developers. Meanwhile, the third and final game in this trilogy – which remained a PC exclusive for many years – wasn’t released outside of Japan until after XSEED released Felghana on PC – again, two years after the international PSP release. As such, for many fans that weren’t already familiar with the classic TG-CD releases or the various fan translations, Oath in Felghana may very well have been the first Ys game they were even aware of.

The Oath in Felghana certainly earns its reputation as one of the best games in the Ys series. It redeemed one of the least popular games in the entire franchise, making it one of the best video game remakes of all-time in my opinion. It also cemented a brand-new gameplay approach for the series, effectively perfecting a concept that was first pioneered in Ys V and substantially refined in Ys VI. Finally, it was among the first Ys games to be released in any official capacity outside of Japan since the original Wanderers from Ys. While that last point didn’t have much to do with the game itself, it did give the series some well-deserved recognition outside its native region and ended up creating an entirely new generation of western fans for the series. Yet, by my own measure, the best game in the “Felghana Trilogy” was still to come.

Ys Origin

So, we come to the latest Ys game I’ve played so far. Ys Origin is more obscure than it deserves to be. The last game in the what many fans dub the “Felghana Trilogy”, Origin doesn’t particularly “improve” on its predecessor in the same way Oath in Felghana improved on Ys VI. In fact, it’s hard to truly describe what the game does better than the previous game: it’s less of a refinement of the existing engine, more taking it well beyond its logical conclusion. Imagine, if you will, if Nintendo had made Ocarina of Time using the base gameplay of A Link to the Past – but instead of creating a game that goes well beyond the technical limitations of the SNES, it instead exceeds the concept of the original game in even the most fundamental ways.

Ys Origin was originally released on Windows PCs in Japan on December 21, 2006. Likely developed as a budget title to hold over audiences until the next major release in the series, Origin was developed using the same engine as The Ark of Napishtim and Oath in Felghana. Shortly after the game was released, Falcom released a patch with a great deal of additional content: new characters, new versions of existing characters, additional difficulty levels, an entirely new game mode and various other secrets. It was so expansive that Falcom had to ship a separate expansion disc to owners of the original version – free if they provided the serial number on their original copy. The game would be optimized and re-released for both Windows Vista and 7 in 2007 and 2010, respectively. On May 31, 2012, XSEED released a localized version of the game on digital storefronts, adding widescreen support, achievements to the Steam version, improving the gamepad support and adding cloud save functionality. This would be the second game they released on the platform and the first that required its own localization effort – once again, working from an existing fan translation. The following year, Falcom released one more version of the game – optimized for Windows 8 this time. The game was unique in the sense that it was the only Ys game that was essentially totally exclusive to the PC platform, until late 2016, when it was announced that DotEmu would be porting the game to both PlayStation 4 and Vita in 2017. While both versions were originally intended to be released simultaneously on February 21, 2017, the Vita version was pushed back to May 30 of the same year. The PlayStation versions both add additional languages and revamp the game’s UI, making it more readable on consoles.

I generally like to refer to Ys Origin as “Ys 0” – or if I’m feeling particularly clever, “Ys 0rigin” – because it’s a far-flung prequel to even the first Ys game. Taking place roughly 700 years before Adol’s first adventure, Origin documents the events that took place soon after the kingdom of Ys was first launched into the sky. After escaping a continent scourged by demons, the people of Ys live peacefully, ruled by the twin goddesses Reah and Feena and the six priests of Ys. However, one day, the twin goddesses disappeared suddenly and without warning. Worried for the safety of their deities, the six priests decided in to send a group of their strongest knights and most powerful magicians in secret to search the ground, fearing the worst. On their way down, a mysterious force sabotages the magical spell meant to teleport them safely to the surface, scattering the party across the now broken and desolate land. There they converge at Darm Tower, a colossal ziggurat seemingly built by the demons themselves with the sole purpose of invading Ys. To make matters worse, the Twin Roda trees – the sole surviving remnants of the land’s once-lush woods – inform the members of the search party that find them that the goddesses are currently within the demonic structure. As the party begins to regroup, their mission becomes clear: recover the goddesses at all costs to keep their power out of the hands of these demons. But is there more to their disappearance than meets the eye?

Ys Origin is unique in the sense that it’s the first mainline game in the series where players don’t play as Adol Christin. To make up for this shortcoming, the game gives you a whopping 3 characters to play with in the main story – though only two of them are available from the start. Yunica Tovah is a young knight and the granddaughter of one of the six priests. Yunica’s father was also one of the two knights that sacrificed themselves to cover Ys’ ascent from the hordes of demons assaulting the land. Lacking any magical ability – a sad irony given the prowess of her family – Yunica instead decided she wanted to follow in her father’s footsteps and become a knight to protect the goddesses after a chance encounter with them when she was a child which led to a life-long friendship. Wielding a small axe, what Yunica lacks in combat experience, she more than makes up for in zeal. Yunica’s got average speed and attack range, effectively making her Adol’s equivalent in this game. Hugo Fact, on the other hand, lives up to his family’s legacy: he’s a powerful magician, but fairly cold. He wields both a magic staff and the Eyes of Fact: two magical orbs that triple his spellcasting ability and were passed down through his family. Unbeknownst to his comrades, Hugo was specifically chosen to determine the whereabouts of his older brother, the other knight who covered Ys’ escape into the sky and seemingly died alongside his comrade. Hugo’s playstyle is actually fairly unique for an Ys game: his long-range projectile attacks allow him to play more like a character out of a shoot-‘em-up like Ikari Warriors than the traditional melee style associated with the Ys franchise in general. To compensate for his wider range, Hugo moves slower than Yunica. Complete the game’s story with one or both characters – it depends on which version you have – and you unlock “The Claw”. The Claw is a figure mired in mystery, a former denizen of Ys who gave up everything in return for demonic powers. Working with the Darklings – the group manipulating the demonic horde into building Darm Tower – The Claw has an untold history with both of the game’s protagonists, as well as veiled motivations behind his actions. The Claw manages to be even more melee-focused than Yunica, sacrificing range for increased speed.

Aside from the new playstyles, the gameplay in Origin is mostly unchanged from Oath in Felghana. It’s to the extent where if you’re playing the game as Yunica, the game comes across as a simple graphic and level mod for Felghana, not unlike video game sequels from earlier generations. One major change made to the game is the fact that there is no overworld: after the game’s opening sequences, the entire game takes place within Darm Tower. The first floor, once cleared of the enemies that act as a tutorial, acts as the search party’s base of operations. The most impressive part about Darm Tower in this game is just how diverse the various segments of it are. While in the original Ys, most of the tower had similar theming, Origin’s reimagining includes an underwater segment, allowing swimming (which is representing by the ability to jump in mid-air perpetually) but also implementing a limited air meter; a desert temple characterized by solid gold platforms with as little traction as an ice floe and even the now-traditional lava area, now supplemented with spinning blades and other death traps. Various corrupted statues of the goddesses litter the tower, but using a Crystal given to the character near the beginning of the game, they can be purified and used as save points. These statues also allow the characters to upgrade their armor and leggings and buy other stat boosts that permanently power-up their characters by using SP, the game’s stand-in for traditional currency. Finally, as with Felghana before it, these statues can also be used as warp points from anywhere on the map by using the crystal.

That’s not to say there are no changes from the previous game. For starters, armor and leggings – replacing Adol’s traditional shield – can only be upgraded once per item. However, the weapons wielded by each character remain a constant throughout the entire game. They can be upgraded by finding Cleria ore and having their weapons tempered by Rico Gemma, a magician who resides at base camp. Likewise, the Boost system returns but acts differently depending on the character: Yunica gets a more traditional stat boost, while Hugo’s Eyes of Fact double, giving him five shots as opposed to his standard three. Three magical relics are also found throughout the Tower, granting Yunica and Hugo new magic attacks. However, the attacks differ between characters. For example, the Levinstrike Warhammer grants its user lightning magic, but while Yunica gains a powerful smash attack, Hugo gains the ability to place remote mines that he can detonate manually or automatically after a brief period. These different approaches to magical attacks generally suit their character’s playstyle, which leads to much wider diversity in gameplay. These relics can be upgraded by various gems once again – the same Emeralds, Topazes and Rubies return from Felghana to achieve this goal. There are also Roos hidden throughout the Tower, each of which offers a power-up as a reward, if you find the area’s corresponding Roda Fruit and feed it to them.

Each character has their own unique storyline, though this has little effect on the Tower’s layout. This does mean that unique bosses are fought in each story mode – not to mention bosses fought at different points – which means that there’s enough of a reason to replay the game multiple times to see how the different scenarios play out. Speaking of which, I love how Falcom handled the bosses in this game, I think they’re among the best in the entire series. Most Ys games’ bosses rely entirely on reflexes, but many of the bosses in Origin require a mild amount of strategy to damage. They’re not quite puzzles, but I’ll give an example: when fighting Nygtilger, one must first remove his entire protective shell, plate by plate, before dealing damage as the giant arthropod erratically fires off thunderbolts and poisonous orbs, requiring planning and spontaneity in equal measure to overcome. There are also additional modes that can be unlocked by completing the game. Time Attack – the Ys series’ now-traditional boss rush mode – is unlocked character-by-character upon completing the game. Beat the game with all 3 characters unlocks both the new Arena mode and a Bonus shop. The arena mode consists of arena-based combat in levels themed after areas in the main campaign, fighting against waves of enemies constantly increasing in strength and number. The Bonus Shop allows you to spend the SP you win by beating stages in Arena mode on additional content. New stages in the arena, powered up versions of the three playable characters and even unlocking Adol Christin as a playable character – albeit only in Time Attack and Arena mode. All of this additional content gives Ys Origin a level of replay value no previous game in the series could even hope to match.

As with Felghana before it, the graphics still haven’t really changed much since The Ark of Napishtim. Considering the increased amount of characters, Falcom has decided to ditch changing the graphics depending on the character’s equipment for the most part this time. There is one minor example of graphics changing based on loadout, however: when Yunica obtains the final magical relic, she’s able to switch out her axe for the Crimson Lotusblade, which changes both her appearance and fighting style in equal measure. Once again, the sprites are essentially identical in style, but the 3D models show minor improvement over even those found in Felghana. You really get the feeling that Falcom was using these games to improve their 3D modelling skills for future projects that relied entirely on them, as opposed to the mixed-media approach seen in this game and its predecessors. I think this game uses full-motion video cutscenes more often than previous games in this style, which doesn’t necessarily improve Origin’s graphical prowess, but does help to better convey the game’s environment and narrative in ways that the overhead and isometric perspectives are often limited.

Given the fact that the game takes place in the familiar Darm Tower, it’s only fitting that much of the music are new arrangements of songs that originated in both Ys I and II. For example, “TOWER OF THE SHADOW OF DEATH” appears as the first section’s theme – this time around however, it’s a much lighter theme, representing the beginning of the adventure within Darm Tower, as opposed to the conclusion of Ys I. There are also several new compositions as well, so there’s a good mixture of old and new in Origin’s soundtrack, which works out perfectly fine for me. Adding to the speculation that this game was a budget title, the game’s soundtrack generally consists of synthetic instruments, and as such, most compositions are credited to the Falcom Sound Team jdk. A few tracks do manage to see some real instruments mixed in there – most credited to Yukihiro Jindo – but honestly, at this point, Falcom’s synths are of high enough quality and it’s not really that detrimental to the compositions. My favorite returning tracks from this game are “TENSION”, “OVER DRIVE” and “SO MUCH FOR TODAY”. “PRELUDE TO THE OMEN”, the sixth section’s theme; the major boss theme “SCARS OF THE DIVINE WING” and the Darklings’ theme “THE ROOT OF DARKNESS” are my favorite original tracks from this game. As with the base gameplay and graphics, the sound effects are about on par with those from the last two games. The really interesting thing is that there isn’t a single version of Origin that had voice acting, which I was honestly fine with – listening to the voice acting from the PlayStation versions of both Ys VI and Felghana made it seem like it would have ended up distracting me in the long run.

Ys Origin’s relative obscurity is ill-deserved, but understandable. Considering that it spent 6 years as a PC exclusive game tied to a region where the platform’s gaming audience is incredibly niche, I’m surprised that the game wasn’t completely forgotten. Fortunately, as with the Ys Eternal/Complete games and Oath in Felghana, Origin was given a fan-made translation, which significantly increased the game’s profile among the niche Japanese PC gaming community in the West. Given the fact that most Japanese games are generally more popular on consoles – in both their native land and internationally – it is surprising that it took so long for Origin to hit consoles, even more amazing that Falcom had to rely on a Western company to handle this port in the first place: I would’ve expected this to have come out on the PSP around the time Oath in Felghana hit it. Better late than never though, right?

As of right now, Ys Origin is the latest game in the series I’ve played. Fitting, considering it’s a perfect place to end this retrospective: I’ve managed to cover the entire lineage of the first two styles of Ys gameplay – as well as a few curiosities worth mentioning. I hope that I’ve been able to provide an overview of the series’ history to those unfamiliar with the series and reminded long-time fans of their favorite moments in the series. As with the Zelda retrospective, I do plan on doing a follow-up in the future, likely involving everything from Ys Seven to the upcoming – at least outside of Japan – Lacrimosa of Dana, the first game in the series since Ys Seven to be localized in English by any company besides XSEED. NIS America is handling the English translation this time and while the fanbase is worried, I’m cautiously optimistic: their involvement is likely how we managed to establish a PC release – and a simultaneous one at that! – in the first place. While Ys Seven and Memories of Celceta are still exclusively available on the PlayStation Portable and Vita respectively, I’m still hoping against all logic that they’ll manage to receive PC ports before Ys VIII releases in North America. Regardless, I can’t wait to see where the series goes next.

Top 10 Games I Want Ported FROM PC II: The Secret of the Ooze

Last year, I decided to change things up when it came to my long-running series of PC port wishlists by doing a list of games that would be great games currently available on PC, but not consoles. I have to admit, I actually had a lot of fun doing it – looking back on lesser-known games that were only available on PC just struck me as a much less futile endeavor than constantly mooning about games that might never get re-released in any format, let alone on PC. At least with PC, there’s always an odd chance that maybe at some point, one of the console manufactures will stumble across one of these obscure gems and decide, “Hey, this could work well on our system” and pay someone to port it to their current platform. Considering the sheer length of your average PC game’s shelf life, I’ve got plenty of material for future lists: I’m even considering making this into a yearly tradition.

First things first, let’s go over what’s been announced since the last time I discussed this – both in terms of console releases and PC. Considering the topic of this article is focusing games being ported from PC to console, that seems like the logical place to start. As I already mentioned, both Ys Origin and Kero Blaster were announced for PlayStation consoles back in December – since then, Ys Origin released on PS4 in February and is expected to hit the Vita on May 30th. Kero Blaster still lacks a release date, but another game being handled by the same publisher (Playism) that didn’t quite make the list – Momodora: Under the Reverie released on March 16th and 17th on the PS4 and Xbox One respectively. Likewise, a game I originally intended to include on this year’s list: Pocket Rumble will be released on Switch sometime in the near future. Ironically, I would’ve suggested putting it on a Nintendo platform anyway, simply due to the lack of fighting games on the platform and the low-definition graphics seemed like a better fit for Nintendo’s core audience. An even bigger surprise came less than a week before this article was set to post: Lethal League is hitting both PlayStation 4 and Xbox One on May 10th, adding another win to what I had originally intended as a joke article.

Fortunately, time has been kind to the PC platform as well. First and foremost, when NIS America announced their obtained the localization rights to Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana, they also announced a release on Steam. This news is particularly inspiring, considering it comes hot off the heels of the fact that the Steam version of fellow Falcom title Tokyo Xanadu – being localized by Aksys Games – will be based on the PS4 release, Tokyo Xanadu eX+. Both games are expected to release late this year and I cannot wait for both games. The only thing that could make me happier would be PC ports of the 2 modern-era Ys games currently missing from PC – and XSEED did mention they had some big PC news coming up soon, so I guess I’ll keep my fingers crossed. Other good news include de Blob making its way to PC on April 27th, courtesy of the good folks at THQ Nordic and Blitworks. To make matters even better, Blitworks may have also leaked the existence of a port of the game’s sequel, which means that soon we could have the entire duology! Finally, Arc System Works teamed up with FK Digital to bring Chaos Code -New Sign of Catastrophe- to PS4 and Steam with a new online mode. Not to mention they confirmed that the “REVELATOR 2” upgrade for Guilty Gear Xrd will be hitting Steam alongside the console versions. It’s encouraging to see how ASW has embraced PC gaming. O

With those musings out of the way, let’s get onto the actual meat of the article: the next ten games I’d like to see ported to console from PC. Same rules as last time – we’re mostly going to be looking at relatively recent PC games, specifically those released during the seventh and eighth generations of video game consoles, that have not appeared on home consoles by the time this article has been posted. I’ll also be discussing which platforms I’d consider the best choice for these games if they do actually manage to make it to at least one platform.

Carrie’s Order Up!

Best described as a cross between Pac-Man and Tapper, Carrie’s Order Up is a fun little throwback to old-school gaming with graphics I’d liken to a lost Neo-Geo game. Players take on the role of Carrie, a crab waitress trying to raise enough money to keep the restaurant where she works afloat. The gameplay is simple enough: customers come into the restaurant, usually ambling around looking for the perfect seat; they place their orders which are made by Carrie’s coworker Calcia and Carries brings them to the right customers to keep them happy. But watch out! Once Carrie gets started, she doesn’t stop and bumping into customers is a big no-no. Fortunately, she can twirl to bypass customers, but using it too much leaves her dizzy. Plus, if the customers aren’t served in time, they’ll also leave angry. The game’s a mere $3 yet offers a great value at that price: in addition to the standard arcade mode, there’s an endless mode and tons of other unlockables.

Best Platform: I’d have to give this one to the Switch, no contest. The cutesy aesthetic coupled with the classic arcade-style of gameplay seems like a perfect recipe for getting lost in the shuffle on Sony – and I doubt Microsoft would ever want to pursue this style of content. Meanwhile, I could see Nintendo advertising this as one of their “Nindies”, perhaps not enough to receive a special announcement in a direct, but definitely a dedicated section in one of their sizzle reels.

Xanadu Next

Okay, now if you want to get technical, Xanadu Next has technically already been on home console – in fact, it was the first time it was available in English. Unfortunately, the system in question was Nokia’s N-Gage and from what I’ve heard, that port wasn’t exactly representative of the original PC game. From what I’ve heard, Xanadu Next has been described as a cross between Metroidvanias, Diablo and Falcom’s own Ys series. There’s no doubt in my mind that console gamers would want to get their hands on that kind of action.

Best Platform: PlayStation 4 and maybe the Vita, if it hasn’t died at that point. Falcom’s had a poor track record with Nintendo-original releases – ranging from as far back as Ys III on the SNES all the way to the ports of Ys I & II on the DS. Given the fact that Falcom gave up on their history of PC gaming to survive in Japan’s console-centric market, a tryst with the Xbox brand is laughable. No, just like Ys Origin before it, I could see Xanadu Next on Sony platforms – I’m just going to assume it won’t happen until after DotEmu has backported all of the Ys games currently available on Steam back to PlayStation all over again.

Super Killer Hornet: Resurrection

Here’s another game where I’m technically cheating by including it: both the original Super Killer Hornet and its remake appeared on the Xbox Live Indie Games service. However, given the fact that XBLIG is set to be taken down later this year – not to mention the fact that it wasn’t that big a priority for Microsoft in the first place – it seems like now would be a good time to try again. SKH:R is an odd mixture, focusing equally on fast-paced shmup action and mathematics. You see, power-ups like score multipliers, options and shot upgrades are tied behind completing simple math problems: first you collect a number with an operator, then a second number to complete the formula, then you’re given the choice of three answers. Answer correctly and you get upgraded. It may sound boring, but the game gets hectic pretty quickly considering this is all happening during a typical shmup.

Best Platform: This one’s going to be difficult. On the one hand, the game does have history on the Xbox brand, but it’s not exactly a stellar one. PlayStation has apparently tried to encroach upon Xbox’s former status of best console for shmups, but I’m not sure if they’d go for something quite like this – granted, the graphical style might be right up their alley. Nintendo, on the other hand, might be open to this unique title – so I guess I’ll give it to the Switch by default, though I wouldn’t count out a PlayStation release as well.

The Wonderful End of the World

I think the best way to describe The Wonderful End of the World would be if Katamari Damacy were less Japanese, made on a smaller budget but at least 90% as quirky. Made by the good people at Dejobaan Games – who have also brought us such games as AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! A Reckless Disregard for Gravity, Drunken Robot Pornography and Tick Tock Bang Bang – The Wonderful End of the World takes place, well, exactly at that point: a demon with a fish for a head is going to eat the world and all that inhabits it. Fortunately, you’re thrust into the role of a puppet that can absorb anything it touches – and everything you absorb only makes you bigger. You’re in a race against time to save as much of the world as you can before it’s all over. A short game, but a fun one all the same – probably my favorite of Dejobaan’s entire library, even if it’s not their most popular title.

Best Platform: Another hard choice. Dejobaan hasn’t really strayed from PC and mobile development throughout their existence. I’d imagine that Sony would probably be happier to prod Bandai Namco to make a new Katamari game and this game doesn’t really seem like the kind of Microsoft would go out of its way to put on Xbox. Nintendo’s Switch just strikes me as a the most viable option by default, just because I think the game’s quirkiness would be a good fit. Honestly, if Dejobaan were to start releasing games on console, I’d wager they’d probably go for something a little more contemporary.

Camera Obscura

I’m a huge fan of platformers – from the twitchy ones that require perfect hand-eye coordination and reflexes to the puzzle ones that force you to rack your mind. Camera Obscura is clearly of the latter camp, but it’s got some unique mechanics: players take on the role of a lone photographer scaling a ruined tower, the failed work of a long since passed cult planning to reach the sun itself. On your trek, you’ll have to face off with wild animals that have taken refuge in the abandoned obelisk, as well as crumbling architecture and traps left behind by the structure’s creators, armed with nothing but your trusty camera. However, this is no ordinary camera: it’s capable of creating afterimages of the world around you – allowing you to bridge gaps, climb ledges, create floating platforms and ever crush deadly monsters between objects in the real world and your copies. But will this ability be enough to scale the tower’s 57 floors?

Best Platform: Once again, I could see this working best on the PlayStation 4, though I wouldn’t rule out releases on the other two consoles. The puzzle elements are a pretty solid match for Nintendo or Sony, but I feel like Sony would probably jump on this one before Nintendo, simply due to the grungier take on pixel art present in the graphics. While Microsoft did get their hands on Fez and Braid – both noted as inspirations for Camera Obscura in its own Steam page – before anyone else, they just don’t really seem like they’re going out of their way to bag pre-existing indie games at this point, preferring to finance their own.

Ultionus: A Tale of Petty Revenge

Perhaps this is a bit of an odd choice, but we’ve seen games of this style released on home consoles both in the past and fairly recently. Starting life as a direct remake of an old computer game called Phantis developed by a little-known company call Dinamic Software, Ultionus: A Tale of Petty Revenge absolutely oozes early 90s western PC game. Players are thrust into the role of heroine Serena S who is inspired to strike revenge on a dangerous alien planet …because someone trolled her on the internet. The gameplay in each level is split into two phases: a side-scrolling shmup inspired by games like R-Type and a side-scroller run-and-gun not unlike the Turrican games of old. Considering its classic artstyle was handled by Andrew Bado, a former alumnus of WayForward and Gameloft and its soundtrack was provided by the incomparable Jake “virt” Kaufman, Ultionus not only feels like a classic ‘90s Amiga throwback, but looks and sounds like one too.

Best Platform: I’m going to have to go with PlayStation this time around. As a similar Amiga exclusive, Psygnosis’s Shadow of the Beast received a remake on PS4 not that long ago, there’s at least precedent to allow something like this to hit the platform. Also, given the fact that main character’s design is brimming with fan service, it might be better suited for Sony’s platform simply due to the perceived maturity of the game’s design in general.

Terrian Saga: KR-17

Another game clearly evoking the spirit of early ‘90s PC games, KR-17 is somewhat evocative of western retro platformers like Commander Keen, the old Duke Nukem games and Jack Jackrabbit. Boasting over 60 levels across 9 worlds, varied level designs, a storyline that’s interesting without bogging everything down, mind-bending puzzles and precision run-and-gun gameplay, Terrian Saga delivers an impressive package at a reasonable price point.

Best Platform: This time, I’m a bit torn. On the one hand, this game seems to have “Nindie” written all over it, with its clear retro style, relatively family-friendly tone and its tendency to achieve “Nintendo hard” levels of difficulty at times. On the other hand, the game’s developer is currently working on getting their next project on both PlayStation and Xbox in addition to PC. I guess because of that, I’d give the edge to PlayStation 4, but I could definitely see this game doing quite well on the Switch too.

Devil’s Dare

If there’s one type of game that never really managed to adjust to the death of arcades, it would have to be the humblest of video game genres – the beat-‘em-up. An entire genre built from the ground-up for the sole purpose of bilking the young and young-at-heart out of entire GDPs worth of quarters, the transition to the console era didn’t do the genre any favors: games had to choose between unlimited continues – which defeats the entire purpose of the games – and a set number of limited continues, which just leaves me disappointed. Devil’s Dare thinks differently: opting for a perma-death mechanic instead. Continues cost in-game money, which can be obtained by performing well. Run out of continues, and the game deletes your save. It’s an interesting concept in my book. Even if the rest of the game’s components aren’t quite the pinnacle of the genre, I think it’s still worth sharing with a wider audience.

Best Platform: I’d honestly be willing to go with the Xbox One on this one, simply because of the game’s gritty yet retro tone. I’d recommend a slight overhaul of the base gameplay and that kind of an undertaking might make the effort to port Devil’s Dare to new platforms more of a Microsoft-friendly project, simply due to their obsession with “getting things first”. Label it as “Devil’s Dare DX” or something along those lines and I’m sure the folks at Xbox would lap it right up.

Owlboy

Developed over the course of nearly a decade as a love letter to old-school platformers, Owlboy dubs itself a “hi-bit game”, due to the fact that it recreates the classic look of 16-bit games at a much higher resolution and with much more fluid animation than what was possible back when 2D pixel art was the apex of its popularity. Players take on the role of Otus, a young anthropomorphic owl. Unfortunately, he struggles with living up to the expectations set for him, because he was born mute. When sky pirates show up, things only get worse and Otus must set off on an adventure. Fortunately, Otus has friends in the form of various Gunners, whom provide him with cover fire while in flight.

Best Platform: This is perhaps the most difficult decision of them all, but I’m going to have to give it to the Nintendo Switch. While you’d think that the fact that the game was built in XNA would make it a shoe-in for Xbox, you’ve got to remember that Microsoft discontinued the service and it isn’t compatible with the Xbox One. Likewise, while PlayStation would likely want to pursue getting this title, much of the game’s inspiration comes from various Nintendo properties, including Kid Icarus and the Tanooki Suit in Super Mario Bros. 3. It’s also fair to bring up that D-Pad Studios, the game’s developer, did consider console ports back in 2013, when the game was still in development – not to mention the fact that ports to both Mac and Linux were released this year – so who knows just where this gorgeous game might end up in the future?

Environmental Station Alpha

Developed by small Finnish studio Hempuli Oy, Environmental Station Alpha is a Metroid-like, pure and simple. It boasts a minimalistic pixelated artstyle, ambient music and solid, yet simple gameplay. Alas, it’s still a Metroidvania – and we’ve reached the point where the independently developed Metroidvania has become a cliché unto itself. Still, when Tom Happ – the man who single-handedly developed Axiom Verge, the last Metroid-like indie to escape being deemed “unoriginal” – says that ESA is worth checking out, I’m not going to argue with him.

Best Platform: The Switch or possibly the 3DS, no question. This game totally evokes the look and feel of a Metroid game and Nintendo would be foolish to not at least try to get their hands on this game to quell that particular fanbase’s hunger. I’m fairly certain that a significant portion of both the PS4 and Xbox One’s core audiences might be turned off by the primitive graphics – though, Vita fans will beg for just about anything.

There you have it, 10 PC games I’d like to see ported to consoles. No honorable mentions this time – might need to save those games for next year after all. I already own every game on the list, but of course, that’s not really the point of this list – it’s less about getting the games myself and more about sharing them with a much wider audience. You know, better to give than to receive and all that mumbo-jumbo. Having said that, it was probably more fun to do this article than the last one: I had already blown through most of my obvious choices last year, so searching for new games that weren’t already on console was pretty fun. Not to mention the fact that actually seeing some of those titles I picked last year getting console ports – that definitely made things more exciting this time around. I wonder which (if any) games will make it over out of this batch. You know, aside from Pocket Rumble, considering that got announced before I started writing this article.