A Wishlist Named GOG

On the one hand, giving up on the PC ports articles helped me out with regards to the quality of my writing, at least in terms of the topics I’d cover. After all, they were effectively vanity pieces, where I would essentially just lay out a list of ten games I’d love to see ported to my current platform of choice, particularly via Valve’s Steam platform. Back in the early days, this was a much more viable endeavor: many companies (particularly those of Japanese origin) had just began looking at PC ports as a potential revenue stream and I simply wanted to make my voice heard, even against the backdrop of a little-known blog, echoing from the most obscure corner of the vast internet. Since then, I’ve gotten a significant dividend on my investments and at this point, it seems like more companies have adopted the PC as a secondary platform for Western releases, superseding the current incarnation of the Xbox, with many smaller Japanese companies considering the PC market as a viable place to invest in general. As such, I decided to focus my interests elsewhere – honestly, those lists about ports of PC-exclusive games to consoles have been fun to write – but at the same time, it feels empty. After all, what’s in it for me? I’ve been itching to write another list and despite the fact that I’ve decided to revive the original concept for one more go this holiday season, I wanted to do something a little different first.

Before we dive into this new list, I’ve clearly got some updates to right, on the acquisitions the PC platform has made since that last list back in April. Truth be told, this was one of the determining factors that all but assured that this list would become a reality: if I’d waited until December to write up on everything else, I probably could’ve written an entire article on all the new PC ports we’ve seen announced and released alone. First off, the first Bayonetta was ported to PC as expected, but it was soon followed by a second Sega/Platinum project, the oft-requested Vanquish. Both have been given an even further coat of paint from their original HD releases and as such, now the PC versions are generally considered the definitive releases. de Blob 2 has joined its predecessor on Steam, skipping out on console versions at this point for some strange reason. Glad to see both games have been re-released on PC – I always felt that they were a bit of a longshot – and I hope this means that THQ Nordic has plans to revive the series down the line as well. Then there were games I’d wanted that didn’t even get the chance to be put on this year’s upcoming list: The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel was confirmed for release tomorrow on Steam, GOG and Humble Store via XSEED, who confirmed that the second game in the trilogy would also be receiving a PC port later this year and is now apparently taking PC development far more seriously (more on that later); Natsume released their first PC game in the form of Wild Guns Reloaded last month; SNK finally granted my wish and released The King of Fighters XIV on PC, with the port being handled by Abstraction Games, the very company that handled Double Dragon Neon, my first successful request; and Raiden V: Director’s Cut, an enhanced release of the former Xbox One exclusive was announced for both PS4 and PC. Speaking of which, last year, I wrote up a top 10 list of the games that I’d mentioned in previous lists that I most wanted to see become a reality. I’m happy to say that not only did two of those entries become a reality, but they were my top 2 choices overall. MegaMan 9 and 10 are coming to PC (as well as PS4 and XBO) via the upcoming MegaMan Legacy Collection 2, with all of their DLC included. As an added bonus, MegaMans 7 & 8 will also be included: truth be told, I’d have paid the $20 asking price for MM9 and MM10 with their bonus content alone; including MM8 was just gravy. Even more amazing was the news from last month that Ys Seven would be coming to PC in the West, via a brand-new port commissioned by XSEED themselves. Coming to us with an improved translation, 60FPS gameplay and enhanced graphics, it’s looking to be the definitive version of the Ys franchise’s first fully-3D adventure. Better still, this means that now, none of my lists are complete failures: at least one game from every list I’ve written up has had at least one PC port listed made, so I’m absolutely ecstatic about it. What this means for Memories of Celceta, now the only modern game in the series missing from PC, I don’t know, but I’m going to keep my fingers crossed, especially in light of the information that Falcom president Toshihiro Kondo went on record saying that he wants “all of their games on Steam“. Of course, with my top two games on that cumulative list acquired, that may just mean I’ll have to write up a new one in December.

So with that gargantuan list of victories, let’s get to the topic at hand – what is the list going to be about this time around? Quite simply, I’m going to turn the entire concept on its head: instead of asking for games that are exclusive to consoles to receive brand-new ports, why not ask for some old PC games (ports or otherwise) to be re-released so that modern generations can enjoy them? If the title didn’t give it away, this wishlist is dedicated to the fine people over at GOG. Formerly known as “Good Old Games”, G-O-G – or “Gog” as I prefer to pronounce it, simply because it sounds like a caveman’s name. Since they generally deal in older PC games, it just seems fitting to me – is perhaps the second-most popular digital platform when it comes to PC games, and that’s probably due to their unorthodox strategies. If their original name didn’t make it obvious, GOG focuses mostly on providing digital re-releases of old games that are long since out of print. That is to say, the majority of their “new releases” are a bit of a misnomer.

I personally believe that GOG’s popularity is because it bucked the trend that many digital storefronts embraced: attempting to create a “Steam-killer”, seemingly going after an entirely different niche audience of PC gamers – a solid concept given their focus on “good, old games”. Of course, perhaps the most prominent way they’ve separated themselves from Valve’s nigh-monopoly is with their strict policy against DRM software. That essentially makes GOG one of the few digital storefronts where you can literally buy PC games. While that’s had the unfortunate consequence of making them the perfect source for PC game piracy, it’s still something that has earned them quite a few companies’ respect, not to mention a dedicated fanbase, especially among anti-DRM advocates. Likewise, while GOG traditionally works off their website, they’ve also built their own Steam-like client, GOG Galaxy, which allows for various quality of life features Steam is acclaimed for, such as in-game achievements, automatic updates and even online cross-platform play with Steam users.

GOG is the class valedictorian to Steam’s starting quarterback with really rich parents. Valve’s massive war chest has allowed them to become everyone’s favorite PC gaming service, effectively becoming the last man standing after the all-out war against the now-defunct Games for Windows Live. GOG’s focus and policies make them a far less popular choice for the majority of developers and especially publishers, but in return, they provide their customers with far better service. Perhaps the best illustration of this is by comparing the two stores’ refund policies: while Steam offers a strange 2 weeks owned/2 hours played policy, GOG offers a 30-day refund policy, no questions asked. Of course, many times when GOG goes out of their way to secure the re-release of an oft-requested title, it’ll often just show up Steam later on, usually after a particularly anemic exclusivity period. Seems a bit thankless to me, but I guess I understand it.

Perhaps my favorite thing about GOG would be their community wishlists. In my opinion, these are the ultimate proof of their dedication to provide their customers with the best possible service. GOG has wishlists for new features on the website, new features on their Galaxy client, new movies (yes, GOG offers digital video downloads as well), but the longest-running and my personal favorite would have to be their wishlist for new PC games. While there are quite a few cases of people completely missing the point of the service, I’ve upvoted quite a few of these and quite a few of these games have ended up emerging on the service. In fact, GOG’s community wishlist is what inspired this wishlist in the first place, both the concept and some of the entries on here. I’ll include links to those with entries on the community wishlist, in an effort to get them some support and, perhaps, one day, some of these games will find their way onto the service.

The rules are going to be a bit different this time around, just to make my life a bit easier. Chances are this will end up being a one-shot, so I’m not particularly worried with the changes. I’ll be keeping the concept of consolidating multiple games in a single series into one entry, simply to both save space and get as many games in as possible. As these are all existing PC games, there’s no point in separating series by platform, so it’s pretty much a free-for-all in that regard. I’m bumping the company limitations from 1 to 2 entries this time around, simply because there just aren’t as many companies with games I’d want. Likewise, much like previous “special” lists, I’ll be including an additional write-up, this time focusing on my thoughts on the likelihood of these games being released on GOG in the future. That seems like it might be good for a laugh.

The House of the Dead/The Typing of the Dead – Sega

I’m sure I’ve mentioned on several occasions that when I was young, my main outlets for gaming were the Game Gear, my ill-fated Nomads (never give a child with a temper a fragile, yet expensive handheld) and of course, the family computer. Sega was a constant presence on all three platforms. I was always a fan of the “Sega PC” line of games: it blew my mind to see Sonic 3 & Knuckles on my friend’s computer and I was equally blown away by the mere existence of Sonic CD. But there were many more games in there, and as time went on, Sega’s offerings improved. The Sega PC lineup was particularly strong during the Saturn days. Given the fact that the source code is long gone, I think Sega re-releasing the original House of the Dead’s PC port would be a good way to honor the franchise, especially given the fact that every other game in the franchise has been re-released in some form. Likewise, I’d love to see a re-release of the original Typing of the Dead, given how much I’m loving Overkill. Unfortunately, since The Typing of the Dead 2 was Japan-exclusive, I’m far less optimistic about that one seeing a re-release on GOG, unless Sega decides to include a translation.

Odds: Well, Sega has yet to release any games on the GOG platform, so that makes things kind of dicey. Still, given Sega of Europe’s recent shift towards PC ports and original development, I think there may be a chance that we could see some of these games pop up in the future with enough fan demand. (5/10)

Panzer Dragoon – Sega

It almost pains me to include this one, simply because there was another game I wanted from the Sega PC line-up. Alas, that game ended up below, in the honorable mentions, simply due to the importance of this game. Generally considered one of the best games for the Sega Saturn, not to mention one of the best games developed by Sega period, Panzer Dragoon only saw release on the Saturn, on the Japan-exclusive Sega Ages line and as a bonus feature in the Xbox’s Panzer Dragoon Orta. The Xbox version utilized the PC port as its basis – a not-at-all uncommon move for Sega with regards to many titles from around that era – which should speak to its quality. As such, I had to put my nostalgia aside and give Panzer Dragoon the nod: besides, I never really got to play it and I’ve been interested in the game for quite some time now.

Odds: I’d almost say that it’s on par with the HotD games, but honestly, given the sheer zealotry of Panzer Dragoon’s small but dedicated fanbase, I’d say that if any Sega PC game makes it onto GOG, it’s got to be Panzer Dragoon – though, hopefully, Sega doesn’t decide to stop at just one. (6/10)

Metal Gear Solid: Integral/Metal Gear Solid 2: Substance – Konami

I guess it just sort of proves how dumb of a kid I was: I had no idea that either of these games had even received PC ports. Of course, given Konami’s history with the MSX, I guess it kind of makes sense. From what I can tell, both ports were fairly well done, and there were even mods that upscaled all of the textures and graphics to allow for HD gameplay, effectively giving the PC versions an edge over any other version. There was a rumor for quite some time that Konami was planning to port the MGS HD Collection to Steam, but frankly, I think I’d rather just see these ports of the first two games re-released instead.

Odds: Like Sega, Konami has absolutely no presence on GOG at the moment. To make matters worse, they’ve earned themselves a fairly poor reputation among gamers in recent years, both through many of their releases but mostly due to some of their managerial shenanigans. Unless Konami decides they want to win back gamers, I wouldn’t hold my breath. (2/10)

MegaMan Legends/MegaMan X3, X4, X5 & X8 – Capcom

The funny thing about MegaMan Legends is that, for quite some time, the only version you could buy new was the PC version. It was sold for quite some time on GameStop’s digital service, then just randomly vanished into the ether. I’m not sure if Capcom ordered them to take it down or if the game just stopped being compatible with current versions of Windows. Whatever the reason, it just disappeared. Considering the fact that Capcom was able to license a re-release of all three games as PS1 Classics, I’d kind of hope that they would be willing to swing a similar re-release of the PC version on GOG.

I also decided to include all of the MegaMan X games that came out in English-speaking regions, with the exception of the piss-poor port of the first game, handled by the folks at Rozner Labs. From what I can tell, all the ports I’ve mentioned are on par with their counterparts on PlayStation consoles (that includes X3), which is honestly fine by me. There were also ports of X6 and X7 (as well as Legends 2), but these were strictly made for the Asian market, and therefore, wouldn’t be available in English. From what I’ve heard, the port of Legends 2 was of poor quality anyway – and given how little I think of X6 in the first place, I’d be fine with just ignoring them. X8 was released exclusively in both Japan and Europe, so it gets a pass.

Odds: Well, for starters, Capcom has already released a couple games on GOG, namely the recent PC port of Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen, but more importantly, their Windows PC port of Street Fighter Alpha 2. This effectively makes them the first company I’ve mention that’s clearly aware of GOG’s existence. Having said that, I’d have to give Legends and the X games two separate scores here. While it’s unlikely that Capcom’s planning any major re-releases of the Legends games, it wouldn’t surprise me if we saw a MMX-themed Legacy Collection down the line. While a release along those lines would technically bring those games back to the PC, it would still be cool to see those old ports re-released on GOG, if only for curiosity’s sake. (Legends: 5/10; X Games: 3/10)

Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo – Capcom

This may seem a bit redundant to many of you: after all, I included the HD version of Puzzle Fighter in one of my earlier wishlists. However, I think both versions offer me something different. While the HD version includes online play and the additional two modes that originated in the Dreamcast version, the existing PC port was based on the PS1 release, which means that it has one thing going for it that the HD version couldn’t possibly compete with: nostalgia. SPF2T was one of the earliest games I owned on the PS1, and it included both the original and arranged soundtracks, as well as Street Puzzle Mode. Street Puzzle Mode was among one of the first video game challenges that I found difficult, but managed to overcome after hours of practice and it left me feeling satisfied. Quite simply, Street Puzzle Mode taught me the joys of “gitting gud” at video games, and I can’t stop thanking it for that. While most people would probably just prefer the HD version to get a re-release, I’d personally love to see both: HD on Steam and the original port on GOG.

Odds: Honestly, it’s hard to say. On the one hand, re-releasing the old port would probably be easier than porting the newer version to PC. But given the fact that current platforms in general also lack Puzzle Fighter HD, it’s entirely possible that Capcom would just do it in an effort to keep bringing older games forward to the current generation of platforms. Like I said, I’d like to see both re-released, but something tells me Capcom wouldn’t be onboard with that. (4/10)

Jazz Jackrabbit series – Epic Megagames

It’s actually really surprising how many great platformers there were on PC back in the good ol’ days. I mainly remember Commander Keen and Duke Nukem, but they weren’t the only ones. Perhaps the most popular was Jazz Jackrabbit, who I mainly remember because I kept confusing him with Bucky O’Hare for reasons that…I’m honestly sure I don’t need to state. I never ended up playing the Jazz Jackrabbit games, but when I was young, I absolutely wanted to play them, and considering all of the good things I’ve heard about them, that interest definitely lives on.

Odds: Unfortunately, there’s a bit of a legal caveat here. Jazz Jackrabbit is co-owned by Epic Games and the series’ original creator, Cliff “Cliffy B” Bleszinski. Cliffy B departed from Epic awhile back and is currently puttering around on his own, and I’m not sure if the break-up was amicable enough to allow Jazz Jackrabbit re-releases to be licensed by anyone, let alone GOG. I hope I’m wrong on this one, but the odds don’t look too good. (1/10)

Croc: Legend of the Gobbos/Croc 2 – Fox Interactive (Jeremy “Jez” San?)

I didn’t exactly adjust all that well when platformers made the shift from 2D to 3D. To this day, I’m still not fond of Super Mario 64, which is generally heralded as one of the greatest platformers of all time. I preferred games like the original Crash Bandicoot and Fox Interactive’s Croc. Croc has recently seen something of a resurgence in popularity lately, due to the alleged effect the game had on the development of Super Mario 64, and by extension, the 3D platforming genre. Even before I knew about any of that, I was just fine playing the game on PS1. Seeing the game revived would be a nice little treat in my opinion.

Odds: Another tricky one for rights issues, but for totally different reasons. With Argonaut – the game’s developer – shuttered and Fox Interactive having been closed down, it’s hard to pin down exactly who owns the rights to the Croc franchise. I’ve heard rumors that the whole shebang belongs to Argonaut founder Jeremy “Jez” San, and therefore any re-releases or new iterations of Croc may have to go directly through him, but considering the fact that he doesn’t seem to be quite as hands-on within the video game industry these days, that may make this pretty much impossible. (1/10)

Blood Omen: Legacy of Kain – Eidos (Square Enix)

I’ll be honest, in recent years, I’ve found myself interested in the Legacy of Kain series from …well, I guess at this point, it would be Square Enix Europe, wouldn’t it? But I’m a stickler for these kinds of things: especially when delving into series that are “newer” – namely, those that started well after I’d gotten into video games – I generally like to start at the very beginning and work my way forward. The original Blood Omen is the one game from the LoK series that hasn’t seen re-release on PCs, though the PlayStation version is available as a Classic on the PS3. I don’t know why, but I always find incomplete collections to be troubling and re-releasing the first game would be the perfect excuse for me to try getting into it.

Odds: Much like the previous two games, there are apparently some legal issues at hand here. I find this particularly baffling, considering that, as I mentioned earlier, the PS version is still currently available on both the PS3 and PSP. Apparently, Activision and Silicon Knights ported the game to PC, which is likely the source of the hang-up. The game’s been made available on Abandonia, an online repository for games that are considered “Abandonware” and has apparently seen no legal action from either Activision or Square Enix. Either way, the chances of an official re-release seem quite poor at this point. (1/10)

Mortal Kombat Trilogy/Mortal Kombat 4 – Midway (WB Games)

Growing up as a kid, I was in a tough spot: I was absolutely obsessed with fighting games, but generally limited to PC as my main outlet for gaming. Man, if only little Icepick could see the literal deluge of big-name fighting games available on PC nowadays! My main outlets for 2D fighters in my early years were the god-awful port of Street Fighter II, handled by the abomination known as Hi-Tech Expressions (even writing their name sends chills down my spine!) and the first 3 Mortal Kombat games. Sure, later on, I’d become enamored with the PC version of X-Men: Children of the Atom, but that’s a story for another time. Now, the Mortal Kombat ports were actually very well made, pretty much as good as their source material, and I loved these games growing up. Fortunately, GOG already has these games available on their service. What I didn’t know is that these weren’t the only MK PC ports made during this era. No, despite my beliefs that the series took a hiatus between 3 and the 2011 reboot, two more games actually made their way to Windows PC. While Trilogy and 4 weren’t the best games in the franchise – Trilogy was the true forerunner to MUGEN and MK4 was just another in a long line of games that were tarnished by the fifth generation’s obsession with 3D – I’ve got enough nostalgia attached to the previous games in the franchise to want to see just how well or poorly these games translated to the PC.

Odds: Like I said, WB Games already put the first 3 PC ports on GOG, they own the rights to the series and I’ve seen footage of both ports running on modern hardware. I think the only thing keeping these games off GOG is their relative lack of popularity compared to earlier games in the series. Seems pointless to keep them off otherwise. (7/10)

Williams Arcade’s Greatest Hits – Midway (WB Games)

I’m actually kind of ashamed that I had to make the wishlist entry for this one myself, but it is what it is. The Williams Arcade’s Greatest Hits Collection on PC was one of my earliest introductions to retro video games, particularly those made before or around the time of my birth. Truth be told, I absolutely loved every game in this collection, even if I wasn’t particularly good at any of them. The first two Defenders, Joust, Robotron 2084, Bubbles and Sinistar – all great stuff. Since PC missed out on WB’s most recent slew of Midway/Williams Arcade re-releases, this would be the next best thing.

Odds: Well, if Midway Arcade Origins gives us anything to go by, it’s that WB Games owns the rights to all six of the games present in this collection, so clearly there are no legal issues. This may just be another case of WB not knowing what they’re sitting on. (7/10)

Honorable Mentions

Virtua Fighter PC/Virtua Fighter 2:  I actually had Virtua Fighter PC when I was a kid and that’s what made it so hard to leave it off the main list. I had no idea that its sequel also received a PC port, but considering the fact that I’d almost certainly prefer to see the version from Sega’s Model 2 Collection hit PC instead, I almost considered leaving it off. Still, it’s better to have options in general, so I figured why not?

Jill of the Jungle: This game actually almost made the list, but considering my lack of nostalgic love for the game and what I’ve seen of the gameplay, I decided to push it down to the honorable mentions instead. Still, it’s an important game when looking back at platforming games on the PC, so it deserves to be preserved in some form and enjoyed by modern audiences.

Super Street Fighter II Turbo: I really wish that I had known about this port when I was a kid: if only that SF2 port had been half this good, I would’ve been happy. By no means arcade-perfect, the game is still impressive in just how much they got right. Supplemented with an amazing arranged soundtrack, courtesy of Redbook audio, Gametek’s port of SSF2T should have gotten way more love than it got. I’ve seen its demo floating around on the Wayback Machine’s PC game archive, but I’d love to own the real deal – even just a digital copy.

Having the past of PC gaming available in the modern day is great. It shows you just how far PC gaming has come and what we’ve lost along the way. While I doubt I’ll have enough material to do a follow-up list for GOG in the future, I’m still happy I decided to write up this list. While I’ve got my clear favorites on this list, I’d love to see any of these hit the service in the near future. I’m not particularly optimistic about most of these games seeing re-release, but who knows, maybe by the time I write the next list, this one too will have borne fruit. I just wouldn’t expect any future lists on other services – I wouldn’t have any idea where to begin with Battle.Net, let alone Origin.

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10 Games I’d Like to See Re-Released #1: SEGA

Truth be told, I’ve been tempted to do another PC ports request article, but lately, there just haven’t been enough games released that fit the bill. After all, it’s not fair to request games to hit PC when they haven’t even hit the systems they originate on. So I decided to look at that series from a different perspective. Inspired in no small part by the recent announcement of Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir, the remaster of the Vanillaware’s PS2 cult classic, I’ve decided to start up a new spinoff. Instead of looking at more recent games and seeing what I would want to get ported to PC, I feel like delving into some forgotten older games that haven’t seen a release on 7th or 8th generation consoles and modern PCs for a change. Might as well spread the love, right?

The rules will be somewhat different from the PC port series. First of all, I’m going to be looking at games from the 6th generation (that is, PlayStation 2, Gamecube and the original Xbox) and earlier. Instead of limiting companies to one entry per article, I’ve decided to focus on one company for each article. I’ll also be discussing any potential improvements that could be made to these games, in cases where the games themselves would receive an HD re-release. To make things more fair, I’ll also be avoiding games that saw re-releases on 7th generation and later consoles, via PlayStation Classics, Virtual Console or anything like that. Sure, more substantial re-releases would be better, but it’s better than nothing.

So as I said, in each of these articles, I’m only going to be focusing on a single company. This time around, we’ll be looking at Sega. Now Sega may not be at their best at this point in time, but it’s hard to deny that they’ve got a rich history in their archives. That’s not to say that Sega hasn’t done a good job with re-releases in general, but lately they’ve slowed down on that front. It would be arrogant to assume that this article would have any real effect on Sega’s policies, but every little bit helps, right?

Sonic Heroes (PS2/Xbox/GCN)

I never really thought Sonic Heroes got a fair shake. It seems like a majority of people played it on the PlayStation 2, and that version…had a lot of issues. Personally, I played it on GameCube and had absolutely no issues with it. Besides, we’ve seen re-releases of the other two games in the so-called “Dreamcast era”, why not Heroes?  For those of you out of the know, Heroes is perhaps the game where the running gag of Sonic having a million friends hit critical mass and the ensuing backlash would keep most of them off-screen for the foreseeable future. Players would take control of a team of three characters: one speed-oriented, one flight-oriented and one power-oriented, each providing their own advantages in specific situations. With four different teams (Hero, Dark, Rose and Chaotix), that’s a whopping 12 playable characters. Each team, however, would offer their own specific twists on the game’s stages. Team Hero was normal difficulty, Team Rose was easy mode, Team Dark offered a harder difficulty and Team Chaotix tended to offer alternate objectives, aside from just completing the stage.

Potential Improvements: Aside from upping the resolution for current-gen consoles and PCs, as long as they base the re-release on the Gamecube or Xbox versions, it should be fine.

Shenmue I & II (Dreamcast/Xbox)

Well, this one’s pretty obvious. I’ll be honest, I’m not really all that well-versed in the Shenmue games, but considering the gigantic megaton that was the announcement of Shenmue III, now is the best possible time to capitalize on the demand. After all, the success of Shenmue III’s Kickstarter proves that there’s definitely a high demand for this kind of thing. In fact, Blitworks, the companies behind the HD port of Jet Set Radio, said they had interest in bringing it to modern platforms.

Potential Improvements: Aside from increasing the game’s resolutions, perhaps including an option to decrease the difficulty of the game’s infamous quick-time events would be nice. Maybe just give an option for an easy mode, that would give players more time to react or multiple chances to get the QTE right. Clearly, this would work better as an optional chance, leaving the original QTE system intact for those who want a more authentic or difficult experience.

Jet Set Radio Future (Xbox)

Another game Blitworks mentioned they wanted to bring to modern platforms was Jet Set Radio Future. I’m a really big fan of the original JSR (or Jet Grind Radio, as I tend to call it) and I did actually own Jet Set Radio Future at one point. Unfortunately, I’ve long since lost my copy (it was from the bundle with Sega GT 2002) but have been itching to complete it at some point. Considering how much copies of JSRF go for online, I’d much rather see a re-release, especially because then I won’t have to plug in my Xbox again.

Potential Improvements: The obligatory high-definition resolutions would be nice, especially given JSRF’s interesting cel-shaded art style. Another nice bonus would be trying to put the soundtrack from the original into Future as well, just because that would be a pretty awesome addition.

Burning Rangers (Saturn)

Another game I never really got the chance to play, but considering what I’ve heard about it, it sounds amazing: rescue civilians and put out fires in a futuristic setting. Too bad it commands obscene amounts online, especially when it comes to the English version. Oddly enough, unlike other popular Saturn games like NiGHTS into Dreams and even the original Panzer Dragoon, Burning Rangers didn’t even get a re-release in the Japan-exclusive Sega Ages 2500 series on PS2. Despite being out of print for almost two decades, Burning Rangers still makes the occasional cameo in Sega games. It had a table in the Game Boy Advance Sega Pinball Party and recently had its own track in Sonic and All-Stars Racing Transformed.

Potential Improvements: I’d like to see Burning Rangers get the same treatment as the recent NiGHTS into Dreams HD re-release: a version rebuilt from the ground up with high-definition graphics and widescreen support, with an emulation of the original Saturn version included as a bonus. Throw in a nice gallery and the soundtrack, and you’ve got it made.

Dynamite Cop (Dreamcast)

I will be honest, Die Hard Arcade is one of my favorite arcade games of all time. Unfortunately, it’s in this weird limbo, where it’s technically a licensed game (due to being inspired by the movie Die Hard, and named after it outside of Japan) while also not being a licensed game (the game is referred to as “Dynamite Deka” [Dynamite Detective] in Japan and stars an original character, Bruno Delinger, who would eventually make an appearance in the 3DS game Project X Zone).

So let’s do the next best thing: re-release the sequel! Dynamite Deka 2, released as Dynamite Cop outside of Japan, is a refined version of the original’s cross between 3D beat-‘em-up action and quick-time events, this time taking place on a cruise ship, instead of a skyscraper.

Potential Improvements: HD upscaling is once again on the agenda, but what would be really awesome would be if they included Dynamite Cop’s arcade-exclusive revision: Dynamite Deka EX: Asian Dynamite. Basically a rearranged version of Dynamite Cop, this time taking place in Hong Kong. The game itself is incredibly similar to Dynamite Cop, with extremely similar level layouts, but it would still be a pretty cool novelty to have a bonafide home port of this game, especially if the original can’t be included due to legal issues.

Fighters Megamix (Saturn)

Recently, Sega re-released some of their old Saturn-era 3D fighting games. Virtua Fighter 2, Fighting Vipers and Sonic the Fighters all made it to Xbox Live Arcade and PlayStation Network (but sadly, not Steam). They did, however, leave out one game, arguably the best of the bunch: Fighters’ Megamix. Fighters’ Megamix was Sega’s own attempt at a self-contained fighting game crossover, mostly starring characters from Virtua Fighter 2 and Fighting Vipers, but with characters from other Sega games like Sonic the Fighters, Rent-A-Hero, Virtua Cop and even Daytona USA! That’s right, you actually get to fight as a friggin’ car!

Potential Improvements: Just make it on par with the other Model 2 Collection games, including the online multiplayer. That’s an absolute must for fighting games.

Billy Hatcher and the Giant Egg (Gamecube)

Like Sonic Heroes, Billy Hatcher and the Giant Egg is one of Sega’s early third-party titles that I feel just doesn’t get nearly enough love. It was a pretty interesting 3D puzzle-platformer with its reliance on the egg rolling mechanics, as well as having different eggs with different abilities. As with Burning Rangers, the game is gone but not forgotten, making appearances in both of the Sonic and All-Stars Racing games. Billy was even playable in the first one.

Potential Improvements: All I can really think of is HD upscaling.

Panzer Dragoon series (Saturn/Xbox)

This one’s pretty obvious and it’s been requested so much, it’s surprising that Sega hasn’t really addressed it. The original Panzer Dragoon actually has been re-released a couple of times before: once in the aforementioned Sega Ages 2500 series and as an unlockable bonus in Panzer Dragoon Orta for the original Xbox. Aside from those instances, we haven’t really seen much of these games otherwise. I mean, I can understand why Zwei and Saga weren’t re-released, but Orta should be achievable to some extent, or at bare minimum, even the first game. Ideally though, we’d see the whole set.

Potential Improvements: As with Burning Rangers, I’d say to give it the NiGHTS HD treatment. A full collection of all 4 games would be ideal, but I think that it’d be more workable if they made Orta a separate release, while bundling the 3 Saturn games into a collection.

Space Channel 5 (Dreamcast/PS2)

This one, I feel like I shouldn’t even need to discuss, but here we are. For whatever reason, only Space Channel 5 Part 2 has seen a re-release on 7th generation consoles and PC, while we’re still missing out on the original. It’s especially weird because both games had ports to the PS2, which I assume is what Sega used as the base for the most recent port. Still, having the sequel up without the original just seems…well, blasphemous.

Potential Improvements: Just make it on par with the games in the “Dreamcast Collection” or Jet Set Radio HD and it should be fine.

Zombie Revenge (Dreamcast)

The last game on the list is actually a spinoff from Sega’s popular House of the Dead series. Eschewing the traditional light-gun rail shooter style of the mainline series, Zombie Revenge goes for beat-‘em-up gameplay with shooter mechanics, not unlike Die Hard Arcade/Dynamite Cop. It’s an interesting little game that just seems like it should be preserved in some way, if only because I want more Sega-developed 3D beat-‘em-ups at my disposal in the here and now.

Potential Improvements: Aside from enhancing the visuals, very little comes to mind. Maybe they could throw in the original House of the Dead as a bonus game, at least for platforms where there’s a way to properly implement controls for a light-gun shooter.

Honorable mentions go to Blue Stinger and Skies of Arcadia. If I’m going to be honest, I thought this article went pretty well. Like I said, since the PC ports series is currently on hiatus, this will probably act as its replacement, at least for the time being. I do have some ideas when it comes to other companies I want to write articles for, but you’ll just have to wait until next time to see what they are. Of course, if you’ve been following the site, you’ve probably got a pretty good idea for what’s coming next.

The Next Level: Selling Sega Bit by Bit (Part 1)

If you’ll recall, one of the earliest articles I wrote for this site was about Sega’s falling finances. Since that article was written, Sega’s been hit with the whole Aliens: Colonial Marines PR fiasco and they may be looking at a potential class-action lawsuit. Sega’s ship appears to be sinking once again, after losing one of the four or five key franchises they planned on using to remain afloat in these trying economic times, so now seems like as good a time as any to revisit the subject, wouldn’t you say? Last time, I explored the idea of other companies buying out Sega wholesale, but considering what happened with the bankruptcies of both Midway and THQ, it seems fitting to think of just what might happen if Sega gets cut up and each asset gets sold off to the highest bidder individually. So I’ve picked out 10 Sega IPs, some with recent releases, some that haven’t been seen for over a decade, some popular, and some so obscure you’ll probably think I just made them up. And just like last time, I’m not really dealing with what’s likely or possible, just what I personally think would be for the best when it comes to each individual intellectual property.

First up, the most obvious Sega franchise to get sold off: the blue blur himself, Sonic the Hedgehog. There’s an obvious answer to this one, folks. Some of you aren’t going to like it, but who cares. Nintendo has shown themselves in the past to be the best modern company when it comes to dealing with mascot platformers and even treated Sonic with respect when he made an appearance as a guest character in Super Smash Bros. Brawl. Needless to say, I’m sure that Nintendo is more than capable of continuing Sonic’s rehabilitation into a solid series, especially considering their heavy involvement in the recently announced Sonic: Lost World. Failing that, I wouldn’t mind seeing Ubisoft getting their hands on Sonic. Just imagine what a new 2D Sonic might look like on the Ubi Art engine. Just the thought of that gives me goosebumps.

Next up, Virtua Fighter, the first 3D fighting game ever. Not gonna say I’ve followed the series as much recently, but I loved the first 3 games. The obvious answer here is Tecmo Koei. Let’s face it, Dead or Alive’s gameplay is practically identical to that of VF (with a few minor tweaks) and while DoA is considering a wobbling, jiggling joke amongst serious fighting game fans, Virtua Fighter’s pedigree is assured. Besides, VF characters made appearances in DoA5. And while Namco-Bandai is an obvious runner-up, as they’ve made two of the most popular 3D fighter series of all time (Tekken and the Soul series), I feel like Virtua Fighter would be a much better fit for Capcom. Let’s face it, Capcom’s been trying to get back into the fighting game market, but their past 3D offerings have been…well, mediocre at best. Besides, Tekken and Virtua Fighter are two totally different animals.

Then there’s the NiGHTS franchise. Effectively Sonic Team’s first attempt at a 3D platformer, NiGHTS filled the gap left when the Saturn didn’t have a Sonic platformer to call its own. An interesting game in its own right, known for its beautiful (albeit extremely polygonal) artstyle and amazing soundtrack, which truly brought the dream world Nightopia to life. Just due to the family-friendly atmosphere of the series, I’m leaving it in the hands of Nintendo. Sure, Journey to Dreams was kind of lame for a sequel, but I’m sure that with enough time, the Big N could nail down the formula. Otherwise, the game itself seems like a perfect companion to the Klonoa series, so give it to Namco Bandai.

Speaking of games with weak sequels, how about Golden Axe? Man, was Beast Rider a stinker or what? I’d probably end up handing off this one to Capcom, simply for the purpose of killing two birds with one stone. Some people want a Golden Axe sequel that lives up to the original. Some people want a sequel to Capcom’s Dungeons and Dragons beat-’em-ups (which are finally being re-released on every major digital platform). So like that little girl in that taco commercial, I ask: why don’t we have both? Combining the Golden Axe mythos and setting with the gameplay from Capcom’s D&D games would be muy bueno, don’t you agree? If that doesnt work out, I guess Konami, the once-king of beat-’em-ups, is my saving throw. Just because I’d like to think that there’s a chance they could pick themselves up and stop making a mockery of their former glory. Fat chance.

Crazy Taxi was another one of Sega’s arcade hits turned console classics. It was also the subject of another lawsuit, this time in Sega’s favor against both EA and FOX Interactive in regards to another forgettable Simpsons licensed game. Regardless, Crazy Taxi was beloved in its own right, with its unique objective-based racing gameplay. I can only really think of one company these days that tackles arcade-style racing games (and isn’t EA) and that’s Namco Bandai. Nintendo would also be a good choice, as there’s a possibility they might just make it an arcade game again. Just not EA. Screw EA.

One of the cornerstone franchises of modern-day Sega is the Ryu ga Gotoku series, better known outside of Japan as Yakuza. The games themselves are effectively a cross between open-world sandbox games (GTA, Saints Row, etc.) and modern 3D action games, particularly ones that ape the classic beat-’em-ups of old (God Hand) with some action-RPG elements thrown in for flavor, set against a backdrop inspired by popular Japanese yakuza films. I’ll be frank: I think Atlus is the best possible company to handle the continuation of the Yakuza brand, due to the fluidity of the brand. If they don’t pick up the rights, I’d just give it to Take-Two Interactive or maybe Deep Silver. Maybe it would help them experiment a little more with regards to their respective sandbox games.

Phantasy Star is one of those rare Sega games that debuted in the days of the Master System and still manages to see new entries to this day: the second Phantasy Star Online game is due to hit the West sometime this year, along with iOS, Android and even PlayStation Vita ports. Once again, I think Atlus would be the best ones to handle this franchise. They have plenty of experience with regards to many forms of RPGs, from traditional JRPGs (the Persona series)to RPG hybrids (the upcoming Dragon’s Crown). And considering the way their North American branch handled Demon’s Souls’s online, it seems like they’d be able to handle both the classic Phantasy Star or the much more popular PSO series quite well. Level-5 might also be a good choice, considering their work on games like Rogue Galaxy and Ni no Kuni.

Another series originating from Sega’s pre-Genesis days was Shinobi. Appearing on many systems ranging from the arcades all the way to the 3DS, Shinobi, while not one of Sega’s most lucrative franchises, is still among its most beloved over old-school fans. Considering their interest in the Darksiders franchise and their own (albeit recently-ended) relationship with Sega, Platinum Games seems like a fair choice to take on Joe Higashi et al.’s adventure, considering their success with action games like the Bayonetta series and Anarchy Reigns. FromSoftware would be another valid choice (they have self-published a few of their games in Japan) considering they’ve worked on a few Tenchu games and have made some games that are really difficult, like a good Shinobi game should be. Perhaps you’ve heard of one: Demon’s Souls? Regardless, as with Yakuza, keeping Shinobi Japanese seems like it should be a top priority for the series.

Now onto some obscure games. First off: Panzer Dragoon. Oddly enough, my top pick for the classic rail shooter is Q Entertainment, the developer behind such games as Child of Eden and…well, a whole bunch of puzzle games. Considering how well Q did with Child of Eden, their spiritual successor to Sega’s Rez, I think seeing their take on the Panzer Dragoon series would be interesting. Otherwise, give it to Treasure. Those Sin and Punishment games were amazing.

Then there’s what is arguably Sega’s most popular rhythm game, Space Channel 5. The rhythm market has kind of dried up lately, but I can think of a few companies that still make them. The one I’m going with is Nintendo: Rhythm Heaven is at least as quirky as the SC5 series was and frankly, I’d love to see what kind of stuff The Big N might do with either the Wii U’s gamepad or the 3DS itself. Namco Bandai, who are still making Taiko no Tatsujin in Japan to this day would probably be my second choice.

Next, there is what may very well be the most obscure Sega franchise I’ll discuss: Comix Zone. An awesome action beat-’em-up featuring amazing (at the time) comic book-inspired graphics and interesting fourth-wall breaking gameplay mechanics. Considering both the game’s strictly Western influences and the fact it was developed by Sega Technical Institute, a dev team located in the United States, I don’t think a Japanese publisher could do Comix Zone justice. I just ended up picking WB Interactive, considering they’ve done quite well with the Midway franchises they’ve obtained and the fact that they’ve published totally awesome games like Lollipop Chainsaw, I’m more than willing to say the franchise would be in good hands. Ubisoft‘s really the only other major Western publisher I can think of that’s dabbled in the beat-’em-up genre, with Scott Pilgrim vs. The World.

Finally, there’s Space Harrier, one of Sega’s earliest franchises. Effectively one of the earliest on-rail shooters, SH had a few arcade sequels and a few home ports, but mainly lives on due to various references in other Sega games, such as Sonic and All-Stars Racing Transformed including the main theme on one of its tracks. Considering how similar the game is to the Sin & Punishment games, Treasure seems like a perfect fit for the franchise, especially given their history with Sega. Handing it off to Q Entertainment might also be interesting, they’d definitely have an original take for the series.

So there you have it, a dozen Sega games paired up with companies that might end up doing them justice. But let’s face it: I definitely missed some important franchises this time around. So see you later this month with Part 2 and another 12 Sega games I didn’t get to cover this time around.