But Is It Art? – Mega Man X6

There is a lot of negative sentiment towards the sixth game in the Mega Man X series. It is regarded as the worst game in the series by every sane person (yes, everyone who thinks X7 is worse, I am personally calling you insane), the level design choices are so horrible that it seems impossible that they were the result of mere incompetence. Is it possible that the game was intentionally designed to be as awful as possible? It’s not only possible, it is the only logical conclusion. And you know what that means…

The game is true art.

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Well, this wouldn’t make for coherent level design either, so only hypocrites would attack X6!

Yep, once you realize that Mega Man X6 was made an abomination on purpose, it reverses everything and shows the designers for the brilliant artists they are. The level design is not lazy or incompetent, it is purposefully and masterfully sadistic. The people who designed MMX6 clearly hated the series with a burning passion, and put their hearts and souls into creating the most twisted, hateful parody of the modern age. A lazy, rushed game would be a level pack of mediocre levels with the occasional spike of frustration caused by an overlooked element. Not so in MMX6, you run into frustrating paragons of “bad” game design constantly, they can’t all be oversights. Let’s examine some examples of the game’s brilliance.

There is a stage in Mega Man X5 that is mostly a drawn-out boss fight against a battleship that follows you throughout the level. You fight it several times, but each fight is against a different part of it. The minds behind Mega Man X6 clearly hated this concept and successfully warped it into sheer torture with the stage of Blaze Heatnix. Five identical boss fight against an annoying, tedious boss with only the setting changing, always to make the fight even more frustrating? It even plays with your expectations by making the penultimate fight the worst one, ensuring that you can’t even embrace yourself for the game’s inspired horror. You can’t tell me this wasn’t on purpose. Or how about one of the X series’ many classic ice levels? Blizzard Wolfang’s stage goes out of its way to throw everything wrong with ice levels at you. You never stop sliding into obstacles due to icy slopes and falling snow chunks. Then you play a luck-based segment where you have to climb ice blocks that fall in random places, replete with enemies to knock you off and make you start again. Think that was just bad game design? Well after that, you have to time your jumps in the only safe place as a row of ice blocks falls on you, with instant death being the penalty for being in the blank space when an ice block spawns in it for no logical reason. Speaking of death, some of the permadeath-prone hostages that you are encouraged to rescue are strategically placed to make you take damage from the falling ice. The juxtaposition of life and death and sacrifice is truly brilliant.

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You’ll get to know this brilliant subversion of good boss design very well.

Every level of Mega Man X6 has something in it to demonstrate its brilliance, but there’s one more Maverick stage I will cover. Metal Shark Player’s (by the way, keeping the literal Japanese translations after Mega Man X5 messed up the names in localization was another bite of spiteful genius) stage is a standard “get to a safe spot or the ceiling will crush and instantly kill you” level, except for one thing. If the ceiling is above you while you’re ducking, moving for any reason will instantly kill you for no logical reason. That is fairly common, but MMX6 shows its brilliance in what counts as movement. Getting hit by an enemy? The damage animation kills you in a brilliant inversion of the invincibility frames it usually gives you. Attack to stop from getting hit? That’s also movement and instant death. It’s hilarious, a work of true inspiration. But the stage has one more piece of brilliance in it. There is a hidden area that requires a specific armor to cross a bottomless pit. If you don’t have that armor, you must suicide… at which point you will spawn at the optional area, with no way to get back to the main level. You have to get a game over to exit the stage, or remain stuck forever. Considering the fact that extra lives don’t make the game any easier due to how the continue system works, putting in a spot where they hurt you is a marvelous splash spiteful creativity. The stage couldn’t be more brilliant.

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Hope your nose doesn’t itch.

Speaking of armors, the fortress stages play a hilarious trick on you with them. There are two armors you can collect in the game, each one having one of four pieces hidden in one of the eight maverick stages. You must get one of the armors before the other, so by the time you have the second armor there’s nothing left but the fortress stages. Luckily, that armor is perfect for the stage, it grants you immunity to spikes and there’s an area in the fortress you can only otherwise survive with missable upgrades or exploits. But then, later in the fortress, you reach an area where the armor’s weakness makes getting through impossible. The armor is completely worthless, the game’s sadistic sense of humor knows no bounds. This can’t possibly have been an accident.

Then there are the bosses. Multiple Mavericks are harder to fight with their weakness than your normal weapons, but High Max is who really deserves credit for his design. Instead of special weapons making the fight against him easier, they are required to do any damage to him at all, after you stun him with your normal weapons. Then they do a pathetically low amount of damage, making the fight one of the most tedious things I’ve ever encounted in a platformer. Fake Big Bad Gate’s fight also deserves mention: you have to destroy his projectiles to reflect them back at him while staying on the small platforms littering the screen, while Gate floats wherever he wants. Then when you beat him, he brings Sigma in out of nowhere, admitting it makes no sense and doesn’t benefit him at all. Then Sigma yells at you in garbled Engrish and fights you while fall down drunk. Seriously. Just as much effort went into making the bosses bad as the levels and the game deserves praise for that.

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Then there are the bosses.

So there you have it, proof that Mega Man X6 is actually a brilliant piece of counter-cultural art. The designers clearly hated Mega Man X, gamers, and humanity, and it comes shining through in every way. It takes true courage to make something as bad as possible on purpose, then trick people into paying for your expression of contempt against them. MMX6 is clearly one of the most profound pieces of art ever created, and I can only give an emphatic yes to the question “But is it art?”

So what do I really think of the game? It has good music and didn’t manage to mess up the controls, which are copy pasted from Mega Man X5. Does that mean it isn’t so bad? Hell no, it just means that it’s better than the Mega Man DOS games. When that’s even a question, you know a game is terrible. While the rational side of me thinks there’s no way it actually was made bad on purpose, the evidence does seem overwhelming at times. The game is as bad as this article makes it out to be, and in reality that is not a good thing.

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Of Axioms and Idioms: Best but Not Least

Well, it certainly has been awhile since I’ve written in this series. The funny thing about this article is that the concept behind it was originally completely different from what I’ll be writing about today: in fact, the original concept was going to be the third article in this series, but eventually, I just ended up discussing the bulk of the content in other articles. There was still some facet of the earlier iteration that I hadn’t explored, so I decided to change my approach to this whole concept and workshopped it into an entirely new direction. Unfortunately, my brain waits for no idea – I was originally going to write this up back in November but came up with an entirely new topic instead – so it just ended up sitting in my drafts folder, as I was working on other projects up until now. I just hope it was worth the wait.

It’s still difficult to articulate my thought process here, but I’ll try to summarize.  Put simply, this article’s topic is about how my favorite games in a particular series generally aren’t the ones I would consider the best. I think the most prominent example I have of this is the comparison between the second and third MegaMan games. For years, I’ve had difficulty explaining my exact feelings on the subject: the most accurate take I’d been able to articulate is that “while MM2 was a better NES game, MM3 was a better ‘MegaMan’ game”. A bold, ham-fisted statement, yes, but still the best I could do until recently. These days, I’ve got a much better handle on my thought process – my favorite game in a series and the “best” game are two distinct concepts that have been intertwined for far too long, so it’s just better to handle both of these indicators separately.

I’m not sure exactly when it started, but as far back as I can remember, I’ve always held preferences that aren’t particularly mainstream. When asked if I wanted Coke or Pepsi, I asked for Sprite – or more accurately, Lemon-Lime Slice. When it came to pizza toppings, I generally shied away from the standards of cheese, pepperoni and sausage. I’m not sure if it stemmed from a need to be different, rebel against the status quo or what have you, but I’d always pick things I enjoyed – even if it wasn’t on the menu. The thing is, this wasn’t just limited to food choices: I felt the same way about media. If there was ever anything resembling a consensus about the best entry in any fictional series I enjoy, chances are I’ll end up disagreeing. I never liked the seventh Friday the 13th film; my take on The Simpsons’ “dark age” is totally out-of-whack with the general consensus and I think Sonic Lost World may have been the best 3D Sonic since the first Sonic Adventure. At the same time, I’ve always acknowledged any widespread agreement on any such topic, albeit with varying levels of contempt. If I’m going to be honest, agreeing with it has always been something of an uncomfortable realization – even when default opinions shift with time – to this day, I feel strange whenever my personal favorite ends up being “the best”.

Perhaps the best way to illustrate this distinction is by defining both terms I’ve been using so far. Let’s start with the simpler of the two: “favorite”. It’s the pinnacle of subjectivity: my personal choice for what I like the most. Given the fact that what I personally consider best can vary based on anything from my mood to seemingly random criteria at any moment – if you could see how many drafts any top ten list I’ve written has gone through, your head would spin – in my case, the concept’s far more nebulous than subjective most of the time. As such, “favorite” lives and dies by personal preference. It’s strictly a personal opinion, one that varies from person to person, one that shouldn’t need to be defended or even explained (but this world is far from perfect). In the end, it’s useless with regards to objectivity – but that’s not the point.

Conversely, the concept of being the “best game” is much harder to define. It’s safe to say that it’s a much more objective concept than being a mere favorite, but that’s a gross oversimplification. In my eyes, the title of best game doesn’t depend on things like personal preference or any sort of quality that can be concretely proven. Instead, it relies on a general consensus – and one that is outright agreed upon by those familiar with the series at large. Going beyond that, this opinion must be stated out loud, repeatedly to the extent that it essentially becomes a “meme” – of course, I’m referring to the original definition (a cultural item transmitted repeated, similar to the biological transmission of one’s genetic code) as opposed to the more commonly-known one (running jokes on the internet). For all I know, there could be a widespread silent minority that considered the second Devil May Cry, Final Fantasy VIII or even (God forbid) MegaMan X6 to be the most beloved games in their respective series, but the deafening silence surrounding such opinions disqualifies them from being considered the “best game” of their franchises.

Of course, I personally disagree with this concept, but this is my gut reaction when describing a “best game”. However, this isn’t the only way to characterize this idea. In fact, there is a much more simplistic way to look at things that doesn’t revolve around the mob mentality of my original definition, but in most cases would lead to the same results, if not choices that are much more representative of each intellectual property in question. At this point in time, the most accurate definition I have for describing the “best game” in a series would the one that you would recommend to a complete newcomer that would give them the best representation of the series as a whole. But more specifically, they serve as the best example of what you – or I or anyone, for that matter – like about the games in question regarding their core concepts. Once again, this isn’t a perfect answer to the question at hand, but it’s the best that I’ve been able to come up with when properly defining the concept at large. At this point, that’s good enough for me.

Of course, the best way to define this entire concept is by, as usual, going through various examples from my own questions. When it comes to the Ys series, the fanbase generally recognizes three distinct “flavors” – Classic (the games that use the bump mechanic, along with black sheep Wanderers from Ys); the “3D” games (utilizing the hack-and-slash Napishtim engine with pre-rendered sprites on fully 3D backgrounds) and “modern” (which utilize a party system – switching between up to 3 characters on the fly – and incorporate 3D models into the game’s themselves). While there’s a recurring joke about “every Ys game being the best game of the series”, the most vocal segments of the fanbase swear by those Napishtim engine games, specifically the second game: The Oath in Felghana, a remake of the third game. Personally? I prefer Ys Origin, a far-flung prequel to the first two games and the last game to make use of the engine. That being said, due to the sheer amount of references to the first two games in Origin, I’d generally recommend Felghana to people interested in finding out about the series. There are other cases that just boil down to preference. For example, while it’s safe to argue that both Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super Mario World are among the best representations for 2D Mario games as a whole, I always find myself gravitating more towards SMB2 (or Super Mario USA, as the Japanese know it). The unique game mechanics just make it that much more enjoyable for me, but it’s probably the worst representation of the Mario series as a whole. This also manages to skew my views on even the most niche titles. Of the Darkstalkers games, I will always prefer playing Night Warriors over its more-lauded sequel, Vampire Savior – even while acknowledging that the latter has some much more interesting game mechanics.

The weird thing about this entire concept is just how much it ends up helping me understand some of my own opinions and biases. Separating my personal favorites from a much more objective ranking of things has been pretty helpful in the long run, keeping me from twisting myself into intellectual knots in order to just why I’d acknowledge other things as being better than my personal favorites. Having struggled with articulating the concept for well over a decade, it’s honestly relaxing to be done with the mental gymnastics I’d often associated with trying to justify why I liked certain games more than ones that were often considered “the best”, but the added benefits of being able to apply this to other opinions I’ve had that are out of the ordinary is a significant bonus. Thanks to this new perspective – that personal preference and widespread consensus can exist separately and simultaneously – I’ve honestly become a bit less defensive about my own opinions. Who knows, maybe the same could be true of anyone who shares this perspective. If this article causes anyone to reconsider these two concepts as being separate rather than identical, then I think it was worth the wait.

Retrospective: MegaMan Classic [Part 1]

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I’ve said this so many times, it’s probably a cliché at this point, but I owe much of my love to the entire medium of video games to MegaMan. When I was a kid, my only regular outlet for playing video games on a console was the old NES at a childhood friend’s house. Of the numerous games he’d traded back and forth to Funcoland (Ah, Funcoland!), there were three games that stood out to me, that would have a profound impact on my taste in video games. Of those three games, for the longest time, MegaMan was the constant. Double Dragon II was its series’ swansong for quite some time – arguably, it only recovered recently with Double Dragon Neon and Double Dragon IV. Likewise, Contra’s relevancy diminished significantly after the 16-bit era. MegaMan, on the other hand, managed to persevere. Not always in its original form, but for most of the Blue Bomber’s life, the franchise was the recipient of much love from the folks over at Capcom. There’s the more mature themes of the X series, the experimental 3D gameplay of the Legends series, the unique RPG spin of Battle Network, my beloved MegaMan Zero quadrilogy, the woefully incomplete ZX and the profoundly underrated Star Force franchise. As far as I’m concerned, Capcom got it right the first time: I still maintain that the “Classic” MegaMan is the best of the bunch, offering what may very well be the purest take on run-and-gun platforming action in video game history. While the series has obviously seen much better days – what with the present 7-year hiatus, multiple cancelled titles and only a disappointing spiritual successor to show for it – sometimes it’s better to just dwell on the past and try to remember the good times.

In honor of the franchise’s 30th year, I’ve decided to go ahead and dedicate a retrospective to MegaMan, specifically the aforementioned “Classic” series. Chances are I will revisit other sub-franchises down the line in future Retrospectives, but this seems like as good a place as any to get started: at the beginning. As with the Retrospective on Ys, I won’t necessarily be handling this in chronological release order, at least not in the pure sense that I ordered the various listings in the first two retrospective articles. Given just how long the series has gone on – not to mention my experience with the games in question – I’ve decided to split this article into four separate ones. This first one will cover the first 3 games, all originally released on the Nintendo Entertainment System. Of course, this time around, I’ll include broader takes on my opinions regarding the various facets of each of these games, as opposed to the generalized reviews I did in previous articles. After all, the original MegaMan series may very well be the video game series I’m the most well-versed in, so it’s only fitting that I accompany each game’s analysis with my own personal thoughts on their various facets.

Likewise, I’ve also decided to cover an assortment of various minor titles: remakes, spinoffs and the like. Now, this list won’t be complete by any means, but I’ll try to hit as many traditional-style MegaMan games as I can possibly remember – and maybe even some that most people wouldn’t even bother with. These will also be split across all four articles, just to keep things a bit light and to allow me to discuss these various offshoots. Of course, that means that I’ll be skipping out on spinoffs like MegaMan’s Soccer, MegaMan: Battle and Chase, Super Adventure Rockman and Wily and Light’s RockBoard: That’s Paradise, but I think those are fair omissions. This time, I’ll be discussing MegaMan: The Wily Wars – fitting given that it’s a remade compilation of the three mainline games I’ll be covering in this article – as well as the two IBM PC games Capcom licensed through Hi-Tech Expressions, arguably the evilest company that ever lived.

Also, given the fact that this is a video game blog, I’ll be skipping over the various adaptations, but I feel like giving a couple of them some proper shout-outs regardless: the cheesy 1990’s cartoon show from Ruby-Spears Production, as well as the brilliant but woefully short-lived comic from Archie were among my favorite takes on the world of MegaMan. Having said that, there may be times where I make references to various other media that MegaMan has inhabited, but I’ll try to keep them to a minimum. So, with all the introductions out of the way, let’s get equipped with some Bubble Lead and get started with this celebration of 30 years since the Blue Bomber first appeared.

MegaMan

Ironically, the first MegaMan game was the second game in the series I’d ever encountered. That friend of mine I mentioned at the beginning of the article? He managed to get his hands on the first game during one of his usual trading binges. It didn’t end up staying in his collection for too long, so my childhood memories of the game are fuzzy at best, and it doesn’t help that they were mostly passive experiences. I’m sure many of you know that feeling, of being at a friend’s house when he’s obsessed with a brand-new single-player game and you’re just essentially sitting there, waiting and watching: hoping for a turn that you know, deep down, will never come. I don’t think I got to sit down and actually play the original MegaMan until many years later, when I really started getting into the series on my own terms. I’ve just always thought it was funny that the original MegaMan, the game that started it all, just barely came out within a month from the day I was born. Maybe I was just destined to love the series because of that odd coincidence. Granted, it does seem like a fair amount of series that I love even to this day – Ys, Street Fighter, even Double Dragon and Contra! – all seemed to start the year before I born. Funny how that worked out for me.

Before we get into the game itself, I feel like mentioning some random trivia about the first game and its development. It’s been long asserted that it was originally meant to be a licensed title featuring Astro Boy (better known as “Tetsuwan Atom” in Japan), but I haven’t been able to track down any concrete evidence supporting this. Regardless, Classic MegaMan in general appears to draw a lot of inspiration from Osamu Tezuka’s classic anime and manga, so it’s only fair that many people would take this rumor as gospel. Likewise, the character was originally named “Rainbowman” – likely due to the fact that he changed colors depending on which weapon he had equipped – but this was soundly rejected due to copyright issues, likely due to the live-action superhero of the same name, created by Toho over a decade prior. They would end up settling on “Rockman”, which would supposedly also find copyright issues elsewhere – considering it’s the name of a series of headphone amplifiers – so the name would be changed to “Mega Man” elsewhere, though Capcom’s then-Consumer Products Division President Joseph Morici asserts that the name was changed because he thought the name was terrible, and that Mega Man would be more appealing to US audiences.

The game’s story is simple, but appealing. In the far-flung year of 200X – which was still fairly far off back in 1987, to be fair – advances in the field of robotics have revolutionized society, allowing humanity to enter a new golden age. Roboticist Dr. Thomas Light is at the forefront of the field, having just created eight highly intelligent robots. Among these were Cutman, built for logging; Gutsman, a construction robot with incredible strength; Iceman, whose resistance to low temperatures made him a suitable choice for exploring arctic territories; Bombman, a demolition robot and expert with explosives; Fireman, built to incinerate trash and Elecman, designed to help maintain electrical plants. However, a former colleague of Light’s, Dr. Albert Wily grew jealous of Light’s fame and glory and reprogrammed these six robots, with world domination as his end goal. Wily would leave behind Light’s earliest robots – Rock, Light’s lab assistant and Roll, a housekeeping robot – feeling that they weren’t worth reprogramming. Feeling a strong sense of justice – God, I love that line – Rock volunteers to be modified into a super fighting robot, to stop the evil machinations of Dr. Wily. Thus, MegaMan is born.

Of course, as was the case with many games of this era, the English story for MegaMan took more than its fair share of liberties with the original Japanese story. For starters, while the setting in Rockman is unnamed, Capcom USA chose to christen the game’s setting “Monsteropolis”. Likewise, Rock and Roll’s origin story was nixed, with Rock always being referred to as “Mega Man”, to the extent where rather than being dismissed by Wily, he outright resisted being reprogrammed. Of course, the most important difference between the original Japanese and Western backstories would have to be Dr. Wily’s role prior to the game’s story. While he was merely a rival scientist in the original Japanese version, the American version out right states that he was originally Dr. Light’s assistant, before going rouge. While I’m not particularly a fan of the other changes, this one always made more sense to me: it added to Wily’s motivations and what better way to reprogram your rival’s robots than from right under his nose? Apparently, I’m not alone either – this particular plot point was used as recently as Archie’s adaptation of the original Mega Man storyline. Other takes that go for authenticity with regards to the original Japanese backstory have a tendency to gloss over how the bad doctor manages to get his hands on Light’s robots, skipping those events in most cases.

MM1-01

I’m still not entirely sure what this stage was supposed to be.

The original MegaMan is the perfect example of what I like to see in the first game in any new franchise: a perfect example of a “diamond in the rough”. The base mechanics are all there, but clearly, they’re going to need some refinement before they reach their full potential. For those of you that have never played a MegaMan game before – which, I’m kind of surprised you’re reading this article – I’ve heard its gameplay best describe in three words: jump and shoot. Taking the qualities of both traditional platformers like Super Mario Bros. and “run-and-gun” games, players guide MegaMan through a stage, vaulting over obstacles and blasting enemies to progress. Each stage ends with a boss fight, as was the style at the time. There are also a number of power-ups to collect: extra lives take the form of MegaMan’s face and both health and weapon energy power-ups, in both small and large varieties. Of course, the larger ones give off more energy, but the small ones are better than nothing. Capcom even threw in a reference to some of their earlier games, in the form of the Yashichi – an icon that originated as an enemy in Capcom’s first title Vulgus – which restores all of MegaMan’s health, energy for all the weapons and is worth a staggering one million points.

MegaMan also brought some unique features to the table as well. You’re allowed to tackle the first six stages in the game in whatever order you choose. The real appeal of this game is what you get after you defeat each boss. After you defeat each of the first six bosses, you get their weapons. Each boss is also weak to a specific weapon, leading to a sort of “rock-paper-scissors” strategy when dealing with the more difficult bosses. Of course, freedom is the name of the game – you can also choose to avoid using boss weaknesses if you prefer a challenge. Both of these features would become franchise staples and would come to define MegaMan as a whole. Weapons could be switched via the pause menu, accessed by hitting the Start button. This would bring up a menu box on the left-hand side of the screen, which would bring up a number of letters and energy meters, each corresponding to the bosses that were defeated thus far – for example, “C” for Cutman – though MegaMan’s standard cannon is oddly identified with “P” and its corresponding energy meter represents his current health as opposed to remaining weapon energy.

MM1-02

I’m a bit rusty, but bomb beats rock, right?

Of course, the original MegaMan also had its own unique quirks, that emphasize the kind of early installment weirdness one comes to expect in the first game of a new series. For starters, the game keeps track of your score, which is entirely pointless: the score resets on a game over, the game doesn’t keep track of high scores and even if it did, the lack of a battery save would make that pointless anyway. Various power-ups also looked different from their equivalents in future games, not to mention there was one specific power-up that only had the effect of increasing your score, which would obviously be dropped in later entries. MegaMan could revisit stages, a feature that would only temporarily be dropped, but unlike future games, the boss would reappear at the end of the stage indefinitely. There’s also some weird physics issues that get ironed out in future games. Spikes are always an instant death, regardless of invincibility frames. Likewise, the game’s physics are a little different compared to future games: MegaMan’s walking is a bit more slippery, jump physics are normal even when underwater, and when the ground falls out from under him, MegaMan drops like a rock. Future games would tweak these weird quirks, but it’s important to keep in mind if it’s your first time playing the game. Of course, the difference on gameplay that had the largest impact was the infamous “pause trick”. By hitting Select, you could activate a secondary pause feature, one that didn’t have the menu. By spamming the Select button while an attack was on-screen, you could get multiple hits off a single shot with certain weapons. Easily abusable, but it takes a certain level of skill to pull off properly.

It’s impossible to fully discuss a MegaMan’s gameplay without discussing the weapons. The Plasma Cannon is MegaMan’s standard weapon, which allows for 3 shots to be on-screen at the same time. There’s also the Magnet Beam, which is less of a weapon and more of an “item”: allowing MegaMan to generate platforms of pure energy that he can walk along for a limited time before they dissipate. It’s stashed away in one of the initial six bosses’ stages, but is paramount to completing the game.

MM1-03

I will never understand why anyone started with Cutman.

The most important weapons are, of course, those you obtain by defeating bosses. I’ve decided that it seems worthwhile to rank each of them, based on my own personal preference. So, I’ll start with my favorite and work my way down. Number 1, in my opinion, would have to be the Fire Storm, which combines a damaging flame shot with a flame shield briefly surrounding MegaMan. Second best would obviously have to be the Electric Beam, which shoots three bolts of electricity directly in front of, above and below MegaMan. Most people tend to be torn on which one of these are their favorite, but usually one comes right after the other. They’re both obviously better than any other weapon in the game. Number three would have to be the Ice Slasher. The weapon doesn’t do damage for the most part, but it temporarily freezes non-boss enemies in place, defying gravity. It’s essentially a weapon that allows you to bypass obstacles, rather than destroying them.  Next, we have the Rolling Cutter, which is essentially a scissor blade that flies in a circular arc, slowly boomeranging back to the Blue Bomber (or would he be the Gray Garderner at this point?). It’s not a particularly useful weapon, but it essentially acts as an alternate aim compared to the standard plasma cannon, which can occasionally be useful when fighting specific enemies. Also, it kills Elecman in three solid hits, so it can’t be all bad. Moving on down to number five, we have Gutsman’s Super Arm. It has good range, solid aim and awesome damage, but it’s all ruined by one simple fact: it’s extremely situational. You can only get any real mileage out of this weapon by finding special destructible blocks that flash when you’re right next to them and have the Super Arm equipped. Kind of a letdown compared to the original version of the attack, where Gutsman can literally stomp blocks out of the sky into his massive arms. Finally, we come to the worst weapon in the game, and it’s obviously the Hyper Bomb. One might expect that the Super Arm’s uselessness couldn’t be topped, but the Hyper Bomb manages to achieve that impressive feat in mediocrity. To summarize, MegaMan throws a representation of the archetypical cartoon bomb at an awkward arc, bouncing two times upon hitting the ground (three times if you use in while jumping!) and standing still for a few seconds before detonating with a moderately-sized explosion. It does decent damage to standard enemies, but it’s too difficult to hit any of them reliably with this thing.

The game’s graphical style is fairly simple, but stylized – effectively going for a super-deformed “chibi” look, befitting the NES’s graphical limitation. There’s really not that much to talk about with regards to the graphics of the first six games: after all, they effectively maintain the same style throughout, even recycling graphics with minor updates and tweaks across titles. The graphics were clearly at their roughest during the first game, which is to be expected. Many of the original MegaMan’s unique enemies have less of an edge to them when compared to future installments, both those unique to this game and those that would eventually become series staples. The Sniper Joe, for example, looks much doughier and less threatening than future incarnations. The Metool – you know, those little hardhat guys – would closely resemble its more traditional incarnations, though lacking the feet that would become a signature trait in its design and having a far more sedate expression on its face. In general, most of the common enemy designs are a lot more abstract than those from future titles in the series, giving the original MegaMan a sort of retroactive individuality compared to future titles. Likewise, many graphical conventions typical of the series had yet to be established: the stage select consisted of full body shots of each of the Robot Masters, as opposed to mugshots. Likewise, instead of empty boxes denoted cleared stages, the backgrounds would change: yellow signifies that the boss had yet to be defeated, while black specifies that the stage has previously been cleared. Even Dr. Wily’s trademark saucer looks different, even sporting a unique red and gold palette, as opposed to the more traditional blue and gold.

MM1-04

I think this might actually be the most visually appealing segment in the game.

Of course, no discussion of any MegaMan game is complete without discussing its soundtrack – these games aren’t called “Rockman” in their home country for nothing! After all, the MegaMan series in general are often renowned for their soundtracks, which have given us many memorable themes in general. The game’s soundtrack was composed by Manami Matsumae and programmed by Yoshihiro Sakaguchi, going by the respective pseudonyms of “Chanchacorin Manami” and “Yuukichan’s Papa”, as staff members in video games at the time were forced to credit themselves under false names to prevent gaining any sort of fanbase or following as individuals. While it differed from future titles in many significant ways, the original MegaMan firmly established the entire franchise’s tendency towards catchy, memorable songs. In fact, many of the franchise’s most iconic musical pieces originated in this game: most notably the jingle that play when a stage is selected. The music that plays on Cutman’s stage is one of the musical pieces best associated with the series as a whole. My personal favorite would have to be Fireman’s theme, an upbeat theme with a mechanical percussion sound that evokes the sound of crackling metal, fitting perfectly with the incinerator it accompanies. MegaMan 1’s boss themes are also both catchy, yet they both evoke different emotions: the standard boss theme is far more manic, exemplifying the deadly struggle between MegaMan and his former comrades at arms, while the theme reserved for the bosses fought in Dr. Wily’s robot factory evokes a sense of foreboding and despair, that perhaps the struggle at hand is truly impossible to overcome. The soundtrack has a much lighter sound compared to future titles, but that may just be because this was the first game Capcom had developed specifically for the NES (and home consoles in general), as Capcom’s developers would likely be unfamiliar with designing a game with that hardware specifically in mind.

With regards to the rest of the series, there tends to be an unspoken agreement among fans with regards to the first MegaMan: it’s generally considered the weakest game in the entire series, but due to its overall importance – not to mention the advantages that future installments building on its solid foundation – it’s rarely referred to as such. This phenomenon isn’t unique to the MegaMan franchise, but it is generally important to keep in mind. However, the first game does manage to win out, especially when compared to various other franchises from the same company. After all, Capcom didn’t even acknowledge the existence of the original Street Fighter until it became customary to celebrate video game anniversaries. The original MegaMan, despite all of its issues and flaws, was never really cast aside or forgotten. It was a bold experiment and ended up giving Capcom one of its most recognizable “mascots” (though, they never seem to recognize the concept) and one of video gaming’s most beloved icons. Given the ubiquity of the game, not to mention the fact that it’s generally packaged with other games in the series, I’d definitely say it’s worth playing, if only as a curiosity. After all, I’d generally consider knowledge of a game’s roots to be important, and despite the myriad of differences compared to future installments, there are more than enough similarities to prevent any sort of confusion. To those just getting into the series, however, I’d suggest playing one of its sequels beforehand, as the first game is among the hardest games in the entire franchise.

MegaMan 2

I don’t really know how to discuss my history with the second MegaMan game: after all, what hasn’t been said? It contributed a vast amount to my love of video games as a whole, it was the first MegaMan game I ever encountered and while it’s not my favorite game in the franchise, I can at least acknowledge why it is generally considered to be the best game in the entire series. Hell, I got way more playtime on this one when I was a mere Icepicklet compared to the first game, but that’s not really that much of an achievement all things considered. I beat a few bosses, got my grubby little hands on a few boss weapons and I was absolutely hooked on the franchise, even with my access to it was essentially blocked off for a number of years following. Regardless, while this game will always occupy a very special place in my heart, MegaMan 2 – subtitled “The Mystery of Dr. Wily” in Japan – has definitely been far outstripped by a fair share of its successors – more on that later. Of course, not prostrating before the 1988 classic as the absolute apex of what the Classic MegaMan series could hope to offer always struck me as a little weird. In the end, having future titles surpass this beloved game strikes me as an ideal scenario: after all, what’s the point in continuing a series that peaked as early as the second game?

The original MegaMan wasn’t a run-away hit in any region, but it did manage to sell well enough in both Japan and North America to warrant a sequel. Keiji Inafune, long-time steward of the franchise, blamed the poor sales of the first game in the latter region due to its infamous box art, literally drawn in six hours with no reference material. MegaMan 2 incorporated various concepts and content that was left out of the original game, and while the majority of the staff from the first game returned to develop the second, they were assigned to other projects in the interim, only allowed to work on MM2 in their spare time. Akira Kitamura, the director for the first two games in the series, wanted to incorporate a greater amount of fan feedback into this game, compared to the first game which was an internal affair. As such, they held a contest for fans to submit their own concepts for boss characters, something that would become a staple for throughout the series history. Capcom received a whopping 8,370 submissions, but only 8 ended up making it into the final product, with major tweaks made to the designs that ended up being accepted. Of course, it all ended up being worth it: MegaMan 2 is the top-selling game in the franchise to this day, moving roughly 1.5 million units, cementing MegaMan’s place as a beloved video game icon.

MM2-02

This area just always stuck out to me.

One year after MegaMan put an end to the evil machinations of Dr. Wily, the not-so-good doctor returns, setting his sights on world domination once again. This time, however, Wily has built eight combat robots all his own to defeat MegaMan. These robots include Metalman, designed as an improvement over Cutman, wielding razor-sharp saw blades; Airman, a robot with a giant fan capable of generating typhoons built directly into his torso; Bubbleman, an aquatic robot resembling a frogman, designed strictly for underwater combat; Quickman, a robot capable of moving at supersonic speeds based loosely on Elecman’s design; Crashman, a combat robot wielding time-bomb explosives with design elements taken from both Bombman and Gutsman; Flashman, a robot capable of temporarily stopping time, freezing his opponents in place; Heatman, an improvement on Fireman’s design, built to resemble a Zippo lighter, providing extra protection against high temperatures and Woodman, a defensive robot built mostly out of wood. Wily himself has taken refuge within a castle lined with a skull motif.

The gameplay is mostly unchanged from the first game: pick from eight stages, beat the boss, take his weapon, rinse, repeat. The fact that the game has beefed up its initial roster of stages from six to eight, which would become the standard for the series. Fun fact there: apparently, MM1 was originally intended to have eight bosses itself, but it was pared down to six due to time constraints. So, it was less that MM2 was adding content, rather it was finally delivering on the original concept. Those physics issues I mentioned from the first game? All changed, leading to the general engine that the series would follow for years to come. MegaMan 2 also added a new power-up: the Energy Tanks, an item that could completely restore MegaMan’s health. Better still, they were added to MegaMan’s inventory, so they could be used at any point. You can, however, only carry four E-Tanks at a time and you lose any that you were carrying on a Game Over. The superfluous score system was removed, it didn’t serve any actual purpose in the first game after all. MM2 also began the trend of coupling the support items with specific weapons, as opposed to hiding them within the stages themselves. MM2 is also fairly unique in the sense that it’s the only game without an obvious “perfect cycle” of boss weaknesses.

MM2-03

This was always a fun boss fight.

Perhaps the most significant addition MM2 made over the original game was the addition of the password system. The original MegaMan was a “one-session” game: if you needed to take a break, you either had to finish it in a single shot or you had to leave your system on while taking breaks and pray that nothing changed that fact before you got back to it. While a battery save would’ve made things even easier, it’s better than nothing. Best of all, passwords even keep track the number of E-Tanks you have left. Besides, the password jingles in many of the MegaMan games are among my favorites in the series – especially the one from MM2 – so it worked out pretty well for me in the long run. The Western releases also added a difficulty setting, that was somewhat misleading: the “Difficult” option had the balancing from the original Rockman 2, while “Normal” doubled the damage MegaMan could inflict on …well, everything. These days, I only play on “Difficult”, but adding that easier difficulty (and not dubbing it “easy mode”) was a brilliant move on Capcom USA’s part: I probably never would’ve gotten into the series back when I was 4 or 5 if I’d only had the original difficulty as an option.

That being said, let’s move onto the fun part: ranking the weapons. MegaMan’s trusty Plasma Cannon returns unchanged from the first game. The Magnet Beam gets retired, in exchange for three new support items. These three items were devised as a response to feedback from both customers and Capcom’s marketing team regarding the first game’s difficulty. Item-1 is a platform with a propeller on its bottom that stays in place for a brief period before disintegrating; Item-2 is a rocket sled that propels MegaMan forward until its weapon energy dissipates; and Item-3 crawls up the first wall it collides with, draining energy until MegaMan jumps off of it and it begins descending towards the ground. These support items are collected by beating Heatman, Airman and Flashman respectively, and while they mainly factor into the later Wily Castle stages, they allow MegaMan to reach otherwise unreachable powerups in the earlier stages as well.

MM2-01

Everyone’s favorite!

With those out of the way, let’s get on with the weapons, once again, going from best to worst. Obviously, the crème de le crème is the Metal Blade, it literally couldn’t be anything else. Generally considered the best weapon in MegaMan history, this thing is broken. Low energy consumption, 8-way aiming and hits harder than your standard buster. Not to mention the fact that it’s often a better option for fighting most bosses than their official weaknesses. It’s so overpowered, I legitimately save Metalman for last in many of my more recent playthroughs, just to get a feel for the other weapons. The next best weapon would have to be the Leaf Shield. Often imitated, never duplicated, the Leaf Shield surrounds MegaMan with a barrier of 4 indestructible leaves. Hitting a direction on the D-Pad, even to move forward, sends the leaves flying in that direction, doing massive damage, but I always found that the weapon works best while standing completely still. Number three would have to be the Crash Bomber. While its best use is destroying destructible walls, the Crash Bomber also does some awesome damage, making it a multi-purpose powerhouse and an extreme improvement over the Hyper Bomb. Then there’s the Quick Boomerang: a short-range attack capable of extreme rapid fire, and perhaps the weapon with the most weaknesses in the later stages. I never really had much love for this thing, considering I’d always go after Quickman last, but it’s still good. Next comes the Atomic Fire, which can be best described as the predecessor to the Mega Buster – more on that later – it fires off a weak fiery shot, but if you hold down the shoot button, it can be charged up into a giant fireball of destruction, albeit at a steep weapon energy cost. Number six is probably the Bubble Lead –I never knew whether it’s pronounced like “reed” or “red”, both make sense honestly, but I always went with the latter. Generally considered the joke weapon of MM2 – I mean, come on, it’s a bubble – it’s actually better than you’d expect, especially around the end of the game. Next comes Flashman’s Time Stopper. I used to love that thing when I was a kid, but once I got actually experience with it, its flaws became apparent. While it freezes enemies and obstacles in place for the duration of the attack, some things aren’t easy to avoid while in this state. As MegaMan lacks any other form of attack while the Time Stopper’s active, it’s impossible to destroy any enemies that are both frozen in place and too large to jump over. Of course, that leaves the Air Shooter as the worst weapon in MM2. It fires at an awkward angle, a lot of enemies are immune to it, it’s basically only useful for beating Crashman and those terrible Sniper Armors. Otherwise, it’s best to just stick with the Plasma Cannon.

As I mentioned earlier, the game’s artstyle doesn’t really vary all that much from the first game – after all, the main character’s graphics are ripped directly from it. At best, we’re essentially looking at a refinement of the first game’s look. The backgrounds are more detailed, the new enemies are more cohesive in style, and the bosses themselves actually seem a little more animated than their predecessors. The major difference between the two games focuses more on presentation. While the title screen in the first game was just a still image – either the “MegaMan” logo on a black screen or a static image of MegaMan with the Rockman logo above it, depending on region – MM2 greets players with an animated cutscene, detailing the game’s backstory. The bosses are represented by unique mugshots, as opposed to the static sprites of the previous game. Transitions between menus, the stage select and even the screen signifying that a stage has been chosen are all animated smoothly. Defeating one of the eight robot masters is accompanied by a new screen that would become a series staple, detailing the name of the weapon MegaMan got from them, showcasing the color palette associated with it and allowing Dr. Light to chime in when the support items get unlocked. The game’s pause menu is mostly similar to that of the previous game, a floating menu box on the left-hand side of the screen, but it’s been expanded with a second “page” to accommodate the larger array of weapons and items available to MegaMan in this game. Perhaps the most impressive transition in the game is when you reach Skull Castle. At the beginning of each of the Wily Fortress stage, an exterior view of the castle is shown, accompanied by a sinister melody. Then, a simple map of the castle’s interior is displayed on screen, detailing the progress MegaMan has made so far. By no means the most complex way they could’ve done it, but there’s just something so satisfying about that whole sequence. It’s completely understandable why it would become another common element of the Classic series.

MM2-04

Kind of impressive how all these crystals can withstand an explosion.

MegaMan 2’s soundtrack was composed by Takashi “Ogeretsu Kun” Tateishi, though Manami Matsumae (credited as “Manami Ietel” this time) did provide minor support as well. Yoshihiro Sakaguchi also returned as sound programmer. MM2’s soundtrack is generally considered an improvement over that of the first game’s, and I’m inclined to agree. One of my favorite elements of the game’s soundtrack is one that I wouldn’t find out until I actually got to sit down and play through the first game: the song that plays during MegaMan 2’s opening is essentially a reprise of the song that played during MegaMan 1’s ending. An obvious statement, but somehow, even though I’ve known about it for years now, it still impresses me. It’s hard to really choose my favorite song from this game, though I often lean toward the Crashman stage theme. The themes from Heatman, Woodman, Airman and Bubbleman’s stage are also pretty good. I already mentioned the Password jingle, but it definitely deserves high praise. The stage select music goes for a far more intimidating and upbeat tone – an objective improvement over the first game’s. The title theme and the credits are both variants on the same composition and deserve their place as MegaMan’s most commonly recurring theme. Of course, the most popular song in the entire game is easily the first theme from the Wily Stages, a song which I personally believe is required by law to be in every single MegaMan music remix album. I used to be a big fan of it myself, but as they say, familiarity breeds contempt. Honestly, it’s still a good song, just a little overrated in my opinion. The rest of MM2’s soundtrack deserves way more love.

MegaMan 2 is considered by many to be the quintessential MegaMan game and for good reason. While I won’t contest the game’s importance, I’ll just restate that I think later games in the series improved upon the framework provided by MM2. Having said that, for anyone just getting into the Classic MegaMan franchise – or even MegaMan in general – there’s no better place to start than the second game in the franchise. MM2 smooths out the odd quirks present in the first game, while keeping the base gameplay equally barebones. It’s a good place to learn the rules – and perhaps more importantly, the feel – of the standard MegaMan game. The fact that the Western releases also include an easier difficulty can also help those new to the series get their bearings, which in turn, may help to spark a new love for the series. Again, as with all the other NES MegaMan games, it’s easy to find these days, even on modern platforms, so I’d recommend giving it a shot. Who knows? Maybe it’ll spark a love for the MegaMan series in you just like I did roughly 25 years ago. Unsurprisingly, MM2 is also the most popular game in the entire MegaMan franchise when it comes to modding, as there are an impressive number of hacks of this game, completely changing stage layouts, boss patterns and even the weapons themselves. So, for even those that have memorized MM2 front to back, there are entirely new ways to play this NES classic.

MegaMan 3

After MegaMan 2, I didn’t really keep up with the series as much as I would’ve wanted to. The friend who first introduced me to them didn’t grab any more NES games after the first two – by that point, we were both way more into his new Genesis – so, for quite some time, I didn’t even know there were any games beyond the first two. I ended up discovering the existence of the third through sixth games when I first found my way onto the World Wide Web itself. Though I was still quite young when I first got my hands on the internet, I was still struck with pangs of nostalgia and curiosity for the MegaMan series I’d enjoyed roughly half a lifetime ago. Granted, four years isn’t that long in retrospect, but it was long enough at that age. My first experience with any of those four games came from sprite sheets, sprite sheets that I moronically printed out instead of saving them to the hard disk. Oh, what a fool I was! Oh well, at least I got some nifty decorations for my school folders and notebooks out of all those drained ink cartridges. All the same, it was definitely not the ideal way to discover that my favorite game series had tripled in size from my perspective, but an important revelation all the same.

Of the NES MegaMan games, I generally consider the third to be my favorite. For quite some time, it was my favorite in the series overall. These aren’t exactly unique opinions. If a Classic MegaMan fan’s favorite game in the series isn’t MegaMan 2, chances are it’s going to be MM3. In that sense, MegaMan clearly follows that trend that you’ll often see in long-running video game franchises: if there’s one game that’s generally considered to be the objective in the series, expect a faction of fans that disagrees and chooses a specific alternate game as their favorite. Maybe it’s a way to establish a higher sense of devotion to the franchise in question, or maybe we’re all just a bunch of colossal hipsters. For whatever reason, after replaying both MegaMans 2 and 3 so many times, I still prefer 3. The way I’ve always looked at it is that 2 is the better NES game, but 3 is the better MegaMan game. That probably doesn’t make much sense, but that’s the best I’ve ever been able to articulate my opinion.

MegaMan 3 – boasting the subtitle “The End of Dr. Wily!?” in its original Japanese release – was the first game in the series where the man long considered the “father of MegaMan” Keiji Inafune took on a planning role in a MegaMan game. Akira Kitamura, the director of the first two MegaMan games, had just left to form his own company Takeru alongside various other former developers from large Japanese developers, including Capcom. As such, Inafune had a much greater role in MM3 compared to previous games. Having said that, Inafune considers MM3 to be a disappointment, likely due to the loss of key staff members during development, leading to a game that clearly falls short of its own lofty aspirations. The game itself is fairly glitchy at times, especially with regards to accessing the pause menu in certain areas. Likewise, the game itself has an odd array of cheat codes: high jumping, slow motion and the infamous “Zombie MegaMan” glitch, which renders the Blue Bomber invincible at zero health, but unable to use his standard weapon. My theory is that these were simply debug functions that the development team didn’t have the time to remove for the final release. While I love MM3, I have to admit it makes me sad to think about what this game could have been with a longer development cycle, being brought to completion. Perhaps the final product could have even surpassed MM2 in the hearts of gamers in general. Regardless, the game did fairly well: selling over 1 million copies and is still the 4th highest selling game in the entire MegaMan franchise to this day. Likewise, the game had significantly more boss submissions from fans compared to the previous game, boasting 50,000 in all, while again only eight ended up being used.

MM3-03

Unbeknownst to Rock, Breakman is actually his older brother, Blues.

After two failed attempts at world domination, Dr. Wily is a changed man. He’s reformed and has decided to join forces with his colleague Dr. Light to develop a giant peace-keeping robot named Gamma. The two worked hard designing the robot, with the final step being to collect eight different Energy Elements from various uncharted planets. The two doctors created a set of eight new robot masters to set off to these mining worlds and collect the power crystals. Unfortunately, these new robots all end up going haywire, attacking everything in their sights. MegaMan is once again enlisted to travel to these distant worlds and recover the elements. But he’s not alone, Dr. Light has built a new companion robot to accompany MegaMan on his mission: Rush, a robotic dog that can transform into a springboard and more. Throughout his journey, MegaMan continuously encounters a mysterious red robot who seems to be an even match for the Blue Bomber. Referring to himself as “Break Man”, is he friend or foe? And what about the robots gone berserk? Did they really just go haywire at random or was their sudden defection just the beginning of a new sinister plot?

As I said earlier, much of MegaMan’s gameplay was refined in the second game. As such, for the most part, MegaMan 3 is more of the same. There are, however, a few new wrinkles. For starters, MegaMan gains the ability to slide, which can allow him to pass under areas blocked off with low ceilings and even dodge certain enemies and their attacks. I’ve always mused that I wished that MM1 had incorporate passwords and I feel the same about MM2 and sliding – it just adds a new dimension to the Blue Bomber’s repertoire. Energy Tanks are now retained between continues and now MegaMan can hold a whopping 9 of them at a time. There’s also the brand new “? Cans”, which only appear in this game. They can be shot to reveal a random power-up, ranging from a small weapon energy all the way up to extra lives and E-Tanks. An interesting little gimmick, but one that never really caught on. You’ll also remember that I said MM2 didn’t have a perfect loop for boss weaknesses. Well, MM3 makes up for this shortcoming by having two individual weakness cycles: Magnetman – Hardman – Topman – Shadowman – Sparkman and Needleman – Snakeman – Geminiman. Crazy stuff, right? The game’s format has also been slightly adjusted. For example, in addition to the standard boss fights with the Robot Masters, MegaMan also has encounters with “Breakman” during four of the game’s stages – three of these lead to miniboss fights, while the fourth time, he simply allows MegaMan to proceed through the stage.

MM3-01

But where’s the jump?

Likewise, MegaMan 3 has many more stages than the previous two games, which works to both its advantage and its detriment. After defeating the 8 Robot Masters, four new stages, utilizing the art assets and themes of Shadowman, Sparkman, Geminiman and Needleman, pop up, each guarded by the maniacal “Doc Robot”. Fun fact: “Doc Robot” is just a mistranslation of “dokurobotto”, a pun on “dokuro”, the Japanese word for skull, and “robot”. Doc Robot utilizes the powers of all 8 Robot Masters from MM2, though only uses one at a time. As such, you fight him twice in each stage, and each time he uses a different ability. After that, MegaMan has one last showdown with Breakman in what appears to be the remnants of Hardman’s stage. After that, we enter Wily’s latest iteration on the Skull Castle, for a whopping 6 stages. While the Doc Robot stages may be among the hardest the game has to offer, the Wily Fortress stages are laughable at best. This is what I was referring to when I said having more stages had drawbacks for MM3. Likely due to the game’s troubled production schedule, the Wily Castle stages feel incomplete and simpler than anything that came earlier in the game as a result. It gets so bad, that the final two “stages” are literally just a screen filled with power-ups before the boss fight. I kind of wish that Capcom would’ve been able to remake this one and put some actual effort into redesigning the Wily stages into something truly memorable, as this is probably the game’s true fatal flaw.

This brings us to my favorite part yet again: talking about the game’s arsenal. MegaMan’s trusty Plasma Cannon makes a return as his standard weapon, but that’s the only thing that returns from previous games. The support items from the previous game have all been replaced with various functions of the Blue Bomber’s new canine companion, Rush. Rush Coil is available from the start and transforms MegaMan’s poochy pal into a springboard, significantly increasing MM’s jumping height, allowing him to reach areas previously unheard of without assistance. Defeating Shadowman nets MegaMan the Rush Marine, which turns the crimson canine into a tiny submersible, able to navigate watery areas with ease. Finally, defeating Needleman allows MegaMan access to the Rush Jet, which I consider the “Metal Blade of support items”. When activated, Rush transforms into a fully-controllable rocket sled, capable of flying anywhere onscreen with absolutely no drawbacks. Of course, the Coil drains energy on each use, and both the Marine and the Jet drain energy while being used, but most people have found an exploit for the latter: the Rush Jet only depletes energy while MegaMan is standing on it, but he can jump at will while riding it, which slows the energy drain and Rush continues to fly beneath you even as you jump.

MM3-02

Such a ridiculous power-up.

With those out of the way, let’s start ranking those weapons. I originally considered shifting the order to worst to best for a few of these, but I decided that consistency was key here, even if it made things a little boring. My top pick for MegaMan 3 would have to be the Needle Cannon. It’s pretty similar to Mega’s standard weapon, with one clear advantage: rapid auto-fire. Its energy consumption is the lowest in the game too, which just adds to the fun. Number 2 would have to be Hard Knuckle. A slow-moving non-explosive take on the Crash Bomber, this fist-shaped projectile can smash through breakable walls, does massive damage and its vertical aim can even be adjusted after it’s been fired. Next up would have to be the Shadow Blade. Charitably described as a cross between the Rolling Cutter and the Metal Blade, in reality it’s just the Metal Blade tethered with boomerang mechanics and being limited to a 5-way aim. Still, despite the balancing, it’s a pretty good weapon. My fourth favorite weapon is probably the Magnet Missile. It’s essentially a standard projectile, but if it’s not aimed properly and it approaches an enemy, it can turn either up or down to lock in on and attack it. Then, there’s the Search Snake. Effectively a weaker Bubble Lead, it makes up for this shortcoming by allowing three snakes onscreen at once, compared to the two-bubble maximum. Sixth best weapon is the Spark Shock, which is functionally identical to the Ice Slasher, except it can only stun up to two enemies at a time, and there are more enemies that actually take damage from it. Second-worst weapon is easily the Gemini Laser, though I wish I could put it lower. The Gemini Laser is a slow-moving laser beam, that can bounce off of walls and ceiling, which changes the trajectory of the act. There can only be one on the screen at a time, and if its aim is off, it will ricochet multiple times, leaving MegaMan defenseless. The worst weapon in MM3 is the Top Spin, but that’s only because it’s literally broken, and I’m not talking about in the overpowered sense. It does no consistent damage, its energy consumption is equally erratic, and it’s a melee-range attack that can only be done while jumping. While I’ve seen more than a few speedrunners use the Top Spin to turn the Blue Bomber into a whirling dervish of destruction, it takes too much effort and luck to use it properly. The only upshot is that it’s the final boss’s weakness – capable of felling the beast in a single hit, if you’re lucky – but frankly, I’m not even sure if that was intentional, a glitch or just an exploit the developers accidentally left in the game.

MM3-04

Spin on, you crazy diamond.

Much like the gameplay itself, the series’ graphical style had pretty much been established in MM2, but 3 attempts to add its own flourishes, again with mixed results. Later games in the series would attempt to expand on the style established in the second game, and MM3 was a first, albeit shaky step in that direction. Stage backgrounds seem a little more complex than those from previous games, though many of them evoke similar themes to its direct predecessor. I do like how they gave MegaMan center square on the stage select, especially how his eyes move to follow the cursor. It’s a simple touch, but still appreciated. The pause menu also changes completely from the previous two games, take up the lower third of the screen, instead of just being a floating box off-centered. It maintains the “two page” format of the previous game, but it’s got a much more ornate layout. For starters, each weapon is now symbolized by two letters instead of one – likely due to the sheer amount of Robot Masters with names that start with the letter “S” – with the exception of the standard arm cannon, which retains “P” from previous games. Each special weapon also has its own unique icon when selected, which is a nice touch. Plus, the E-Tanks can be selected from either page now, while in MM2, they were limited to the second page. Unfortunately, the implementation of this fancy new UI was clearly imperfect, as there are numerous points in the game where the top edge of this menu will glitch up slightly. A shame, because otherwise, I thought it looked great.

The game’s presentation takes a hit in some areas too. This game lacks an opening cinematic, likely due to the game’s troubled production, but I’ve always sort of imagined that the epic tune that plays on the title screen implied that they considered one. MM3 does seem to do a much better job at expressing its story in what few cutscenes it does have, though these make me wonder if more were originally planned. And then there’s the ending, where Breakman returns to the collapsing Wily Fortress, too late to save Wily but just in time to save MegaMan. As Rock awakens in Dr. Light’s lab, the two wonder how he was able to make it back in one piece, when they both hear Breakman’s signature whistle. Dr. Light identifies the whistle as that of ProtoMan, MegaMan’s older brother and prototype, who mysteriously went missing. As MegaMan chases after the whistle, we see a notebook with entries for all of Light’s robots from newest to oldest. First the six robot masters from the original MegaMan, then Roll, then MegaMan and finally Protoman himself. This is definitely one of my favorite endings in the entire series.

It seems like the area where the game tried to deviate the most from its predecessors was in its soundtrack. The original composer for the game was Harumi “Mrs. Tarumi” Fujita, but she ended up giving birth fairly early into the project and was forced to drop out because of it. She did manage to compose the themes for Needleman and Geminiman, as well as part of the credits song before leaving though. The project was then picked up by Yasuaki Fujita – no relation – better known as “Bun Bun”. The MegaMan 3 soundtrack actually manages to avoid reusing any musical compositions from earlier games. The boss victory jingle established in MM2 – that would eventually become a trademark of the series – was eschewed. Even the jingle that plays when a stage is selected is completely original and the previous one was used in the first two MegaMan games. I have to say, overall, I think I like MM3’s soundtrack more than the previous two, and its sheer boldness in discarding tradition is a big reason why. While MM3 does a lot to set itself apart from its predecessors, it still manages to sound like a “MegaMan game”, if that makes any sense.

Another thing this game’s soundtrack does that I love is utilize two separate boss themes: one for most of the boss battles in the game and one exclusive to the Wily Fortress stages, just like in the first MegaMan. I would like to say that it’s difficult for me to choose a favorite song from this game, but if I’m going to be honest, the theme to Hardman’s theme is my clear favorite, without a doubt. That’s not to say I don’t love a majority of the songs from MegaMan 3: the aforementioned Needleman stage, Sparkman’s theme, Shadowman, both boss themes, the first two Wily Fortress stages and both the game’s ending and credits theme all come to mind quickly. All the same, MM3’s soundtrack deserves way more love than it gets – the sole exception would have to be the theme that plays when MegaMan gets a new weapon. That one actually managed to end up becoming something of a recurring theme. It’s a shame that the rest of the soundtrack doesn’t get nearly as much love.

In the end, I think the reason that I love this game is completely intertwined with its failings. It’s easy enough to understand why MM3 became the MegaMan game of choice for more contrarian fans: while its myriad troubles during production clearly took their toll on MegaMan 3, flickers – no pun intended – of the game’s true potential shine through. It’s a shame that Capcom gave up on remaking MegaMan games so quickly: MM3’s problems are so obvious and easy to fix, that a true remake – more akin to Powered Up, as opposed to the one found in The Wily Wars – could’ve brought the game up to the lofty standards associated with its predecessor, if not outright surpass it. All the same, it’s still a fun game, definitely well worth playing, regardless of its obvious flaws. Better still, since most people are only familiar with MegaMan 2, MegaMan 3 could act as an almost entirely new experience, for those out there who are only familiar with the most popular game, but still find themselves craving more action in the same vein. Many fans who consider MM2 the best series in the game recognize MM3 as the next best game in the franchise. If that’s not enough of an endorsement to give this game a shot, I don’t know what is.

MegaMan: The Wily Wars

Considering that I just discussed the first three MegaMan games, it only seems fitting to take a quick look at the first attempt at a MegaMan remake – one that encompassed all three of these games – and one that is a bit of a curiosity, especially in North America. MegaMan: The Wily Wars – or Rockman Megaworld as it was known in Japan – was also the first MegaMan game to be released on a non-Nintendo console, specifically for the Sega Mega Drive, or the Genesis as we Americans know it. I think the mysterious nature of the game in our region is what made it so much more intriguing to us in the first place. The prospect of enhanced remakes of the first three MegaMan games – the games in the series that are generally considered the best overall – and one that most Americans missed out on is a very tempting prospect. Unfortunately, it sounds much better than it actually is.

Originally released in 1994, The Wily Wars was outsourced to Minakuchi Engineering – the same team that worked on the vast majority of the Game Boy MegaMan games (more on those later) as well as large portions of MegaMan X3 – and it seems that they just couldn’t cope with the Mega Drive’s hardware. Of course, every other project I’ve seen attributed to them were on Nintendo platforms, so that makes sense. Keiji Inafune described the game’s development as an “absolute nightmare” and even stated that he had to help with the game’s debugging himself. Aside from that, Inafune’s involvement with the title was fairly limited: he designed the three new boss characters and drew a piece of artwork that was incorporated into the game’s box art. The new characters, dubbed the “Genesis Unit” (or the “Mega World Corps” in Japan) were based on characters from the Chinese novel, Journey of the West. Buster Rod G., Mega Water S. and Hyper Storm H. were based on Sun Wukong, Sha Wujing and Zhu Bajie. Of course, these same characters also inspired many other works, most notably Son Goku, Yamcha and Oolong in Dragon Ball.

WilyWars01

Power Pole, extend!

Of course, the question on everyone’s mind generally revolves around the game’s release. While there were physical releases in both Japan and Europe, The Wily Wars was exclusive to the Sega Channel service in North America. However, it does appear that there were originally plans to release the game properly in America as well. The success of Street Fighter II’: Special Championship Edition fueled the initial rumors of a MegaMan title hitting a Sega system. Sega of America even displayed the game at their Sega Summit sales meeting back in May 1994 Apparently, it was put on hold indefinitely due to “graphical problems” in October of the same year, and the game’s American release was officially cancelled in 1996. With that and the Sega Channel being discontinued in 1998, the American version appears to no longer exist in any form, official or illicit. I doubt there’s much difference between the American and European versions in terms of content, but it would’ve been nice to have an official release in English that ran at the proper NTSC speed. Of course, that could be achieved by playing the European version on an NTSC Genesis, using a Game Genie to bypass the region lock, but that just strikes me as being more trouble than it’s worth.

The game even manages to have an original backstory, despite being a compilation title. Tired of his schemes for world domination being foiled by MegaMan, Dr. Wily decides to build a time machine to undo the Blue Bomber’s earliest victories over the not-so-good doctor. Transporting himself into the past, Dr. Wily restores the robots that MegaMan previously defeated and started to create chaos across the timestream, aiming to cause chaos even in the peaceful past, before his megalomaniacal aspirations even begin. In order to stop Dr. Wily, Dr. Light manages to hastily build another time machine and sends MegaMan back to stop Wily’s twisted time tactic. Of course, even if the Blue Bomber manages to stop his plan, Wily has another trick up his sleeve in the present: three new robots he built to guard his new Wily Tower, a massive structure with traps and enemy robots taken from the past to ensure MegaMan has no future. Of course, the remade games retain their original storylines as well, but since I’ve already gone over them, it just seemed like it was worth detailing the new content instead.

WilyWars03

If you can’t handle me at my worst…

The gameplay is difficult to discuss. The simplest way to put it is that the remakes definitely play worse overall when compared to the original NES releases, while there are a few improvements as well. This is most evident when playing MegaMan 2, which gets hit the hardest with the Wily Wars’ flaws. The sole advantage this version has over the original is that now, E-Tanks are no longer lost when continuing, much like in MM3. On the other hand, the first and third games manage to get a few improvements out of the deal. MM1’s physics now align properly with those of later games in the series, which definitely makes the game feel less unfair at various points. Likewise, MegaMan 3’s presentation improves significantly and the Top Spin is no longer as glitchy as it used to be: now it deals consistent damage and all with a non-random energy expenditure. Of course, these benefits come at the cost of gameplay quirks like MM1’s pause trick and MM3’s various cheat codes and exploits – seems like a fair trade to me, in the end. I’ve been told that MegaMan 3 is more prone to locking up when compared to the original NES version, but aside from one instance – while I was using certain Game Genie codes, more on those later – I never experienced any game-breaking glitches. Likewise, the password system has been excised – replaced with a save system that works about equally well, saving data on all three games to a single file. Even MegaMan 1 gets this save functionality – definitely an improvement over having to beat the game in a single setting on the NES. The save feature does have its limitations, however: it will only recognize progress as far as reaching the Wily Castle stages, the Castles themselves must be completed in a single sitting. After completing any of the games, the system must be reset in some form in order to make it back: the game’s completion is confirmed with a giant “GAME CLEAR” written over the game’s page on the save file.

Unfortunately, there’s not much else positive to say about the remakes. Movement feels significantly more sluggish than the original NES games, especially the walk speed. What’s even worse is the weapons. The fire button’s response time is even slower than the movement, sometime weapons don’t come out on a single button press, and sometimes, it takes a while for fired shots to be considered inactive, even after they’re off-screen. Worst of all, the game won’t let you pause if there are any weapons or support items on-screen. For example, in the NES version of MM2, you could pause the game while using one of the support items, which would remove it and prevent you from draining precious energy on misfires. This is no longer possible in The Wily Wars, which means that shots must be planned carefully. As far as I can tell, Wily Wars also gets rid of the ability to aim the Super Arm weapon taken from Gutsman in MM1 – if it’s still possible, it certainly works completely differently than it did in the original. There’s also a significant change to the gameplay that significantly throws off the balance: the Robot Masters – and by extension, the Copy Robot bosses from MM1 and 3 – now have invincibility periods after taking damage (much like MegaMan himself), preventing the weapon spam possible on the NES. While this was common in later games, the games aren’t rebalanced for this new property. In turn, this has some strange effects on balance: between this and the inability to aim the Super Arm, Cutman, of all things, becomes incredibly threatening. Strangely, no other bosses appear to be affected by this change.

WilyWars04

…you don’t deserve me at my best.

Perhaps the worst aspect of The Wily Wars would have to be the slowdown. The early MegaMan games pushed Capcom’s limited knowledge of the NES hardware to its limits and oftentimes, the Blue Bomber would be put into situations thought to be beyond the system’s capabilities. To compensate for this, sprites would often flicker, limiting any framerate drops to a minimum. The Wily Wars decided to do away with that method – after all, the Mega Drive was so much more powerful than the NES. Given how the games originally came out roughly midway through the NES’s lifecycle and this remake was coming out closer to the end of the Sega’s 16-bit powerhouse, was it even possible for the Genesis to run into any issues when running these ancient games? The answer was a resounding “yes”. I think what I encountered in Wily Wars may very well be the worst slowdown I’ve ever seen in a MegaMan game, official or otherwise. There’s one moment in particular I remember while playing that embodies these limitations: while on one of the Wily Stages, there’s a segment where you have to ride a moving platform through an area, while being attacked by 3 enemies that constantly respawn. Attempting to use the Leaf Shield in this area literally slowed the game down to a crawl. Worst of all, one might be under the impression that destroying at least one enemy would mitigate the slowdown. They would be right, unless that defeated enemy drops a power-up, in which case, the game continues to chug at a pace that is downright molasses-esque. It’s embarrassing. The worst part about it is that there are times where the slowdown makes the game easier. The Yellow Devil fight in MegaMan 1 is so much more manageable now than in the original thanks to it, it almost makes up for the loss of the pause trick!

By far, the best part of the game would have to be the original content. After clearing all three of the NES remakes, a brand-new entry is added to the game select menu: the mini-game “Wily Tower”. The game starts off with a cutscene of Dr. Wily talking about how while MegaMan stopped him from changing the past, but he still has one last plan up his sleeve. From there, players are sent to a stage select screen, with the three Genesis Unit robots as the choices. At the start of each level, players are allowed to choose any eight weapons and three support items from the first three games. This is somewhat a mixed bag: it’s cool to have mix-and-match different elements from previous games, but most of the bosses have two weaknesses at the most, and if the wrong weapons are chosen, it can make things difficult in general. The Genesis Unit’s stages are essentially hodgepodges of various elements from the previous games – which is neat, because it leads to some interesting synergy. Once those three are defeated, MegaMan moves onto the eponymous Wily Tower. The theming is pretty simple: the first stage is themed around elements from MegaMan 1, the second takes aspects from MM2, the third from 3 and the final stage is the standard corridor to the final boss.

WilyWars02

A weapon from MegaMan 3 , an enemy from the first game and obstacles from MM2, it’s madness!

The weirdest aspect of Wily Tower is that, while the remakes feel off in various ways, it feels “right”. It feels more distinctly like the original NES games than their remakes in this collection. If I have one comment to make about Wily Tower, it’s that I wish it were longer and had a bit more content. The Genesis Unit don’t give out weapons after being defeated – which makes the presence of original and unused “New Weapon” music in the game’s data even more bizarre. Were they originally planned to give MegaMan boss weapons at some point? I wouldn’t even specifically ask for additional robots: considering the fact that the game was called “Wily Tower”, a larger take on the Wily Fortress could’ve been pretty cool. The first three stages were essentially remixes from each individual game – imagine if they had added stages that mixed elements from 2 games and then done an extra-long one with aspects from all 3. Even more than that, it makes me wish that Capcom had just made an original game for the console. Definitely not a mainline, but one unique full-length spinoff game would’ve probably ended up way better than three mediocre remakes of some of the most common games in the franchise.

The graphics are something of a mixed bag. The backgrounds and some of the characters have been redrawn from scratch and they look great. The characters have been redrawn slightly larger than their NES counterparts while still maintaining their general look. They boast a much wider palette of colors compared to the original versions and there’s more detail put into the sprites themselves – for example, Sparkman’s face is actually visible now, Bubbleman’s air tank is visible and both Gutsman and Hardman are less squat, better emphasizing just how colossal they’re meant to be. Unfortunately, for most enemies and even a few major characters – looking at you, Protoman – they literally just took the NES sprites and recolored them to match with everything else. It generally works alright for less humanoid designs, but for anything that’s supposed to be even vaguely in scale with MegaMan, they’re just clearly too small, it honestly gets a little distracting at times. I wish that Capcom had had the resources to redraw everything, because what they managed to get done looks excellent, even by today’s standards – I wouldn’t mind if a new MegaMan game had a similar art style.

The music is actually pretty good in this one. Both the rearrangements of the classic NES music as well as the original compositions were handled by Kinuyo Yamashita – one of the composers for the original Castlevania. Unfortunately, much like everyone else who worked on this game, her work went uncredited. Regardless, I’d say that, for the most part, I personally prefer most of these arrangements over the originals, but I’ve always been a fan of the Genesis’s sound chip. My favorite arrangement in the entire game would have to be Fireman’s stage, which gets turned into a samba. I wish more tracks in the game could’ve received rearrangements that thorough. My only real gripe is that, at least in the case of MegaMan 3, some of the music – particularly the Dr. Wily stage map and the ending – were truncated to match what could’ve been heard in the original release. Of course, given the fact that the full compositions were never legitimately accessible in the game itself, this makes sense – but it’s still a bit disappointing to try to listen to these tracks and expect the full tune, only to be cut off at an inopportune moment. Of course, as with everything else, the songs original to the Wily Wars are the best part of the game’s soundtrack. The song that plays during the game’s introductory cutscene has been stuck in my head for well over a decade. The music for the third and fourth stages of Wily Tower are probably my favorite in the entire game, especially stage 4’s. I can’t describe why, but I love it when original music from various spin-offs sound like they belong in a mainline MegaMan game, and the Wily Wars soundtrack certainly fits the bill.

In the end, I’d say that it’s probably not worth trying to track down a copy of The Wily Wars, especially if you’re from North America like I am. The NES versions of the first three games are significantly more widely available – both as digital re-releases and even the original cartridges – and those are the definitive way to play. While Wily Tower is a good bonus, it just doesn’t add enough to the base package to make the whole thing worth it: the fact that one has to complete all three remakes just to reach just manages to make things worse. Regardless, I’ve been meaning to play through The Wily Wars for years, ever since I first learned of its existence and I’m thankful that this article gave me both a reason and the motivation to finally complete it. While it’s a shame that North America missed out on a physical release of Wily Wars, we did get our very own exclusive MegaMan game on a Sega platform – one that I’ll be covering later on.

Mega Man & Mega Man 3 (DOS)

With those out of the way, let’s move on to what are certainly the worst officially-licensed MegaMan games of all-time. Mega Man and Mega Man 3 – they skipped 2 – are difficult to define. Most people are sure to differentiate these two from the NES originals, generally either appending their titles with “PC” or “DOS”, to make sure that they’re being perfectly clear when discussing them. The reason behind this is simple: both games are terrible, yet it seems like anyone and everyone I’ve ever encountered who’s ever played them and still consider themselves fans of the series at large have an almost masochistic fascination with them. At worst, they’re not unlike an eldritch abomination, maintaining a small but permanent space of one’s memory and psyche; at best, remembering the games is akin to watching a car crash – you want to look away, but just can’t bring yourself to do it. Despite being released in 1990 and 1992 respectively, it’s really impossible to discuss one game without the other. Both are so intertwined with one another in a way that no other two MegaMan games can match. I only managed to play the first game when I was a child. A cousin of mine owned it, and I was only barely able to make it one level in before the game became far too difficult for me to continue.

Capcom licensed out the right to develop PC games based on the MegaMan franchise to an American company known as Hi Tech Expressions. On the surface, Hi Tech seems no worse than many publishing companies of the time: licensing the rights to develop video games that were typically mediocre at best based on various properties from other media – Hi Tech just managed to be one of the few that upped the ante by doing the same with existing video games. In addition to the MegaMan games, Hi Tech also published PC ports of the first two Street Fighter games – which would eventually be bundled with the MegaMan games in a later release – as well as the original arcade version of Tecmo’s Ninja Gaiden. Development of the title was handed off to Rozner Labs. Effectively a one-man development team headed up by Stephen Rozner, his brother William would eventually take over the position of artist during the development of Mega Man 3. Rozner Labs was a short-lived company, though they would also end up developing the PC port of MegaMan X directly under Capcom.

The games’ backstories are both fairly simple – not to mention redundant. Both games involve plots from the devious Dr. Wily attempting to take over the world, using a mere 3 Robot Masters in the first game and doubling that number in its oddly-named sequel. This time, however, Wily has the assistance of CRORQ, a mega-computer as powerful as its name is unpronounceable. While it was originally developed by the government as an advanced peacekeeping system, the devious doctor reprogrammed it in order to control robots from all over the world. Perhaps the most interesting thing about the DOS MegaMan games is their sheer originality: most poorly-made cash grabs based on popular franchises would be content with aping existing material poorly, but Rozner Labs went one step further, essentially making officially-licensed fanfiction and that’s probably the major reason why I’ll never be able to get this game out of my head.

MMPC-01

Times have been tough for Rock, I hear he’s been moonlighting as a bug zapper.

I’ll talk about each game’s gameplay separately, simply because there are pretty much as many similarities as differences between the two. Both games maintain the same awkward control scheme: the arrow keys move, but the J key is jump and the fire button is the space bar. I don’t know how people were intended to orient themselves on the keyboard while playing this. To make matters worse, F9 pauses the game but F10 quits to DOS. The Escape key opens the weapons menu in game, and pressing F10 while there kills MegaMan instantly. Both games also have the usual assortment of power-ups, health and weapon energy refills, extra lives and even E-Tanks. Mega Man has a total of five stages. The first of which is actually a franchise first: Mega Man DOS had an intro stage. Sure, it simply involved MegaMan trying to run through a tollbooth while being mauled by a nigh-indestrucible mechanical dog that just respawns if you destroy it, but it’s an intro stage all the same. It managed to even beat MegaMan X to the punch by roughly 3 years. No wonder they hired Rozner to handle that game’s PC port. Apparently, the man was a visionary.

After clearing that slog of an opening, players are dropped into a slightly familiar stage select screen, allowing them to tackle Wily’s three robots in any order. They are Sonic Man, who looks like someone tried to recreate Bomberman using stock clipart; Volt Man, the clear winner in terms of design; and Dyna Man – short for Dynamite, much like “Elec” being short for Electric – who boasts a strange design with blue, green and yellow body armor, topped with a blue helmet and a black facemask that only reveals his eyes. After defeating all three and gaining their keys – which are shaped like calculators for reasons I don’t entirely understand – players are then sent to Dr. Wily’s castle, a single stage consisting of rematches with the three robot masters, followed by a two-stage fight with CRORQ, who has been converted into a bipedal mech piloted by Dr. Wily. That’s the entire game, a mere five stages. The controls feel sticky at times, the jumping and shooting is really awkward and the game has an odd fascination with enemies that are too small to hit with the standard arm cannon, forcing you to take damage in order to progress. There’s also a notable lack of checkpoints: it gets so bad that I’m not even sure if the final stage has any, I never actually died once I got past the rematches with the first three bosses and dying on any of them sent you all the way back to the beginning.

MMPC-02

I can’t even begin to comprehend this design. That’s what I love about it.

MegaMan 3 improves on the original game’s formula in some ways, but makes entirely new mistakes to compensate. For starters, the controls feel marginally better than the previous game and the enemies that are too small to hit normally are gone. Another interesting quirk, MegaMan now swims when underwater, as opposed to the standard moon-jump physics – which means, once again, Rozner Labs introduced a gameplay mechanic to one of their games before Capcom would go on to implement it in a game of their own. Unfortunately, the level design takes a hit: everything goes from straight-forward and linear to literal mazes. It’s interesting, but trying to progress can get confusing and frustration can set in when faced the sheer commonality of dead ends. This game misses out on the intro stage, but given the fact that there are three more boss stages, it brings the grand total to 7. The bosses are a lot less original this time around – most of them are directly based on existing robots from the actual MegaMan 2 and 3. Torch Man, Bit Man, Shark Man (well before Battle Network), Wave Man (not the one you’re probably thinking of, although both MM3 PC and MegaMan 5 for the NES came out the same year), Oil Man – not that one – and Blade Man – not that one. After that, it’s another gauntlet of rematches in Wily’s Castle, followed by a rematch against CRORQ and then finally, a two-stage battle with Dr. Wily himself, who has surrounded himself with acid that kills MegaMan instantly. I personally think that MM3 was the better of the two, but there’s no real objective way to measure which game is superior. It’s all just a matter of opinion. Besides, it’s not really that much of an achievement to be the better of the two Rozner Labs Mega Man games.

MM3PC-01

An underwater maze with awkward controls. Clearly, a good omen.

I suppose I might as well mention both games’ array of weapons. Both games grant MegaMan the use of his standard Plasma Cannon. The way that one selects weapons in this game is intuitive but also weird: on the pause screen, you hit the key on the keyboard associated with the weapon to select it – the E key is, of course, reserved for E-Tanks. Of course, the oddest bit is that MegaMan doesn’t change colors based on which weapon he’s using – this is especially weird in Mega Man 3, where he shows up in different colors on the “New Weapon” screen. The weapons in the first game are fairly unique: the Force Field is a unique shield weapon that can be turned on and off with the fire button, keeping it on drains the weapon energy; Sonic Wave is like a faster version of the Gemini Laser and Nuclear Detonator, which is like a worse version of the Hyper Bomb: it has a lower firing arc, takes longer to go off and can damage MegaMan himself. It can destroy certain blocks though. The weapons from MegaMan 3, on the other hand, are a lot more one-note. The Torch Arm shots off a fireball; Oil Stream looks almost identical, though it’s colored black to signify that it’s oil; the Shark Boomerang effectively works like the Ring Boomerang from MM4; the Blade Launcher fires off an upward spread shot of three blades; the Bit Cannon is probably the best weapon in the game, firing off a powerful lightning bolt and the Water Shooter fires off three water balls at a downward arc at different angles, almost like an upside-down Air Shooter from MegaMan 2. Kind of fitting when you consider Wave Man’s design. I’d say the first game has the edge when it comes to weapons – while there are less overall, they’re way more unique than the ones in MegaMan 3.

The graphics in this game are, in a word, terrible. Instead of essentially recycling the graphics from the NES games, Rozner decided to redraw everything from scratch. This ends up leading to an array of unique enemies – in the first game, MegaMan ends up fighting more animals than robots, bats, ants, spiders, even parrots and mosquitos. In fact, the only traditional MegaMan enemies that show up in the game are Mets and Sniper Joes, which only show up in the final stage. The enemies in MegaMan 3 make a little more sense: a few of the animals return, but now MegaMan’s mostly fighting gillmen, plant monsters and guys in hazmat suits. The Mets and Sniper Joes return and better still, they show up more often. The robot masters are drawn in a completely different style, with more realistic proportions. They look like they belong in a different game. The oddest part is that, even though Rozner’s brother took over art duties in the later game, most of the Robot Masters’s in-game sprites appear to be traced over the Dynaman sprite from the first game. The backgrounds are the only aspect of the game that look good. In fact, the crates from Dyna Man’s stage and the nuclear barrels in Sonic Man’s stage were actually used in the original Duke Nukem, which is perhaps the game’s most enduring legacy. As for music, there’s really nothing to say: this game has none, which feels like the biggest blasphemy to me. The sound effects all come through the PC speaker anyway, so even if there was music, it would probably sound terrible.

MM3PC-02

Somehow more incoherent and less lovable that even Sonic Man.

Like I said before, these games are both trainwrecks, but I can’t help but remember them. While they are by far the worst games I’ve ever played that have borne the MegaMan name (and I’ve played more than my fair share of them) but I do still manage to have some positive feelings toward these games – and I’m almost certain they aren’t ironic! I think it all stems from the fact that Rozner Labs came up with original content while making this game, as opposed to just taking content directly from earlier (read: better) games in the series. Perhaps it’s just a trick, but the originality of CRORQ and Rozner’s own take on Robot masters – many of whom would eventually be reused by Capcom in one form or another – implies that, regardless of how poor the final product came out, actual effort went into the creation of these two games. The only remaining mystery is why Hi Tech and Rozner Labs skipped directly to MegaMan 3, as opposed to making a MegaMan 2: after all, MM2 was the most popular of the NES games, so making a game with that title likely would’ve sold even better. The best explanation I’ve heard for it is that they wanted the game to sound as “new” as possible. Granted, since the first Mega Man game on PC came out in 1990 – the same year MM3 came out – so you’d think they’d be called MegaMan 3 and 5, instead. I think the titles are perfect in their own way: they perfectly represent the outright bizarre nature of both games. Still, they both seem to have a handful of …I’m not sure if “fans” is the right way to describe them. Nevertheless, I’ve seen fanart of the characters from this game, heard attempts at creating original songs to associate with them and I’ve seen at least two attempts at remaking the games to bring them more in line with the quality generally associated with the Blue Bomber. Personally, I wouldn’t mind seeing the characters from this game show up in some form in a future Capcom release. After all, we’ve seen other licensed games get similar treatment – but that’s a story for another time.

Six games – or would that be eight? Nine? – seems like a perfect place to stop for now. I’ve got a lot more to talk about, but I think keeping these articles shorter should make them much easier to read. What do you think: do you prefer the massive, almost novel-length Retrospective articles I did before, or do you prefer these smaller, much more digestible segments over a longer period of time? Feel free to let me know in the comments and keep your eyes peeled for Part 2, which should be coming your way soon.

Remaking History

Originally, this article was going to be my own personal take on an earlier piece from KI, where he detailed various sequels he’d like to see for games that have long been ignored or forgotten. Truth be told, I’ve got a similar hunger to see some old games resurface myself. Of course, while I was brainstorming that topic (and don’t worry, my take on that idea will resurface at some point down the line) I eventually decided that it would be more interesting to think up games I’d like to see remade. After all, remakes and sequels are pretty similar when it comes to video games.

I’ve said this in the past, video games are unique in the sense that sequels typically improve on their predecessors. The same can honestly be said with remakes: video game remakes typically improve on the source material, where most other forms of media have a much lower success rate. Unfortunately, video games fall into a similar trap as other forms of media. Commonly if a game is remade, it’s generally already a popular (and by extension, good) game. It’s somewhat pointless to try to reinvent the wheel. Games like Maverick Hunter X and Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles weren’t improvements over the originals. On the other hand, you’ve got remakes like Metroid: Zero Mission and MegaMan Powered Up, which were definite improvements over the games they were based on.

For the purposes of this article, I’ve chosen 5 games which I believe deserve to be remade. Maybe people will disagree that they need remakes, maybe some of you will even think these games are just lost causes altogether. The other thing these games all have in common is that they come from either established franchises or development teams that eventually redeemed themselves after each respective misstep. I’ll be discussing each game’s faults, strengths and how I personally would handle a remake for each game, though the order in which the first two aspects are discussed may vary between entries. The importance of each element will determine which takes precedence in the discussion.

Mother (1) [a.k.a. “Earthbound Zero”] – Nintendo Famicom/Game Boy Advance

The Problems

Just as a bit of a disclaimer, I’ve never actually played the original Mother. I requested that a friend of mine play through it, mainly because after playing through Earthbound on my own, I was curious about the game’s roots. In spite of having no hands-on experience with the title, I can tell that it is definitely a very flawed game. The problems I have with the original Mother can be summarized in a single sentence: it’s an NES-era Japanese RPG. The NES was a part of the last video game generation where the abomination that is random battling could be blamed on hardware limitations. Likewise, while its sequels played around with unique gameplay mechanics that matched the franchise’s off-beat tone, the original Mother feels incredibly generic by comparison.

The Potential

On the other hand, Mother 1 actually gives us a unique opportunity. Shigesato Itoi, the mastermind behind the Mother trilogy, has stated that he has no intention to make a fourth game in the franchise. Considering how Mother 3 ended, it’s safe to say that there may be nothing left to explore in the future of the games’ storyline. However, the Earthbound fanbase is extremely passionate about seeing a new entry in the series. Meanwhile, Earthbound and Mother 3 don’t actually really need remakes: they’re perfectly fine in their current state. That leaves us with the original Mother, a flawed, but still very interesting game. Remaking the original Mother could allow Nintendo a chance to give the fanboys what they want, while avoiding any potential backlash in making a new game without Mr. Itoi’s involvement. It’s also important to keep in mind that Mother has only been released in Japan. I may have ragged on The Dracula X Chronicles earlier (despite the fact that I actually like that game), but there’s one thing that it objectively improved upon its predecessor: the number of regions it was released in. Sure, Nintendo’s supposedly sitting on that complete, unreleased English translation of the original Famicom game, but why just release that when you could do something with much more style?

My Proposal

I think a remake of Mother 1 would work best as a downloadable game for the Wii U. I’d actually prefer it if they kept the story about the same as the original, making as few alterations to the Famicom game’s scenario as possible. I’d say the gameplay should probably emulate Earthbound more than Mother 3, just due to its place in the timeline. Represent enemy encounters on the world map, use the odometer-style HP system, all that good stuff. Graphically, I’d like the game to resemble those clay models used for the Mother series’ concept art. It’s such an interesting aesthetic and Nintendo’s already attempting something similar with Kirby and the Rainbow Curse.

Street Fighter (1) [a.k.a. “Fighting Street”] – Arcade/NEC TurboGrafx CD

The Problems

People say I go way too easy on the original Street Fighter, due to the fact that my first experience with the game was with the even worse PC port. While I don’t think that SF1 is as bad as everyone else says, I must admit it’s an incredibly flawed game. It suffers both from being a late-80’s era arcade game and one of the earliest examples of a modern fighting game. The game suffers from both stiff controls and gameplay, which coupled with the traditional “unfair” difficulty typical of “quarter muncher” arcade games, made the experience even less enjoyable.  While introducing special moves was a pretty cool idea, the lack of playable characters (just Ryu and “Player 2”, later renamed Ken) also hurt the game’s appeal, especially when compared to later fighting games.

The Potential

Of course, Street Fighter’s potential is obvious to anyone who’s ever played its sequels or Final Fight. Once the initial kinks had been worked out, Street Fighter’s core ideas led its successors to become some of the most important fighting games of all time, even to this day. Besides that, SF1 also had some fan favorite characters that haven’t reappeared in more recent titles. I’m sure few people care about such mainstays as Lee, Joe and Mike (who is generally considered the basis for later SF2 character Mike Bison/Balrog, known colloquially as “Boxer”), but we haven’t seen characters like Birdie and Eagle since Capcom’s transition to 3D models in their 2D fighting games. There are even characters that never reemerged in later games that have been requested to some degree. Remember when the internet thought Retsu was the fifth new character in Ultra Street Fighter IV? Geki, the Japanese ninja, is another common request when it comes to returning characters, though he’s not at the top of most people’s lists.

My Proposal

Honestly, I’d kind of want Street Fighter V (which has been alluded to, by series producer Yoshinori Ono) to take a page from the Mortal Kombat reboot and retell the stories of all the previous games, which would lead to having a gigantic roster (and effectively remake Street Fighter 1 unintentionally). However, that would probably take an insane amount of resources, despite the fact that the game could potentially reuse some of the assets from the last game.

So let’s just talk about a straight remake of the original game instead. On one hand, seeing something along the lines of the MUGEN-based remake “Street Fighter One” would be pretty cool. Reuse the graphics from the arcade version, the TGCD version’s soundtrack and create an entirely new gameplay engine that would fix the flaws of the original. There’s also the possibility that there could be a full-on 2.5D remake, made by the team behind the Ultra update, in a case of what some people I know refer to colloquially as “watching the bee”. Think about it, the Ultra team is small and many people have complained about their work being buggy in many cases. Giving them another chance on a less important project to redeem themselves would be far more productive than just disbanding the team. Regardless of which form this remake take, there’s one thing this game should definitely have: the entire SF1 roster playable. Yes, even Joe.

Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest – Nintendo Entertainment System

The Potential

Regardless of my personal feelings towards Simon’s Quest, I must acknowledge that it was an important step in the evolution of the Castlevania series and had a profound impact on the entry in the franchise that most people consider its magnum opus: Symphony of the Night. Granted, it wasn’t the first Castlevania game to focus more on exploratory gameplay as opposed to standard linear platforming, that distinct honor belongs to the MSX2 version of the original Akumajou Dracula, commonly referred to as “Vampire Killer” outside of Japan. Considering that little factoid can easily be filed as “obscure trivia”, it should be pretty clear why SQ is generally considered the proto-“Metroidvania”. Of course, a remake of Simon’s Quest could lead to the most interesting Metroidvania ever, if done properly. Considering the game takes place across multiple mansions, towns and forests, there’s way more potential for this compared to just another romp in Dracula’s Castle.

The Problems

Simon’s Quest falls into the “good concept, awful execution” category. Konami retained the standard lives systems from the first game in the series, despite the fact that it really didn’t add much to the game. The level design also left a lot to be desired, what with all those fake blocks and instant-death pits. The latter appear even in the towns, for some reason. The game allowed you to accidentally skip important (yet cryptic or possibly poorly translated) hints, but not the excruciatingly slow day/night transitions (call me a ripoff of AVGN for complaining about this, if you must). Finally, though the convoluted password system only appeared on the cartridge-based renditions of SQ, the original Famicom Disk System version had load times that would make the PS1 blush.

My Proposal

If Konami ever decides to remake Simon’s Quest, I’d like them to emulate another remake of one of the weaker entries in the series: Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth. Make it a downloadable game, use the same style of faux 16-bit graphics and music. Instead of just aping the old “Classicvania” style of gameplay, I’d like to see a cross between that and the more Metroid-like style of gameplay from later 2D entries in the series. Keep the sprawling overworld and the various puzzles, but maybe include some kind of a “journal” where any clues the game gives you can be re-read at your own leisure. Expand on the mansions, maybe make them into actual stages, either linear Classicvania layouts or labyrinthine exploratory areas. Better yet, use both styles to keep things interesting. Develop on the towns by throwing in more shop mechanics like the ones , keep the day/night mechanic (but make the transitions more immediate) and we could be potentially looking at the best Metroidvania in the series.

Metroid II: Return of Samus – Nintendo Game Boy

The Potential

Let me be perfectly clear on this one, if Zero Mission didn’t exist, the original Metroid would be here instead of its Game Boy sequel. Return of Samus is a significant improvement on the original Metroid in pretty much every way. The controls are significantly improved. There are brand new power-ups including the Spider Ball, which allows Samus to climb walls and the Space Jump, which allows her to repeatedly spin-jump in the air. They join old favorites from the original like the Varia Suit, Ice Beam and Varia Suit, giving the intrepid bounty hunter a much more versatile arsenal. It’s also significantly longer than the original Metroid, with at least twice as many boss fights (that’s assuming you count each variant of a Metroid as a single fight, regardless of how many times they appear in the game) and several other areas to explore.

The Problems

Metroid II’s biggest issue is the fact that its sequel is an even greater improvement on it than it was to the original Metroid. Super Metroid added an in-game map, which allowed for a return to the original’s more non-linear game progression while avoiding its tendency to leave players stranded, added even more iconic weapons to Samus’s arsenal and improved the controls to perfection. There’s a reason why Super Metroid is generally considered the best game in the series. Unfortunately, due to being a Game Boy game and not being the series’ progenitor, Metroid II is generally considered to be the weakest game in the franchise. Its reputation isn’t helped by the fact that Zero Mission is generally considered to be close to the quality as Super Metroid.

My Proposal

At one point, Nintendo had plans to remake Metroid II for the Game Boy Color, as they did with Link’s Awakening. Unfortunately, it was scrapped along with other similar remakes (including MegaMan V, supposedly). I always thought it would’ve been pretty cool to see this idea come to fruition, but honestly, this project wouldn’t make much sense at this point in time.

Instead, I feel like Return of Samus should get the “Zero Mission” treatment. Give it an expanded remake, utilizing a similar engine to Super Metroid. I’d personally keep the more linear layout the game, but maybe throw in some exploits that would allow speedrunners or anyone else who’s looking for a challenge an opportunity to break sequence. Better yet, just make an extra mode that removes the roadblocks. Add some new bosses, but keep the 40 Metroid boss fights intact. Considering most of those were just the same 4 bosses repeated, that shouldn’t be much of a problem. The fact that Metroid’s fanbase has been clamoring for a new game in the franchise, especially a 2D one, pretty much means that if this remake is done well, it’ll relieve some of the pressure on Nintendo when it comes to working on the next real entry in the series.

Knuckles’ Chaotix – Sega 32X

The Problems

To say that Knuckles’ Chaotix was the best the 32X had to offer is pretty much an objective fact. Unfortunately, that’s really not saying much. Though its fellow expansion peripheral the Sega CD had a respectable amount of cult classics, the only other 32X game I find remotely endearing is Kolbiri, a free-roaming game with shump-style controls where you play as a hummingbird. Despite its status as the “one good 32X game”, Knuckles’ Chaotix still has its fair share of issues. Though I don’t really mind the random selection when you decide to switch out your partner, the way the stage order is randomized bugs me: you often switch between zones before you finish whichever one you’ve started with, which messes with the game’s flow. There’s also the fact that, at times, the game just doesn’t feel as smooth as its predecessors on the Genesis and Sega CD, the controls feel a little off at times and there’s also the occasional slowdown.

The Potential

The funny thing is, my first experience with Knuckles’ Chaotix didn’t happen until way after it was released. Even then, it wasn’t actually with Chaotix itself: I played a leaked beta made for the Genesis by the name of Sonic Crackers. While it wasn’t nearly as polished as the final product, I was enamored with its unique idea: controlling two different characters (in that case, Sonic and Tails) tethered together by a pair of rings. Likewise, Knuckles’ Chaotix delivered on that concept in my opinion. It may not have been a perfect game, but it was a way more interesting spin (no pun intended) on the Sonic formula than 3D Blast ever was.

My Proposal

Simply put, give it the Sonic CD treatment. Use the art and sound assets from the 32X version and let Christian “The Taxman” Whitehead work his magic on it, removing any technical limitations and tightening up the controls from the original version. I think the main reason I’d want this one remade is because it’s just not worth the time or effort for Sega to try to emulate 32X games, even though many fan-made Genesis emulators can handle them (to varying levels of success).

There you have it, 5 games I think are worth remaking. Some of them are more flawed than others, but all of them could use a second chance in my opinion. Of course, like I said before, most games that get remade even today are still as good as they ever were. Instead, they should be reserved for games that didn’t age gracefully, fixing their problems while sharing their potential with a new generation of gamers.

 

Sum of Its Parts: MegaMan X9

Originally, the next topic in the Sum of Its Parts series was going to be something completely different. However, both due to some recent developments with the franchise’s owner and because my last article in the series involved the same genre, I felt that this make for a less monotonous article this time around. As this series itself was inspired by one of my Megarants from last year, it seemed only fitting to revisit the series in a full-fledged article. After all, despite the fact that we’ve got Inti Creates’ Azure Striker Gunvolt coming out later this month in North America, as well as Comcept’s Mighty No. 9 set to release sometime next year, people still long to see a new entry in the MegaMan series.

I’ve already covered my wishlist for a potential MM11, but what else is there? The MegaMan Zero and Battle Network series both came to definite conclusions. People are still clamoring for Legends 3, but considering the controversy regarding the cancellation (sorry, failure to greenlight), it would probably be best to let things cool down before deciding to go anywhere with it. The Star Force games were fairly unpopular, even among fans of its predecessor. So I guess that leaves…MegaMan ZX3! Okay, okay, I know, I’m just dancing around the obvious. Despite my personal distaste for the series, if Capcom doesn’t decide to make another Classic MegaMan game, the obvious choice is MegaMan X9.

Why MegaMan X9 over anything else? Well, it’s obvious: the X series is quite popular among many fans of the series, arguably second only to the original Classic series at this point. A better question is why should I, someone who professes to hate MegaMan X (and I do), be considered the arbiter of what would make for an ideal new game in this series? Well, I did like the first 4 MMX games (the fifth was okay, but X6 was so incompetently designed, it killed any interest I had in continuing the series), I do have something of an inkling of where the series came from and where it should be going. There’s also the fact that I was actually a fan of the X games’ sequel series: Zero and ZX. Most important, at least in my opinion, is the fact that the first X game is not my favorite of the franchise.

What’s so important about that particular opinion of mine, you ask? Well, most people (with the exception of an ill-conceived article on Game Informer) I’ve seen write on their opinion of how to create an ideal ninth game in the X franchise tend to say that it should be as close to the original as possible. But why try to imitate the original, when we can try to exceed it? MegaMan 10 is my favorite game in the Classic MegaMan sub-line because it attempted to exceed MM2, where its predecessor only succeeded in aping it. Shouldn’t we try to apply the same principles to the X series?

As usual, gameplay will be the main topic we tackle in this article. First off, let’s discuss the game’s base style. For X9, I feel like as with MM9 and 10, there should be a return to the game’s base roots. Yep, make it a full-on 2D platformer, just like the SNES and PS1 games. Well, the first PS1 game, anyway. Dashing, charge shots, armor upgrades, all that good stuff. Make the engine as solid and responsive as the SNES games, X4 and 5. Actually, speaking of 5, maybe you should bring back the crouch mechanic from X5 (and by extension, X6). Hell, maybe even just make it exclusive to specific characters.

Speaking of which, definitely bring back the multiple playable character options first introduced in X4. I personally preferred being able to choose a single character for the duration of the single-player campaign and the differences seen in X4 (different bosses for specific characters) could be further expanded in X9. X and Zero are both must-haves at this point, but we could have more than just those two. Personally, I found Vile Mode to be the most interesting part of Maverick Hunter X, so bringing him into the fold would be interesting, especially if that led to some sort of alternate universe where the Mavericks in this game were Maverick Hunters instead and there was an entirely different fortress stage, where Vile storms Maverick Hunter headquarters and blasts everything to cinders. Of course, we’ve also got to deal with the elephant in the room, Axl. Since I’ve got very little experience with the games he appeared in, I’m not exactly sure how he plays. From what I can tell, he gets different types of ammo for his guns, somewhat like a cross between X and Vile, but his main ability in X8 appears to be Copy Shot/“A-Trans” which allows him to transform into various enemies. He’s also got an aimable rapid-fire gun, similar to Bass from MM&B in X8. So how do we rectify this? I say, let him keep the rapid-fire pistol, but instead of giving him random weapons from bosses, we implement his A-Trans ability similarly to the way ZX Advent handled it with Model A: allow Axl to transform into the Mavericks he defeats, giving him access to their weapons and some special abilities. Now that would be pretty cool, at least in my opinion.

That brings us to my next point, my ideal X9 would implement some elements from the X series’ direct sequels in order to improve on the original, especially the MegaMan Zero games. Frankly, I’d like to see an X game with the difficulty of the second or even the third Zero game. Hell, give Zero a choice of a secondary weapon he can use. Maybe not anything exclusive to the Zero games themselves, because they would be anachronistic, but hell, getting a MMZ-caliber Z-Buster would be pretty cool. Make it smaller and weaker than the X-Buster for balancing. Some original weaponry would be pretty interesting too, especially if it makes Zero a more versatile character. Throwing in a hub world (like those from the Zero and ZX games) would be an interesting addition as well. Having the option to explore Maverick Hunter HQ would be better than simply being forced to switch between stodgy menus, though I’d leave the menus in, as some people don’t care for that level of detail. Better yet, you could even throw in some optional interactions or even sub-missions with various NPCs, like the Navigators, Signas and various other Maverick Hunters to extend gameplay.

Of course, this leads to an important point I touched on in the MM11 article: the game’s length. Let’s face it, MegaMan X games are typically about as long as their Classic counterparts and in today’s marketplace, you just can’t charge that much for a game that short. So we have two options: charge less for the games or increase their length. This is another area where emulating the Zero games would come in handy for X9. In addition to the typical 8 stages and multi-staged fortress we see in most MM platformers, the Zero games also typically threw in some additional stages that took place outside of that typical format. Considering X3 attempted something like that with Vile’s mini-stage and both X5 and X6 attempted something similar with Dynamo, it wouldn’t be out of the ordinary. Maybe utilize some Mechaniloid bosses as opposed to Reploids, in order to further distinguish them from the main 8 bosses. Though honestly, increasing the number of Mavericks X et al. fight in the ninth game would be pretty cool.

Now typically, I don’t get involved with any sort of a storyline for games I write up in the Sum of Its Parts series, but considering my musings on this topic in previous articles, it’s only fair that I discuss it yet again. For those of you out there who are familiar with this controversy, the eighth (and at the time of writing, latest) game in the MegaMan X series kind of ended on a cliffhanger. As such, part of the fanbase wants to see the conclusion to these plot points in the ninth game of the series. On the other hand, another faction within the MMX fanbase doesn’t really care much for where the storyline went in later games and are much more in favor of a sort of “soft reboot”, ignoring certain games’ effects on the canon. Obviously, there’s no way to please both sides of the audience. While I may not care for many of the story elements of the later games, I think it’ll be easier to win back the soft reboot group if Capcom puts enough effort into the gameplay itself. The people who want to see the plot threads wrapped up are likely more die-hard about how the game’s storyline turns out. It’s probably for the best to just let them have that one.

Next up, let’s discuss the graphics. Again, this will be a bit of a retread for some of you, but it’s still worth revisiting. The majority of the people I’ve seen pitch ideas for how their ideal MMX9 would turn out either want the game to utilize the same artstyle as the SNES games (arguing that they are the equivalent to using NES graphics for MM9 and 10) or they want to see them use the same artstyle from the PS1 games (for the same reasons, I guess?). I’ve also seen some people ask for a 2.5D artstyle, not unlike Maverick Hunter X, because I dunno, wave of the future. My personal choice? I’d love to see some high-definition sprites or some hand-drawn graphics, but as long as the sprite-to-screen ratio remains the same as the SNES/PS1 games, I think I’ll be fine.

There’s one last thing I’d like to discuss on this topic. Which company would be the best to make a brand new entry in the MegaMan X series? Inti Creates is, of course, at the top of my list, due to their work on the Classic, Zero and ZX series. Similarly, I brought up WayForward as a potential company for a Classic game, but they could probably work somewhat well on an X game. Of course, I wish Yacht Club Games’ debut release had been out when I was brainstorming the best company to take over MegaMan Classic, because Shovel Knight leads me to believe they’d be an even better choice for any MegaMan platformer than WayForward themselves. Of course, SNES Master KI once said that he’d love to see Nintendo’s Retro Studios make a MMX game exclusively for Nintendo platforms. I must admit, that would be interesting to behold. I’d personally like to see Treasure’s take on a MegaMan game, and the X series seems like the best fit for their style of run-and-gun games. Hell, Capcom would be better off using them for X9 than just making an expansion for that massive bomb Gaist Crusher. Capcom Vancouver might also be an interesting pick, they seem to be fans of the MegaMan franchise in general and it would be cool to see them work on something besides Dead Rising (as much as I love the series). Of course, considering Capcom’s currently hiring staff for game development, it could even be internally developed. Whoever Capcom ends up going with for this project, hopefully they pay tribute to the better games in the franchise and don’t leave us with just another rushed blunder like X6. Hopefully, if X9 does well, we can see some other MM spinoffs return. Maybe even get the conclusion to the ZX series?