Sum of Its Parts: MegaMan X9

Originally, the next topic in the Sum of Its Parts series was going to be something completely different. However, both due to some recent developments with the franchise’s owner and because my last article in the series involved the same genre, I felt that this make for a less monotonous article this time around. As this series itself was inspired by one of my Megarants from last year, it seemed only fitting to revisit the series in a full-fledged article. After all, despite the fact that we’ve got Inti Creates’ Azure Striker Gunvolt coming out later this month in North America, as well as Comcept’s Mighty No. 9 set to release sometime next year, people still long to see a new entry in the MegaMan series.

I’ve already covered my wishlist for a potential MM11, but what else is there? The MegaMan Zero and Battle Network series both came to definite conclusions. People are still clamoring for Legends 3, but considering the controversy regarding the cancellation (sorry, failure to greenlight), it would probably be best to let things cool down before deciding to go anywhere with it. The Star Force games were fairly unpopular, even among fans of its predecessor. So I guess that leaves…MegaMan ZX3! Okay, okay, I know, I’m just dancing around the obvious. Despite my personal distaste for the series, if Capcom doesn’t decide to make another Classic MegaMan game, the obvious choice is MegaMan X9.

Why MegaMan X9 over anything else? Well, it’s obvious: the X series is quite popular among many fans of the series, arguably second only to the original Classic series at this point. A better question is why should I, someone who professes to hate MegaMan X (and I do), be considered the arbiter of what would make for an ideal new game in this series? Well, I did like the first 4 MMX games (the fifth was okay, but X6 was so incompetently designed, it killed any interest I had in continuing the series), I do have something of an inkling of where the series came from and where it should be going. There’s also the fact that I was actually a fan of the X games’ sequel series: Zero and ZX. Most important, at least in my opinion, is the fact that the first X game is not my favorite of the franchise.

What’s so important about that particular opinion of mine, you ask? Well, most people (with the exception of an ill-conceived article on Game Informer) I’ve seen write on their opinion of how to create an ideal ninth game in the X franchise tend to say that it should be as close to the original as possible. But why try to imitate the original, when we can try to exceed it? MegaMan 10 is my favorite game in the Classic MegaMan sub-line because it attempted to exceed MM2, where its predecessor only succeeded in aping it. Shouldn’t we try to apply the same principles to the X series?

As usual, gameplay will be the main topic we tackle in this article. First off, let’s discuss the game’s base style. For X9, I feel like as with MM9 and 10, there should be a return to the game’s base roots. Yep, make it a full-on 2D platformer, just like the SNES and PS1 games. Well, the first PS1 game, anyway. Dashing, charge shots, armor upgrades, all that good stuff. Make the engine as solid and responsive as the SNES games, X4 and 5. Actually, speaking of 5, maybe you should bring back the crouch mechanic from X5 (and by extension, X6). Hell, maybe even just make it exclusive to specific characters.

Speaking of which, definitely bring back the multiple playable character options first introduced in X4. I personally preferred being able to choose a single character for the duration of the single-player campaign and the differences seen in X4 (different bosses for specific characters) could be further expanded in X9. X and Zero are both must-haves at this point, but we could have more than just those two. Personally, I found Vile Mode to be the most interesting part of Maverick Hunter X, so bringing him into the fold would be interesting, especially if that led to some sort of alternate universe where the Mavericks in this game were Maverick Hunters instead and there was an entirely different fortress stage, where Vile storms Maverick Hunter headquarters and blasts everything to cinders. Of course, we’ve also got to deal with the elephant in the room, Axl. Since I’ve got very little experience with the games he appeared in, I’m not exactly sure how he plays. From what I can tell, he gets different types of ammo for his guns, somewhat like a cross between X and Vile, but his main ability in X8 appears to be Copy Shot/“A-Trans” which allows him to transform into various enemies. He’s also got an aimable rapid-fire gun, similar to Bass from MM&B in X8. So how do we rectify this? I say, let him keep the rapid-fire pistol, but instead of giving him random weapons from bosses, we implement his A-Trans ability similarly to the way ZX Advent handled it with Model A: allow Axl to transform into the Mavericks he defeats, giving him access to their weapons and some special abilities. Now that would be pretty cool, at least in my opinion.

That brings us to my next point, my ideal X9 would implement some elements from the X series’ direct sequels in order to improve on the original, especially the MegaMan Zero games. Frankly, I’d like to see an X game with the difficulty of the second or even the third Zero game. Hell, give Zero a choice of a secondary weapon he can use. Maybe not anything exclusive to the Zero games themselves, because they would be anachronistic, but hell, getting a MMZ-caliber Z-Buster would be pretty cool. Make it smaller and weaker than the X-Buster for balancing. Some original weaponry would be pretty interesting too, especially if it makes Zero a more versatile character. Throwing in a hub world (like those from the Zero and ZX games) would be an interesting addition as well. Having the option to explore Maverick Hunter HQ would be better than simply being forced to switch between stodgy menus, though I’d leave the menus in, as some people don’t care for that level of detail. Better yet, you could even throw in some optional interactions or even sub-missions with various NPCs, like the Navigators, Signas and various other Maverick Hunters to extend gameplay.

Of course, this leads to an important point I touched on in the MM11 article: the game’s length. Let’s face it, MegaMan X games are typically about as long as their Classic counterparts and in today’s marketplace, you just can’t charge that much for a game that short. So we have two options: charge less for the games or increase their length. This is another area where emulating the Zero games would come in handy for X9. In addition to the typical 8 stages and multi-staged fortress we see in most MM platformers, the Zero games also typically threw in some additional stages that took place outside of that typical format. Considering X3 attempted something like that with Vile’s mini-stage and both X5 and X6 attempted something similar with Dynamo, it wouldn’t be out of the ordinary. Maybe utilize some Mechaniloid bosses as opposed to Reploids, in order to further distinguish them from the main 8 bosses. Though honestly, increasing the number of Mavericks X et al. fight in the ninth game would be pretty cool.

Now typically, I don’t get involved with any sort of a storyline for games I write up in the Sum of Its Parts series, but considering my musings on this topic in previous articles, it’s only fair that I discuss it yet again. For those of you out there who are familiar with this controversy, the eighth (and at the time of writing, latest) game in the MegaMan X series kind of ended on a cliffhanger. As such, part of the fanbase wants to see the conclusion to these plot points in the ninth game of the series. On the other hand, another faction within the MMX fanbase doesn’t really care much for where the storyline went in later games and are much more in favor of a sort of “soft reboot”, ignoring certain games’ effects on the canon. Obviously, there’s no way to please both sides of the audience. While I may not care for many of the story elements of the later games, I think it’ll be easier to win back the soft reboot group if Capcom puts enough effort into the gameplay itself. The people who want to see the plot threads wrapped up are likely more die-hard about how the game’s storyline turns out. It’s probably for the best to just let them have that one.

Next up, let’s discuss the graphics. Again, this will be a bit of a retread for some of you, but it’s still worth revisiting. The majority of the people I’ve seen pitch ideas for how their ideal MMX9 would turn out either want the game to utilize the same artstyle as the SNES games (arguing that they are the equivalent to using NES graphics for MM9 and 10) or they want to see them use the same artstyle from the PS1 games (for the same reasons, I guess?). I’ve also seen some people ask for a 2.5D artstyle, not unlike Maverick Hunter X, because I dunno, wave of the future. My personal choice? I’d love to see some high-definition sprites or some hand-drawn graphics, but as long as the sprite-to-screen ratio remains the same as the SNES/PS1 games, I think I’ll be fine.

There’s one last thing I’d like to discuss on this topic. Which company would be the best to make a brand new entry in the MegaMan X series? Inti Creates is, of course, at the top of my list, due to their work on the Classic, Zero and ZX series. Similarly, I brought up WayForward as a potential company for a Classic game, but they could probably work somewhat well on an X game. Of course, I wish Yacht Club Games’ debut release had been out when I was brainstorming the best company to take over MegaMan Classic, because Shovel Knight leads me to believe they’d be an even better choice for any MegaMan platformer than WayForward themselves. Of course, SNES Master KI once said that he’d love to see Nintendo’s Retro Studios make a MMX game exclusively for Nintendo platforms. I must admit, that would be interesting to behold. I’d personally like to see Treasure’s take on a MegaMan game, and the X series seems like the best fit for their style of run-and-gun games. Hell, Capcom would be better off using them for X9 than just making an expansion for that massive bomb Gaist Crusher. Capcom Vancouver might also be an interesting pick, they seem to be fans of the MegaMan franchise in general and it would be cool to see them work on something besides Dead Rising (as much as I love the series). Of course, considering Capcom’s currently hiring staff for game development, it could even be internally developed. Whoever Capcom ends up going with for this project, hopefully they pay tribute to the better games in the franchise and don’t leave us with just another rushed blunder like X6. Hopefully, if X9 does well, we can see some other MM spinoffs return. Maybe even get the conclusion to the ZX series?

Advertisements

The Son of 10 Games I Want Ported To PC

Well, it’s been another two months, so it’s time for another one of my wishlists for PC ports. When I was first laying this article out, I thought that the fates had been cruel to me, and another game from my master list hadn’t had a PC port announced. Then I actually looked at the list and realized that another game had had a PC port announced: Battleblock Theater, which came out yesterday. So, that’s three for three. Not bad. It’s only sort of a minor technicality, but when I came up with the list, I had no idea there was going to be a PC port. Either way, I’m kind of worried about my chances up keeping up this streak. Who knows when my luck will run out? Considering the fact that many older games are still being ported to the PC now, I guess it doesn’t really matter if games on these lists get confirmed before the next time I write one of these. After all, it’s just a matter of time by now.

Most of you probably remember the rules by now, but for anyone reading this series for the first time, I’ll repeat them. First, there’s only one game per company per list. These lists will be sticking mostly to third-party companies (except Microsoft, because they also release games on PC). Most of the focus on these lists will be on companies that have released games on PC recently in some form or another. Games on these lists will specifically be taken from the seventh (Wii/360/PS3) and eighth (WiiU/XBO/PS4) generations, especially those that were on multiple consoles at the time of their release. Finally, games that are both from the same series that were released on the same platform CAN and often will be packaged together. So with this increasingly pointless recap out of the way, let’s get on with the list.

Super Puzzle Fighter 2 Turbo HD Remix – Capcom (360/PS3)

Oh man, I have a long history with this game. It was the first game I ever owned with Darkstalkers characters in it, it taught me what Cyberbots was, and it was the game that made Dan Hibiki the #1 Shotoclone in my heart (CRIMSON DEATH FIST!). I was really happy to see this get an HD remake way back when, and it ended up way better than a certain other HD Remix Capcom put out on consoles last-gen. It was based on the Dreamcast re-release, which included two other gameplay modes which mimicked other puzzle games, specifically Columns and Nintendo’s Puzzle League series. The only major flaw with the game in my opinion is that it didn’t receive any sort of re-release on PC. After all, even the original home versions included a PC release. Weird, right? I actually had to look that up, and frankly, I’m just as surprised as you are. So get to it, Capcom. Commission QLOC to make a PC port so this game isn’t lost to the impending digital apocalypse once more.

Anarchy Reigns/Madworld – Sega/Platinum Games (360/PS3)/(Wii)

When I put this on the list, it was before Namco Bandai announced their upcoming PC exclusive 2-on-2 brawler, Rise of Incarnates. Many people have compared this game to Anarchy Reigns, as they both seem to exist within the same fighting game sub-genre genre: it’s an arena game akin to Virtual On, Castlevania Judgment or Namco’s own Gundam Extreme Vs. series. While RoI may have an edge in the PC market due to being exclusively designed with Western audiences in mind, I’d still love to have Anarchy Reigns on PC, just due to how unappreciated it was in the West, due to mitigating factors. Better yet, pack it with a remastered port of its predecessor. Madworld didn’t get much mainstream success due to its odd status as a hyper-violent game on Nintendo’s Wii platform, so giving the game a second chance on a new platform would be amazing.

Soul Calibur II HD Online – Namco Bandai (360/PS3)

Speaking of Namco Bandai, I was honestly a really big fan of the Soul series from the first game. I first played Soul Blade on the PlayStation 1 when I was a kid. The first game I picked up for the Dreamcast when it launched was Soul Calibur. Soul Calibur II is generally considered the best game in the series and for good reason. It just hit everything right. The series began its decline shortly afterward: Soul Calibur III was pretty good, but IV and V were terrible. Namco Bandai recently re-released Soul Calibur II on PSN and XBLA, while snubbing Nintendo and PC owners. While a Nintendo re-release would obviously necessitate adding Link back into the game (thereby finally creating a literally perfect version of Soul Calibur II with all three guest characters), a PC re-release wouldn’t require that kind of work. Just fix the netcode this time around, okay?

Metal Slug XX – SNK Playmore (360/PSP)

I was happy to see that Metal Slug 3 made it to PCs not too long ago, and I have to say, DotEmu did a good job handling that port. The online was around the same caliber as that of KoF XIII’s, and the emulation itself was handled well. Having said that, I’d like to see even more Metal Slug games make it to PC. Let’s start with the latest one: Metal Slug XX. A remake of the DS-exclusive Metal Slug 7, which added co-op multiplayer and a new character: Leona Heidern from the KoF games, joining her teammates Ralf Jones and Clark Still. Of course, she was DLC in the earlier versions, but considering how SNK Playmore handled the console DLC in KoFXIII Steam Edition, I’m sure they’d include her in the base package. Metal Slug XX didn’t really receive much attention in the US, only appearing on the PSP and Xbox Live Arcade, so a PC port seems like a quick and easy way to garner more attention.

Persona 4: The Ultimax Ultra Suplex Hold – Atlus/Arc System Works (AC/PS3)

Let me reiterate: I’m not really a fan of most JRPGs. So, when I first saw Persona 4 Arena, I was skeptical and frankly a little angry, as this killed off any chance of a Power Instinct revival. After playing the game, I fell in love with some of the game mechanics (like certain attacks causing status effects, a throwback to the game’s JRPG roots) and was only slightly annoyed by others (auto-combos). Either way, it was an awesome game and I’d personally like to see its update/sequel hit PC at some point, though I’m sure most people would put more of a priority on the JRPGs in the series.

Mighty Switch Force! 2 – WayForward Interactive (WiiU/3DS)

Last time, I mentioned wanting the original MSF on PC, so it’s only fitting that I’d also want the sequel, right? I can’t really tell if I preferred the original or this one, but this game has its own unique set of mechanics which makes it less of a puzzle game and more of a straight platformer than the previous game, opting for a more even balance between its puzzle, platforming and run-and-gun elements. As with last time, I’m pretty much just looking for a straight port of the Wii U version to PC, though I was a little disappointed with the fact that it used the original pixelated graphics instead of the sleek redrawn designs from Hyper Drive Edition. Oh well, beggars can’t be choosers and it’s better to have any version of this amazing game than none at all.

Midway Arcade Origins – WB (360/PS3)

It really shouldn’t be a secret at this point that I love me some old-school arcade games. When I was a kid, I actually owned Williams Arcade Classics on PC. Sinistar, Bubbles, the first two Defender games, Joust and Robotron 2084 were some of my fondest PC gaming memories from my childhood. So when I heard WB Games was making a collection of some of the arcade games they acquired from Midway (and by extension, Williams), I was ecstatic. Alas, it was only announced for consoles. Even more disappointing was the fact that some of the games weren’t emulated so well, especially those that used trackballs. WB Games doesn’t exactly have the best track record for PC ports, but seeing this classic collection ported to PC (with some fixes for those games that didn’t turn out so well) would make me incredibly happy.

Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles – Konami (PSP)

I’m a fairly big fan of the Castlevania series, specifically the old-school, linear stage-based games. Rondo of Blood is probably one of my favorite games in the series, but the first time I was able to play this game was through this enhanced remake. One of the games that made the PSP worth buying (at least to me), The Dracula X Chronicles was really three games in one: the base game was a 2.5D remake of Rondo of Blood, and it also included brand-new English translations of both the original TurboGrafx CD version and its sequel, Symphony of the Night, generally considered the best game in the series. Since Konami wasted resources porting MercurySteam’s pathetic attempt at a 2D Castlevania to PCs and other platforms, an HD version of DXC would’ve been a way better use of that time and manpower.

Akai Katana – Cave/Rising Star Games (360)

As you may or may not know, I’m a really big fan of the “shoot-‘em-up” genre. Steam has recently become a haven for indie variants of the genre and they even recently scored a port of Treasure’s classic Ikaruga. But as with most genres I love, it’s just never enough for me. I want more. Cave seems like a good place to start. Though Cave isn’t really known for doing PC ports, the game’s North American and European publisher, Rising Star Games, has handled some of their own PC ports of Japanese titles, so hopefully they can work their magic on this game and add another game of real pedigree to Steam’s every growing shmup library.

Ys Seven – Nihon Falcom/XSeed (PSP)

Recently, I’ve become a big fan of the Ys series. A Japanese action RPG from a company mainly known for dabbling in various forms of PC gaming? Hell yes. So far, I own all 3 (4?) of the games that XSeed has made available from the series on Steam and frankly, I want more. Let’s start with something simple: Ys Seven, like Oath of Felghana before it was originally a PSP exclusive. So why not port that to PC as well? XSeed’s small team for PC ports has done wonderful work with the previous Ys games, so seeing more from them would just be awesome.

So, there we go, another ten games. With three of my six planned lists done, it looks like I’m about halfway through this little series. However, recently, I’ve managed to come up with two more lists, one of which is a special bonus list, so good news for anyone who enjoys these articles, this little series will be continuing on into 2015. As for my hot streak, I’m a little less confident that it will continue by the time my next article gets posted, but you never really know. All the same, here’s hoping for more announcements soon.

From Good to Excellent

This article is dedicated to perhaps one of the most devious trends introduced to video game journalism as a whole, and considering it originated as little more than a catalog of paid advertisements aimed at children, that’s really saying something. Of course, I’m talking about what’s been referred to the “four-point scale”. By this point in time, it’s probably been around for the better part of a decade, with some notable exceptions. Unfortunately, the impact it’s had on the industry was both quickly apparent and toxic, especially its effects on the psyches of many core and hardcore gamers today.

For those of you who haven’t heard of it before, the “four-point scale” refers to a common phenomenon in modern video game reviews. Many journalists have a tendency when gives scores ranging in the top 40% of their respective scales. On a ten-point scale, this is represented by scores between 7 and 10 points, but in other scoring conventions it may manifest itself as scores between 3.5 and 5 or 70 and 100. Regardless, the trend basically shows that unless a game is entirely non-functional or the reviewer has some grudge against the game, the lowest score it can possibly get is would be a 7.

Of course, that explanation doesn’t explain the detrimental effect this trend has had on gaming. After all, a 70% score in education would either be considered the bare minimum for a C- or D-, depending on which scale the school in question uses. So, by extension, a 7/10 score would generally be considered a poor grade in any context. Unfortunately, the effect this has on the entire scale is profound. If a 7 is the lowest score commonly used in reviews, this affects the way the other scores in the scale are interpreted. Regardless of what most gamers think, an 8 out of 10 is a good score, NOT a bad one. Yet if a game that is generally well-liked by a significant grouping of gamers gets anything below a 9/10, even if they miss that by a tenth of a point, it’s considered a devastating insult and they end up going rabid about it. Granted, this doesn’t happen quite as often or as violently as it used to (probably due to a growing negativity amongst internet cultures in general, but that’s a topic for another time…and probably another blog), but I can still remember the fallout of Gamespot’s review for Twilight Princess way back in 2006. Over a score of 8.8.

Unfortunately, backlash against “unfair” reviews are probably the least serious of the negative effects of this trend. Even worse are the people who buy into the hype. Many gamers feel like any game that scores lower than an 8.5 or even a 9 has no right to exist. Another horrible side effect is that even reviewers are buying into the hype of the four-point scale. Take a look at a review for a game rated 7, 7.5 or even 8. If you ignored the scores, you’d think they’d given the game a 3 just based on the bile they spew at the game. Granted, maybe they would’ve given it a 3 but were forced to increase it to fit in the four-point scale. Regardless, it seems fairly unprofessional to see something with a relatively high score paired with an extremely critical review.

Perhaps worst of all is how it amplifies the effect a bad review can have on the game’s developer. Even a single low score can taint a developer’s reputation for years. Take Double Helix, when they were revealed to be the developers of the recent Killer Instinct and Strider games, gamers threw a collective tantrum, bringing up how shoddy their licensed games were. Because most tie-ins are of the finest quality, right? The gloom and doom became so impenetrable, even in my own small circle of friends, that I went from hating KI 2013 as much as everyone else did to playing Devil’s Advocate for DH to a bonafide defender of their work. I ended up being vindicated in the end: both KI and Strider turned out well. The point is, developers should not be forever tainted by a poorly-rated game. Pretty much every company in existence today has made their fair share of crap.

Why is the four-point scale so pervasive in gaming journalism? Most other forms of media criticism allow for a wider spectrum of scores, so why is mainstream video game criticism so limited by comparison? I’m not going to pretend I know exactly why this occurs, but I have heard some popular theories. Perhaps the most pervasive of these theories is also the simplest: it’s good ol’ fashioned bribery. Game journalists have a lot of expenses to deal with, and a great deal of their advertising budget comes from game publishers themselves. Considering Gamespot’s spotty reputation in this regard, it wouldn’t really be surprising if most (if not all) major game review websites fell prey to this kind of thing. A much more charitable theory, however, would be that it was just a natural evolution. Like I said earlier, bad reviews of popular games tend to get serious backlash. So maybe sticking to the four-point scale is a distinct strategy to reduce tensions. Of course, if this was the plan, it’s clear by now that it’s backfired spectacularly. One last theory I can think of is that, maybe the professionals just aren’t that good at their jobs to begin with. Wouldn’t surprise me, anyway.

Of course, the four-point scale isn’t literally a constant in the field of game journalism by any means. Many publications do use other scores on occasion. For example, it’s not exactly unheard of to see scores of 6, 5, 4 and especially 3s, out of IGN. Their review for Double Dragon Neon managed to only score a 3/10 back in 2012, and I’m still reeling over it. Of course, in my experience these lower scores only tend to occur when a game is assigned to a reviewer who either hates its genre or hates the game itself for some reason. Hell, even the widely acclaimed Donkey Kong Country Tropical Freeze only managed to receive a 6/10 from Gamespot, and rumors indicated there was a chance it may have been scored even lower prior to the review being posted. Unfortunately, these exceptions pretty much prove the rule at large, due to their overall rarity in mainstream video games journalism. The fact that I can point out specific examples quite easily is evidence of just how rare this kind of thing is in modern games journalism.

Personally though, I just think the four-point scale is an incredibly stupid trend in general, regardless of the collateral damage it has had on video games themselves. For one thing, there’s an odd trend in the prevailing viewpoint regarding video game criticism: only scores matter. In this age of Metacritic and other review aggregate services, all that really matters is getting a high score, regardless of the quality of either the reviews or the product itself. Even I’m guilty of glossing over the review itself and just looking at the score, though by this point, that’s mainly due to the fact that the quality of criticism somehow managed to get worse from the early 90’s, where they were pretty much either fluff pieces written to avoid any real criticism of the game or were just straight-up advertisements (sometimes, even posted side-by-side with actual advertisements for the game being reviewed). In the end, the four-point scale is more of a symptom of an even greater problem with modern game criticism, as opposed to the underlying cause in general.

Fixing this whole problem would be simple: just abolish scores in general. Hahahaha, yeah, THAT’S gonna happen. I guess a more practical solution would be to find some alternate way to quantify quality, as opposed to just cut-and-dry scores or letter grades. When I entertained the idea of going back to reviewing games after a long hiatus (don’t ask), I had grown weary of simply using the traditional points-by-category method of scoring that was the standard for the site I used to write for. I figured a better way to quantify a game’s quality would be determining how much I thought it was worth. How much I had paid for the game would be the maximum possible score for the game being reviewed, allowing for proper scaling between games of different price points. Of course, this whole concept didn’t really go that far: I never really determined a good way to properly weigh the worth of whatever game I was playing, attributes like playtime, replayability and most importantly, how much I enjoyed playing the game itself would have been key to these determinations. In the end, I still tend to use this method to assess games, but only simply as a way to determine whether or not I feel like I’ve been ripped off. I’ve seen certain sites go for a “buy it/rent it/avoid it” system, in addition to a conventional scoring method, which while a little simple, seems like an overall better way to deal with this kind of thing. I guess the simplest solution of all would be to have critics adopt a literal 4-point scale. You know, like the stars ratings movie critics tend to use. Give them half-points for good measure too.  At least that would be more accurate than what they’re currently doing.

By this point, the four-point scale has pretty much become another one in a long line of wisecracks and punch-lines regarding “professional” video game criticism. The fact that no amount of mockery can stop it is a little disconcerting. Nevertheless, it needs to end. Regardless of the reasons why, flooding the market with nothing but inflated scores is a significant blow to whatever reputation video game journalists and critics want to cultivate. Judging by their recent preoccupation with social issues and “watching the medium grow up”, I’m sure they would rather be considered true journalists than a bunch of spineless cowards. That’s just my opinion, though.

10 More Games I Want Ported to PC

Hey, I said this was going to be a recurring series last time, didn’t I? If you’ve read any of my previous articles, you’ll know that I’ve been getting more and more into PC gaming in the last few years. One of the big reasons for that is the emphasis on backwards compatibility: even when the game’s original developers fail to deliver, it usually takes a resourceful fan a short amount of time to make it work again on newer systems. Consoles just don’t deliver on that as well as they did during the previous two generations. On the plus side, with the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 running on PC architecture, PC ports could be beneficial to console gamers as well, allowing for easier and enhanced re-releases of these older games.

Before I recap the rules I established in the previous article, I’d like to give a shout-out to Deep Silver for taking down one of the games I had planned for a future list, before I even got the chance to set it up: Suda 51’s latest game Killer is Dead is coming to PCs this May. So I’ll have to replace that in a future list. Anyway, the rules are the same as they were in the last article: only one game per company per list; sticking mostly to third-party companies (with the exception of Microsoft, who is known to release games on PC as well), especially those that have released games on PC recently and games will specifically be taken from the seventh (Wii/360/PS3) and eighth (WiiU/XBO/PS4) generations, especially those that were on multiple consoles at the time of their release. Finally, games that are both from the same series that were released on the same platform CAN be packaged together. So, once again, let’s get on with the list.

Darkstalkers Resurrection – Capcom (360/PS3)

Anyone who has known me for a good amount of time knows that I love me some Capcom fighting games. At the top of that list stands not Street Fighter, not the Vs. Series, but Darkstalkers, a cult classic fighter revolving around some of cinema’s classic monsters duking it out in a fight to the death. I love me some Darkstalkers and when the second and third games in the series (Night Warriors and Vampire Savior, respectively) recently got re-released on PSN and Xbox Live Arcade, I just had to jump on it. I got both releases of the game the first day they were available and I had a lot of fun with them. Unfortunately, the game sold poorly on these platforms. So why ask for a PC release? Well, while it is possible to emulate both games online with the same netcode Resurrection used, that’s not exactly legal. I’d jump at the chance to have a legal avenue to play some Darkstalkers on my PC. More importantly, PC gamers are clamoring for some legitimate fighting game releases, to the point where Arc System Works recently allowed other publishers re-release the mediocre PC ports of both Guilty Gear Isuka and the Blazblue: Calamity Trigger on Steam (which lacks netcode, due to GfWL shutting down and no one bothering to convert it to Steamworks) and people are just eating it up, in an effort to show ASW that yes, people want their games on PC. Ultimate Marvel vs Capcom 3 may be the number one Capcom fighting game people are demanding a PC port for, but I’m well aware that Capcom’s deals with Marvel has lapsed.

Blazblue Chronophantasma/Continuum Shift EX – Arc System Works (AC/PS3/Vita/360*)

Speaking of Blazblue, I definitely want the other games in the series to see releases on PC. I guess at this point, getting Continuum Shift EX is useless for the most part, since its sequel Chronophantasma is already out in Japan and is due out in North America later this month. Anyone who’s familiar with the series, however, knows that there’s more to Blazblue than just having the current version ready for tournaments. The series has an extensive story mode, and considering the fact that we’ve got the first game’s story mode, it seems like it would be good to have the complete story up to this point, so doing a two-pack (perhaps gut CSEX’s online component like CT’s if that would make a port more cost-effective) would be great, especially for PC-only gamers who really want to get into the series. Xrd is still probably my top priority for a PC port, just because it’s both newer and runs on Unreal Engine 3 (which was literally made for PCs). Still, I’d probably be happier if the other Blazblue games made it to PC instead, as Calamity Trigger was the first Arc fighter I honestly enjoyed: my poor luck with the Guilty Gear series is legendary. Just my opinion, though.

Splatterhouse – Namco Bandai (360/PS3)

I’ve never really been that big on the survival horror genre, but I do tend to love games that borrow thematic elements from horror movies. Each game in the original Splatterhouse trilogy was a side-scrolling beat-‘em-up where you take on the role of Rick, who dons the cursed Terror Mask to save his girlfriend from a mansion filled with Lovecraftian horrors. In 2010, Namco Bandai rebooted the classic series as an action hack-and-slash, and while it wasn’t critically-acclaimed by any means, I loved the game. The atmosphere, the gameplay and especially the voice acting: if you can’t appreciate Jim Cummings cursing out Josh Keaton, I pity you. The only real flaw that bothered me was the abysmal load times which a properly-optimized PC port could easily fix. As an added bonus, Splatterhouse 2010 actually contained ports of the original trilogy as well, so even long-time fans who hated the reimagining have some incentive to pick it up. Besides, Namco Bandai recently ported Enslaved to PC, so why not Splatterhouse?

NeoGeo Battle Coliseum – SNK Playmore (360)

Considering we’ve recently seen Metal Slug 3 released on Steam, it seems like SNK Playmore has jumped on the Steam hype train. Frankly, I’d like to see something a little more recent come out. NeoGeo Battle Coliseum was one of Playmore’s first fighting games after regaining the SNK license and it’s an awesome little game. A 2-on-2 tag-team fighter that uses characters from various SNK games: King of Fighters, Samurai Shodown, Last Blade, Garou: Mark of the Wolves, King of the Monsters and even Marco Rossi from Metal Slug. I’ve had a hankering for more classic SNK fighters and NGBC is not only one of my favorites, but an underrated gem. Considering it was re-released on XBLA, just port that version, throw in the improved netcode from King of Fighters XIII or MS3, and you’ve got a solid release on your hands.

Sega Model 2 Collection – Sega (360/PS3)

The worst part is, this shouldn’t even be on here. Many sources online claimed that Sega’s Model 2 Collection was coming to PCs back when it was initially announced. Unfortunately, that never came to be, which is a shame, because I really want to get my hands on Fighting Vipers, one of my favorite 3D fighters of all-time, and the enhanced port of Sonic the Fighters, which finally made long-time dummied-out character Honey the Cat fully playable for the first time in any legitimate release. Virtua Fighter 2 would always be welcome as well. To make matters even better, Sega could also pony up the two games that we never got in the North American or European console releases: the original Virtual-On and Virtua Striker. Granted, in that case, Virtual On would be a higher priority for me than even VF2, but let’s keep it simple: porting the 3 games that were released outside of Japan to PC would be fine.

Vigilante 8 Arcade – Activision (360)

I’ve been a fan of car combat games ever since I played the original Twisted Metal at my aunt’s house when I was a kid. Unfortunately, Twisted Metal’s a Sony franchise, so asking for a PC port these days would be a fool’s errand. Besides, the latest game in the series (Twisted Metal for PS3) was apparently garbage. Fortunately, there’s one series in the genre I liked even more than TM and it’s ripe for the taking: Vigilante 8. Vigilante 8 Arcade was the third game in the series, released on the Xbox Live Arcade early in the 360’s life cycle, but it’s a pretty stellar semi-remake of the original game. Sure, it’s a little barebones and it’s an early title, but frankly, I’d love to see it get ported to PC at some point, even if just for the sake of preservation.

Red Dead Redemption – Rockstar (360/PS3)

This is a big one that people have been demanding for a long time, so I’m really just stating the obvious here. I’m one of the few gamers out there who actually remembers Red Dead Revolver, so I was ecstatic to hear it was getting a sequel on seventh-gen consoles. Unfortunately, they ditched PC for that release. Many other Rockstar games from that era got late PC ports: Grand Theft Auto IV, L.A. Noire and it’s been speculated that even GTAV is getting a PC port at some point. Unfortunately, I don’t really care much for GTA, I want RDR on my PC. Make it happen, Rockstar.

Mighty Switch Force! Hyper Drive Edition – WayForward Interactive (Wii U)

I haven’t really made it a secret: I’m a really big fan of WayForward Interactive’s work. They’ve made some of the best licensed games in recent times and their original IPs are generally fantastic. Considering we’re already getting the second and upcoming fourth Shantae games on PC, it seems fair to branch out and ask for a different series. Mighty Switch Force! HD Edition is a perfect choice, as it’s already an upscaled version of the 3DS eShop hit. Since the Gamepad support in the game was minimal, it seems like porting this to the PC would be simple, if not for the fact that WayFoward has a hectic schedule as it is. Still, this is a wishlist and I want more WayForward games on PC.

Muramasa: The Demon Blade (Rebirth) – Vanillaware/Marvelous AQL (Wii/Vita)

Muramasa: The Demon Blade was probably one of my favorite games on the Wii, so I was happy to hear it was getting an expanded port. Then I found out that port was for the Vita. What a waste of resources. Marvelous AQL has some experience porting games to PC and they handled the North American release of Muramasa Rebirth. Maybe they could even upscale the graphics to at least 720p, so we’d finally be able to appreciate Vanillaware’s hand-drawn 2D artwork in its full splendor. Bundle it with the additional DLC content exclusive to the Vita version, and it would be perfect.

Shadow Complex – Microsoft Studios (360)

I love a good Metroid-like. Most people call them “Metroidvanias”. I used to be one of those people until a friend of mine told me it bugged him and why it bugged him: because while Castlevania games in that style may have borrowed from Super Metroid, the same could not be said for the Metroid series itself. Why have I gone off on this random tangent? Simply because the only thing I really know about this game is that it’s one of the best Metroid-style exploration platformers to have come out in a long time. That’s good enough for me.

And that’s another list done. So far, two of the games on any incarnation of the six lists I’ve planned already have PC ports confirmed. While Killer is Dead: Nightmare Edition isn’t due out until this May, Double Dragon Neon was released last month. Abstraction Games did an excellent job on that port, even quickly patching many minor glitches in the PC version. Hopefully, by the time my third list is ready, a third game’s PC port will have been announced. Sure, that’s just wishful thinking at this point, but here’s hoping.

Two Sides to Every Story

While video games are primarily known for their gameplay and interactivity, each new generation has increased the importance of various other qualities of the medium. Graphics, music and sound have all made impressive strides in the past few generation, to the point where gaming is unrecognizable compared to how it was even a decade ago, let alone three. By comparison, however, storytelling in video games has probably made among the largest strides by comparison. In this medium, we have gone from having either no context or a sentence-long blurb to having multiple hours of cutscenes in the average game.

That’s not to say that there haven’t been any shortfalls in the process, even toward when story in games has become so ubiquitous in the industry. Sometimes, an emphasis on story can hurt a game. Take for example, Ducktales Remastered. While I personally liked the game’s various cutscenes, which were literally scattered throughout each stage, many gamers threw a temper tantrum about the entire affair, claiming that they wreck the game’s overall flow. Of course, a later update added the option to automatically skip most of the game’s cutscenes, but the damage was done. Somehow, putting some story elements into a game based on a Saturday morning cartoon of all things ruined it for everyone.

Of course, the lessons one should probably learn are that some genres are more conducive to involved storylines than others. To this day, fighting games have had some major difficulties with implementing cohesive storylines and plots, just due to their history. In the fighting game genre, canonical events weren’t usually determined until the sequel, as there were several playable characters, each with their own unique endings and in many cases, one character’s ending would contradict another’s. Most modern Japanese (or Japanese-influenced) fighting games opt for fleshed-out story modes for each playable character that resemble a visual novel, with specific fights placed between certain segments for flavor. Netherrealm Studios did something similar in both the latest Mortal Kombat game and Injustice: Gods Among Us, substituting the visual novel portions with cutscenes and delivering one unified storyline with multiple playable characters, though generally not the entire cast. Many gamers preferred NRS’s style of delivering narrative and hope to see more companies attempt something similar in the future. The majority of long-time hardcore fighting game fans, however, don’t really care about these or other single-player modes, preferring a greater emphasis on the base gameplay mechanics.

Recently, a new concept has started to become popular within the video game journalism community: ludonarrative dissonance. Ludonarrative dissonance occurs when there are inconsistences between the gameplay and the storyline of a video game. The Bioshock series is among the most popular examples used to explain this: as the thoughtful exploratory nature of the games’ protagonists as depicted in the game’s storyline is considered by some to be at odds with the violent gameplay the series is well-known for. A simpler example would be how Aerith died permanently in FFVII, when Phoenix Downs are both plentiful and capable of resurrecting the dead. Since storyline is becoming more and more an integral part to most modern video games, this is something that must also be kept in mind.

Personally, I’ve never been a fan of exclusively using cutscenes to depict story in video games. Some games have chosen a more “interactive” route in certain cases, allowing for in-game conversations that mimic the traditional cutscenes. A few games that utilize this include Arkham Asylum and the Half-Life games. While this does have the disadvantage of breaking immersion by allowing players to retain some control, it has the added benefit of making the transition between gameplay and story sequences more seamless than the traditional cutscene method. Not to mention, I tend to think it’s kind of fun to mess around with the in-game camera, attack them without doing any real damage or even just interrupting people in-game when given the option.

There’s also the method of hiding story materials within the gameplay itself. Games like the Bioshock series, Demon’s Souls/Dark Souls and the aforementioned Arkham Asylum all hid various items containing backstory and other context for the game’s story in the game itself. Retelling various characters’ and locations’ backstories through journal entries, signposts and even audio recordings does an even better job of creating an immersive storyline than all the cutscenes in every video game in the past decade combined and I would love to see more games attempt this sort of storytelling. Of course, this has the added disadvantage of “cheating” less adventurous players out of a significant portion of the deeper storyline, while cutscenes are generally available to everyone. If I’m going to be honest though, I think that’s worth it.

To wraps things up, here are some DOs and DON’Ts for any game developers, fledgling or otherwise, who happen to come across this article. DO allow for skippable cutscenes, some people aren’t really big on these things and the fact that this still isn’t an industry standard is disgraceful. If you’re going to prevent people from always being able to skip cutscenes, at least allow them the option to skip after the first time they’ve seen it. Forcing gamers to keep rewatching the same damn cutscene that takes place before that boss they just can’t beat is cruel and unusual punishment.

DON’T choose a game genre that doesn’t suit the story you’re trying to tell, and vice versa. For example, if your main character is supposed to be some kind of a pacifist, an action hack-and-slash game probably isn’t the best choice for your particular universe. And for the record, this isn’t a jab at the Bioshock franchise. In fact, I don’t even believe that the Bioshock games suffer from ludonarrative dissonance: both Rapture and Columbia have very seedy underbellies and survival is the name of the game.

DO make an effort to allow players’ actions have some kind of tangible effect on the gameplay. Even if it’s something as minor as some subtle aesthetic changes or some slight variation in some dialogue later in the game, this little parlor trick tends to make story-oriented gamers happy. Plus, it adds to replay value, which is always good to have in general. As long as it makes sense within your game’s narrative and you don’t go overboard with it, it should work out fine.

Speaking of overboard, DON’T oversaturate your game with cutscenes. If I wanted to sit through 7+ hours of uninterrupted non-interactive segments, I’d go for a TV show or movie binge on Netflix, because that’s what TV shows and movies are good at: being passive entertainment. If you ship a game with more hours of cutscenes and cinematics than gameplay, you have failed as a developer. A good rule of thumb, at least in my opinions, would be to shoot for at least 3 hours of gameplay for every hour of cutscenes in a single-player campaign, bare minimum.

DO try to achieve a proper tone for the storyline you’re trying to tell. Not everything has to be an epic, serious storyline: take a look at how well Sonic ’06 turned out. Light-hearted storylines or straight-up parodies shouldn’t be as rare in gaming as they are today. We need more games we can just laugh at. On that note, DON’T wedge a story into a game if you can’t make it work. Despite the fact that all single-player games seem to be moving more and more towards story-heavy experiences, I think there is still a need out there for some arcade-style games with minimal storylines. The backlash against Ducktales Remastered supports my point here. The most important thing to remember is that if your focus during development is on telling a story, make sure it’s one worth telling in a game, instead of some other medium. Interactivity should be key to your story in some form, even the crummiest fighting game storyline got that one right, because even at worst, it was the bare minimum of what could be considered a Choose Your Own Adventure, and a CYOA is more interactive than the stories in most other forms of media.

In the end, regardless of how important stories become as video games continue to evolve and grow, they should never come at the cost of gameplay. Even in the case of visual novels, where the most complex form of interactivity you’re likely to find is cycling through multiple menu choices, unless they include some kind of weird mini-game. Excising the gameplay from a video game is like taking the video out of television or movies, the sound from radio and even the words from books. In some cases, you’ll be left with something, but the main point of that particular form of media will be lost on its audience.

Challenge From The Future

All things considered, it hasn’t really been the worst of years for the Blue Bomber. Sure, we got nothing in terms of announcements for new games and the only re-releases we managed to receive in North America were the same damn NES games that keep getting trotted out every time Nintendo relaunches their Virtual Console service on yet another console, starting from scratch each time for no discernible reason (but that’s a gripe for another day). Capcom USA announced earlier this year that we’d finally see the rest of the Game Boy and Game Boy Color MegaMan games hit the 3DS’s VC soon, but thus far, that’s only been happening in Japan, with all 5 Rockman World games already released and Rockman X: Cyber Mission (better known as MegaMan Xtreme in the West) on the way, while North America and Europe are left in the cold yet again.

That’s not to say it was all doom and gloom: there was that neat Capcom-funded fan game Street Fighter X MegaMan, Rock made it into Nintendo’s upcoming Smash Bros game with a sleek redesign, the Archie Comics series recently wrapped up its crossover with the long-running Sonic the Hedgehog comic and several 25th anniversary fan albums have been released throughout the year. But given the fact that the most exciting video game news we’ve heard regarding the MegaMan series came in the form of ex-Capcom employee (and Megaman’s biggest fan) Keiji Inafune’s Mighty No. 9 Kickstarter campaign raking up over $4 Million for a game that’s not even due out until 2015, clearly something isn’t right with this picture. Hopefully, Capcom isn’t just resting on their laurels and is coming up with something worthy of fan acclaim after effectively pissing away MM’s 25th Anniversary.

So you’re probably wondering what this next article is going to be about, considering I actually put some effort into the title for a change. It’s pretty simple honestly: this is a top 10 wishlist of things I would like to see Capcom do with the MegaMan franchise in the near future. They don’t have to do any of these by next year, and in some cases, some of my choices are pretty much impossible. But hey, that’s what a wishlist literally is, right? A list of wishes.

Before we get started, I have an Honorable Mention. Please Capcom, come clean about the circumstances behind the MML3 cancellation. I’m not saying release the prototype, I’m not asking you to make the game, I’m just asking you to explain why you ditched a functional prototype that was ready for release and probably would’ve ended up being the final nail in the Legends 3 coffin, given the fact that the audience certainly wasn’t big enough for your sales aspirations for the entire MML3 Project. Instead, you just threw it away and cancelled the game with little fanfare. Dick move, Capcom. Dick move. Given the contrast between the transparency promised when the project was first announced and the total secrecy regarding the circumstances of its cancellation, the fanbase is completely justified in assuming the worst. So, with that out of the way, onto the real list:

10. Old PC ports on GOG

And I’m not talking about those crappy original DOS games made by Hi-Tech Expressions and Rozner Labs. Believe it or not, quite a few console MegaMan games actually got PC ports in the past. The original MMX, MMX3-7, and even the main two games in the Legends series got PC ports. In fact, Gamestop was selling a digital download of the PC version of MegaMan Legends on their online store until fairly recently. Sure, some of these games clearly have rights issues, but how about the original MMX? Just put that sucker up on GOG, apparently it’s in (mild) demand on their community wishlist page.

9. More Re-releases

As I said before, Capcom Unity has assured us that eventually we’ll be seeing the rest of the Game Boy MegaMans hit the 3DS Virtual Console at some point in the future, in addition to the Xtreme series. Likewise, I’m sure that eventually, the Wii U’s assortment of NES games will be completed in the future, and I’m sure eventually North American will get their hands on MMX2. Still, I want more. I want to see games that haven’t seen re-releases in some time. I want to see MegaMan 7, Rockman & Forte and MegaMan X3 hit the Wii U’s Virtual Console. Hell, if the Wii U Virtual Console ever decides to expand on its system line-up, give us The Wily Wars too. Furthermore, Sony, you’ve got to finish up the Complete Works series on PSone Classics. I mean come on, it’s ridiculous that you just dropped the ball after Rockman 4. Release Rockman 5 and 6 already and complete those works!

8. MegaMan X9

Not exactly my first choice for a new MegaMan game, but even someone who hates this sub-series as much as I do has to admit that it’s got such a major following, Capcom could do far worse than throwing them a bone. As I mentioned in an earlier article, I’m not sure if the best way to do it would be continuing from X8’s story or just doing some kind of a reboot from an earlier game, but whatever they do, I’m sure it’ll be better received than that cancelled Maverick Hunter FPS that got leaked a while back.

7. MegaMan ZX3

Ah, much better. Now here’s something I can get behind. Considering ZX Advent did better than its predecessor (not exactly a Herculean feat by any means) and the game left us with a massive cliffhanger that seemed to be leading to a climactic conclusion, it pained me to see the duology left incomplete, when all we really needed was one more game to finish this up. I’m a really huge fan of all of Inti Creates’ work with the series, and while the original ZX was derivative of the Zero series, I don’t think Advent got a fair shake. At the very least, this would finish up another MegaMan spinoff and possibly provide even more backstory for the Legends games.

6. A New Cartoon

Yeah, not gonna lie, considering my complaints earlier about all of the big MegaMan events this year having nothing to do with games, it’s a bit hypocritical to be asking for even more ancillary media. On the other hand, shut up. Considering the fact that Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures is already airing on Disney XD and there’s the upcoming “Sonic Boom” cartoon, now seems like the perfect time to bring MegaMan back to airwaves…with hopefully something that isn’t just a poorly-dubbed anime. I stand by my opinion that the Ruby-Spears MegaMan cartoon from the 90’s has the dubious honor of being the best cartoon based on a video game, but hopefully a new MM cartoon would manage to be even better.

5. A Game Starring Bad Box Art MegaMan

The worst part is, I’m not even trolling. Despite being considered a colossal insult by the majority of rabid MM fans when he was announced as a playable character in SFxT, I always loved BBAMM. Frankly, I thought it was pretty cool that he was going to be a playable character in the ill-fated MegaMan Universe, and seeing him becoming even sillier in a fighting game was great. I did mention in the past that I wanted to see a BBAMM game, possibly in the style of a Legendsesque third-person shooter/RPG hybrid, and I’m sticking by that statement. Say it with me, guys: “THIS IS…MY DESTINY!

4. Remakes of MM8 and MMX4

Yeah, this one’s going to require some context. A couple years back, Sega made a re-release of Sonic CD that was actually a complete recreation of the original game developed by Christian “Taxman” Whitehead, utilizing his “Retro Engine”. I’d like to see Capcom do something similar with both the eighth Classic MegaMan game and the fourth MMX game. MM8, because while I liked some of the concept of the original game, I thought the gameplay felt a bit off. X4, on the other hand, was my favorite X game by far, and frankly, I’d love to see it further improved. Use the original art assets, music, cutscenes and, if possible, voice acting – better yet, redub it anyway and include both versions. Just rebalance and improve the gameplay. Better yet, in the case of MM8, you could even include the extra bonuses from the Saturn version without having to figure out how to emulate a Saturn game. In the end, it beats just getting standard re-releases on PSone Classics or tracking down the Anniversary Collections for PS2 or Gamecube.

3. Port MM9 and MM10 to Steam, et al.

Gonna just come clean here, I’d be happy if Capcom just decided to do ports of the ninth and tenth MegaMan games to PC and put them on Steamworks. But given the fact that only one of the current-gen consoles can even play these games (and only because of a wondrous backwards compatibility loophole), clearly we’ve got to get it on more than just PC. Put it on 3DS, Xbox One, PS4, and yes even the Vita. Hell, do an iOS and an Android re-release. And don’t just put it on Windows PCs, make it work on Mac and Linux OSes too. Come on, Capcom, don’t let these awesome games become lost to the ages.

2.  A MegaMan game developed by WayForward

Yep, another callback to that crummy video that led to the birth of these MegaRants in the first place. They did a good job with Contra 4 and a radical job on Double Dragon Neon. Do it Capcom. Complete the trifecta. Even if their last game (Adventure Time: Explore the Dungeon Because I DON’T KNOW!) was mediocre at best, WayForward Technologies has built up more than enough good will to justify getting a chance to work on a MegaMan game. Especially considering their previous collaborations with Capcom: Capcom published the original Shantae and Wayforward developed Capcom’s Ducktales Remastered. Besides, WF’s own Mighty Switch Force games prove that they can recreate the precision platforming and jump-and-shoot action necessary to build an excellent MegaMan game perfectly.

1. MegaMan 11

Oh, don’t look so shocked, this was obviously going to be number one. When it comes right down to it, I want more games from the Classic series above the others. Whether it’s MM11, Rockman World 6, The Wily Wars 2, Powered Up 2 or something else entirely, as long as it stars the original MegaMan and it’s got quality gameplay, I’m gonna be happy with it.

In the end, I feel that I should reflect on the Megarants themselves. They were an interesting experiment. They helped me transition from stinking up Youtube with long-winded rant videos to stinking up WordPress with long-winded rant articles. More importantly, reflecting on the past of one of Capcom’s most popular franchises and bemoaning its current fate was, at the very least, a therapeutic experience. It’s also led me to consider doing more recurring article series in the future. In fact, if you look closely, one of the Megarants itself has inspired an article series I’m planning to start next year. Which one, you ask? Well, you’re just going to have to wait and see. But I’ve gotten off-topic. Hopefully, 2014 will treat MegaMan better, but for now, let’s just wait for the day he’s able to once again fight…for everlasting peace.