The Top Ten Most Overrated Games of All Time and What You Should Play Instead (Part 2)

Here we are, Part 2, hopefully in a more reasonable timeframe. I’m continuing counting down my top ten most overrated games of all time and listing antidote games that do what the overrated games are doing, but better. Let’s get right into it!

Number 5: Metroid

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Told you more Nintendo games were coming. Now there’s no way to deny how important the original Metroid is, it expanded what a platformer could be with its non-linear, interconnected world and myriad of upgrades that were needed to progress in the game. But damn it, that doesn’t mean we have to pretend it aged well. Metroid laid a great foundation, but the house is absolutely not up to code. The endless stretches of identical looking rooms with no map make navigating the game a nightmare, the control is too clunky for the game’s high difficulty level and starting at the first room of the game with 30 health (out of a possible 800 by the end of the game) are crippling flaws. I’ll give it a pass on the password issue, since the original disk-based version had saving. There are plenty of NES games that are much more playable today, to say nothing of later games using the Metroid formula. This hasn’t stopped people from acting like the original Metroid is the timeless classic that later games in the series are, and that’s why I’m putting it on this list. It deserves appreciation and respect, but you don’t have to pretend none of its flaws exist just because it came first.

Instead You Should Play: Super Metroid

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Here it is, the game you remembered the original Metroid as. Super Metroid takes the formula from the original game and fixes everything wrong with it. A fun to explore world with a map, excellent controls, a balanced difficulty level, worldwide saving. Plus great new abilities that the game uses to their fullest, great boss fights, and one of the most iconic emotional moments in gaming. Super Metroid is everything the first game wanted to be, the seeds of potential that the first one planted sprouted and produced one of the best series in all of gaming. There’s even a remake of the original Metroid using the elements from Super Metroid, which I considered for this position, but using a remake didn’t feel right. But whatever your preference is in that area, there are Metroids out there that will give you exactly what you remember from the original game and require much less nostalgia filtering.

Number 4: Secret of Mana

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Yeah, this is what I was talking about when I mentioned those supposed action-RPGs that may as well be turn-based. In the 90s, any RPG that wasn’t literally turn-based would be labeled a Zelda-style game, and that’s what I went into Secret of Mana expecting. Yeah, that’s not what I got. My sword needing to recharge after every swing and magic attacks freezing everything on the screen while they connect (and this includes bosses freezing you to get in their unavoidable attacks) was not my idea of Zelda. But genre preference isn’t my only reason for putting Secret of Mana on here. You have a three-person party in the game, with the option of co-op play. But if you don’t have two friends you can summon to your side whenever you want to play, you’re going to have to deal with the AI, and dear God. Now, I understand that a hyper-competent companion AI in a SNES game wasn’t a realistic request, but my issue is that the game puts the responsibility on you for the AI characters dying. And this is one of those RPGs where bringing a party member back from the dead is a huge pain in the ass early in the game. You can swap which character you control, but there will always be two vulnerable, AI-controlled characters during fights if you’re in single-player. Oh, and you not only have to individually level up several different types of elemental spells, the game sucker punches you by basically requiring you to have maxed out several elements to beat one of the last bosses. The grinding I endured when I got there… never again. Secret of Mana simply does not deserve the praise it gets, there are so many better RPGs on SNES. But for the antidote, I decided to go with the three-person party theme…

Instead You Should Play: Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana

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There are a lot of great things about this game, but for the purpose of being an antidote to Secret of Mana, I’m going to focus on the combat. Like Secret of Mana, Ys VIII is an action-RPG where you have three party members fighting at once, which you can freely switch between at any time with the other two being AI-controlled (there’s no co-op option, but that allows for the single player mode to be better balanced). However, the CPU-controlled characters have greatly increased defense and can’t be knocked out while the computer is controlling them, because the game isn’t a complete asshole. And the combat, it’s night and day. Fast action game-style combat where every attack is avoidable, you can combo enemies, link in special moves, dodge and parry, even activate something like Bayonetta’s “Witch Time” mechanic. This is what an action-RPG should be, and modern action-JRPGs thankfully seem to be adopting this style as a whole. The fourth generation was a golden age for many genres, but action-RPGs are doing much better in the present.

Number 3: Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater

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I’m still in a dream, and I want to wake up and get the Metal Gear I loved back. I’m not talking about the universally acknowledged monstrosity that modern Konami has turned Metal Gear into, I’ve felt this way ever since Metal Gear Solid 3 was first released. After loving the first two console Metal Gear Solid games and the Game Boy Color one for their fast-paced stealth gameplay and insane stories, Metal Gear Solid 3 messed everything up and the series never recovered, although MGS3 remained the low point until Konami really went demonic. The story was much simpler than the previous games with a one-dimensional main villain, zero dimensional bosses, and far fewer plot twists with the one the game presented as its biggest being insultingly obvious. But the gameplay was worse. Fast-paced stealth? Yeah, screw that, now we have to tip toe up behind enemies to avoid alerting them and worry about our supplies so that we can micromanage camouflage and recovering health, with long load times for the menu we constantly need, of course. And we lose the radar from the earlier games while at the same time getting much more open environments that the overhead camera is absolutely not suited for. I just want the old Metal Gear back.

Instead You Should Play: Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty

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Well, this should have been pretty easy to guess after what I wrote above. Metal Gear Solid 2 is one of my favorite games of all time, and one of the most unfairly bashed in its heyday. Raiden not being Snake doesn’t change that the gameplay of the Metal Gear series, which is at its peak in MGS2, with fast paced stealth that still gives you real options (as opposed to “do you want to use the camouflage that the game demands on this specific texture or be handicapped?” in a certain later game). The story doesn’t give a shit about realism, and that’s exactly how it should be, and it doesn’t hinder it at all when it wants to be philosophical. The fact that this game never got a faithful sequel saddens me to this day, and I can only hope that by some miracle Death’s Stranding turns out to play like this (not like we have any gameplay information to prove it won’t). Easily the best game of 2001, and the fact that people nitpicked it to death while giving a pass to… never mind, we’ll get to that in a bit.

Number 2: The Legend of Zelda

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I’ve had this issue in articles before, the Zelda and Metroid series parallel each other so well in their early days that it’s hard to think of unique things to say about one after covering the other. The original Zelda is an incredibly important game that laid the foundation for an incredible series, but the house is nowhere near up to code and if you go into that basement known as the second quest, you’re as good as dead. The original Zelda has barely any puzzles, control that is too stiff for the level of difficulty, obnoxiously scarce resources, and cheap “do something in a random place with no indication” roadblocks that try to pass themselves off as puzzles. It not holding your hand does not make up for all of this, it does not even come close. When I first played this game (with the very much needed help of a guide) I assumed that I was just bad at it since I was still fairly inexperienced with adventure games. When I came back to it years later, I realized that it was actually just not well designed. This led to some pretty strong feelings towards it, and it was actually my pick for the most overrated game of all time for a good number of years, before a certain game (I feel like I’m trying to hide Wily or Sigma being the final boss of a game by refusing to name it) took that spot.

Instead You Should Play: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

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I was originally going to put A Link to the Past in this spot, but I decided to try something different (if you want the ALttP writeup, go to the Super Metroid one and replace every mention of Metroid with Zelda). For all my issues with Breath of the Wild, there’s no way to deny that it completely annihilates the original Zelda at everything the latter game is praised for. More freedom, more non-linearity, way more open world to explore. This game was clearly made to please the people who loved the original Legend of Zelda, and while there are some parts that weren’t done as well (the original Zelda had way more dungeons and I don’t remember your sword breaking) it unquestionably obliterates the original game in pretty much category that gets it so much praise. Now just please fix the weapon durability and lack of dungeons so I can feel confident in the future of my second favorite series.

Number 1: Mega Man X

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Well, what can I say? People change. After a while you have to come to terms with what the games you played as a kid were really like, even if it means having an unpopular opinion. Yes, there was a time when I thought the control, level design, boss fights, secrets, and aesthetics in this game were enough to earn it all the praise it absorbs, but after REALLY taking a long look at it, you realize… you’re not buying this, are you?

The Real Number 1: Grand Theft Auto III

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Yeah, I know, this was a really, really obvious pick. I’ve actually called this my pick for the most overrated game of all time in previous articles. But I am not going to pretend I have a different pick just to surprise people… not for longer than it takes to set up a joke, anyway. Well, I think this is where I should lay it all on the line and tear into Grand Theft Auto III as much as I can and try to thoroughly explain why I hate this game so much.

Basically, the game has a similar decent structure but completely unsafe building issue to the original Metroid and Zelda. But this game isn’t from the 80s, it’s from 2001 and it’s not the first game in its series. Yes, it was the first 3D one, but many of its issues are unrelated to that (although some certainly are). The game not only has an appalling lack of checkpoints, it is actually designed so that even the meager checkpoint you do get is worthless. Die during a mission? You wake up at the hospital and have to drive back to the mission. Except you lost pretty much everything (all your weapons and money), so what you really have to do is load your save, which may be even farther away, since there are only three save points in the entire game. And you’ll have to drive to one after every mission, so even more pointless trekking back and forth. A Retry option would have made this game so much better, but nope, you’re going to spend exponentially more time driving to missions than actually playing them. Also, there’s no full map. Yes, you get a mini-map to guide you to missions, but I hope you never have to visit a gun store or Pay ‘n’ Spray after the one time the game points out the location of a single one to you. You’re also treated to the worst lock-on system I have ever seen in a game. Winning a firefight is nearly impossible, you’ll be quickly shot to death while the camera has a seizure and all of your bullets miss. The driving controls aren’t as bad, but they’re still lacking considering how easy it is to get caught on objects or get flipped over. And let’s talk about the hidden packages. They are the codifier for the worst type of collectable in all of gaming, tiny objects that could be hidden ANYWHERE in an open game world. And they aren’t even confined to masochistic 100% runs in GTAIII, if you want simple quality of life features like being able to restore health at save points, you’re going to need several of them.

Now, some people dismiss these issues by saying you’re really supposed to ignore the missions and enjoy causing chaos with no other objective. I have two responses to that. One, if a game puts in the amount of content and effort into its story mode that Grand Theft Auto III did, and it turns out the game is at its most fun when you ignore it, that is an abject failure on the developer’s part. Two, even this is held back by the awful controls and ultra-strict penalties for dying. And you’re going to need to find a lot of those hidden packages if you want good chaos tools without playing the story. I get it, being able to kill any character in a 3D game was mind-blowing at the time, but that doesn’t change that GTAIII is a genuinely bad game. Innovation can’t replace quality, at least not in the long term, and while the sequels to GTAIII fixed some of my many issues with it, several others remained for no reason. I genuinely think the lack of demand for Grand Theft Auto to fix its issues held the series and genre back for years. It took until Grand Theft Auto IV in 2008 for the gaming community (not reviewers, they still worshipped it) to finally say that the sandbox emperor had no clothes. Not that anyone admitted that about the prior GTA games. Thankfully, the sun was about finally rise and eliminate the shadow GTAIII cast on its genre…

Instead You Should Play: Saints Row 2

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Yep, this was also pretty predictable if you’ve read my past articles. But like my pick for most overrated game of all time, just because it’s predictable doesn’t mean Saints Row 2 hasn’t earned its spot. Saints Row 2 is incredibly similar to the PlayStation 2 Grand Theft Auto games, in most circumstances a game so similar would be a shameless rip-off. But Saints Row 2 had the radical, groundbreaking idea of making the gameplay style good. Almost every single issue I mentioned about GTAIII is fixed. Solid control in every area, checkpoints, a fully functional map, the hidden package equivalents are still there but at least the gameplay doesn’t depend on them in any way. This means you can enjoy the over-the-top story, massive gameplay variety, content packed quest, and all the senseless chaos you want without crippling flaws holding you back at every turn. Saints Row 2 is what Grand Theft Auto always should have been, and between it and the backlash against Grand Theft Auto IV, the genre finally evolved into what it had the potential to be. Saints Row 2 is not only an antidote to Grand Theft Auto III, it cleansed its entire genre of GTAIII’s illness. It earns the number one spot on its list as much as GTAIII earned its number one spot.

So, there you finally have it, my ranked picks for the top ten most overrated games of all time and the antidotes to their flaws. I’m very relieved to finally be finished, see you next time for an article that hasn’t been hanging over me for almost two years.

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Retronaissance’s Most Anticipated Games of 2018

SNES Master KI

2017 didn’t quite turn out the way I expected when I wrote my top ten list for it.  Between delays and disappointments, I’d say only three games on it really matched my expectations.  In the end, I’m forced to say that 2017 in gaming was… freaking incredible!  Lists don’t define years, releases do, and between games I didn’t know I wanted so badly (Ys VIII, A Hat in Time, among others), a huge amount of games being both announced and released in 2017 (Xenoblade 2, Wolfenstein 2, Splatoon 2, The End is Nigh, Metroid II: Samus Returns, the long awaited console Undertale), the honorable mention games exceeding expectation (Crash N. Sane Trilogy, Sonic Mania) and my number one pick for Game of the Year both meeting my hype and actually making it out in 2017 (unless you want to take Nintendo at their word and say Super Mario Switch was a tech demo that just happened to have a level from Super Mario Odyssey in it), 2017 was amazing.  It was also great for announcements, so many franchises that had their future in doubt in 2016 got new games announced, and while some of them I’m not expecting until 2019, others will definitely be on this list.  Between those and the delayed/never confirmed for 2017 games, there’s plenty to anticipate in 2018, so let’s get started.

Honorable Mentions

  • Pikmin 4 (Switch): While not confirmed for 2018 (main reason this is only an honorable mention), with this game being “near completion” since 2015, I think we’re due. The only RTS I’ve ever gotten into, Pikmin finally getting an original mainline game on a successful console could be the big break it needs to go from Miyamoto passion project to major Nintendo IP.  Either way, it should be another great adventure in the cutest post-human world ever.
  • God of War (PS4): I was not pleased when this game was initially revealed. Well, that’s an understatement, I was heartbroken.  Thankfully, 2017 showed some improvements (more action, less WRPG) that have given me cautious optimism, although if this played like the original God of War games it probably would have made the top three.  This game’s cycle for me has been the complete opposite of Breath of the Wild, where I loved it at reveal but got more and more nervous as it approached release.  BotW was a fantastic game that disappointed me as a Zelda game, so is this going to be a terrible game that feels completely faithful to God of War?  Yeah, probably not.
  • Spider-Man (PS4): If you think about it, the Arkham series’ gameplay seems better suited to Spider-Man than Batman, with the emphasis zipping to (near) the ceiling, warning prompts, and “detective vision” that feels a lot like Spider Sense. Since Spider-Man is my favorite superhero, that definitely puts this game on my radar, even if it doesn’t quite crack the top ten.  Just hoping for lots of real boss fights against super villains and some platforming.
  • Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes (Switch): I remember when Wii U made its official debut at E3 2012, Suda 51 basically confirmed that No More Heroes 3 would be made for it. Then it was never heard from again.  Well, fixing everything that went wrong with Wii U is Switch’s main purpose, so it getting a new kind of-No More Heroes game seems appropriate.  Haven’t followed this too closely, but will definitely pick it up when it comes out.

10.  Red Dead Redemption 2

Publisher/Developer: Rockstar Games
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: 2018

The delays got this one, and we still haven’t really seen any more than we did in 2016, but this is still the first new Rockstar open world game in years, and the sequel to the game that signaled them getting their head out of their ass when it comes to quality of life features.  Not a whole lot to say about this game, I already complemented the environment graphics last year, and… yeah, nothing else to really do.  I did play Red Dead Revolver last year, that was fun, but completely different from Redemption and I’d never mention it if there was anything meaningful known about this game besides its series and developer.  Red Dead Redemption also taught me how to play poker, so that’s… yeah, let’s just move on.

9. Kingdom Hearts III

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release: 2018

The best case scenario for this game is that it comes out 12 years after Kingdom Hearts 2 and six years after the last new Kingdom Hearts game.  Where did it all go wrong?  Well, whatever the reason was, 2018 is the first year where I feel like there’s a real possibility of this game coming out, and I am looking forward to it.  The combat looks greatly improved and Disney has bought a ton of franchises since Kingdom Hearts 2 that would make great worlds.  And they just bought more, maybe if I’m still alive when Kingdom Hearts 4 comes out it will have a Simpsons world.  I liked Final Fantasy XV’s combat system, combine that with a better story and characters and you could have a masterpiece.  This might actually be higher on my list if I had more confidence in it coming out in 2018, but whenever it comes out I think I’ll like it.  It may have taken forever, and I’ve lived more than a third of my current life since Kingdom Hearts 2 came out, but at least it wasn’t a half life scenario (puts on sunglasses).

8. Runner3

Publisher/Developer: Choice Provisions
Platform: Switch (at least)
Release Date: 2018
 

The other game from my list last year that got hit by the delay stick (or would have if I hadn’t just been guessing when it would be released), we should actually get it in 2018, and it’s even a Switch semi-exclusive!  Back when the Bit.Trip games were being released, I thought Runner was the best of them by a wide margin, and was shocked when the developer agreed with me and gave it, and only it, a sequel.  And I was even more shocked when Runner2, which everyone seemed to forget about as soon as it was released, got a sequel.  Runner3 became a bit of a symbol of hope for me when it was announced, that the series I felt like I had lost in recent years weren’t gone forever (and that hope was completely valid, with the long awaited returns of Metroid and… something we’ll get to later).  But symbolism aside, Runner and Runner2 are great games and Runner3 looks at least as good, this game is slotted for early 2018 and I can’t wait.

7. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/ArtPlay/DICO
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation Vita
Release Date: “March 2018”

There’s hope for Konami’s franchises, there’s always hope, 2017 made that abundantly clear.  But while we wait for whatever demon has possessed Konami to be excised by a priest who calls his cross a boomerang, we have Bloodstained to tide us over.  Despite some people desperately trying to tie this game to Mighty No. 9, there is nothing to indicate that Igarashi exaggerated his creative talent the way Inafune’s was, and Bloodstained still looks great as we finally get close to its release date.  With a huge amount of content (Metroidvania mode, Classicvania mode, retro mode), this could be a feast that makes the wait worth it.  I even backed this game on Kickstarter, mainly to reward it for not pulling that “yeah, we’ll put it on consoles if hit this stretch goal placed above every extra for the PC version that we can think of” crap.  That alone shows a level of integrity that certain other Mighty disappointing games never could have matched, I think we could finally get a good replacement goldfish from Kickstarter.

6. Kirby: Star Allies

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/HAL Laboratory
Platform: Switch
Release Date: Spring 2018

Kirby has been doing great recently, ever since Return to Dreamland brought back the deep combos and variants for powers that had been missing since Super Star, Kirby platformers have been getting better and better.  So what can Star Allies do to stand out and keep that improvement streak going?  Maybe being the first HD Kirby platformer and the first console one since 2011?  Screw that, we got the goddamn yo-yo back!  My favorite Kirby powerup of all time, which was confined to Kirby Super Star for more than 20 agonizing years, is finally in a new game!  There isn’t too much else to say about the game at this point, but with Kirby’s recent track record there’s no reason not to expect a great platformer.  And again, it has the yo-yo; that’s on the level of Charging Chuck’s return for me.

5. Darksiders III

Publisher/Developer: THQ Nordic/Gunfire Games
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC
Release Date: TBA 2018

Not even a game released as its publisher died, that starred Death himself, could kill this series.  After years of re-releases and vague promises that “something” involving the series would be announced by its new owner, in 2017 we finally got Darksiders 3 announced.  The hybrid of character action combat and Zelda style puzzles is one I absolutely love, and Darksiders 3 looks to continue that and tone down on the WRPG elements added to the second game.  And with your character in this one using a whip, it looks like the new God of War game that I wanted.  Character action games haven’t been doing so great in the past couple years, but with this game, the hopefully at least decent brand name God of War, the heavily rumored Devil May Cry 5, and something you’ll see in a bit, 2018 looks like a comeback year for the genre.  At this rate we won’t see what happened after the end of the first game until Darksiders 5, but as long as we keep getting great playing games, this series can draw it out as long as it wants.  It was a long War, full of Strife, that may have caused some Fury, but this series was rescued from the grip of… doom.

4. Guacamelee 2

Publisher/Developer: DrinkBox Studios
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: “Early 2018”

I didn’t play Guacamelee until I was given a free copy of the Wii U version to review, and it made me wish I had supported the series from day one.  Guacamelee is my favorite digital only game of all time and one of my favorite Metroid-likes of all time.  The other games I played by its developer, Drinkbox, were also high quality, but nothing compared to Guacamelee.  So it getting a sequel (the developer kept their word about making it after they finished Severed, that’s something I always respect) natural caused a great amount of excitement for me.  I’m not sure how the story will continue, the first game seemed pretty self-contained, but I don’t care.  As long as we get that same mix of platforming, melee combat, and exploration, all done fantastically, the story can be whatever it wants.  Even with Metroid back, this series is one of pinnacles of its genre and deserves more praise and attention.

3. Yoshi Switch

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Good-Feel
Platform: Switch
Release Date: 2018

It may not have a name yet, but after Yoshi’s Wooly World miraculously not only made a good Yoshi game again but one that goes toe to toe with the legendary Yoshi’s Island, a sequel from the same developer is something I prayed for and am ecstatic that we got so quickly.  Aside from a couple interesting new features (being able to aim eggs at things in the background and flip to the other side of levels) we don’t know too much about this game, but I think that will change very early in 2018.  With levels demoed at Nintendo’s Treehouse during E3 2017, I think this game is close to completion and we should get it pretty early in 2018.  Whenever it comes out, I can’t wait to have Yoshi’s amount of great games finally average one per decade since the 90s… yeah, that’s really sad, but it’s water under the bridge.  Yoshi has finally found a Good home, and I can Feel that things will be all right for him from now on.  But what will Arzest do now?  Yeah, I don’t care either.

2. Bayonetta 3

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Platinum Games
Platform: Switch
Release Date: TBD

Okay, they never said this was coming in 2018, but I have two arguments for why this is on the list while Metroid Prime 4 and Pokemon Switch aren’t.  One, we’ve technically seen more of this game that either of those, and with Bayonetta 1 and 2 being ported to Switch in very early 2018, I feel like waiting over a year from then to release Bayonetta 3 seems unlikely.  And it’s not like Nintendo hasn’t released some games faster than anyone thought possible recently. (Wait, why isn’t Xenoblade 2 on this list?  Oh, right, the “inevitable” delay didn’t happen.)  Two, it just wouldn’t feel right if I DIDN’T put something on this list with a high chance of showing up on the 2019 list.  It’s tradition!  That aside, this announcement filled me with glee.  Bayonetta 2 is one of the best action games of all time, and I’m so relieved that Wii U’s sales struggles didn’t doom the series.  Now that Bayonetta 3 is on a successful system (and it being on one system is better than zero, regardless of what your favorite platform is) we can see what a Nintendo/Platinum team up is truly capable of.  As mentioned earlier, character action games seem to be making a comeback in 2018, and Bayonetta 3 is the perfect title to symbolize that.  Time for this series to achieve a triple platinum.  But would you believe it wasn’t the most exciting game announced during the week where it debuted?

1. MegaMan 11

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform:
Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC
Release Date:
“Late 2018”

I think this was the closest a game announcement has ever come to making me cry.  Even with Super Mario Galaxy 2 and Super Mario We Swear It’s A Tech Demo, it’s not like I thought there was a chance we’d never see another Mario game.  But Mega Man… I kept the faith, during the dark six and a half year between Universe (yes, Icepick, I did care about it from the start) and Legends 3 being cancelled and Mega Man Isn’t Dead Day I always insisted that series as popular and long running as Mega Man couldn’t permanently die.  But there’s always doubt, always fear, until it actually comes back.  And it did, it finally did.  I would have settled for a licensed game based on the new cartoon, so even if Mega Man 11 isn’t my very first choice, it’s still way more than I dared to hope for.  Classic Mega Man gameplay combined with the first attempt to feel like a modern game in over a decade should make the game fantastic, but I’ll be honest, the emotional impact was a big factor in this getting the number one spot.  It feels like a giant weight has been lifted from gaming, and the one two punch of Metroid and Mega Man returning after being MIA since 2010 made 2017 a better year than even my hope for it last year could have imagined.  As 2013 proved, even releasing great games can leave a dark aftertaste if the future doesn’t look bright, and 2017 was both the best year for gaming in a long time and one of the most hopeful.  2017 has left the world of gaming a much brighter place than it was at the start, and 2018’s games are a testament to that.  2018 has big shoes to fill, but it also has momentum on its side, I can’t wait to see how it turns out.

Dariwan

2017 is winding down. It was a pretty decent gaming year. We got great games like Persona 5, even better systems like the Nintendo Switch. Now that 2017 is coming to a close, we’re looking forward to 2018.  Here’s my top 10 Games (if I can find 10 I’m even interested in…) but first, a few honorable mentions.

Honorable Mentions

Here’s a few games that didn’t make the top 10 but I feel still deserve a mention…

  • Bayonetta 3 (Switch) – I love the Bayonetta series. A sexy witch who fights angels because she doesn’t like them. How can you hate this! (oh wait, you hate that the game isn’t on your system even though when it was, no one bought it …but I ain’t saying nothing you ain’t already heard…)
  • Death Stranding (PS4) – This game …I’m not even sure it IS a game at this point…interests me. I like the whole death and life thing it’s trying to portray, and I hope to see more of the gameplay that may interest me in the future.
  • Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night (PS4, Xbox One, Switch, PS Vita, PC) – I’ve half been a fan of the Castlevania series, despite playing half of one game. This game somewhat interests me because it seems like what the creator wanted to do with the Castlevania series if he had the chance.
  • Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection (PS4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) – The Street Fighter anniversary train still won’t end! Re-releases of most of the old games (Street Fighter 1, some of the Street Fighter 2s, Street Fighter Alpha, and all of Street Fighter 3) some with online and they’re all Arcade Perfect! There are some problems we’ve found with this but again, another article for another time.
  • Dragon Ball FighterZ (PS4, Xbox One, PC) – the only game with an actual date on this list! Dragon Ball FighterZ is a pretty much pitch perfect anime fighting game made by the great minds at Namco Bandai and Arc System Works. They really put in the work to make the game look like it literally came from the anime to my console! 3V3 combat is reminiscent of Marvel vs Capcom 2 and 3 and the combat looks pretty good for a Dragon Ball Z/Super fighter.

10. Spider-Man

Publisher/Developer: Sony Interactive Entertainment/Insomniac Games
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: 2018

I have a small bit of nostalgia for this game, mainly because of how I got certain consoles in my youth. I got an Xbox around the time the Raimi Spider-Man movies came out, and  of course they had games for said movies. I had the first Spider-Man Raimi  movie game (what a mouthful!) and I thought it was pretty awesome!  I’d eventually get my hands on the second game as well. Even if the games are considered mediocre for this day and age, I enjoyed them. So seeing a new Spider-Man game in this generation with great graphics and  great gameplay. Even though I also loved Shattered Dimensions in its day, I cannot wait to web-swing the streets of New York as Peter Parker (or maybe even  Miles Morales) against fighting Spider-Man’s great rogue gallery!

9. Ghost of Tsushima

Publisher/Developer: Sony Interactive Entertainment/Sucker Punch Productions
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: TBC

We don’t know a lot about this game, as all we saw were some nice looking cut scenes (I guess?) and some developer talk on  the game at the Paris Games Week in 2017, but the premise got me hooked. Being a Samurai in the feudal era of Japan interests me. And I’d like to play as that since I missed out on so many other games in the past like that (Brave Fencer Musashi, for one) The closest to a game like this I’ve played Is Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance. So I’m excited to see what more Sucker Punch can give me after the Infamous series.

8. Vampyr

Publisher/Developer: Focus Home Interactive/Dontnod Entertainment
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC
Release Date: Spring 2018

Again, this one I know little about. I have a love-hate relationship with Vampires. There are times when they’re awesome, (Castlevania series and the Vampire: The Masquerade series in games, almost anything really involving Dracula -OR BLACULA!- in movies/TV) and times when they’re just not. (Twilight, anyone? I shudder when I think about it: VAMPIRES DON’T SPARKLE!)  The little I’ve seen of this game reminds me of The Darkness, one of the only 3 FPS games I’ll actually play and enjoy. (If you want me to delve into that, I’ll talk about it some other time) and the Infamous series, which interests me a bit. So I’ll see how this goes…even though the developer, Dontnod, has had some stinkers in the past (Life is Strange, a train wreck using time travel to make things worse; and Remember Me, which no one remembers…ha ha) Let’s see if they can actually come up with some gold with Vampyr.

7. Indivisible

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/Lab Zero Games
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch
Release Date: 2018

I backed this game back in 2015. (I know, that feels SO long ago..) and this game is finally coming out in 2018! The things that sold me on it back then were the people who made the then-wonderful fighting game Skullgirls were developing it, and it had an interesting battle system. Now in those 3 years, we’ve seen a couple games copy this system, like the Fallen Legion series and Has-Been Heroes to an extent. But I think Indivisible will be a great game on its own and I hope my 3-year-old payment will be worth it in the end!

6. Darksiders III

Publisher/Developer: THQ Nordic/Gunfire Games
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC
Release Date: TBA 2018

I have had an interest in this series for a while. I bought the first game on PS3 a few years ago, I got stuck in it (as I usually do) and eventually shelved it, but I did like what I played. It definitely had God of War vibes and I love the fact that it involved the Horsemen of the Apocalypse. I enjoy the supernatural parts of religion, such as angels and demons and the such, so this game is right up my alley! I haven’t played the second game yet, but I have it on my PS4, so hopefully by the time this comes out, I may have a chance to play, if not beat the second one. Maybe even get the first one played and beaten to so I can enjoy this one. As always, a female protagonist is never a bad thing and neither is a whip for combat! (Here’s looking at you, Belmonts!)

5. God of War

Publisher/Developer: Sony Interactive Entertainment/SIE Santa Monica Studio
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: Q1 2018

How fitting this game is next after talking about Darksiders 3, since that game is pretty much inspired by this one! I’ve loved God of War since I bought the first game on an impulse so many years ago at Walmart (back when I bought my video games exclusively at Walmart…those were the days) I call(ed) it my rage game because I can let out all my anger and kill and gnash and have blood everywhere and no one will tell me anything AND I won’t go to jail!  Anyway, I’ve played most of the  games in the series by now (sans Ascenion) and I’ve loved every one I’ve player (save Chains of Olympus…don’t ask.)  Even though this game is straying from the old formula and it’s kind of giving me “dadmance vibes” like Spider-Man Homecoming did with Peter Parker and Tony Stark, I think the game will still be solid. Also using Norse gods this time instead of Greek will defintely spice things up in Kratos’ world, and he’ll obviously show that age isn’t anything but a number, and he can still kick butt, beard and all!

4. Soulcalibur VI

Publisher/Developer: Bandai Namco/Project Soul
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC
Release Date: TBA 2018

Ah yes, “it’s time to go back to the stage of history!” I’ve loved the Soul Calibur/Soul Edge series for a while, even if Namco themselves went a bit crazy for a few years. The last Soul Calibur game I played and loved was Soul Calibur II, but some of the characters in the later games were interesting to see. I didn’t really play very much of Soul Calibur III, IV, or V, so I’m not gonna comment much on them. But I got really excited when I saw the announcement for Soul Calibur VI during The Game Awards. The game looks superb, even if it looks like a retread back to  the original Soul Calibur, I personally think the game needs to go back to its roots, since the current games really have left  a sour taste in some people’s mouths. It’s also fitting since Soul Calibur just recently had its 20th anniversary, so a nod to its roots is never a bad thing. Also I may need another solid fighting game as it looks like my choices are dwindling…but that’s another article for another day.

3. Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes

Publisher/Developer: Marvelous Entertainment/Grasshopper Manufacture
Platform: Switch
Release Date: 2018

NO MORE HEROES. Another impulse game on the Wii, one of my first in my Gamestop days of buying games (I’m feeling  a bit old typing this). I bought this game because I’m a sucker for a cool guy with a sword. And oh that rabbit hole that Goichi Suda (Suda 51) dug was a nice one. The game is about a crazed otaku-turned-assassin who’s told to kill other assassins and rise up to the top of the leaderboards. The gameplay is amazing and one of the few games of its time to truly make motion controls feel fun! I really felt like I was Travis Touchdown and I was swinging that katana around! I beat the first game and loved it, and got stuck in the second. I got a bit angry when they remade the first game for PS3, because I really felt like the Wii was the perfect system for the game, but people gonna complain until they get what they want, and apparently it wasn’t that good a game. (good for them…) I got a bit scared for this series, because as I recall, Suda51 said on many occasions that this game wouldn’t be on a Nintendo system if it was gonna get an update, and the game wouldn’t really see a release. But when I saw this trailer, I felt like Suda51 gave me an early Christmas/birthday gift! (My birthday is 4 days before Christmas) I cannot wait to see what (and WHO) Travis Touchdown has gotten his awesome katana(s) stuck into this time!

2. MegaMan 11

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: “Late 2018”

I know I’ve personally had some bad times with this series, but I’m actually happy that Mega Man is gonna come back again in 2018! It’s been a long, long  wait for a new Mega Man game since Mega Man 9 and 10 came out in 2008 and 2010, respectively.  Most people even thought Mega Man to be a dead series, never to see another new game again. But for its 30th Anniversary, Capcom announced Mega Man 11 and also the Mega Man X series coming out to next gen consoles (PS4, Xbox One, and Switch)  I am personally very excited for the new Classic Mega Man game, even if I had much trouble with the series in the past, and it caused me a few…issues. I’m sure this game will be amazing and I will hopefully beat it sometime in the next 10 years….

1. Kingdom Hearts III

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release: 2018

Oh god I’ve been waiting for this game FOR-EVER!  Almost as long as the smash hit Persona 5 that finally came out last year in 2017!  (Winter 2015….grumble grumble) Anyway I’ve loved this series for a long time. Ironically I got into this series because my cousin had it. And she was afraid of one of the bosses. So she ended up giving it to me. My Xbox got stolen so I got a PS2, mainly for this game, and I’ve been in love ever since. I’ve played almost all of the games except for the few mobile games since then. I’ve been waiting for Kingdom Hearts 3 since I finished 2 around…2006-ish. When I heard this game was actually happening, I was shocked. I didn’t expect this game to come out at all in my lifetime since it took so long between 2 and 3 and they had so many side stories and spin-off games. I think they’re finally putting Nomura’s foot to the fire and telling  him to release this game in 2018, so I hope it actually comes out. The worlds look amazing from what I’ve seen and the properties they’re using are also top-notch. I chose this as my number one because I think this game will hopefully be the best of them all as it will end the Keyblade Seekers portion of the Kingdom Hearts series, then they can start on a whole other adventure, which I cannot wait to hear about in the far-flung future!

Well 2017 has ended and 2018 will soon begin. The last 12 months of gaming have been great and let’s hope for 12 more!

This is Dari, signing off!

NekoGamerX

2017 was a great year for video games and 2018 is looking good so far as well. This is my list for most anticipated games for 2018.

Honorable Mention

Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection (PC/Switch/PS4/XBO): Okay, so technically this is not a new game. I love classic Capcom fighting games and this sounds like a great collection. I only wish Capcom would release some more of their other classic fighters like Darkstalkers but that dream is dead.

10. Guacamelee 2

Publisher/Developer: DrinkBox Studios
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: “Early 2018”

I liked the original Guacamelee. It was a really fun Metroidvania/Metroid-like game. I didn’t care for the game’s theme but the gameplay was solid. I want more games like this.

9. project OCTOPATH TRAVELER

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix/Acquire/Nintendo
Platform: Switch
Release Date: 2018

This game reminds me of the old RPGs that were on the Super NES back in the day. I’m glad to see games like this are still around. Hope to see more like it in the future.

8. MegaMan 11

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: “Late 2018”

Okay, classic MegaMan is my second favorite MegaMan, but I won’t lie: I was hoping for a new MegaMan X game. Oh well, this is the next best thing and at least the older MegaMan X games are getting re-released on everything and MegaMan is not dead.

7. Blazblue Cross Tag Battle

Publisher/Developer: Arc System Works
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4
Release Date: 2018

I’ve been a Blazblue fan for years and I think it’s a way better series than Guilty Gear. I’m just waiting for Taokaka or Kokonoe to be announced as playable characters. Hell, why not both? I’d be happy with just one of them though, but at least Makoto is in it.

6. Monster Hunter: World

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: January 26, 2018

The Monster Hunter series is really fun and I’m glad to see it come to the PS4, though I don’t mind what it comes out on, as long as they keep coming out here.

5. Kingdom Hearts III

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix
Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release: 2018

Okay, this game has been a long time coming. I just about gave up on it, but it looks like it’s finally going to happen. And it’d better!

4. Indivisible

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/Lab Zero Games
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch
Release Date: 2018

Now this game, from what I’ve seen. It looks good and it’s being made by the same people that made Skullgirls, so I’ve got faith that it’s going to be good.

3. Dragon Ball FighterZ

Publisher/Developer: Bandai Namco/Arc System Works
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: January 26, 2018

This game looks way better than what MvCI could ever hope to be and a lot more. MvCI was the biggest letdown of 2017 for me and I hope there are more fighters like this in the works – and less games like MvCI.

2. Freedom Planet 2

Publisher/Developer: GalaxyTrail
Platform: PC, possibly more
Release Date: 2018

The first Freedom Planet was one of the most fun 2D platformers I’ve played in a long time and I was hoping for a sequel. Glad it’s coming in 2018. Well, at least I hope it does and doesn’t get delayed.

1. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/ArtPlay/DICO
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation Vita
Release Date: “March 2018”

I’ve wanted a new Metroidvania-style Castlevania game for a long time and with Konami being the way they are right now, I’ve given up on that. Bloodstained is the next best thing and it’s my only hope for a Metroidvania game. I don’t want this to be another Mighty No. 9 and from what I’ve seen, it looks like it’s not going to be. It looks like the people working on this game know what they’re doing, which makes me happy and I can’t wait to play the final game.

Shellshock

The year 2017 started with, and ended with a bang on many different fronts. We had what many consider to be one of the best years in gaming, and with good reason. We’re already seeing a growth in many different gaming markets with compelling software, as well as new hardware being released. Now that 2018 is on the horizon, there are many different games I’m excited for, more than how I was going into 2017. I don’t expect 2018 to top 2017, but it doesn’t have to, as it needs to be able to hold its own with lots of games that will keep people playing.

Now, I’m going to omit games with no set release window or date (Metroid Prime 4, Pokémon Switch, Fire Emblem Switch [sic], and Bayonetta 3, to name a few), as we don’t have a lot of info to go by. I’m also going to shy myself away from ports or remakes, with one exception. That being said, let’s get on with, what I would consider to be my Top 10 Most Anticipated Games of 2018!

Before we get into the list, let’s get into some honorable mentions, shall we?

Honorable Mentions

  • Soulcalibur VI (PS4, Xbox One, PC): Announced at The Game Awards 2017, Soulcalibur VI is returning to its roots by bringing us fan favorites from the original series, with a new take, and a reimagining of the series’ story and setting. Soulcalibur V was a disappointment, and it’s been years since that game was released, so I’m looking forward to seeing if 6 could give us the experience we’ve been wanting to see again.
  • Wargroove (Switch, PC, Xbox One): A strategy game in the vein of Advance Wars, Wargroove has a lot of interesting characters, and a battle system that will keep you coming for more. I’ve enjoyed the Advance Wars games, so I’ll definitely be looking forward to this.
  • Runner3 (Switch): The Runner games were fun to play, especially Runner2, in addition to the cool background music during gameplay. With paths that you could now branch off into the background, and the ability to double jump, there’s lots of new experiences to be had in this installment.
  • Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes (Switch): I’m going on record to say that I still need to finish the first game (as well as start the second after that), but that doesn’t take away my excitement I have for this game. There’s a lot of crossovers with other indie games, which is really cool. From what I’ve played of the first game, I liked, so there’s a high chance that I will enjoy this one.
  • Indivisible (PC, Nintendo Switch, Playstation 4, XBOX One): Lab Zero made a great fighting game in Skullgirls, and I’ve enjoyed that one a lot. With Indivisible, it looks a lot more ambitious, by combining Valkyrie Profile and Metroidvania-style gameplay, and that’s an awesome combination. However, there’s not a lot of info on this game, which is why it’s an honorable mention at best. Hoping we get more info on this game really soon!

And now onto the main list.

10. Valkyria Chronicles 4

Publisher/Developer: Sega
Platform: Playstation 4, Nintendo Switch, XBOX One
Release Date: 2018

Valkyria Chronicles 4 looks to be a return to form for the series, as it’s going back to a similar style that the first game had. It’s set in the same timeframe as the first game, so it’s not required to have played any of the other games in the series to have knowledge of what’s going on, or to even get right into it. If you are into turn-based strategies with an overhead view, and controlling characters with different methods of combat, then you’ll definitely want to pick this up.

9. Yoshi (Nintendo Switch)

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Good-Feel
Platform: Nintendo Switch
Release Date: 2018

Yoshi makes his return, this time on the Nintendo Switch. The game is developed by Good-Feel, and has a similar gameplay style as Yoshi’s Woolly World. Unlike Woolly World, Yoshi is made of a different material than yarn. When this was announced at the Nintendo E3 Spotlight, it was overshadowed due to the announcement of Metroid Prime 4. Despite that, I thought it was nice to see a new Yoshi game on the Nintendo Switch. Eggs are back, which made sense since Yoshi’s not made of Yarn in this one, so he won’t need Yarn Balls. Otherwise, the game is just like Woolly World, which is a good thing. I like Yoshi, so I’m definitely looking forward to this!

8. Dragon Quest XI

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix/Armor Project
Platform: Playstation 4, Nintendo Switch, Nintendo 3DS
Release Date: 2018

The Dragon Quest series outside of Japan has always been overlooked, at least until Dragon Quest VIII on PS2. That game sold well, but it did have a demo for Final Fantasy XII as part of it. We did get Dragon Quest IX on DS, and that ended up being the best-selling game in the series outside of Japan. We never got X here, though it did go the MMO route, but I’m sure some people would’ve appreciated it. That being said, when Dragon Quest XI was announced, I couldn’t be any more excited! It’s back to the traditional Dragon Quest gameplay we all know and love, and the game itself looks even more beautiful than ever before. I’m hoping it gets localized here in 2018, as I will be spending so much time with this game!

7. Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection

Publisher/Developer: Capcom/Digital Eclipse
Platform: PC, Nintendo Switch, Playstation 4, XBOX One
Release Date: May 2018

I said I wasn’t going to talk about ports or remakes, but I have to make this one an exception. Coming from Ultra Street Fighter II: The Final Challengers, many people criticized the price point, using HD Remix’s graphics, and the awful Way of the Hadou minigame. Out of nowhere, Capcom announced the Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection at the 2017 Capcom Cup, which includes twelve different Street Fighter games. You get the original, five versions of Street Fighter II, all three games in the Alpha series, and all three games in the Street Fighter III series. The reason I’ve added this game to my list is because of the Nintendo Switch version, specifically. The fact that I could take Street Fighter Alpha 3 and Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike anywhere with me is a big deal. Now I could play with my friends at the meetups I run, at conventions, or even online. You could only play Hyper Fighting, Super Street Fighter II Turbo, Alpha 3, and 3rd Strike online, but those are the four that are worth playing the most, so I’m fine with that. No matter where I go, Street Fighter will always be with me.
 

6. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/ArtPlay/DICO
Platform: Nintendo Switch, PC, Playstation 4, XBOX One
Release Date: 2018

Konami’s Castlevania series has been dormant for a couple of years now, mostly because Lords of Shadow 2 didn’t set the world on fire. As such, we haven’t seen a Metroidvania style game since Order of Ecclesia, though we did get Harmony of Despair, but that’s more-or-less a multiplayer platformer. Bloodstained returning to the Metroidvania style roots is something that I’m excited about. There’s also a prequel to the game in retro style, which is right up my alley, as I loved classic Castlevania.

I’ve backed this game on Kickstarter, and originally went for the Wii U stretch goal. Earlier this year, the development staff confirmed that the Wii U version was cancelled, but later confirmed that it was coming to Switch. I made the Switch (no pun intended), and now I’m looking forward to playing this game anywhere I go!
 

5. Dragon Ball FighterZ

Publisher/Developer: Bandai Namco Entertainment/Arc System Works
Platform: Playstation 4, XBOX One, PC
Release Date: January 26, 2018

I’m a huge Dragon Ball Z fan, and I’ve enjoyed many of the DBZ fighting games in the past, so this one is a no-brainer. After the disappointment that was Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite, many fighting game fans (including myself) took a look at this game’s previews and trailers, and were wowed at the execution of the fighting system. This felt more like a Marvel vs. Capcom game than Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite, and it showed. This game also has elements of many different Arc System Works games, such as “Vanish” and “Dragon Rush” moves, as well as “Super Dash”. Who is developing this game, might you ask? Well Arc System Works, of course! Even the element where you could collect the Dragon Balls to make a wish that helps you in the match sounds interesting, too! Dragon Ball FighterZ is definitely going to be a lot of fun, whether you love fighting games, the Dragon Ball universe, or both!

Sadly, this is the final Dragon Ball series video game where longtime Japanese voice actress Hiromi Tsuru voiced Bulma, as she passed away on November 16, 2017. May she rest in peace.
 

4. Blazblue Cross Tag Battle

Publisher/Developer: Arc System Works
Platform: Playstation 4, Nintendo Switch, PC
Release Date: 2018

Another crossover fighter? Yes, please! Arc System Works is two for two with multi-man tag team fighting games, both with Dragon Ball FighterZ, and now Blazblue Cross Tag Battle! Who knew they would be the ones filling a huge positive void in that market that not even Capcom could do?

Anyway, you have characters from the Blazblue series, Persona 4 Arena, Under Night In-Birth, and RWBY, all colliding against each other in this tag team fighting game! The gameplay is a mix of Blazblue Central Fiction, Persona 4 Arena Ultimax, and Under Night In-Birth EXE: Late[st], with lots of tweaks. While I’m looking forward to Dragon Ball FighterZ, I’m looking forward to Blazblue Cross Tag Battle even more!

3. Kirby: Star Allies

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/HAL Laboratory
Platform: Nintendo Switch
Release Date: 2018

Kirby has a lot of fun games; some of them are easy, and many of them are very challenging. Kirby: Star Allies returns to the 4-player co-op style, similar to Kirby’s Return to Dreamland. However, it also brings back the Helper feature from many games in the series, such as Super Star and Squeak Squad [sic]. You could have up to three companions with you throughout the game, and turn into a giant tire as you roll down hills. There’s a lot of new puzzles, which I always enjoy, since they could be challenging. You could also combine power-ups, something that hasn’t been seen in the series since Kirby 64, which is neat. During the September Nintendo Direct, they revealed King DeDeDe with huge muscles, so clearly, he’s been working out (though he still has stubby legs). This looks like it’ll be released during the Spring, and I’ll be picking this one up as it’s released!

2. Project Octopath Traveler

Publisher/Developer: Square Enix/Acquire
Platform: Nintendo Switch
Release Date: 2018

The moment I first laid my eyes on this game when it was announced back in January, I fell in love with it! Using an HD 2D engine, Project Octopath Traveler goes back to the old school JRPG roots with many new twists. In this game, you could make your command multiple times via boost points, which allows you to attack, defend, or increase potency of abilities. This game gives me vibes from Final Fantasy VI, Chrono Trigger, and the Bravely series of games, all rolled into one, with beautiful 2D graphics. This game feels more like a Final Fantasy game to me than a lot of modern games in that series. Acquire and Square Enix captured the magic of the older 16-bit era Squaresoft RPGs, and if they could add a lot of content to this game, it’ll make a lot of people come back for more! I also look forward to what the final name of the game will end up being.

1. Mega Man 11

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform: Nintendo Switch, PC, Playstation 4, XBOX One
Release Date: Late 2018

Many of you who know me better have already seen this one coming, and why wouldn’t this be my most anticipated game of 2018? I was so happy to see The Blue Bomber back with a new game! I had a glimmer of hope for a new Mega Man game for years now. I felt like there was hope since Mega Man was included as a playable character in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U. Since then, all we’ve had were Mega Man Legacy Collections 1 and 2, up until December 4th, where Capcom had that Mega Man 30th Anniversary Livestream. Even with the hope that I had, I went in, and kept my expectations low, as I didn’t want to be upset if there wasn’t a new Mega Man game that wasn’t a port. I sat through watching a game show, a Mega Ran Live Performance, and some developers talking about Mega Man’s history. Not long after the Mega Man X games were announced for all major platforms, Capcom showed off the History of Mega Man retrospective, in the form of Mega Man in 8-bit, running, jumping, and climbing through a big stage, showing off all the main games in the Classic series. It was sad to see Mega Man pass through 2011 and onwards with nothing (Mega Man XOver doesn’t count as a real Mega Man game in my eyes). Once I saw Mega Man in Dr. Wily’s lab, I was wondering what was going on, as Dr. Wily went through a turning door. When I saw Mega Man get the ? Orb that represents 2018, I wondered what was up, only to be shocked at what I saw.

MEGA MAN IS BACK!!!

So let’s talk about the game, and what we know so far. It’s a 2.5D style game that plays like the Classic Mega Man games. Mega Man looks a bit taller and sounds like a teenager, which I didn’t mind. The slide and Charge shot are back, which is great, because I wanted them to add a lot of elements from the entire Classic series. It looks like there was a Super Charge Blast of some sort, which I don’t know much about, but it looks to do a hefty amount of damage. The music sounds good, but I want to hear more catchy tunes that the Mega Man series is known for. The graphics look exactly what I would expect them to, a modernized Mega Man game with a 2.5D Gameplay. I’ve seen people claim that this game looks like Mighty No. 9, but to be honest, I think this looks a heck of a lot better. You could collect gears in this game, but it’s unknown as to what purpose they serve, but I wonder if it’s either similar to the Nuts and Bolts from previous entries, or something different? I’ll have to wait and see to find out all the details when Capcom’s ready to share them.

Capcom has been on a huge roller coaster ride with many of their fans for over 11 or so years, and they’ve made a lot of stupid decisions that really ticked people off. It seems like they now want to get on their fans’ good graces again, and while Mega Man 11 is a great start, they still have a long way to go before they get universal praise again. I really hope Capcom delivers with this game, and I trust the new lead director and producer to get the job done. I also had a funny feeling that Capcom wanted to make a new Mega Man game for years now, and there have been cancelled games, even after Universe and Legends 3’s cancellations (the Metroid Prime-styled Mega Man X game for Nintendo 3DS [sic] says hi), but they weren’t sure as to how to go about it. Now that the Blue Bomber is back, I will do everything I can to support this game. I will buy this game on both Switch and Steam (and if I had a Playstation 4 or XBOX One, then I’d get them on those platforms, too). Not only am I happy that Mega Man is back, I also never want him to go on another seven-to-eight-year hiatus ever again. Saying that I cannot wait for this game is a complete understatement, but the latter part of 2018 is going to be worth it!

So that’s my 10 most anticipated games of 2018.I had a lot more games that I was more anticipating than previous years, as there’s a lot for me to look forward to. There are many other games I’m looking forward to that’s not on this list, but they lack info or a solid release date, but if any of them get released in 2018, you bet I will be picking them up! Again, I enjoyed 2017 a lot more, and while I don’t expect 2018 to top it, I do hope we get yet another great year in video games.

Professor Icepick

2017 was probably one of the best years for gaming we’ve had in a long time. What I find really surprising is the fact that, for once, the vast majority of the games on last year’s list actually managed to come out – for better or for worse. The only real issue I’ve got with this year is that it seems like compared to this time last year, relatively few new games were announced to fill in the gaps the stellar releases that hit in 2017 left behind, but that’s just nitpicking. Hopefully, 2018 manages to continue 2017’s trend of timely releases and amazing titles. With that being said, let’s get started with this year’s honorable mentions before we tear into my top 10.

Honorable Mentions

  • Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection (PC/Switch/PS4/XBO): Okay, so technically this is a cheat. But that’s why it’s only on the honorable mentions listing. 12 classic Street Fighter games, with 4 of the most popular games getting full online capabilities for $40 sounds like an amazing offer to me. The fact that Digital Eclipse – who previously brought us the original MegaMan Legacy Collection and the Disney Afternoon Collection – is heading up this game’s development, and we know that there’s at least some form of rollback netcode involved makes me feel confident in this upcoming anthology’s quality.

I just hope they reconsider making Alpha 2 an offline-only experience. There has also been a bit of controversy over the fact that they’re only including the American versions of each game in this collection: even MMLC had both the American and Japanese versions of each game included in all releases.

  • Toejam and Earl: Back in the Groove (PC/PS4/XBO/Switch): One of the few stragglers from last year’s list, TJ&E may look amazing, but it’s been demoted to honorable mention this time. It’s partly due to the fact that so many other amazing games were announced for 2018, but I’m still bitter that it didn’t manage to release in 2017. I guess adding a Switch version pushed everything back.
  • Monster Boy and the Cursed Kingdom (PC/PS4/XBO/Switch): Monster Boy also hits the honorable mentions for the same reasons as Toejam and Earl. Of course, I guess Cursed Kingdom has an excuse: they’re retooling the graphics from sprites to hand-drawn animation. Considering how late into development they decided to shift the artstyle, it only makes sense that it’d be pushed back at least a year.
  • Dragon Ball FighterZ (PC/PS4/XBO): DBFZ was actually on the main list until I realized that there was another game slated for release next year that I preferred. It’s nothing personal, but I generally tend to prefer 2-on-2 tag fighters over the 3-on-3 versions – but looking at how well Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite turned out for me, that’s not an automatic sign of quality.
  • Indivisible (PC/PS4/XBO/Switch): Another game that was just barely kicked off the main list, Indivisible is the newest product from Lab Zero Games, the people behind Skullgirls. News on the game’s development has been slow and I’ve been following for a long time now. By this point, I’m just kind of burnt out on the whole concept, to the point where I’ve been ignoring news until something significant pops up. Still hoping they make that final stretch goal – which would add a bonus dungeon and multiple endings – by their end of the year deadline.

Dishonorable Mention

  • Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana (PC): “Same day release”, my fat, pale hairy ass.

10. Guacamelee 2

Publisher/Developer: DrinkBox Studios
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: “Early 2018”

I consider the original Guacamelee among the best Metroidvanias platform-adventure games ever released, so I was incredibly excited to hear that it’s finally getting a sequel. The only reason that it ends up so low on my list is that it’s presently a PS4 exclusive. That’s not much of a surprise, considering the first game launched as a timed exclusive on PlayStation, but considering the game took roughly 15 months to hit other consoles, that means I probably won’t be getting my hands on it until 2019 at this rate. Kind of kills the hype, don’t you think?

9. Lethal League Blaze

Publisher/Developer: Team Reptile
Platform: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: 2018

The original Lethal League is perhaps one of my favorite indie games of all-time. Effectively the bastard love child of Super Smash Bros., Super Dodge Ball and Pong, the game is a unique blend of arcade sports and fighting game action. The game managed to finally hit both the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One this year, but they also announced a pseudo-sequel – it’s been stated to be an expanded retelling of the original game – for those two platforms as well as PC. Boasting additional characters and a sleek new cel-shaded 2.5D art style, Blaze seems to be well on its way to taking Lethal League to the next level. We have very little information over all, but Team Reptile seems confident that the game will launch next year. I’m hoping that there’s some form of crossplay – ideally between PS4 and Steam – but even if there isn’t, I’m still excited for this remake.

8. Kirby: Star Allies

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/HAL Laboratory
Platform: Switch
Release Date: Spring 2018

I’ve been a fan of the Kirby series for a long time and I’d consider them to be the “chess” of the platformer genre: easy to learn, but difficult to master. Considering how much I ended up loving Triple Deluxe and Planet Robobot, I was excited when Nintendo first revealed their new Kirby game for the Switch back at E3 this past year and we got to see even more footage this past September during one of their Nintendo Directs. The ability to combine copy powers returns from Kirby 64, though in an entirely new form, which seems like a pretty good gimmick to base an entire game around. My only nagging doubt is the implication at the reliance on co-op play – and by extension, AI partners in single-player. I’m hoping that this doesn’t end up dragging things down, but I’ll just have to wait and see when the game releases.

7. Blazblue Cross Tag Battle

Publisher/Developer: Arc System Works
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4
Release Date: 2018

Okay, so Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite ended up being a huge disappointment to me and many others and to capitalize on that, Bandai Namco partnered with Arc System Works to deliver what looks like an amazing 3v3 tag fighter featuring the Dragon Ball franchise, with gorgeous cel-shaded 3D models on par with those of the Guilty Gear Xrd games. I was impressed, but still a bit sad: I’d been waiting for so long for a return to form for 2-on-2 games and Capcom had clearly messed that up for me. Turns out Arc System Works had my back the entire time – and with Blazblue no less! A crossover fighter utilizing Blazblue, Persona 4 Arena, French Bread’s Under Night In-Birth and the popular online animated series RWBY, I was suddenly unshackled from the tyranny of MvCI’s oppressive mediocrity. I’m not particularly fond of the current roster, but Arc’s promised many more announcements in the coming months.

6. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night

Publisher/Developer: 505 Games/ArtPlay/DICO
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation Vita
Release Date: “March 2018”

This has been a long time coming. Originally slated to be released this past year when it was first Kickstarted, Bloodstained was quickly booted back to 2018 once the fundraising came to its conclusion. Since then, we’ve had a revolving door of developers: Inti Creates was booted off the project and replaced with developers more proficient in Unreal Engine 4. The Wii U version was killed off and replaced with a Switch version, which led to mixed reactions at first, but inevitably met with more and more support as time went on. I played the demo they released back in 2016, and while it was a bit rough, the potential was definitely there even that early into development. So, as we finally approach the game’s release, I’m excited once more. I’m probably far more excited for the pack-in retro-themed prequel game and the game’s linear mode than I am for the base game itself, but the entire thing should be a blast. Yet for all that excitement, I still worry that we may have another Mighty No. 9 on our hands.

5. Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes

Publisher/Developer: Marvelous Entertainment/Grasshopper Manufacture
Platform: Switch
Release Date: 2018

“It’s a new game in the No More Heroes franchise” should be enough of a reason for this game to nab the number five slot on this list, but I’ve got a reputation of going above and beyond when it comes to describing just why these games end up where they do. Travis Strikes Again isn’t a traditional entry in the series, but instead chronicles Travis Touchdown being assaulted by Badman – the father of NMH’s Bad Girl – only for the two of them to get sucked into Travis’s Death Drive Mark II video game console and forced to beat its games in order to escape back to the real world. It’s implied to be a collaborative game, developed by several indie developers and might feature some crossovers with paradoxical big-name indie titles like Hotline Miami and Shovel Knight. To put it mildly, this game is for me what Death Stranding is to what feels like everyone else on the planet: I have no idea what it is, and yet I can’t help but be excited.

4. Fighting EX Layer

Publisher/Developer: Arika
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: 2018

This game almost didn’t make the list – simply because I was unaware that it was set for release next year. Back when I was a kid, I loved the original Street Fighter EX – a close friend of mine lent me his copy of the game for an extended period of time. Sure, the graphics were crude, the mechanics imperfect, but there was just something endearing about the whole game. I feel exactly the same about Fighting EX Layer: not an amazing technical powerhouse – either in terms of graphics or gameplay mechanics – but it looks like it’s going to be a lot of fun. Unfortunately, the game’s currently slated as a PS4 exclusive, but maybe if the game performs well, it could make its way onto other platforms.

…just wish they’d gone with “Fighting Layer EX” for the title instead. FLEX is a perfect acronym.

3. “Yoshi for Nintendo Switch”

Publisher/Developer: Nintendo/Good-Feel
Platform: …Switch
Release Date: 2018

20 years. 20 long years. 20 long, agonizing years filled to the brim with broken dreams and unfulfilled promises. That’s how long it took for Yoshi’s Woolly World to deliver a worthy successor to Yoshi’s Island and one that arguably outstripped its predecessor. Fortunately, it’s only taken 3 years for yet another sequel. Once again developed by Good-Feel, “Yoshi for Nintendo Switch” looks like it’s going to expand on the previous game’s formula – and honestly, that’s all it really needs to do. It looks like the game is going to expand on the craftwork setting of the previous game, implementing papercraft and various other media, while the gameplay appears to be better utilizing its 3D graphics, not unlike the early 2.5D platformers, allowing Yoshi to walk into the background and foreground. The truth is, this could’ve been a level pack sequel and I’d still be excited, but it’s good to see further experimentation with the solid formula of the previous game.

2. Freedom Planet 2

Publisher/Developer: GalaxyTrail
Platform: PC, possibly more
Release Date: 2018?

It’s funny: I put Freedom Planet 2 in the #2 spot and GalaxyTrail comes out with a massive update on the game’s progress. The original game is probably one of my favorite 2D platformers of this generation thus far and FP2 looks to deliver at least twice as much on everything the first game had. While we were never really given any sort of release window for the game – only a mention that a playable beta would be available in “mid-2017” (it hit in January of that year) back when the game was announced on Christmas 2015 – the game looks to be nearing completion. GalaxyTrail has mentioned that they have a release date in mind, but simply don’t want to announce it until they’re absolutely sure they can hit it. Considering the issues they had with the first game’s Wii U port, I can’t really blame them. They also mentioned that they can’t confirm any platforms besides PC, Mac and Linux, but are working hard to secure at least some form of console release.

1. MegaMan 11

Publisher/Developer: Capcom
Platform: PC, Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Release Date: “Late 2018”

I know I said these same exact words last year – and I know how well that turned out for me – but once again, “it couldn’t be anything else”. The Blue Bomber has been in dire straits the past seven years, with only a free PC game, a crummy mobile game and a disappointing spiritual successor to show for it. In retrospect, Capcom’s choice to let Inafune make the first move was a brilliant one, but it left the fanbase feeling frozen out. With the specter of Mighty No. 9 finally banished from the forefront of the fanbase’s mind, MegaMan 11 seems poised to capitalize on our aching hunger pangs and deliver a true new-generation MegaMan game.

The ironic thing is that one of the main criticisms I’ve seen leveled at MM11 is that the game has decided, like MegaMan 7, 8 and MegaMan & Bass before it, to abandon its 8-bit roots. Yet I seem to recall an incalculable amount of teeth-gnashing and wailing when MegaMan 10 decided to reuse that retro throwback art style, two years on the heels of MegaMan 9. I guess it’s true what they say: you can’t please everyone. The 2.5D style looks gorgeous, with the character models properly representing the concept art’s new take on the classic anime-inspired look. Some of the backgrounds even look hand-drawn, which just adds to the appeal.

Capcom has been a bit of a mixed bag in recent years, delivering on the promise of Resident Evil 7, while stabbing me in the back with abominations like Dead Rising 4 and Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite. Perhaps it’s naïve to believe in Capcom blindly at this juncture, so I’m looking at this game through the lens of cautious optimism. Still, after 7 years of radio silence, I’m ready to get hurt again. MM11’s set to launch on all four major platforms late next year and I’m willing to give Capcom the benefit of the doubt given what we know so far. At the very least, it should be better than nothing.

Those are my picks for 2018. Last year, I was cynical about any of my choices releasing in 2017, but considering how many did, I was able to come up with an entirely new list this time around. However, this was a double-edged sword: I’m a bit less hyped for this list overall, simply due to a lack of information on what’s been announced and the fact that it feels like very little has actually been announced in 2017 for next year. My previous lists all had the stench of constant delays permeating from some of my major picks, but this year has all but wiped the slate clean. I guess that makes creating a new list difficult: chances are, there could be some pretty amazing games set to release in 2018 that we don’t even know about yet. That’s my hope, anyway.

PC Ports Wishlist 2: Lost in New York

Around this time last year, I decided to do a new article in my long-running indulgence: port-begging for PC games. Of course, in the most recent article, I also added in some additional musings. I discussed what my favorite overall “victories” were since I’d originally started doing these lists, as well as focusing on both my overall top 10 most wanted games out of what I’d covered in older lists and the top games for each remaining list. I can’t really remember if I decided I wanted to make it a yearly tradition after the previous article – at the same time, I guess I just sort of assumed I’d be doing it again anyway. I had fun with last year’s lists, so why not?

This time around, I’m going to be focusing entirely on 2017 with the recap. As such, I’ll be starting with my top 5 confirmations of the years, which was a lot more difficult than I would have expected. Little has really moved since last year’s “Best of the Rest” list, but I’ve finally been able to cobble together an entire new list, so it only seems fitting to introduce it in this article. Finally, considering the fact that the top two slots in my previous top ten list – MegaMans 9 & 10 and Ys SEVEN – have since been released, I’ve decided to write up a new list. Not every game is new, but some have switched places.

Before we get on with this year’s lists, I’d like to go over the PC port announcements that were made since August, when I did the list for GOG games. Admittedly, I didn’t really expect that much in the way of announcements, especially considering the major announcements revealed from May until August. That’s not to say there was nothing these past four months. Killer Instinct was finally released on Steam back in September, technically not a new port – as it was previously a Windows Store exclusive. However, putting it on Steam and adding (albeit limited) crossplay with both the Xbox One and Windows Store versions was a nice touch. September also brought us the announcement of Zone of the Enders 2 receiving another re-release, adding a new VR option, on both PS4 and PC. While the ZOE HD Collection was on a previous list, I suppose getting a new release of the game that worked – apparently, the PS3 and Xbox 360’s version of the first game was broken – is better than nothing, so I’ll count that as a win. However, November alone definitely brought me some big-name releases – that ended up forcing me to modify the new game’s list not once, but twice. Capcom announced that Okami HD would be ported to PC, as well as PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. I wish I could say that I had considered this game for my list, but I thought of it as too much of a long shot, given the series’ Japan-centric aesthetic running counter to Capcom’s Western goals. Sphinx and the Cursed Mummy, a Zelda-like adventure game with platformer elements previously released on the GameCube, PlayStation 2 and the original Xbox, also managed to receive a remastered port on PC, Mac and Linux, courtesy of THQ Nordic. The game didn’t fall within my usual criteria for inclusion, but considering the game’s recent cult following, it’s definitely good news from my perspective. Injustice 2, on the other hand, was originally going to be on this year’s list, but it ended up receiving a PC port courtesy of the fine people at QLOC. Unfortunately, the game uses Denuvo, so I’m going to have to hold off on it until WB comes to their senses. And just like last year, the biggest surprise comes from SNK. The Last Blade 2 – based on the PS4 release this time around – was released on Steam completely unannounced. Ironically, this was another game I intended to put on this year’s list but had to swap it for something new at the last minute.

Speaking of last-minute announcements, there were two more PC gaming announcements I’d consider wins literally the day before this article was scheduled to go up. First, both Jazz Jackrabbit games were released on GOG, which means that the GOG wishlist I wrote back in August has finally borne fruit. Here’s hoping it’s the first of many. Earlier this week, XSEED announced a livestream on November 30th, with a mystery announcement. I was hoping for something Falcom-related and once again, I hit the jackpot. 2001’s Zwei!! – now retitled as Zwei: The Arges Adventure – is being translated and set to release on their usual storefronts (Steam, GOG and the Humble Store) sometime in “Winter 2018”. The work that went into bringing this to modern computers cannot be understated: the original game used DirectX5. XSEED managed to collaborate with Matt Fielding of Magnetic Games, the developer behind Exile’s End. As such, a majority of the original applications and mini-games from the original Falcom release have been maintained in this new version, with the exceptions of the calculator and the calendar. Frankly, I’m just surprised at the turnaround on this one and can’t wait for it to be released.

This year’s list of console ports also managed to achieve a win. Owlboy was originally announced for the Switch back in May, but since then, PS4 and Xbox One ports have also been announced. Last year’s list did way better. Back in March, Lethal League was announced for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Team Reptile also announced a sequel – named “Lethal League Blaze” – set to release some time next year on both PC and “console”. Undertale was also announced for release on PlayStation 4 and Vita back during this year’s E3. I was honestly surprised that it didn’t end up hitting the Nintendo Switch, but that’s life. Likewise, while NEO AQUARIUM – The King of Crustaceans – failed to receive a console port, its sequel ACE OF SEAFOOD has been ported to the PlayStation 4, as well as developer Nussoft teasing a future port to the Nintendo Switch.

Top 5 Successes of 2017

Before I get to my actual picks, I’d like to give an honorable mention to Arc System Works in general. They’ve made quite the evolution over the past couple years, going from re-releasing old PC ports of classic games on GOG to outright announcing PC versions of upcoming games – Double Dragon IV and BlazBlue Cross Tag Battle come to mind. I hope more Japanese companies take after their example and decide to offer major PC support for any games they decide to release in the West.

5. de Blob 1 & 2 – THQ Nordic (Wii, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

I honestly didn’t think this was possible, which is why this made the list over ASW. ASW’s transition into a more PC friendly company was alluded to for quite some time, but when Nordic Games rebranded themselves as “THQ Nordic”, the Darksiders III announcement wasn’t remotely surprising. Bringing back not one, but both de Blob games, on the other hand? Absolutely blew my mind. When Nordic first purchased the intellectual property and said they “had plans” for the series, I thought it was merely corporate talk. After all, the game’s rights had languished in purgatory while other major IPs were claimed by other companies at auction. Best of all, they hired Blitworks to handle the ports of both games. Eventually, the first game had ports announced for the Xbox One and PS4, and it wouldn’t surprise me if the second game follows.

4. Bayonetta/Vanquish – Sega/Platinum Games (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii U)

Speaking of amazing turnarounds, Platinum Games managed to grant us not one, but two of their cult classics from last-gen on PC this year. The fact that both games came out so close to one another made this even more amazing. It’s also been heavily rumored that both games will be released as a double-pack on the PS4 and XBO, though confirmation has yet to be made. With Platinum’s Twitter heavily implying that Bayonetta 3 may be on the horizon, it only makes sense to get the game in as many hands as possible. While a Bayonetta 2 PC port is a pipe dream due to Nintendo’s heavy involvement with the game’s development, I hope we can see even more of Platinum’s back catalog hit PC in the near future.

3. The King of Fighters XIV – SNK (PlayStation 4)

It’s funny: I was honestly expecting to put this one on this year’s list of new games: it was even the sole new addition to last year’s list. SNK managed to impress me with a timely Steam port that I assumed would usher in the game’s demise when it came to additional content, but apparently that wasn’t the case at all. With a port handled by Abstraction Games – an underrated company that handled the Double Dragon Neon PC port – KoFXIV is now capable of shining in brand-new ways, thanks to a fledgling mod community. Seriously, what they’ve been able to do with the game has been amazing.

2. MegaMan 9 & 10 (MegaMan Legacy Collection 2) – Capcom (Xbox 360, PS3, Wii)

I’m surprised this is coming in at number 2, but my top request definitely put up a good fight. I’m probably alone in the sense that I’d have been willing to pay $20 for these two games and all their DLC alone. Adding in two more MegaMan games that hadn’t shown up on PC before – MegaMans 7 and 8 – only served to sweeten the deal and make it a can’t-miss proposition for me. For a while, Capcom had been weird about what they’d port to PC – but in recent years, as long as it’s not a Nintendo-exclusive, PC gamers are likely to get love from Capcom. If anything, I wish they’d been a little less generous in some cases…

1. Falcom (in General)

Yeah, I get that it’s kind of cheating to put an entire company in the top slot, but if I’m going to be honest, they deserve it. Sure, the promises of day one parity with the console releases of Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana ended up being a pipe dream, but considering the rumors of the port’s quality (or lack thereof), not to mention the outright poor quality of the original translation, it may have turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Aksys Games’ translation of Tokyo Xanadu eX+ is set to launch the same day as its PS4 counterpart as promised, but considering how late they started their own beta testing (similar to Ys VIII), well, “watch this space”. Even though Ys VIII didn’t hit its original release date on PC, some good did come of it. Ys VIII is actually the first game that NIS America is releasing on GOG, which is amazing. Whether or not that means other NIS games will hit the platform is beyond me, but that seems pretty cool.

Despite these setbacks from one of their new partners, XSEED more than picked up the slack when it came to representing Falcom on PC. The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel, Ys SEVEN and Zwei: The Ilvard Insurrection (formerly “Zwei II” in Japan) all saw release on Windows PC this year. Also, they’ve announced that both Trails of Cold Steel II’s PC port and the first Zwei!! will release some time next year. Good stuff, but that’s not the major reason why they topped it out. In an interview with Techraptor, Toshihiro Kondo – Falcom’s president – said that he wanted “all of [their] games that come out to [release] on Steam”. Not just all future titles, not all of the old games that Falcom previously released on Windows, ALL of their games. Big words, but considering the massive collection of Falcom games we’ve amassed on PC so far, I wouldn’t be surprised if this comes to pass.

Our Feature Presentation

Before we go onto my new list, I feel like it’s worth going over the rules I’ve limited myself to in the past with these lists. It’s odd, I know, but it just ends up making the process of building a list much more fun. For starters, I’m limiting myself to games from the seventh (PS3/Xbox 360/Wii) and eighth (PS4/Xbox One/Wii U/Switch) generations of gaming. Porting anything else seems like it would require a brand-new release across the board and this is more about simple ports. Considering the sheer amount of games from these generations that have been ported to PC in recent years, it only seems fair. I also try to limit myself to one game per company, though considering the sheer number of buyouts we’ve seen, I’ve decided to expand that to one game per “brand” – but only if the buyout happened since the games were made in the first place. For example, I can ask for one game each from Sega and Atlus, but asking for two games from Square Enix is a no-no. I also consider one “series” as an entry, as long as the games themselves were all present in the generations available to me. Finally, no games that are clearly “console-exclusive”. So, even though Sony Music has started that whole “Unties” publishing label for indie games and Nintendo’s willing to do tie-ins on mobiles, I’m not going to be asking for stuff like Parappa the Rapper Remastered or Super Mario Odyssey. It’s just common sense.

Brandish: The Dark Revenant – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Portable)

I mentioned earlier that Falcom’s president wanted to put all of their games on Steam. The main goal most people have their sights set on is getting Trails of Zero and Trails of Azure on the PC platform. A segment of Falcom’s popular “Legend of Heroes” series, these two games – known colloquially as the “Crossbell games”, named after their setting – are quite literally the most commonly requested games. Unfortunately, they also lack any official English translations, so this would be a necessary part of porting the games to PC.

But do you know what Falcom game already has a full English translation and is also currently doomed to exclusivity on the inescapable purgatory that is the PlayStation Portable? That’s right, Brandish: The Dark Revenant. A remake of the first installment in a short-lived Falcom series, the games bring a new perspective to the first-person dungeon crawlers of old with its unique brand of gameplay. Brandish’s translation was a labor of love from Tom “Wyrdwad” Lipschultz, one of XSEED’s most prominent localizers. While the PSP remake saw its original Japanese release in 2009, it only managed to reach America in January 2015 as a digital-only release. It’s a shame that such an interest game was resigned to such a lackluster fate outside of its home market. Considering the fact that we’ve seen Ys SEVEN hit PC this year, I’d love to see Brandish achieve the same thing. At worst, it would at least give XSEED’s new partners a chance to hone their craft while XSEED is working on translating the Crossbell duology.

Rare Replay – Microsoft Studios/Rare (Xbox One)

This almost feels like cheating, considering I put the Banjo-Kazooie games on an earlier list. Considering they’re both included in this compendium of some of Rare’s most beloved titles (not owned by Nintendo), getting this collection would just end up killing two birds with one stone. It may seem unlikely given the fact that it hasn’t already come to PC, but that’s exactly what I thought about the Killer Instinct reboot back on my very first list. If I’m going to dream, I might as well dream big.

Tekken Tag Tournament HD – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3)

This has the exact opposite problem compared to Rare Replay. I’ve already asked for the second Tekken Tag Tournament, so why ask for the original? The answer’s simple: despite being outclassed in every possible way by its sequel, I associate some really happy memories with the classic game. The re-release in the Tekken Hybrid package reminded me of that and so did replaying the game for the Tekken retrospective I did this year. There was just something amazing about the original game, some intangible factor that prevents me from letting go of it. That’s not to say I wouldn’t rather have the second game if forced to choose, but if Bandai Namco considers re-releasing both, I’m not going to complain.

Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir – Atlus/Vanillaware (PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita)

Every list has got to have at least one pipe dream on it. A game that outright transcends any other baffling choice. I’ve got quite a few on this year’s list, but I’d say last year’s re-release of Odin Sphere is the big one this time around. Since I started doing these wishlists nearly four years ago, we’ve seen Atlus’s stubborn refusal to acknowledge the PC market go from the rule to the exception when it comes to Japanese publishers. Having said that, Atlus USA does do a good job of publishing various indie titles on the platform and Sega has apparently been applying pressure on Atlus’s PC-phobia, with various people speculating that we could see a Persona game hit the platform someday. Frankly, I’d rather just have Vanillaware games, considering the developer’s stated openness to releasing their games on PC. Leifthrasir is technically their most recent release, therefore it feels the most likely.

Azure Striker Gunvolt 2 – Inti Creates (Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo Switch)

This was honestly a last resort when it came to PC port requests. Don’t get me wrong: I loved Gunvolt 2 even more than the original game. It’s more that it seems like Inti Creates may have abandoned the platform when it comes to the games they publish themselves. Not to mention the fact that I think I’d rather have a release of the Striker Pack on PC, as opposed to just the second game. The original Gunvolt’s release on Steam was sort of wonky and it looks like the version included in the Striker Pack on Switch is a much more coherent experience, likely due to what Inti Creates was able to learn from their first attempt at transferring the title – which required two screens – onto a single-screen platform and improve their efforts. At the same time, asking for the Striker Pack feels a bit skeevy, considering we already have the first game on Steam. That’s what makes the whole thing so complicated. I mean, ideally, they’d just release the Striker Pack on Steam and give anyone who bought the first game a discount. That’s my opinion anyway.

Yakuza series – Sega (PlayStation 3, Wii U, PlayStation 4)

From what the internet has been telling me, the Yakuza games – better known as Ryū ga Gotoku in Japan – are the best games I’m not playing. I totally want to try them out, but I’m afraid I’m just no longer into playing big experiences like that on console these days and frankly, I wouldn’t even know where to start at this point. Much like Atlus’s Persona series, there is a massive wellspring of support for these games to make their debut on PC. Some people want the games to start with the latest game in the series – either Yazuka 6 (the next game set to hit the West) or Yakuza Kiwami 2, the remake of the second game set to hit Japan in a matter of days. Other people seem to be fine with the series starting up with Yakuza Zero – which has essentially been deemed the perfect place to jump into the series for newcomers. Meanwhile, I’m a little more extreme: I want everything. Start by localizing the Japanese-exclusive HD ports of the first two games on the Wii U, then just continue from there. Ideally we’d be seeing most of the cut content restored to its original glory in the process. It sounds ridiculous, I know, but honestly, a legitimate entry in the Yakuza series hitting PC is a pipe dream anyway.

(P.S. Nice try, Sega. But no one’s counting that smartphone game you’re working on as an actual PC release for the Yakuza series. In fact, most of us were just insulted.)

The Witch and the Hundred Knight – Nippon Ichi Software (PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3)

NIS America still appears to be pretty heavily involved in the PC scene, but personally, I wish they’d port more of Nippon Ichi’s games to the platform. The Witch and the Hundred Knight is a game that friends of mine have been raving about, and considering the fact that it’s an action-RPG, I’m onboard with it too. The game’s sequel released in Japan early this year and is set to release in the West sometime next year, so allowing the PC crowd to get their hands on the first one would be a nice treat. Though frankly, I’m still worried about which Disgaea game we’ll get next – I’m kind of worried that they might just skip right to 5, considering the game’s ESRB listing. I’d rather play through the rest of the old games first, personally.

Final Fight: Double Impact – Capcom/Iron Galaxy Studios (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)

Truth be told, my backlog of PC port requests from Capcom is running pretty low. That’s not exactly a bad thing: it means that most of the recent games I actually want from the company have already been released on PC. Final Fight: Double Impact just seems like a safe choice to make. It contains arcade-perfect releases of both the original Final Fight and Magic Sword, two beat-‘em-ups with significantly different gameplay styles. Factor in the drop-in multiplayer using GGPO and it’s still worth playing to this day, in spite of the DRM present on the PS3 release. Considering that the 360 and PS3 have essentially been retired, it’d be nice to see this collection – or better yet, a bigger collection with more games included – ported to modern platforms, PC included.

Windjammers – Data East/DotEmu (PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita)

Windjammers is among the most underrated multiplayer games of all-time, so when it managed to get a re-release on both PS4 and Vita this past year, it was exciting. The only thing that could’ve made it better would’ve been if PC had been involved in the fun as well. Fortunately, DotEmu’s released a whole lot of their ports on the platform down the line, so I’m pretty confident that we’ll be tossing frisbees in no time. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that out of all of the games on this year’s new list of games, this is the one I’m most confident will hit PC by this time next year.

Let It Die – GungHo Entertainment/Grasshopper Manufacture (PlayStation 4)

Let It Die and I have had a pretty turbulent history. I was originally excited for the game when it was first announced as “Lily Bergamo”, I’m a huge fan of Grasshopper Manufacture after all. Then the game was transformed into Let It Die and touted as a “free-to-play” experience, at which point, I totally lost interest. Flash-forward to earlier this year when I actually hear some actual information about the final product and I’m intrigued all over again. Let It Die may be a free-to-play game littered with microtransactions, but it’s built far more like a classic arcade game than the mobile cash grabs we associate the concept with. Let It Die is effectively a dungeon-crawler with rouge-like elements, you’re limited to a single life – but if you pay in a quarter, you can continue with your current character. Otherwise, you’ve got to start from scratch. Aside from that, the game maintains the typical Grasshopper off-the-wall insanity: for example, the player is guided by a skateboarding grim reaper named Uncle Death. The permadeath mechanic also lends itself to asynchronous multiplayer: dead characters appear in other players’ games. It’s an honestly interesting concept and one that I’d like to see on PC, though given the fleeting nature of games like this, I wouldn’t hold my breath.

Top 10 Most Wanted

Last year, ranking my top 10 list of the games I want ported to PC the most was more haphazard than anything. I’ve never really been all that good at ordering my favorite things in general and in many cases, there wasn’t really much of a difference in how much I wanted many of the games on the list. So to compensate for it, I’ve decided to factor in just how likely I think it would be to see a re-release on PC, which should go a long way toward explaining why various games have switched places from the previous year. Keep in mind that the top two games from the previous list were in fact the top two games I wanted, this new method just helps to keep things feeling a little more structured: I’ve never really been all that good when it comes to rankings and usually by the time I’m done with one list, I instantly regret the final product. Also, don’t view a game being snubbed from the list as a sign that I don’t want the game: it’s safe to assume that I want everything that’s ever been on any of my list, even games like the now-defunct Tekken Revolution. These are just the ten that would make me the happiest to see on PC at this point in time.

10. Catherine – Atlus (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Like I said earlier, Atlus’s Japanese branch appears to be actively against doing PC versions of their games. That setback won’t stop me from holding out hope. But this was clearly the longest of the longshots last year and yet, here we are. Considering the fact that we were teased with a potential new entry in the series back in August, it only seems reasonable to bring the original back for those who missed it or simply want to play it on more modern platforms.  And what platform is more modern than the PC? Come on, Atlus: you’ve literally got nothing to lose – do a modern “HD” port on PS4 and PC, replacing the Xbox brand. It’s a Golden opportunity you can’t afford to miss.

9. Lollipop Chainsaw – WB Games/Grasshopper Manufacture (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Lollipop Chainsaw dropped a fair amount this year and there are a couple of reasons for this. For starters, WB Games’ PC gaming record has been littered with ups and downs in recent years – ranging from the legendarily bad port of Arkham Asylum to hiring QLOC to fix the botched Mortal Kombat X port to adding Denuvo to a QLOC-developed port of Injustice 2 – Warner Bros. just seems to keep me guessing in strange new ways. More importantly, I don’t think WB Games has any interest in reviving the game, particularly given the game’s controversial content and our current social climate. I mean, the game hasn’t even been added to the Xbox One’s library through backward compatibility. Even Catherine managed that. I think our only hope to see this game again is if Grasshopper Manufacture’s new parent company GungHo Entertainment manages to buy the rights from WB Games and that just seems like a pipe dream.

8. Dragon’s Crown Pro – Atlus/Vanillaware (PlayStation 4)

Of course, even though Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir is the most recent Vanillaware release, we do know what their next release is. Last year, I simply had the original Dragon’s Crown on this list, but considering the fact that there’s a re-release coming up with a higher resolution and on a platform with a more PC-friendly architecture, it just seemed obvious to ask for the new version instead. Still seems odd that they’re doing a re-release so soon: they even released a patch for the PS3 and Vita versions allowing for crossplay with Pro. Truth be told, there’s a part of me that wonders if Dragon’s Crown Pro is just being made as a Trojan Horse to allow Vanillaware to toss their hat into the PC gaming market. I’m more than onboard with the concept.

7. NeoGeo Battle Coliseum – SNK (Xbox 360)

This one seemed like an obvious choice. I didn’t have any 2D fighting games on the list last year and frankly, that’s unacceptable. Considering the fact that many of SNK’s old games that have been re-released on this gen have made their way onto PC – particularly the ones handled internally – it only seems fair to ask for something from the previous gen. Hamster’s been killing it with their Arcade Classics releases of classic NeoGeo games, but SNK’s work after their long-running self-made arcade hardware is a rarity these days. Considering the rumors abound that SNK may be working on a second Battle Coliseum game, re-releasing the first on modern platforms seems like a no-brainer. I see it going down like this: initial release on the PS4, followed by a Steam release at some point down the line.  Not an ideal scenario, but perhaps the most realistic.

6. Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo HD Remix – Capcom (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)

Another significant drop from last year’s list, I just think that seeing either a re-release of the old PC version or a new port of the HD release just isn’t in the cards anymore. Puzzle Fighter’s recently been relaunched as a new free-to-play mobile game with a hideous art style and I’m sure that Capcom would try to avoid any undue competition by releasing the original game. And believe me, this new mobile game is going to need all the help it can get. Maybe we’ll see a re-release if it fails to meet Capcom’s likely insane expectations, but it’ll take some time to gauge the game’s success.

5. Tekken Tag Tournament 2 – Bandai Namco (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U)

While we did finally end up getting a Tekken game on PC this year, I honestly still would prefer Tag 2 to make its way there as well. Unfortunately, as TTT2 was among the worst selling games in the entire series, it seems like the chances of this game getting re-released on more platforms are pretty slim. At least it’s on the Xbox One via backwards compatibility, but I’m still salivating over the thought of what the modding scene could do with this game.

4. Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles – Konami (PlayStation Portable)

It feels a little weird moving this up, considering Konami’s recent history. This year offered us an omen: Super Bomberman R, one of the Nintendo Switch’s launch titles, was a true return to form for the company. This has led to a great deal of speculation about a return to Konami’s roots, with potentially even more new games in the vein of classic titles. An easy way to test the waters for this kind of revival would be re-releasing actual old titles and I still can’t think of a better choice than the Dracula X Chronicles. Containing a full graphical remake of one of the most beloved Castlevania games, an official English translation of the original PC Engine version, as well as a retranslated version of Symphony of the Night, DXC deserves a better fate than being trapped on the likely-defunct PlayStation Portable line for all eternity. The remake could use a little polish to handle higher resolutions, but aside from that, it would be a perfect package.

3. Splatterhouse (2010) – Bandai Namco (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)

2010’s Splatterhouse reboot did not get nearly as much love as it deserves. The game was a high-adrenaline romp through a horror-inspired environment that both paid homage to and build on the original games. Considering we’ve seen various companies choose seemingly random games for modern revivals, Splatterhouse feels like it could have a chance. The game’s only major flaw, its terrible load times, could easily be fixed on modern platforms and frankly, even if you’re not a fan of the reboot itself, it also comes with perfect ports of all three of the mainline games from the 90s. If that’s not worth a re-release, then I don’t know what is.

2.  MegaMan: Powered Up/MegaMan: Maverick Hunter X – Capcom (PSP)

I wouldn’t have considered putting this so high on the list, but considering the recent re-releases of Okami HD and Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney on contemporary platforms, it looks like Capcom may be raiding their backlog for some big cheap releases. For me, the most obvious choice would have to be a twin-pack of their MegaMan releases on the PSP. Both games were critical darlings crippled by the platform they were released on and their timing. Re-releasing both games with improved resolutions in a two-pack for $20 would sell like gangbusters. Considering the fact that Powered Up isn’t even available as a downloadable title outside of Japan, this would also go a long way to preserve what is objectively the best iteration of the original MegaMan in existence and the fascinating curiosity that is MHX’s Vile Mode. Better yet, don’t just release this on PC – release it on everything: PS4, Switch, and even the Xbox One. Come on, Capcom. It’s the Blue Bomber’s 30th anniversary, let’s celebrate!

1. Ys: Memories of Celceta – Nihon Falcom/XSEED Games (PlayStation Vita)

It might surprise you to see that while much of last year’s list has remained pretty much the same, Memories of Celceta managed to jump a whopping six places to take the number one slot. For starters, the main reason that it was low was to keep things fair – after all, Ys SEVEN was my second most highly-requested PC port of all, and with that out of the way, MoC could flourish. But beating out a MegaMan game for the top slot? That comes down to pure psychology. With SEVEN coming out this year and Lacrimosa of Dana eventually hitting PC at some point, Celceta is literally the only remaining modern Ys game without a PC version in the West. You ever notice how the most painful losses are the ones where you come so close to victory? The most noticeable gap in any collection is a single entry? Same basic concept: PC is so close to being a perfect platform for the Ys series, it just needs that one last game.

Another element that puts this so high on my list is the sheer possibility of it. Everything else on here feels like a pipe dream to at least some extent – a majority of these games are from last-gen and companies don’t seem quite as keen on re-releasing old content as I’d hoped. With that in mind, I’d easily consider Ys SEVEN to be the less likely of the two missing Ys games when it comes to PC ports and that managed to become a reality. Considering the poor timing of SEVEN’s release date on PC compared to the American release date for VIII on consoles, I’d almost be willing to bet that we might see confirmation of a Memories of Celceta PC port from XSEED around the time NIS America announces the final release date for the PC version of Lacrimosa of Dana.

To put it simply, Memories of Celceta is the only game on this list right now that I don’t see merely as a hope. It’s an inevitability. Falcom has already begun focusing more on the PC market in the West, the fact that day-one PC releases were a big part of what led them to choose Aksys and NIS America only proves it. XSEED has been playing a game of catch-up, effectively proving that they are capable of following through with this new strategy given the fact that they released 3 Falcom games on PC this year alone, with one more set likely to release sometime next year. And while the Trails games are Falcom’s top brand in Japan, Ys is still the more popular brand in the West. The Western demand for Crossbell may be deafening, but there’s a much more viable option left to XSEED. The cry for Memories of Celceta on PC is literally deafening: it was riled up by a Twitter gaffe two years back, Joyoland’s attempt to put their ports on Steam Greenlight with pages entirely written in Chinese were met with salivation in English and SEVEN’s recent PC release proves that XSEED finally has the resources to make this request a reality. It’s time to complete my collection.

Thus concludes this year’s set of lists. It almost makes me wonder what I’d be able to write next year. The sheer amount of new games receiving releases on PC and old games being ported long after their initial release is what caused me to abandon this entire concept in the first place, so in a strange sense, it almost feels good to not have to write these nearly as often as I did in previous years. At the same time, I do miss writing up these lists: that’s why I’ve continued with the yearly April Fools’ list of console ports and managed to put together a wishlist for GOG this past summer. On the plus side, I’ve almost got a full list ready for next April, but as for December 2018, I’m kind of at a loss of what to do to extend an article like this to its usual length. Oh well, at least I’ve got a whole year to figure that out.

 

Rising Fun: Dawn for Japanese Games

The second half of the 80s and entirety of the 90s were a golden age for Japanese games.  From the moment Super Mario Bros. revived the American console industry, Japanese games absolutely dominated consoles.  While there were some exceptions, the vast, vast majority of good console games came from Japan during the third, fourth, and fifth generations.  Even the most prominent exceptions were made by western developers that were working with Japanese companies: Naughty Dog, Insomniac, and of course Rare.  Things started to change in the sixth generation, games like Halo, Grand Theft Auto 3, and the rising Tony Hawk series were critical and commercial successes, something very few western console games had achieved before that point.  Japanese games were probably still bigger or at least equal at that point, but it definitely wasn’t the absurd level of domination they previously held.  This was, of course, a good thing: there’s no reason for one country to dominate the way Japan did at one point.

 

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And thus Japan conquered console gaming overnight.

 

In the seventh and eighth generations, however, things started to become unbalanced in the other direction.  Several Japanese companies went into slumps at the same time, while western mega-publishers increased their dominance.  This led to an attitude in the 2010s that Japan was becoming irrelevant to the gaming industry.  I was not happy about this, but it would be fair to ask why when I was fine with how things were in the 90s.  Well, I have a few reasons.  For one, there was a fair amount of nationalistic gloating, treating this as “revenge” and calling the Japanese gaming industry a failure for not being able to match the combined output of two continents.  There’s also the fact that the fading Japanese companies had made so many great games in the past, and losing something is a lot more painful than never having it to begin with.  And while this may be too subjective and in the moment to use as a reason, I would much rather have 90s Capcom, Konami, and Squaresoft as the dominant publishers instead of companies like EA, Ubisoft, and Activision.  I’m not saying we need to go back to Japanese dominance, but all game producing regions making great games is the optimal situation and always will be.  I just want Japanese games to make a comeback for their own sake.

 

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Market Combat Evolving.

 

That seems to be what’s happening.  After many years of turmoil, Japanese-developed games are making a substantial comeback in 2017, in both the released and upcoming categories.  This year we’ve already seen Resident Evil 7, Yakuza 0, Gravity Rush 2, Nier Automata, Nioh, and Persona 5; quality releases that have mostly seen a good deal of commercial success and attention from the gaming community.  Looking ahead, we have Sonic Forces, Tekken 7, Tokyo Xanadu, Ys VIII, and Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite as some promising 2017 releases.   Compared to the past few years, this is a huge upturn in quality Japanese games.

Going beyond a simple games list, many of these games represent once mighty Japanese publishers and developers showing signs of recovering from their slumps.  Capcom finally made a Resident Evil that was well received, Team Ninja made their first well liked game in who knows how long with Nioh, Sega has two promising Sonic games coming out this year (although one is technically by western developers) – there are decades that would kill for that amount – and Square Enix has brought an underrated series into mainstream success while giving Platinum a chance to shine simultaneously with Nier: Automata.  Series that never had a huge western presence, such as Persona, Ys, Yakuza, and the aforementioned Nier/Drakengard also seem to be getting more attention than they previously did, which is great for the Japanese gaming industry.  The light of dawn may be starting to break through the cynicism that has clouded the concept of Japanese games in recent years.

 

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Looks like JRPGs don’t have cooties anymore.

 

There are two major Japanese publishers I consciously avoided mentioning up until this point.  One of them is a hugely conspicuous absence considering who is writing this article.  Why have I waited until now to say anything about Nintendo?  Because I like building things up before playing my strongest card.  Nintendo is in their own league among developers, and I’m don’t mean because they’re my favorite, their situation as the primary developer for their systems puts them in a very different position than the third parties I’ve covered.  Nintendo has always been prominent as a software publisher, even during the Wii U days their games sold millions with absurdly high attach rates that annihilated the best selling games of other systems with a low userbase.  However, Nintendo’s health is often measured by their console’s sales, and that has certainly not been going well in recent years.

Then it was like someone simply flipped a Switch.  Seeing what happened when they tried to copy their competitors with the Wii U, the Nintendo Switch is showing all indications that it recaptured the lightning bottled by the original Wii.  With the system selling out every shipment it makes almost instantly (and this is in March and April) and a non-pack in game managing to attain an unprecedented over 100% attach rate in at least one region, we have plenty of reason to believe that Nintendo’s console division is back on track.  And they’re definitely contributing to Japanese games making a resurgence in 2017.  This year we have or are scheduled to get The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, ARMS, Splatoon 2, Xenoblade 2, Fire Emblem Warriors and the game that means so much to me it was my most anticipated game of 2017 based on a six second “tech demo”, Super Mario Odyssey.  Breath of the Wild, the only one released so far, is one of the highest rated games of all time and would single handedly make this a better year for Japanese game reception than some of the last few.  Nintendo is back, and they’re ready to lead the charge in the Japanese game resurgence.

 

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Mario is back, and he’s not alone.

 

And what was that other company I avoided mentioning?  Well, it’s one that’s pretty easy to ignore, if the bitterness doesn’t get you, at least.  Konami, tormentor of employees, bane of Kojima, the Japanese EA.  No other Japanese publisher fell as far as Konami, but even with them, there is a glimmer of light this year.  Super Bomberman R is one of the more prominent Switch launch games that isn’t Zelda, and has been selling amazingly well for such a niche game.  Konami has publicly announced plans to revive more dormant franchises, as opposed to fleeing video games to make pachinko machines.  The slightest bit of hope for Konami is a miraculous step forward at this point.

 

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This game existing at all is a frigging miracle.

 

So, with the games released and announced in 2017, I think it’s safe to say that the sun is rising again for Japanese games.  Again, I’m not asking for western console games to go back to their dark age.  While I generally prefer Japanese design philosophy, western developers (many of whom grew up with games from Japan’s golden age) are perfectly capable of using it, and both sides can learn things from the other’s games.  Gamers benefit from as many developers as possible making great games, no matter what region they’re from.  With E3 fast approaching, we will hopefully soon have even more games to look forward to from Japanese developers and proof that the revival trend will continue in 2018 and beyond.

Top 10 Games I Want Ported FROM PC II: The Secret of the Ooze

Last year, I decided to change things up when it came to my long-running series of PC port wishlists by doing a list of games that would be great games currently available on PC, but not consoles. I have to admit, I actually had a lot of fun doing it – looking back on lesser-known games that were only available on PC just struck me as a much less futile endeavor than constantly mooning about games that might never get re-released in any format, let alone on PC. At least with PC, there’s always an odd chance that maybe at some point, one of the console manufactures will stumble across one of these obscure gems and decide, “Hey, this could work well on our system” and pay someone to port it to their current platform. Considering the sheer length of your average PC game’s shelf life, I’ve got plenty of material for future lists: I’m even considering making this into a yearly tradition.

First things first, let’s go over what’s been announced since the last time I discussed this – both in terms of console releases and PC. Considering the topic of this article is focusing games being ported from PC to console, that seems like the logical place to start. As I already mentioned, both Ys Origin and Kero Blaster were announced for PlayStation consoles back in December – since then, Ys Origin released on PS4 in February and is expected to hit the Vita on May 30th. Kero Blaster still lacks a release date, but another game being handled by the same publisher (Playism) that didn’t quite make the list – Momodora: Under the Reverie released on March 16th and 17th on the PS4 and Xbox One respectively. Likewise, a game I originally intended to include on this year’s list: Pocket Rumble will be released on Switch sometime in the near future. Ironically, I would’ve suggested putting it on a Nintendo platform anyway, simply due to the lack of fighting games on the platform and the low-definition graphics seemed like a better fit for Nintendo’s core audience. An even bigger surprise came less than a week before this article was set to post: Lethal League is hitting both PlayStation 4 and Xbox One on May 10th, adding another win to what I had originally intended as a joke article.

Fortunately, time has been kind to the PC platform as well. First and foremost, when NIS America announced their obtained the localization rights to Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana, they also announced a release on Steam. This news is particularly inspiring, considering it comes hot off the heels of the fact that the Steam version of fellow Falcom title Tokyo Xanadu – being localized by Aksys Games – will be based on the PS4 release, Tokyo Xanadu eX+. Both games are expected to release late this year and I cannot wait for both games. The only thing that could make me happier would be PC ports of the 2 modern-era Ys games currently missing from PC – and XSEED did mention they had some big PC news coming up soon, so I guess I’ll keep my fingers crossed. Other good news include de Blob making its way to PC on April 27th, courtesy of the good folks at THQ Nordic and Blitworks. To make matters even better, Blitworks may have also leaked the existence of a port of the game’s sequel, which means that soon we could have the entire duology! Finally, Arc System Works teamed up with FK Digital to bring Chaos Code -New Sign of Catastrophe- to PS4 and Steam with a new online mode. Not to mention they confirmed that the “REVELATOR 2” upgrade for Guilty Gear Xrd will be hitting Steam alongside the console versions. It’s encouraging to see how ASW has embraced PC gaming. O

With those musings out of the way, let’s get onto the actual meat of the article: the next ten games I’d like to see ported to console from PC. Same rules as last time – we’re mostly going to be looking at relatively recent PC games, specifically those released during the seventh and eighth generations of video game consoles, that have not appeared on home consoles by the time this article has been posted. I’ll also be discussing which platforms I’d consider the best choice for these games if they do actually manage to make it to at least one platform.

Carrie’s Order Up!

Best described as a cross between Pac-Man and Tapper, Carrie’s Order Up is a fun little throwback to old-school gaming with graphics I’d liken to a lost Neo-Geo game. Players take on the role of Carrie, a crab waitress trying to raise enough money to keep the restaurant where she works afloat. The gameplay is simple enough: customers come into the restaurant, usually ambling around looking for the perfect seat; they place their orders which are made by Carrie’s coworker Calcia and Carries brings them to the right customers to keep them happy. But watch out! Once Carrie gets started, she doesn’t stop and bumping into customers is a big no-no. Fortunately, she can twirl to bypass customers, but using it too much leaves her dizzy. Plus, if the customers aren’t served in time, they’ll also leave angry. The game’s a mere $3 yet offers a great value at that price: in addition to the standard arcade mode, there’s an endless mode and tons of other unlockables.

Best Platform: I’d have to give this one to the Switch, no contest. The cutesy aesthetic coupled with the classic arcade-style of gameplay seems like a perfect recipe for getting lost in the shuffle on Sony – and I doubt Microsoft would ever want to pursue this style of content. Meanwhile, I could see Nintendo advertising this as one of their “Nindies”, perhaps not enough to receive a special announcement in a direct, but definitely a dedicated section in one of their sizzle reels.

Xanadu Next

Okay, now if you want to get technical, Xanadu Next has technically already been on home console – in fact, it was the first time it was available in English. Unfortunately, the system in question was Nokia’s N-Gage and from what I’ve heard, that port wasn’t exactly representative of the original PC game. From what I’ve heard, Xanadu Next has been described as a cross between Metroidvanias, Diablo and Falcom’s own Ys series. There’s no doubt in my mind that console gamers would want to get their hands on that kind of action.

Best Platform: PlayStation 4 and maybe the Vita, if it hasn’t died at that point. Falcom’s had a poor track record with Nintendo-original releases – ranging from as far back as Ys III on the SNES all the way to the ports of Ys I & II on the DS. Given the fact that Falcom gave up on their history of PC gaming to survive in Japan’s console-centric market, a tryst with the Xbox brand is laughable. No, just like Ys Origin before it, I could see Xanadu Next on Sony platforms – I’m just going to assume it won’t happen until after DotEmu has backported all of the Ys games currently available on Steam back to PlayStation all over again.

Super Killer Hornet: Resurrection

Here’s another game where I’m technically cheating by including it: both the original Super Killer Hornet and its remake appeared on the Xbox Live Indie Games service. However, given the fact that XBLIG is set to be taken down later this year – not to mention the fact that it wasn’t that big a priority for Microsoft in the first place – it seems like now would be a good time to try again. SKH:R is an odd mixture, focusing equally on fast-paced shmup action and mathematics. You see, power-ups like score multipliers, options and shot upgrades are tied behind completing simple math problems: first you collect a number with an operator, then a second number to complete the formula, then you’re given the choice of three answers. Answer correctly and you get upgraded. It may sound boring, but the game gets hectic pretty quickly considering this is all happening during a typical shmup.

Best Platform: This one’s going to be difficult. On the one hand, the game does have history on the Xbox brand, but it’s not exactly a stellar one. PlayStation has apparently tried to encroach upon Xbox’s former status of best console for shmups, but I’m not sure if they’d go for something quite like this – granted, the graphical style might be right up their alley. Nintendo, on the other hand, might be open to this unique title – so I guess I’ll give it to the Switch by default, though I wouldn’t count out a PlayStation release as well.

The Wonderful End of the World

I think the best way to describe The Wonderful End of the World would be if Katamari Damacy were less Japanese, made on a smaller budget but at least 90% as quirky. Made by the good people at Dejobaan Games – who have also brought us such games as AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! A Reckless Disregard for Gravity, Drunken Robot Pornography and Tick Tock Bang Bang – The Wonderful End of the World takes place, well, exactly at that point: a demon with a fish for a head is going to eat the world and all that inhabits it. Fortunately, you’re thrust into the role of a puppet that can absorb anything it touches – and everything you absorb only makes you bigger. You’re in a race against time to save as much of the world as you can before it’s all over. A short game, but a fun one all the same – probably my favorite of Dejobaan’s entire library, even if it’s not their most popular title.

Best Platform: Another hard choice. Dejobaan hasn’t really strayed from PC and mobile development throughout their existence. I’d imagine that Sony would probably be happier to prod Bandai Namco to make a new Katamari game and this game doesn’t really seem like the kind of Microsoft would go out of its way to put on Xbox. Nintendo’s Switch just strikes me as a the most viable option by default, just because I think the game’s quirkiness would be a good fit. Honestly, if Dejobaan were to start releasing games on console, I’d wager they’d probably go for something a little more contemporary.

Camera Obscura

I’m a huge fan of platformers – from the twitchy ones that require perfect hand-eye coordination and reflexes to the puzzle ones that force you to rack your mind. Camera Obscura is clearly of the latter camp, but it’s got some unique mechanics: players take on the role of a lone photographer scaling a ruined tower, the failed work of a long since passed cult planning to reach the sun itself. On your trek, you’ll have to face off with wild animals that have taken refuge in the abandoned obelisk, as well as crumbling architecture and traps left behind by the structure’s creators, armed with nothing but your trusty camera. However, this is no ordinary camera: it’s capable of creating afterimages of the world around you – allowing you to bridge gaps, climb ledges, create floating platforms and ever crush deadly monsters between objects in the real world and your copies. But will this ability be enough to scale the tower’s 57 floors?

Best Platform: Once again, I could see this working best on the PlayStation 4, though I wouldn’t rule out releases on the other two consoles. The puzzle elements are a pretty solid match for Nintendo or Sony, but I feel like Sony would probably jump on this one before Nintendo, simply due to the grungier take on pixel art present in the graphics. While Microsoft did get their hands on Fez and Braid – both noted as inspirations for Camera Obscura in its own Steam page – before anyone else, they just don’t really seem like they’re going out of their way to bag pre-existing indie games at this point, preferring to finance their own.

Ultionus: A Tale of Petty Revenge

Perhaps this is a bit of an odd choice, but we’ve seen games of this style released on home consoles both in the past and fairly recently. Starting life as a direct remake of an old computer game called Phantis developed by a little-known company call Dinamic Software, Ultionus: A Tale of Petty Revenge absolutely oozes early 90s western PC game. Players are thrust into the role of heroine Serena S who is inspired to strike revenge on a dangerous alien planet …because someone trolled her on the internet. The gameplay in each level is split into two phases: a side-scrolling shmup inspired by games like R-Type and a side-scroller run-and-gun not unlike the Turrican games of old. Considering its classic artstyle was handled by Andrew Bado, a former alumnus of WayForward and Gameloft and its soundtrack was provided by the incomparable Jake “virt” Kaufman, Ultionus not only feels like a classic ‘90s Amiga throwback, but looks and sounds like one too.

Best Platform: I’m going to have to go with PlayStation this time around. As a similar Amiga exclusive, Psygnosis’s Shadow of the Beast received a remake on PS4 not that long ago, there’s at least precedent to allow something like this to hit the platform. Also, given the fact that main character’s design is brimming with fan service, it might be better suited for Sony’s platform simply due to the perceived maturity of the game’s design in general.

Terrian Saga: KR-17

Another game clearly evoking the spirit of early ‘90s PC games, KR-17 is somewhat evocative of western retro platformers like Commander Keen, the old Duke Nukem games and Jack Jackrabbit. Boasting over 60 levels across 9 worlds, varied level designs, a storyline that’s interesting without bogging everything down, mind-bending puzzles and precision run-and-gun gameplay, Terrian Saga delivers an impressive package at a reasonable price point.

Best Platform: This time, I’m a bit torn. On the one hand, this game seems to have “Nindie” written all over it, with its clear retro style, relatively family-friendly tone and its tendency to achieve “Nintendo hard” levels of difficulty at times. On the other hand, the game’s developer is currently working on getting their next project on both PlayStation and Xbox in addition to PC. I guess because of that, I’d give the edge to PlayStation 4, but I could definitely see this game doing quite well on the Switch too.

Devil’s Dare

If there’s one type of game that never really managed to adjust to the death of arcades, it would have to be the humblest of video game genres – the beat-‘em-up. An entire genre built from the ground-up for the sole purpose of bilking the young and young-at-heart out of entire GDPs worth of quarters, the transition to the console era didn’t do the genre any favors: games had to choose between unlimited continues – which defeats the entire purpose of the games – and a set number of limited continues, which just leaves me disappointed. Devil’s Dare thinks differently: opting for a perma-death mechanic instead. Continues cost in-game money, which can be obtained by performing well. Run out of continues, and the game deletes your save. It’s an interesting concept in my book. Even if the rest of the game’s components aren’t quite the pinnacle of the genre, I think it’s still worth sharing with a wider audience.

Best Platform: I’d honestly be willing to go with the Xbox One on this one, simply because of the game’s gritty yet retro tone. I’d recommend a slight overhaul of the base gameplay and that kind of an undertaking might make the effort to port Devil’s Dare to new platforms more of a Microsoft-friendly project, simply due to their obsession with “getting things first”. Label it as “Devil’s Dare DX” or something along those lines and I’m sure the folks at Xbox would lap it right up.

Owlboy

Developed over the course of nearly a decade as a love letter to old-school platformers, Owlboy dubs itself a “hi-bit game”, due to the fact that it recreates the classic look of 16-bit games at a much higher resolution and with much more fluid animation than what was possible back when 2D pixel art was the apex of its popularity. Players take on the role of Otus, a young anthropomorphic owl. Unfortunately, he struggles with living up to the expectations set for him, because he was born mute. When sky pirates show up, things only get worse and Otus must set off on an adventure. Fortunately, Otus has friends in the form of various Gunners, whom provide him with cover fire while in flight.

Best Platform: This is perhaps the most difficult decision of them all, but I’m going to have to give it to the Nintendo Switch. While you’d think that the fact that the game was built in XNA would make it a shoe-in for Xbox, you’ve got to remember that Microsoft discontinued the service and it isn’t compatible with the Xbox One. Likewise, while PlayStation would likely want to pursue getting this title, much of the game’s inspiration comes from various Nintendo properties, including Kid Icarus and the Tanooki Suit in Super Mario Bros. 3. It’s also fair to bring up that D-Pad Studios, the game’s developer, did consider console ports back in 2013, when the game was still in development – not to mention the fact that ports to both Mac and Linux were released this year – so who knows just where this gorgeous game might end up in the future?

Environmental Station Alpha

Developed by small Finnish studio Hempuli Oy, Environmental Station Alpha is a Metroid-like, pure and simple. It boasts a minimalistic pixelated artstyle, ambient music and solid, yet simple gameplay. Alas, it’s still a Metroidvania – and we’ve reached the point where the independently developed Metroidvania has become a cliché unto itself. Still, when Tom Happ – the man who single-handedly developed Axiom Verge, the last Metroid-like indie to escape being deemed “unoriginal” – says that ESA is worth checking out, I’m not going to argue with him.

Best Platform: The Switch or possibly the 3DS, no question. This game totally evokes the look and feel of a Metroid game and Nintendo would be foolish to not at least try to get their hands on this game to quell that particular fanbase’s hunger. I’m fairly certain that a significant portion of both the PS4 and Xbox One’s core audiences might be turned off by the primitive graphics – though, Vita fans will beg for just about anything.

There you have it, 10 PC games I’d like to see ported to consoles. No honorable mentions this time – might need to save those games for next year after all. I already own every game on the list, but of course, that’s not really the point of this list – it’s less about getting the games myself and more about sharing them with a much wider audience. You know, better to give than to receive and all that mumbo-jumbo. Having said that, it was probably more fun to do this article than the last one: I had already blown through most of my obvious choices last year, so searching for new games that weren’t already on console was pretty fun. Not to mention the fact that actually seeing some of those titles I picked last year getting console ports – that definitely made things more exciting this time around. I wonder which (if any) games will make it over out of this batch. You know, aside from Pocket Rumble, considering that got announced before I started writing this article.